Moderna vaccine appears to work against variants
25/01/2021 | news | health | 1,652
Laboratory tests suggest antibodies can recognise and fight the UK and South Africa variants.
1
25/01/2021 14:52:41 77 5
bbc
Great news. I hope they all work.
27
25/01/2021 14:58:36 16 24
bbc
Great it works.....but then they roll back with a ' booster ' comment, and not given a percent of how much it works.......
155
25/01/2021 15:17:09 0 1
bbc
hope?

we all, hope...
240
25/01/2021 15:27:19 5 2
bbc
How can anybody downvote that comment? I despair!!
2
25/01/2021 14:53:16 461 25
bbc
Let's hope if anything good comes from 2020/2021, it's restoring the position that science and progress should occupy in our society. All of the best news I've read for months has come from scientists.
72
25/01/2021 15:04:49 132 244
bbc
Hmm... some scientists such as researchers helping with vaccines. But we should be careful to generalise. The scientists on SAGE have made mistake after mistake regarding travel into the UK, community testing, face coverings etc.
115
25/01/2021 15:11:45 27 5
bbc
Yes that's absolutely true incarnia. Science will save us. Respect
126
25/01/2021 15:13:21 27 4
bbc
of course it won't

the masked singer will make more in phone-in votes in one series than laboratary funding will make
145
Leo
25/01/2021 15:15:58 22 9
bbc
I agree, but would extend that sentiment to thinking rationally - and about others - in general. Take the story the BBC carried a couple of days ago about a group of young people who would gather in large groups because "they'd already caught the virus and so developed immunity". Immunity isn't a shield against catching - and spreading - the virus again, it only mitigates the symptoms.
170
25/01/2021 15:19:05 59 2
bbc
So lets stop paying 'celebrities' these huge salaries and start paying decent salaries to proper jobs like life saving scientists, doctors and nurses and other professions that contribute positively to society. Too many people wrapped up on who is wearing what made by someone or what make up brand is in fashion - who cares about that stuff!
213
xlr
25/01/2021 15:24:49 58 4
bbc
I think I say this every time, but the average bench analyst in CROs testing these things gets £23k. The mid-ranking scientists (who are now usually expected to double as study managers too now) get £28k. Senior scientists and post docs get £32k. These wages have actually dropped over the last 10 years, and we are still expected to live on them in Cambridge and Oxford.

It's an absolute disgrace.
333
25/01/2021 15:40:25 6 22
bbc
The same scientists that are keeping us locked down like some sort of social experiment
350
25/01/2021 15:42:11 5 0
bbc
Hear Hear....People can pray to any God or Gods or Saints they like, but it will do nothing to stop a virus or bacterium. If you doubt that, just look at some history. Fourteenth Century Europe was far more religious than it is today, but it did not stop the Black Death from wiping out at least a third of the population. It didn't matter whether you were personally devout or a complete libertine.
615
25/01/2021 16:34:57 1 4
bbc
But wasn't The Virus created and released by scientists? Computer science gave us brilliant computers. It also created some of the world's worst villains.
753
25/01/2021 17:02:39 2 2
bbc
Science gave us the aeroplane, which gave us the means to spread the virus... it gave us pollutants, toxins and the nuclear bomb. It gave us a generation that is almost totally reliant on computer technology.
Science is meant to enhance life IF USED IN A MORAL, RESPONSIBLE WAY.
HUMANITY, not science, is what society should be concentrating on.
877
25/01/2021 17:38:47 1 0
bbc
I hope henceforth people respect scientists instead of complaining about how much they are paid, very few citizens could perform this role with the appropriate level of sagacity or succeed in the selection process - academic rigour of a PHD higher degree in science.
25/01/2021 18:27:44 1 0
bbc
No, let's hope if anything good comes from 2020/21 it's how humans should treat animals with respect.
25/01/2021 18:28:39 1 0
bbc
Though scientists and science should be applauded and show business heroes seen as just entertainers the responsibility for the problems of society should be laid with the voters. In democracies it is not politicians who are to blame they just do what their leaders the voters insist upon; or else. The ordinary people should be put on the spot more often despite their dislike, even terror, of it.
25/01/2021 18:31:11 1 1
bbc
The vaccine is no doubt the best news from scientists but since the daily briefings from Downing Street started last year all the scientists have done is to find ways to keep us in one form of lockdown or another until the vaccine came.
25/01/2021 18:32:49 0 0
bbc
sure, as long as scientists agree with the mainstream
3
25/01/2021 14:53:32 78 10
bbc
Well thank goodness for that. Now we have the vaccines, lets focus on building effective treatments against the virus with anti-viral research
129
25/01/2021 15:13:39 95 2
bbc
Also research into antibiotics. In the next 50 years antibiotic resistance could shadow Covid-19 in terms of deaths and a global catastrophe.
477
25/01/2021 16:06:52 1 1
bbc
Better to catch up on treating all those people suffering from other conditions which have been put on the back burner over the last year.
604
25/01/2021 16:32:43 3 0
bbc
Realistically, we're unable to do much about viral infections.

Best we can manage are vaccines, stalling treatments and plasma transfusions.

None of which are actual cures or particularly reliable in the long term.

A key disturbing example is that HIV may eventually become a death sentence once again as viruses also develop drug resistance, albeit slower than bacteria.
717
25/01/2021 16:56:08 2 0
bbc
That is also going on at the same time. A number of new and old drugs are in clinical trials now. Merck has just announced that it is dropping its two vaccines development to concentrate on anti viral drugs.
4
25/01/2021 14:53:42 71 9
bbc
Great news. We need to get the levels down and get everyone vaccinated.
575
25/01/2021 16:26:20 11 99
bbc
I refuse any vaccine which is unproven and rushed
718
25/01/2021 16:56:24 2 20
bbc
You are aware, I assume, that using the government's preferred indicator, more than 10,000 people have died of any cause within 28 days of a covid vaccination. Sleep well.
749
25/01/2021 16:57:53 6 15
bbc
Is that “get everyone vaccinated “ by force? Or would you allow people the freedom to make their own choices?
25/01/2021 19:09:45 4 0
bbc
Surely it''s the other way around - get everyone vaccinated THEN the levels come down
25/01/2021 21:39:53 2 0
bbc
I assume you also refuse any hospital treatment through a waiver should you require it.
5
25/01/2021 14:53:50 12 9
bbc
They are obviously not that different, which is good news for all of us. Let’s get on jabbing

Makes you wonder why the government are so keen to stress this new variant is solely to blame for all of life’s ills mind...
8
25/01/2021 14:55:19 11 2
bbc
Because it is more infectious maybe?
10
25/01/2021 14:55:48 6 2
bbc
Remember when the North had high numbers it was poor education and poverty. When the south got it it was a new variant.
18
25/01/2021 14:57:34 1 1
bbc
Oh please. have you read the whole article. Yawn....
29
25/01/2021 14:58:40 0 5
bbc
Makes you wonder why remoaners are so keen to stress that Boris is solely to blame for of life's ills mind...
6
25/01/2021 14:54:18 22 4
bbc
Good news.
7
25/01/2021 14:54:34 7 3
bbc
Here's hoping!!!
5
25/01/2021 14:53:50 12 9
bbc
They are obviously not that different, which is good news for all of us. Let’s get on jabbing

Makes you wonder why the government are so keen to stress this new variant is solely to blame for all of life’s ills mind...
8
25/01/2021 14:55:19 11 2
bbc
Because it is more infectious maybe?
33
25/01/2021 14:58:54 2 2
bbc
Or could it be that they want lockdown to be in place for as long as ever possible? Lockdown is perhaps the easiest way for politicians of questionable ability to govern a country?
9
25/01/2021 14:55:46 18 7
bbc
What the BBC neglect to mention here (unbelievably) is that Moderna themselves have said that their vaccination shows a 'six-fold' reduction in effectiveness against the South African strain. They just think it will still provide some benefit against it still. People meeting even in national lockdown will be responsible for vaccines being undermined by a new mutation and longer restrictions.
93
25/01/2021 15:07:41 12 1
bbc
And that’s the angle Sky has gone with. It’s a totally different story on Skynews.
103
25/01/2021 15:07:57 0 0
bbc
I agree that they haven't reported these results with enough nuance as it relates to the South African variant. Although I would say that in vivo the effects are highly unlikely to be as much as six times diminished because neutralising antibodies are not the only immune proteins activated by vaccination. There is also the role of T-Cells, complement, non and broadly neutralising antibodies etc.
25/01/2021 21:33:06 0 0
bbc
Sixfold relative to what?
5
25/01/2021 14:53:50 12 9
bbc
They are obviously not that different, which is good news for all of us. Let’s get on jabbing

Makes you wonder why the government are so keen to stress this new variant is solely to blame for all of life’s ills mind...
10
25/01/2021 14:55:48 6 2
bbc
Remember when the North had high numbers it was poor education and poverty. When the south got it it was a new variant.
11
25/01/2021 14:56:03 6 4
bbc
But will the government use of the moderna vaccine be in accordance with the laboratory tests
12
mae
25/01/2021 14:56:15 29 8
bbc
If their data is genuine, then good show.
739
25/01/2021 17:00:41 5 5
bbc
What makes you think it isn’t genuine?
13
25/01/2021 14:56:20 16 7
bbc
Some good news at last. Let's get everyone vaccinated as soon as possible and put this nightmare behind us.
14
25/01/2021 14:56:21 19 7
bbc
Note the word/phrase "appears to work".

It doesn't say that it absolutely will, as with all vaccines there's no 100% guarantee that it will.
23
25/01/2021 14:57:47 11 5
bbc
Mr Optimist
978
25/01/2021 18:06:14 1 0
bbc
Note that with covid a lot of people appear to die.

Lucky smallpox was eradicated or with the attitudes prevalent today millions would still be dying from that every year particularly children.
15
25/01/2021 14:56:52 5 3
bbc
So they say it ' appears ' to work......then it sort of steps that back by talking about a booster........to what level does it work? What percent. I know that fools tend to rush in where others......so get the facts before shouting!
95
25/01/2021 15:04:18 3 2
bbc
Be realistic. What do you want? Them to conduct a whole new efficacy study in South Africa that takes months to conclude? In such an urgent situation we need to put out data as soon as there is a reasonable chance that it's accurate.
16
25/01/2021 14:56:57 16 11
bbc
That's great news!

Now all we need is a Government that works effectively for all scenarios.
26
25/01/2021 14:58:32 7 5
bbc
Don't hold your breath
28
25/01/2021 14:58:38 3 3
bbc
Just a single scenario would be an improvement.
64
25/01/2021 15:03:09 2 9
bbc
You mean like a government that has delivered over 6 million vaccines in a short space of time? That kind of government?
17
RC
25/01/2021 14:57:06 146 13
bbc
Great news and well done to the NHS for getting the vaccination program operational whilst under the incredible pressure of helping those with covid
And let's hope there is no repeat of the 2005 Sars-Cov1 trial which was abandoned when a high proportion of the experimental ferrets dropped down dead. They are using the same mRNA antibody dependent enhancement techniques.
Fingers crossed.
Removed
943
SB
25/01/2021 17:56:59 2 5
bbc
Now we've got a vaccine, open the pubs...
25/01/2021 23:27:11 0 1
bbc
YES ,,, BUT THE VACINE!! SHOULD HAVE GONE FIRSTLY TO Drs,Nurses,CLEANERS/PORTERS ..IN HOSPITALS.. THEN TO ALL OLD AGE HOME STAFF,,(Carers ,etc),,then to the older folks,, as the medical mob in general would then be able to do the job of caring better,, being protected,, and less off work causing overloading???
LH
26/01/2021 01:51:50 0 0
bbc
AND well done to the UK Government for getting it up and running, too!!
5
25/01/2021 14:53:50 12 9
bbc
They are obviously not that different, which is good news for all of us. Let’s get on jabbing

Makes you wonder why the government are so keen to stress this new variant is solely to blame for all of life’s ills mind...
18
25/01/2021 14:57:34 1 1
bbc
Oh please. have you read the whole article. Yawn....
62
Bob
25/01/2021 15:03:02 1 1
bbc
If you don't know by now 'jude nelson' just refreshes the BBC homepage all day waiting for HYS articles to open up.

They then post whatever they think will get the most upvotes. It doesn't matter if it conflicts with their previous posts either (like this one does), it is only votes that matters.
19
25/01/2021 14:57:44 3 2
bbc
We have yet to find any strain or variant that is completely vaccine-resistant, and I hope we never do.
20
25/01/2021 14:53:39 0 6
bbc
hooray! with a bit of luck rather than skill we are able to save humanity
84
25/01/2021 15:06:53 4 1
bbc
Humanity has still to prove that it is worth saving
198
25/01/2021 15:23:04 0 0
bbc
"bit of luck rather than skill"

And yet you claim to be the "Scientist Economist Voice of ALL knowledge"?

Pull the other one, it plays the National Anthem!
21
25/01/2021 14:54:07 8 11
bbc
Oh dear so Hancocks and the BBC's attempt to scare the bejesus out of the population again yesterday with another 'emerging' variant has just fallen flat.
59
25/01/2021 15:02:45 3 2
bbc
Hancock is a wally but how on earth are the BBC 'attempting to scare the population'?
121
25/01/2021 15:12:50 0 0
bbc
No you are wrong. Hancock was talking about the Brazillian variant. This article mentions the UK and South African variants only, which Pfizer and AstraZeneca have already said 'should' be contained by the current vaccines. There have also been other studies showing the Pfizer vaccine 'should' work against the UK and South African variant, but the Brazil variant showed resistance.
22
25/01/2021 14:54:21 0 2
bbc
Thank goodness
14
25/01/2021 14:56:21 19 7
bbc
Note the word/phrase "appears to work".

It doesn't say that it absolutely will, as with all vaccines there's no 100% guarantee that it will.
23
25/01/2021 14:57:47 11 5
bbc
Mr Optimist
774
25/01/2021 17:07:18 0 0
bbc
Not at all just being a realist.

I don't want to see people's hopes raised, only to get them dashed at the last moment.
24
25/01/2021 14:58:02 4 11
bbc
There has been a great deal of silence about new variants from Astrazeneca. Both Pfgizer and Moderna have said they can tweak their vaccines - nothing from AZ. Given that AZ's efficacy is also lower than the other two have we been sold a pup just because it is UK developed and cheaper?
44
Bob
25/01/2021 15:00:32 6 1
bbc
Fake news. AZ/Oxford said even before variants came about that they can tweak it in a matter of weeks.

Variants are of no surprise to these vaccine makers.
178
25/01/2021 15:20:05 0 0
bbc
People on here are moaning about this early release of information about the Moderna vaccine, whilst others complain about the silence from the other 2 camps. They just can't win.

However, I've no doubt whatsoever that the Pfizer and Oxford scientists are beavering away looking at the new variants and if necessary tweaking the vaccines to cope with them. Or do you think they're now just relaxing?
25
25/01/2021 14:58:09 11 13
bbc
Yes, good news, but we cannot relax. All sporting events should be cancelled as so much of the virus is being spread as hundreds of people involved with football, horse racing etc. are travelling and mixing with each other every day .
50
25/01/2021 15:01:10 7 3
bbc
Evidence?
67
25/01/2021 14:59:49 0 5
bbc
All sporting events should be cancelled anyway cos they're rubbish.
94
25/01/2021 15:03:37 0 2
bbc
There was hardly a car parked up in the village yesterday, they couldn't have all gone shopping at once.
132
25/01/2021 15:12:04 0 1
bbc
Agree, I work in the industry and wish they would stop too! Hundreds of tech and support crew moving around the country (even with remote production) - just a silly risk we don't need for a few months. I appreciate a good portion of crew are self employed, with the associated financial issues that may bring, but are people going to become seriously ill if they don't have "live" televised sport?
16
25/01/2021 14:56:57 16 11
bbc
That's great news!

Now all we need is a Government that works effectively for all scenarios.
26
25/01/2021 14:58:32 7 5
bbc
Don't hold your breath
1
25/01/2021 14:52:41 77 5
bbc
Great news. I hope they all work.
27
25/01/2021 14:58:36 16 24
bbc
Great it works.....but then they roll back with a ' booster ' comment, and not given a percent of how much it works.......
710
25/01/2021 16:54:54 1 0
bbc
For gods sake. It still works! Stop with the miserable negative whining! Having any vaccines avails that work after such a short time is incredible.
16
25/01/2021 14:56:57 16 11
bbc
That's great news!

Now all we need is a Government that works effectively for all scenarios.
28
25/01/2021 14:58:38 3 3
bbc
Just a single scenario would be an improvement.
5
25/01/2021 14:53:50 12 9
bbc
They are obviously not that different, which is good news for all of us. Let’s get on jabbing

Makes you wonder why the government are so keen to stress this new variant is solely to blame for all of life’s ills mind...
29
25/01/2021 14:58:40 0 5
bbc
Makes you wonder why remoaners are so keen to stress that Boris is solely to blame for of life's ills mind...
30
25/01/2021 14:58:41 274 14
bbc
I hope all of those responsible for bringing us all these vaccines are named, credited and properly recognised when this is all over.
169
25/01/2021 15:19:04 55 120
bbc
it already has

the Johnson-Dido society is already planning what colour carpets to have for it's annual meal.
385
25/01/2021 15:48:22 1 3
bbc
I'm sure they are being properly remunerated. Where there is money, their are medicines.
432
25/01/2021 15:55:40 14 8
bbc
No doubt the Tories will claim credit and give knighthoods and gongs to the old Etonians who did none of the actual work as per normal.
518
25/01/2021 16:16:28 0 4
bbc
It will never be over. The government doesn’t want it to end and the sheeple don’t want it to end. All obsessed with this “stay safe” BS.
655
25/01/2021 16:41:52 0 0
bbc
More so than the BBC Sports personality of the year?
25/01/2021 21:58:25 0 1
bbc
But it'll really upset the Brexiteers when they find out that even the Oxford one has been developed by lots of 'foreigners' won't it!
31
25/01/2021 14:58:45 64 39
bbc
Johnson has recently been been blaming the new variant for the crisis. Variants appear where Covid has not been controlled in the community. South Africa, Brazil and England. Not much chance of an Australian or New Zealand variant.
45
25/01/2021 15:00:40 61 100
bbc
You know this, do you? You're an expert on how genes mutate, eh? Or just a remoaner talking drivel.
60
25/01/2021 15:02:56 10 4
bbc
Where they appear, or where they are identified?
68
25/01/2021 15:04:03 14 5
bbc
Lest we forget there will be a US variant soon, too. The UK and US don't need to look to the government as the key factor we're not controlling the virus, but self-importance and lack of common sense from many of our people.
174
25/01/2021 15:19:28 20 0
bbc
fair comment. There's more chance of a spontaneous mutation happening in a country with a million cases as opposed to a country with none. The fact - so far- no US super strain has been discovered probably has more to do with poor US sequencing of strains than anything else.
506
25/01/2021 16:09:47 1 2
bbc
Developing countries like Brazil and the U.K. have corrupt governments that are not prepared to sacrifice business interests to save lives.
731
25/01/2021 16:59:29 0 0
bbc
Viruses mutate at random in the body. A new strain could appear anywhere.
764
25/01/2021 17:03:45 1 0
bbc
True. The higher the number of infections transmitted the greater the risk of mutations occurring during transmission. Mutations happen when errors occur in transcription of the viral DNA code during the viral replication process. Mutations that confer no advantage die out. Mutations that confer an advantage are more likely to survive and become the dominant type. Survival of the fittest
878
25/01/2021 17:38:54 0 0
bbc
Viruses mutate for a number of reasons, one being previous exposure to similar viruses, or disease, another an existing weak immune system. Clearly the numbers of infected does have an impact in terms of the chance of mutation, but a single infection on a desert island could generate a variant, depending on the circumstances.
25/01/2021 18:18:45 0 0
bbc
By that logic there should be 3 or 4 US variants by now
25/01/2021 19:44:45 0 0
bbc
You obviously know nothing about virus mutation, so don't make stupid comments.
32
25/01/2021 14:58:54 7 9
bbc
“Appears to work” the government appears to be doing a great job and Brexit appears to be a good idea..
244
25/01/2021 15:27:34 2 0
bbc
"the government appears to be doing a great" You mean like they did just before Christmas which caused all the extra deaths and put us the terrible position we are in now!
8
25/01/2021 14:55:19 11 2
bbc
Because it is more infectious maybe?
33
25/01/2021 14:58:54 2 2
bbc
Or could it be that they want lockdown to be in place for as long as ever possible? Lockdown is perhaps the easiest way for politicians of questionable ability to govern a country?
34
25/01/2021 14:59:00 27 7
bbc
It is the variants that have yet to emerge that we need to prevent entering the UK.
736
25/01/2021 17:00:28 4 1
bbc
How do you know the next significant variant won’t occur here? We have a lot of infection being transmitted with increases the changes of mutations.
35
25/01/2021 14:59:11 764 103
bbc
It's an odd editorial decision that we can call strains of a virus British but not the origin of the virus as Chinese
51
25/01/2021 15:01:13 433 54
bbc
We should, perhaps, at least be calling the original strain the "Chinese strain".
76
25/01/2021 15:05:28 96 35
bbc
It's nothing to do with the Chinese holding the WHO (amongst others) over the barrel of a gun, honest
120
25/01/2021 15:12:40 71 17
bbc
CNN seem to now be at odds to call it a strain that was originally identified by the UK as opposed to the UK variant. Good journalistic lead I would say? The back story from China about its origins stinks however. Sounding more like a Trump election fraud story
139
25/01/2021 15:15:20 51 49
bbc
Could always call it "Trump's Chinese virus". Honestly it doesn't matter where it originally started, a virus is a virus and needs to be dealt with.
141
25/01/2021 15:15:33 50 38
bbc
No, you can't call something 'the Chinese virus' all the time, that's dumb. You have to give it a proper name like sars-cov-2.

Don't get me wrong, I dislike China very much but let's be sensible about this particular issue.
180
VoR
25/01/2021 15:20:31 63 67
bbc
It only started being called Chinese by Trump when he needed a scapegoat to avoid blame for his own actions (or lack of them).
205
25/01/2021 15:23:45 59 16
bbc
Despite that glaring contradiction and China's bureaucratic games with the WHO inspection team; there's a palpable and curious sense from world leaders that they all want to gloss over China's clear role at the very roots of all this and think about something closer to home.
215
25/01/2021 15:24:55 9 4
bbc
Absolutely right, we should the ‘British’ strain by its correct name:
The ANDROMEDA strain!
223
Leo
25/01/2021 15:25:36 31 30
bbc
Nobody is arguing the origins of covid, or it's variants, however calling covid just "the China virus" is pejorative. And just for the sake of accuracy (and perhaps a smidgeon of pedantry), the origin of covid isn't "Chinese" (it doesn't have a nationality) - it's China (as far as we know).
255
25/01/2021 15:29:29 11 21
bbc
That is not right. Why should it be called the British variant when it is clearly the English variant as it originated in Kent.
336
25/01/2021 15:40:38 4 15
bbc
Tin foil hat a squeezing a bit tight is it ?
361
25/01/2021 15:44:10 27 10
bbc
A predictable BBC editorial decision. Woke defines what may be said at Auntie it seems.
363
25/01/2021 15:44:18 3 15
bbc
Yes let’s try and blame someone. Tory Trumpy tactics
369
SJ
25/01/2021 15:45:56 15 2
bbc
The original virus is called SARS-CoV-2 or covid19. The variant in question is called SARS-CoV-2 VOC 202012/01. They have these names, given by WHO, and the BBC should use them.
370
You
25/01/2021 15:46:01 4 15
bbc
https://www.oxfordstudent.com/2020/07/08/coronavirus-found-before-china-outbreak/
It's been found elsewhere before it was found in China.
379
25/01/2021 15:47:46 13 2
bbc
It's also interesting (and perhaps more than a coincidence) that the 'British strain' started in Kent and London and not, say, Manchester or Leeds. What are London and Kent closer to?
399
25/01/2021 15:49:48 20 0
bbc
It's also pretty naive of people to think it really did originate in the UK, as opposed to the UK just being the first to detect it.
443
25/01/2021 15:58:25 4 3
bbc
I think the editorial decision comes down to the fact that we all know what Covid-19 is, we don't need to refer to it by its place of origin. But with different variants popping up then the quickest and easiest way to identify them in the media is by place of origin. It's easier for readers to understand 'UK variant' or 'UK strain' rather than VUI-202012/01.
455
25/01/2021 16:01:29 7 0
bbc
Odd but entirely predictable.
475
25/01/2021 16:05:25 6 0
bbc
It's called propaganda my old mate.
498
25/01/2021 16:10:31 6 1
bbc
Yes but we still talk about Spanish Flu when in fact it originated in America.
In fact had absolutely nothing to do with Spain.
502
25/01/2021 16:08:35 1 10
bbc
It’s been commonly referred to as the Wuhan coronavirus. The reason China virus isn’t used is because the far-right in the US hijacked that term.
510
25/01/2021 16:13:32 11 0
bbc
The BBC hate the British?
529
25/01/2021 16:18:27 9 0
bbc
Censorship and alt leftwing agendas at work
558
25/01/2021 16:24:38 3 8
bbc
Still.no guarantee the virus stated in China
Yes it was identified there
Yes the Chinese have not been fully cooperative with other nations

Now has uk been working fully with other nations- no
Has uk got one the highest infection and death rates - yes
Easy to blame others think glass houses and bricks etc
562
25/01/2021 16:24:46 0 6
bbc
Prove this started in China.
Seriously, what do you know that others don’t or are not saying?
FWIW unicorns don’t exist, yet they do.
I will leave you to use your cognitive skills and abilities to figure it out.
563
25/01/2021 16:25:24 1 5
bbc
It's call a British strain because it mutated in Britain. That's standard scientific terminology.
36
25/01/2021 14:55:31 1 4
bbc
The information being given to media has more variants than the virus or vaccines being used to combat this particular flu.
37
25/01/2021 14:56:01 85 41
bbc
When a vaccine resistant strain develops, people are going to need to remain calm. We can't just keep locking down, and will have to learn to live with this virus. As a country we have already collectively lost some 70 million "years" of life.
199
VoR
25/01/2021 15:23:04 96 59
bbc
Being locked down isn't losing a year of life.
212
25/01/2021 15:24:41 5 42
bbc
You mean learn to die with the virus. It's mutating very fast sooner or later the vaccine will be no good and the whole thing will have start again. By then quite possibly the virus will have mutated enough to be deadly to all ages. Lets pull the drawbridges up before it's too late. New Zealand had the right idea.
270
25/01/2021 15:31:08 22 26
bbc
The only ones to lose years of life, are the ones that have died, having to do as you're told to save lives, should not be seen as hardship, I thought humans are the caring species
536
25/01/2021 16:19:59 7 11
bbc
When a vaccine resistant strain develops,
encouraged by govt extending the interval between vaccinations without a shred of evidence.
721
25/01/2021 16:57:14 17 10
bbc
You haven’t lost any years of your life you have just lived a year differently. Stop being a drama Queen.
850
25/01/2021 17:31:55 1 4
bbc
Better get used to it because there's probably worse to come, the melting of the permafrost doesn't just give us frozen wooly mammoths and sabre toothed tigers, it also releases pathogens that pre-date humans and for which we know nothing about and will likely have no defence against
38
25/01/2021 14:59:20 119 12
bbc
These people who have made the vaccinations possible are just amazing
309
25/01/2021 15:36:07 12 36
bbc
clap for them
566
25/01/2021 16:25:37 3 5
bbc
As they watch our children suffer
782
25/01/2021 17:08:16 3 1
bbc
Thank Edward Jenner.
39
25/01/2021 14:59:47 9 6
bbc
"researchers looked at blood samples taken from eight people"

8 people is hardly a conclusive study
127
25/01/2021 15:13:30 4 0
bbc
That's why they're not concluding it's major breakthrough - merely that it looks promising and I find that worth knowing.

But maybe you'd rather they kept it secret until they've definitely absolutely proven without a shadow of doubt that it cures everybody who just looks at it?
40
25/01/2021 15:00:02 9 7
bbc
Okay, place your bets. How many days until we hear about a NEW, new variant that may or may not work against this vaccine, meaning therefore we must abandon all hope and lockdown some more?

Pardon my pessimism, but for every bit of good news, there always seems to be a bit of bad news later to cancel it out. It's almost as if they're doing this deliberately to torment us.
41
25/01/2021 15:00:03 3 8
bbc
Don’t worry people.....our illustrious scientific advisers will go against the licensed protocols and render it useless.
42
25/01/2021 15:00:08 26 12
bbc
I’m not in any way religious - but, Praise The Lord!! Wonderful news.

That along with the UK government and all of those involved are making fantastic progress with the rollout - thank you to all involved in the vaccination program
54
25/01/2021 15:01:27 45 11
bbc
Don't praise the Lord. Praise the scientists.
26/01/2021 00:04:40 0 0
bbc
dear god

thank you god for making a virus and pandemic and the sun and trees and hills and thank you for the scientists and a vaccine and thank you for a cure for a virus that we have and

I also want a new bike, and some ice cream
43
25/01/2021 15:00:29 14 12
bbc
"Experts think the UK strain, which emerged in September, may be up to 70% more transmissible."

Prediction - Govt will try to ease restrictions over Spring, cases will spike in Summer, and come 2022 we'll still be in lockdown with kids still off school, mounting national debt & more unemployed people than ever.
161
25/01/2021 15:18:15 6 1
bbc
Cases will surely go down in summer like they did last year. Everyone's immune systems are stronger, people are outside more, etc. We need to open up much more in summer this year.
24
25/01/2021 14:58:02 4 11
bbc
There has been a great deal of silence about new variants from Astrazeneca. Both Pfgizer and Moderna have said they can tweak their vaccines - nothing from AZ. Given that AZ's efficacy is also lower than the other two have we been sold a pup just because it is UK developed and cheaper?
44
Bob
25/01/2021 15:00:32 6 1
bbc
Fake news. AZ/Oxford said even before variants came about that they can tweak it in a matter of weeks.

Variants are of no surprise to these vaccine makers.
31
25/01/2021 14:58:45 64 39
bbc
Johnson has recently been been blaming the new variant for the crisis. Variants appear where Covid has not been controlled in the community. South Africa, Brazil and England. Not much chance of an Australian or New Zealand variant.
45
25/01/2021 15:00:40 61 100
bbc
You know this, do you? You're an expert on how genes mutate, eh? Or just a remoaner talking drivel.
143
25/01/2021 15:15:51 3 18
bbc
Hear hear !
154
25/01/2021 15:17:06 19 6
bbc
"Or just a remoaner talking drivel."

We know you lot won, you don't have to keep reminding us, whether it is relevant to the HYS you are in or not...
192
25/01/2021 15:22:33 28 5
bbc
a) Its got nothing to do with Brexit b) Its obvious to anyone with a modicum of intellegence that the more prevalent the virus the more the chance of a mutation. c) your monomania about Brexit makes you blind to any rational thought.
202
25/01/2021 15:23:23 26 5
bbc
There's always some mouth-breather who has to make it about Brexit, isn't there?
232
VoR
25/01/2021 15:26:12 18 0
bbc
It's actually very basic. An individual virus has a probability of mutating. The more virus subject to that probability, the more mutations. The more mutations, the greater the risk of a problematic one and not just ones that are unviable and die out. So he's spot on.
243
25/01/2021 15:27:28 27 5
bbc
Wow that is a DUMB comment.

Simple facts seem to be a bit much for you (I wonder why)

Let's explain in nice short words.

If you don't get the virus, it can't mutate in you.
If there are no cases in your country, there is nowhere for it to mutate.
If there are lots of cases in your country, there are lots of people who it can mutate in.

Simple enough for you?
294
25/01/2021 15:34:16 9 1
bbc
What has Brexit or Remaining got to do with viral mutation? Fraser is correct, the more the virus spreads, the more it has a chance to mutate. That's not virology or genetics, that's basic maths. How much it mutates specifically then depends on many other factors. A simple web search would tell you that.
303
25/01/2021 15:35:09 10 1
bbc
It's all about numbers: the more people infected, the greater number of viral particles produced. A low probability of mutation simply means more chances of producing a variant.. I am a genetics graduate, so I do know "how genes mutate", but you only needs maths
316
25/01/2021 15:36:50 6 1
bbc
oh dear. sir royston.
345
25/01/2021 15:41:12 3 6
bbc
Congrats on being duped into giving up your freedoms and rights by the super-rich. You must feel proud.
434
25/01/2021 15:56:02 7 1
bbc
Some people are , but you are clearly not he was talking about the virus and you in your typical Brexiter ignorance go on about genes. Completely different.

Us Remoaners are calling the Kent Strain the Brexit Strain. ??????
544
25/01/2021 16:21:35 1 0
bbc
That was just an intelligent observation, no need to be an expert to see that possible link.
785
25/01/2021 17:09:22 2 0
bbc
He obviously has more knowledge that you do. Mutations happen when errors occur during replication of the viral DNA code. Mutations that confer an advantage survive. Mutations that confer no advantage die out. The higher the number of infections, the higher the transmission rate and the greater the risk of mutations occurring. The more infections the greater the risk of new variants appearing.
807
25/01/2021 17:15:25 0 0
bbc
How is Brexit relevant here ?
46
25/01/2021 15:00:41 10 5
bbc
Several words in this article means that this has yet to be proven out as factual information. How about actually proving it works against the new variants before writing up such a thing.

Last year we were in the middle of a situation where Covid-19 disinformation was rife. We need as much accurate and up to date information from the media as possible to fight this thing correctly in 2021.
108
25/01/2021 15:09:42 9 1
bbc
If you read the details, you'll see the actual facts being reported, namely that blood samples taken from people vaccinated with the Moderna vaccine suggest antibodies triggered by the vaccine can recognise & fight the new variants.

That's all the information available so far, but nevertheless, it's excellent news & well worth reporting. We won't know for some time how well it works in practice.
273
VoR
25/01/2021 15:31:17 2 0
bbc
All analysis is down to probabilities, since we can't have infinite data. Even if no one in a vaccinated group got Covid, and everyone in the unvaccinated group did, we are still only talking about probabilities and not certainty. It's just a question of what probability causes you to accept a result.
47
25/01/2021 15:00:42 13 7
bbc
Maybe if our borders were shut, or at least testing people on entry, we wouldn't have to deal with any new variants ??
74
25/01/2021 15:04:55 14 3
bbc
Whilst I agree on quarantining new arrivals to the country, and discouraging all travel generally, you are mistaken if you think only foreigners are responsible for new variants.

The virus will mutate wherever it is, and is more likely to come up with a successful mutation (i.e. one that replicates) in places where there are lots of infections. Like the UK for example.
48
25/01/2021 14:57:19 3 2
bbc
This is the one we won't get until March, right? Let's hope the others are similarly effective,
49
25/01/2021 14:58:53 6 15
bbc
Comment posted by maideneer10

"Some good news at last. Let's get everyone vaccinated as soon as possible and put this nightmare behind us."

I'll give it a miss, thanks. You lot - fill yer boots.
25
25/01/2021 14:58:09 11 13
bbc
Yes, good news, but we cannot relax. All sporting events should be cancelled as so much of the virus is being spread as hundreds of people involved with football, horse racing etc. are travelling and mixing with each other every day .
50
25/01/2021 15:01:10 7 3
bbc
Evidence?
278
VoR
25/01/2021 15:32:12 0 0
bbc
You don't have to look beyond the premiership players and staff.
35
25/01/2021 14:59:11 764 103
bbc
It's an odd editorial decision that we can call strains of a virus British but not the origin of the virus as Chinese
51
25/01/2021 15:01:13 433 54
bbc
We should, perhaps, at least be calling the original strain the "Chinese strain".
134
25/01/2021 15:14:32 104 52
bbc
Yes - that’s one thing that Trump did get right yet he was vilified for saying it !
137
25/01/2021 15:14:47 50 5
bbc
what would happen if it came fronm Andromeda?
272
25/01/2021 15:31:10 16 5
bbc
Well... its definitely all Chinese to me.
323
25/01/2021 15:37:59 6 10
bbc
For ours, take your pick from UK variant, Garden of England strain, or Plague Island game changer.
378
25/01/2021 15:45:50 4 1
bbc
Perhaps also UK Mad cow?
52
25/01/2021 15:01:18 16 11
bbc
Seeing as the vaccine does NOT reduce your chances of catching COVID, it does NOT stop you spreading it & you would still have to follow all social distancing guidelines, can anyone tell me why anyone under the age of 40 would want to take the vaccine, when the overall IFR for people under 40 is 0.1%?

I'm not anti vaxx or looking for an argument, just seeing if anyone can give a good reason why?
70
25/01/2021 15:04:26 1 1
bbc
Before anyone asks, the 0.1% is based from this article by Imperial College:

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/207273/covid-19-deaths-infection-fatality-ratio-about/

It is from October so if there has been an update on this please let me know and provide a link
78
25/01/2021 15:06:03 0 3
bbc
It can't hurt you taking it, and can reduce the risk of getting long Covid.
92
25/01/2021 15:07:41 3 3
bbc
Because it does reduce your chance of catching covid after the first 3 weeks, and it does reduce your chance of spreading it, after the first 3 weeks - and it's not just the IFR it's the high chance of long term symptoms and the chance of accidentally passing it on to someone who is in that .1%?
97
25/01/2021 15:08:18 1 1
bbc
It is not yet known if the vaccine stops or greatly reduces the ability to spread covid.
102
25/01/2021 15:07:36 3 0
bbc
Yes, I'm waiting for some half decent journalist to ask the same questions - can't quite work out why no one does?
They do seem pretty obvious questions that would be asked.
123
25/01/2021 15:12:58 1 1
bbc
Moderate reason- there are people who cannot have the vaccine, the more we can suppress the virus in the population by reducing carried viral load will help protect them.
If fewer people are then hospitalised/don’t get long covid better overall for treatment of those that are.
I agree not a “great” reason but also not a bad one either - helping society in non specific way.
124
25/01/2021 15:13:07 2 3
bbc
Well if you were the 0.01% waiting to die in a hospital bed, no family around you, gasping for your last breath, I think you would wish you'd had the vaccine - no argument, just common sense!
138
25/01/2021 15:14:58 0 0
bbc
I'm not an expert but logic tells me due to the rapid mutations of Covid so far that sooner or later it will change so much that the vaccines will not be able keep up with it. Plus it could mutate enough to be deadly to all ages. It is changing very fast now. Bit of a doomsday scenario I know. We are in the situation now because Westminster did not react fast enough in the first place.
156
25/01/2021 15:17:21 2 1
bbc
It will reduce the severity of the infection,it will help against the possibility of a mutation,it will help you to not develop long Covid.
157
25/01/2021 15:17:38 0 3
bbc
There are approximately 17 million people aged between 20 and 40 in the UK. An IFR of 0.1% would suggest up to 170,000 deaths in that age group. No idea if that counts as a good reason for you.
158
25/01/2021 15:17:38 0 2
bbc
"can anyone tell me why anyone under the age of 40 would want to take the vaccine"

To reduce the possibility of serious effects from the virus. Long Covid even among the younger generations will lead to a large health burden. The cost of vaccinating them is trivial compared to the costs of not doing so.
164
25/01/2021 15:18:29 0 3
bbc
Here's the simple answer - it stops you getting sick. My mate who is the same age as me (35), also fit as a fiddle, was almost hospitalised with covid. He couldn't stand for even one minute before feeling extremely short of breath. Had he been vaccinated he wouldn't have gotten sick.
318
25/01/2021 15:37:27 0 0
bbc
There is no room for debate on anything, let alone ppl making informed decisions not to take a vaccine, which by all accounts would still be in the trial phase, but due to demands of covid on our population, everyone is expected to follow the rule & get injected with virus, using mRNA, wow, hang on a minute, surely these trials should be given time to be appropriately assessed & ALL data published
53
25/01/2021 15:01:19 48 3
bbc
Will those that put out the scare stories, please check facts first, there are some people who are very worried...
245
VoR
25/01/2021 15:27:42 57 1
bbc
You forget that many of those putting out scare stories know this and take advantage of it. Whether to hamper efforts of a rival country to address Covid, or to simply divide the country politically so it wastes time arguing internally, or to make money from gullible people.
706
25/01/2021 16:54:09 5 1
bbc
first rule of the media

never let the truth get in the way of a good story/publicity
719
25/01/2021 16:56:27 3 1
bbc
Probably previously employed at The Sun newspaper.
25/01/2021 20:09:59 1 1
bbc
Generally the media. Majority of them who are educated are in the arts and humanities. When it comes to science stories most of them are floundering. Given they then have to dumb their reporting down for your average Brit it's no surprise much of it comes across as scaremongering and full of minor, but important, errors.
42
25/01/2021 15:00:08 26 12
bbc
I’m not in any way religious - but, Praise The Lord!! Wonderful news.

That along with the UK government and all of those involved are making fantastic progress with the rollout - thank you to all involved in the vaccination program
54
25/01/2021 15:01:27 45 11
bbc
Don't praise the Lord. Praise the scientists.
302
25/01/2021 15:35:03 2 2
bbc
Don't praise the government, praise the MHRA and NHS who have been effective in their response. The government has repeatedly proved itself incompetent, but the independent MHRA and NHS where not hampered by government incompetence have been excellent.
750
25/01/2021 17:02:14 1 3
bbc
The scientists are guided by the lord my son.
25/01/2021 21:26:49 1 1
bbc
Maybe God has helped the scientists? There are scientists out there who have faith!
55
25/01/2021 15:01:37 6 9
bbc
The race continues, Safe, effective vaccine rollout v continued government stupidity, they're running neck and neck at the moment
79
25/01/2021 15:06:06 9 1
bbc
I take it you're talking about the EU, who are fighting like rats in a sack over who gets what and when. Meanwhile, the UK is streets ahead of them combined.
It's all a scam Removed
114
Rob
25/01/2021 15:11:37 0 0
bbc
Prove it is a scam, I got told that Donald Trump was an alien sent to destroy the world, they did not have any proof but it is 100% true you know.
57
25/01/2021 15:01:57 8 7
bbc
We may be one of the worst countries at responding to the virus by way of modifying behaviour (lockdowns, mask wearing, school closures etc) but we're certainly at the forefront of scientific research around identifying strains and treatments for COVID.
69
25/01/2021 15:04:25 5 6
bbc
mmmmmmmmmm?..........or we could be the idiots who skip adequete testing.
58
25/01/2021 15:02:10 2 3
bbc
Wording released by the big pharmas will have had at least a dozen lawyers scruitinizing it first.
I say this because the statement is unspecific and from past occurrences,will always have a sell ASAP intent attatched to it.
21
25/01/2021 14:54:07 8 11
bbc
Oh dear so Hancocks and the BBC's attempt to scare the bejesus out of the population again yesterday with another 'emerging' variant has just fallen flat.
59
25/01/2021 15:02:45 3 2
bbc
Hancock is a wally but how on earth are the BBC 'attempting to scare the population'?
165
25/01/2021 15:14:39 2 1
bbc
By relentless reporting of the doom laden data from Whitty and Vallance plus SAGE along with daily death reports and cases with zero context and also welcoming Professor Lockdown back onto our screens as the go to man for a quote of the nutty professor's predictions of death.
Encamped news crews in Covid wards with a daily dose of morbidity no uplifting stories, no news on recovery rates etc
31
25/01/2021 14:58:45 64 39
bbc
Johnson has recently been been blaming the new variant for the crisis. Variants appear where Covid has not been controlled in the community. South Africa, Brazil and England. Not much chance of an Australian or New Zealand variant.
60
25/01/2021 15:02:56 10 4
bbc
Where they appear, or where they are identified?
87
25/01/2021 15:07:02 8 16
bbc
Where they come from. Or are you saying the superior British testing system has identified A Jonny Foreigner variant before Jonny Foreigner. And it has nothing to do with England?
61
25/01/2021 15:02:58 4 3
bbc
The Professor on the Today program outlined the advantages of the longer period before the 2nd injection...could not bring himself to pass an opinion on the BMA ? comment other than to say their research was flawed..no comment on this web site to this good news
18
25/01/2021 14:57:34 1 1
bbc
Oh please. have you read the whole article. Yawn....
62
Bob
25/01/2021 15:03:02 1 1
bbc
If you don't know by now 'jude nelson' just refreshes the BBC homepage all day waiting for HYS articles to open up.

They then post whatever they think will get the most upvotes. It doesn't matter if it conflicts with their previous posts either (like this one does), it is only votes that matters.
63
Ed
25/01/2021 15:03:07 5 5
bbc
It may work against these mutations but will it work against coming ones?

Something tells me we are just going to to have to learn to live with covid like we live with aids.
16
25/01/2021 14:56:57 16 11
bbc
That's great news!

Now all we need is a Government that works effectively for all scenarios.
64
25/01/2021 15:03:09 2 9
bbc
You mean like a government that has delivered over 6 million vaccines in a short space of time? That kind of government?
98
25/01/2021 15:08:34 7 2
bbc
It may be something to do with the fact that they didn't give this particular gig to their Eton chums.
125
25/01/2021 15:13:14 10 1
bbc
The NHS did this not your government. They did this inspite of years of underfunding and privatisation creep under their governance. They managed this in the face of the xenophobic ideological decisions made by a large percentage of the populous they kill themselves to save. By all means have a clap on your doorstep though.
569
25/01/2021 16:25:56 1 0
bbc
8 down votes. They don't like good news.
65
25/01/2021 15:03:47 5 11
bbc
There's a fantastic treatment for Covid - inhaled interferon beta developed by British company Synairgen - that has had no support from the UK government. Instead, Boris keeps banging on about vaccines as the only way to beat the virus; meanwhile, thousands of people are dying.

The US government are smarter: they've got Synairgen's drug onto their Activ-2 trials today and will use it soon!
89
25/01/2021 15:07:27 2 1
bbc
Ivermectin cheap and effective too but just no money in it.
153
25/01/2021 15:13:28 0 0
bbc
66
25/01/2021 14:59:14 4 9
bbc
WELL DONE MODERNA

And May I point out I bought a large number of shares in Moderna back in June.

Thanks.
201
25/01/2021 15:19:43 1 0
bbc
So you will be rich as Moderna are protecting their product with a parent and can charge what they like. Well done you.
25
25/01/2021 14:58:09 11 13
bbc
Yes, good news, but we cannot relax. All sporting events should be cancelled as so much of the virus is being spread as hundreds of people involved with football, horse racing etc. are travelling and mixing with each other every day .
67
25/01/2021 14:59:49 0 5
bbc
All sporting events should be cancelled anyway cos they're rubbish.
175
25/01/2021 15:19:37 0 0
bbc
That'd be a shame, it would be amusing to see how you could do in the UK Billy-Goat Catching Championships...

Not very well at all, I suspect!
31
25/01/2021 14:58:45 64 39
bbc
Johnson has recently been been blaming the new variant for the crisis. Variants appear where Covid has not been controlled in the community. South Africa, Brazil and England. Not much chance of an Australian or New Zealand variant.
68
25/01/2021 15:04:03 14 5
bbc
Lest we forget there will be a US variant soon, too. The UK and US don't need to look to the government as the key factor we're not controlling the virus, but self-importance and lack of common sense from many of our people.
57
25/01/2021 15:01:57 8 7
bbc
We may be one of the worst countries at responding to the virus by way of modifying behaviour (lockdowns, mask wearing, school closures etc) but we're certainly at the forefront of scientific research around identifying strains and treatments for COVID.
69
25/01/2021 15:04:25 5 6
bbc
mmmmmmmmmm?..........or we could be the idiots who skip adequete testing.
52
25/01/2021 15:01:18 16 11
bbc
Seeing as the vaccine does NOT reduce your chances of catching COVID, it does NOT stop you spreading it & you would still have to follow all social distancing guidelines, can anyone tell me why anyone under the age of 40 would want to take the vaccine, when the overall IFR for people under 40 is 0.1%?

I'm not anti vaxx or looking for an argument, just seeing if anyone can give a good reason why?
70
25/01/2021 15:04:26 1 1
bbc
Before anyone asks, the 0.1% is based from this article by Imperial College:

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/207273/covid-19-deaths-infection-fatality-ratio-about/

It is from October so if there has been an update on this please let me know and provide a link
71
25/01/2021 15:04:33 4 3
bbc
Eight people is hardly conclusive.
2
25/01/2021 14:53:16 461 25
bbc
Let's hope if anything good comes from 2020/2021, it's restoring the position that science and progress should occupy in our society. All of the best news I've read for months has come from scientists.
72
25/01/2021 15:04:49 132 244
bbc
Hmm... some scientists such as researchers helping with vaccines. But we should be careful to generalise. The scientists on SAGE have made mistake after mistake regarding travel into the UK, community testing, face coverings etc.
91
25/01/2021 15:07:30 101 14
bbc
You are confusing with science with politics. Scientists provide evidence, it's politicians that make the decisions.
133
25/01/2021 15:14:31 25 24
bbc
and now extending the 2nd dose with no specific scientific basis, yet they endorse it ignoring the makers requirements and the advice of the WHO. Heads should roll if they get this wrong.
162
25/01/2021 15:18:20 65 16
bbc
SAGE advised the government to lock down in September to avoid the resurgence of the virus.
The government chose to ignore SAGE.

SAGE were proven right, the government proven wrong.

It is the government that has made mistake after mistake, not the scientists.
163
25/01/2021 15:18:26 38 5
bbc
Not sure it is the scientists who have made these decisions. More like non-scientists who think everything is negotiable.
262
25/01/2021 15:30:05 13 3
bbc
You are confusing Science and Scientists.

Science is a process of establishing truth & understanding through developing hypothesis & testing them until eventually proven or disproven to a high degree of certainty.

Scientists - often the best examples of humans - apply their knowledge & expertise in an academic or professional way but make decisions based on the mix evidence that exists today
288
25/01/2021 15:33:49 22 8
bbc
I think it is Boris who has made those decisions, he has never listened to the advice of the Scientists he even caught Covid not adhering to the rules, this why we have one of the worst Death rates in the world, Boris owns That!
305
25/01/2021 15:35:51 4 23
bbc
Sept- schools super spreaders and Unis were safe according to scientists.. so i agree lets not generalise as that Sept decision has killed tens of thousands ... all because school is so important not to be missed for a few months as its part of the Cradle to Uni indoctrination of the young so they accept the hopeless life chances (home ownership and wage slaves) set up for them by elite Neo Libs.
341
25/01/2021 15:40:51 5 3
bbc
And I suppose you know more than most of the best scientific and medical minds in the country, if not the world? I think not...
694
25/01/2021 16:51:31 2 0
bbc
I think you will find they are government mistakes. Being too slow to react to advice.
726
25/01/2021 16:57:58 4 0
bbc
No, they don’t make decisions they provide data for the government to act on, or not. The government decided not to lockdown when scientists said it would be wise to, for example
743
25/01/2021 17:00:55 2 0
bbc
Scientists advise, they did not make the decisions. Very often the advice was and is ignored. Sometimes with good reason sometimes not. It is not simply a case of handing the keys to the cabinet office over to SAGE.
766
25/01/2021 17:04:05 0 0
bbc
And of course you being the world expert would have done what differently....do say please
790
25/01/2021 17:10:17 1 1
bbc
That’s not scientists that’s Hancock.
810
25/01/2021 17:16:28 1 1
bbc
I do not believe that SAGE members can be seen as independent from their political masters. Try Indie SAGE for independent thought out ideas that are way better.
73
25/01/2021 15:04:50 8 17
bbc
So 9% of the population already vaccinated and 6% have had the virus which leaves us with 15% of the population which are protected. Can we start relaxing the lockdown please.
81
25/01/2021 15:06:39 4 4
bbc
Amen to that.
106
25/01/2021 15:09:29 0 0
bbc
It may well be far more than 6% who have had the virus. However, the level of protection gained from having the virus is unknown and some have had it more than once.
533
25/01/2021 16:19:12 0 0
bbc
No not yet.
47
25/01/2021 15:00:42 13 7
bbc
Maybe if our borders were shut, or at least testing people on entry, we wouldn't have to deal with any new variants ??
74
25/01/2021 15:04:55 14 3
bbc
Whilst I agree on quarantining new arrivals to the country, and discouraging all travel generally, you are mistaken if you think only foreigners are responsible for new variants.

The virus will mutate wherever it is, and is more likely to come up with a successful mutation (i.e. one that replicates) in places where there are lots of infections. Like the UK for example.
965
25/01/2021 18:02:03 0 0
bbc
Not only that but add in our excellent NHS keeping people alive with it for weeks because their immune system can't find the right key for the lock gives it chance to run riot, the poor souls suffering the worse can become a home for new strains and a slip in infection control can let it out easily.
75
25/01/2021 15:05:11 4 6
bbc
Still had enough of experts Govey?
90
25/01/2021 15:07:29 2 2
bbc
Scientists are experts; economists (whom he was talking about) are full of guesswork, and each differs from the others.
35
25/01/2021 14:59:11 764 103
bbc
It's an odd editorial decision that we can call strains of a virus British but not the origin of the virus as Chinese
76
25/01/2021 15:05:28 96 35
bbc
It's nothing to do with the Chinese holding the WHO (amongst others) over the barrel of a gun, honest
77
25/01/2021 15:05:47 101 13
bbc
There is something missing in this report, that has been reported on other sites like New York Times/FT: a.) the vaccine works against new variants but appears to be less effective. And, therefore, b.) Moderna is working on a booster that could be applied in future if necessary - a part that's missing in this article.
177
25/01/2021 15:19:42 27 4
bbc
hey...... don't tell people what they are missing

otherwise they may never know.
200
25/01/2021 15:18:46 1 11
bbc
If it's in the NYT then it's fake news.
312
25/01/2021 15:36:26 6 0
bbc
In the press release, Moderna noted that:

“a six-fold reduction in neutralizing titers was observed with (the variant discovered in South Africa) relative to prior variants.”

You thought that might have got a mention in the main article?
334
25/01/2021 15:40:34 2 2
bbc
Sadly - Business is Business ... despite the Pandemic. Note that the report comes from Moderna's own 'In-House' labs. NOT from true independent labs.
451
25/01/2021 16:00:51 5 0
bbc
Not a surprise - the scaremongering that’s going on is undermined if the scientists can overcome the problems raised by new variants.
511
25/01/2021 16:10:41 6 2
bbc
It's the BBC. Half the story.
553
25/01/2021 16:23:49 7 2
bbc
That's the BBC for you... They dumb things down to such a level they are wrong.
554
25/01/2021 16:23:57 9 0
bbc
Sorry Peter, but you obviously didn't read the article properly - it clearly says that Moderna are testing whether a third dose will boost immunity to the new strains.
701
25/01/2021 16:52:55 4 0
bbc
I’m sure all of the approved vaccine manufacturers are working on future booster doses to cover emerging new variants. It what we expect them to do.
920
25/01/2021 17:51:09 0 1
bbc
What is missing on this report is that the vaccine is 'gene technology therapy'. Very remiss to leave this point out as the 'vaccines' are patented under this name and cannot be called vaccines as they do not work like vaccines.
25/01/2021 20:28:16 1 1
bbc
I would try reading the article again? There was reference both your points.
52
25/01/2021 15:01:18 16 11
bbc
Seeing as the vaccine does NOT reduce your chances of catching COVID, it does NOT stop you spreading it & you would still have to follow all social distancing guidelines, can anyone tell me why anyone under the age of 40 would want to take the vaccine, when the overall IFR for people under 40 is 0.1%?

I'm not anti vaxx or looking for an argument, just seeing if anyone can give a good reason why?
78
25/01/2021 15:06:03 0 3
bbc
It can't hurt you taking it, and can reduce the risk of getting long Covid.
122
25/01/2021 15:12:54 2 1
bbc
Well you can't confidently say that, as there is zero evidence of long term effects of the vaccine. Also if you suffer from allergies it can definitely hurt you so I'm not buying this argument either.
55
25/01/2021 15:01:37 6 9
bbc
The race continues, Safe, effective vaccine rollout v continued government stupidity, they're running neck and neck at the moment
79
25/01/2021 15:06:06 9 1
bbc
I take it you're talking about the EU, who are fighting like rats in a sack over who gets what and when. Meanwhile, the UK is streets ahead of them combined.
80
25/01/2021 15:02:39 5 2
bbc
You haven't really reported this with enough nuance. The results showed that the vaccine likely works against both the U.K. variant and the South African one but that levels of neutralising antibodies are undiminished against the U.K. variant but relatively more diminished (but not to the extent that they'd fail to protect monkeys) against the South African one.
73
25/01/2021 15:04:50 8 17
bbc
So 9% of the population already vaccinated and 6% have had the virus which leaves us with 15% of the population which are protected. Can we start relaxing the lockdown please.
81
25/01/2021 15:06:39 4 4
bbc
Amen to that.
82
25/01/2021 15:06:47 1 4
bbc
Tests based on someone who has had both doses and developed antibodies- how does that compare with one dose and waiting 12 weeks for second, will that be a large enough window for the virus to mutate against virus?
Maybe not in a handful of instances but maybe in a million or two a possibility?
Are we giving virus too much leeway to adapt?
83
Les
25/01/2021 15:06:53 2 10
bbc
Many congratulations to scientists and those who are participating in the vaccine roll out. Also those who have looked after the sick and vulnerable. Unfortunately has taken the Covid and Brexit government fiascos to expose the Tory party for what it is. Profit before people et al.
112
25/01/2021 15:09:21 3 0
bbc
You forget it was this Tory govt who funded Oxford/AstraZeneca. And it was this Tory Govt who secured huge supplies of the first vaccines. Naughty Tory govt.
263
25/01/2021 15:30:07 0 0
bbc
What explains the epic failure of the Labour in Wales and snp administration's then? Both remoaners.
hooray! with a bit of luck rather than skill we are able to save humanity
84
25/01/2021 15:06:53 4 1
bbc
Humanity has still to prove that it is worth saving
85
25/01/2021 15:07:00 4 4
bbc
What was the plan if they didn't or if the others don't. There's an awful lot of eggs in this basket and no plan B.
113
25/01/2021 15:10:08 2 1
bbc
The plan B would have to be to update these vaccines. For mRNA vaccines like Moderna's and Pfizer's that's easy to do in the lab but the production lag caused would have quite a significant impact on the timescale for ending the pandemic.
277
25/01/2021 15:31:59 0 0
bbc
Last year when the Gov. placed the orders for various vaccines, they did in fact have a plan B. They ordered at least half a dozen different types so that if the first ones didn't work, there were others in the pipeline.

Obviously, if they all failed, then we would be stuffed, but there's not a lot that could be done about that that I can think of. Maybe you've got some ideas?
86
ian
25/01/2021 15:07:00 1 7
bbc
Shame there isn’t enough vaccines to go around
182
25/01/2021 15:17:51 1 1
bbc
In the EU ? correct, colossal failure of government
235
25/01/2021 15:26:39 0 0
bbc
For once I can agree with the statement 'not enough'. A global shortage. I will take the vaccine when it is my turn but would like the opportunity to pay for another vaccine for someone in a country less fortunate than us.
60
25/01/2021 15:02:56 10 4
bbc
Where they appear, or where they are identified?
87
25/01/2021 15:07:02 8 16
bbc
Where they come from. Or are you saying the superior British testing system has identified A Jonny Foreigner variant before Jonny Foreigner. And it has nothing to do with England?
88
25/01/2021 15:07:15 159 8
bbc
Even with 50% efficacy (flu vaccine) you are effectively protected. Your body will recognise and react to the virus. Trials with first dose of the vaccines had no recorded infections resulting in hospitalisation or death. Yes the vaccines will probs work. Yes there is a risk of you catching CV19 no matter what. People will still be at risk of risk ill health; death is a fact of life
276
25/01/2021 15:31:44 140 57
bbc
The average age of covid deaths is 82, this is higher than the average life expectancy (81). We need to vaccinate the old and vulnerable, and get back to living.
446
25/01/2021 15:59:21 30 22
bbc
So, in your medical opinion "death is a fact of life" and "vaccines will probs work"? Shall we rid of pedestrian crossings, guard-rails, life-jackets, doctors, nurses, and all medicines then? Blase indifference puts other people at risk of a totally unnecessary death, on their own, no family near, or just maybe not being able to climb a flight of stairs ever again. Take COVID seriously, people!
594
25/01/2021 16:30:42 4 1
bbc
as soon as your comment is peer reviewd, I'll add it to wiki
25/01/2021 19:28:02 0 0
bbc
Well I never!
25/01/2021 23:22:43 0 0
bbc
YES TO-A POINT! BUT THE 50% EFECT OF THE FLUE JAB,, HAS AFTER A FEW YEARS CAUSED ME TO BELIEVE I AM VERY VERY LITTLE BETTER OFF! WHY WITHIN DAYS OF THE JAB ,,,I SUFFER MONTHS OS COLD/FLUE SYMPTOMS,, MOST UNPLEASANT ??
65
25/01/2021 15:03:47 5 11
bbc
There's a fantastic treatment for Covid - inhaled interferon beta developed by British company Synairgen - that has had no support from the UK government. Instead, Boris keeps banging on about vaccines as the only way to beat the virus; meanwhile, thousands of people are dying.

The US government are smarter: they've got Synairgen's drug onto their Activ-2 trials today and will use it soon!
89
25/01/2021 15:07:27 2 1
bbc
Ivermectin cheap and effective too but just no money in it.
75
25/01/2021 15:05:11 4 6
bbc
Still had enough of experts Govey?
90
25/01/2021 15:07:29 2 2
bbc
Scientists are experts; economists (whom he was talking about) are full of guesswork, and each differs from the others.
72
25/01/2021 15:04:49 132 244
bbc
Hmm... some scientists such as researchers helping with vaccines. But we should be careful to generalise. The scientists on SAGE have made mistake after mistake regarding travel into the UK, community testing, face coverings etc.
91
25/01/2021 15:07:30 101 14
bbc
You are confusing with science with politics. Scientists provide evidence, it's politicians that make the decisions.
628
25/01/2021 16:36:18 0 7
bbc
Scientists produce viruses and accidentally release them. Politicians turn a blind eye.
661
nfn
25/01/2021 16:42:58 2 3
bbc
politicians have been making policy based on dodgy evidence from glum and glummer aka witty and van tam.
52
25/01/2021 15:01:18 16 11
bbc
Seeing as the vaccine does NOT reduce your chances of catching COVID, it does NOT stop you spreading it & you would still have to follow all social distancing guidelines, can anyone tell me why anyone under the age of 40 would want to take the vaccine, when the overall IFR for people under 40 is 0.1%?

I'm not anti vaxx or looking for an argument, just seeing if anyone can give a good reason why?
92
25/01/2021 15:07:41 3 3
bbc
Because it does reduce your chance of catching covid after the first 3 weeks, and it does reduce your chance of spreading it, after the first 3 weeks - and it's not just the IFR it's the high chance of long term symptoms and the chance of accidentally passing it on to someone who is in that .1%?
111
25/01/2021 15:10:07 1 0
bbc
According to the government website, it does not reduce your chance of catching it and it does not reduce the chance of spreading it. Where have you read otherwise? please show me
9
25/01/2021 14:55:46 18 7
bbc
What the BBC neglect to mention here (unbelievably) is that Moderna themselves have said that their vaccination shows a 'six-fold' reduction in effectiveness against the South African strain. They just think it will still provide some benefit against it still. People meeting even in national lockdown will be responsible for vaccines being undermined by a new mutation and longer restrictions.
93
25/01/2021 15:07:41 12 1
bbc
And that’s the angle Sky has gone with. It’s a totally different story on Skynews.
128
25/01/2021 15:13:31 2 1
bbc
Sky News like to make everything sound scarier than it is - coincidentally, Sky also benefit hugely from everyone being locked down at home watching TV all day.
25
25/01/2021 14:58:09 11 13
bbc
Yes, good news, but we cannot relax. All sporting events should be cancelled as so much of the virus is being spread as hundreds of people involved with football, horse racing etc. are travelling and mixing with each other every day .
94
25/01/2021 15:03:37 0 2
bbc
There was hardly a car parked up in the village yesterday, they couldn't have all gone shopping at once.
15
25/01/2021 14:56:52 5 3
bbc
So they say it ' appears ' to work......then it sort of steps that back by talking about a booster........to what level does it work? What percent. I know that fools tend to rush in where others......so get the facts before shouting!
95
25/01/2021 15:04:18 3 2
bbc
Be realistic. What do you want? Them to conduct a whole new efficacy study in South Africa that takes months to conclude? In such an urgent situation we need to put out data as soon as there is a reasonable chance that it's accurate.
25/01/2021 18:55:35 0 0
bbc
Bang on Alex,you just saved me from thinking the whole country was being sucked into a massive pedantic vortex.
96
25/01/2021 15:05:35 69 34
bbc
Meanwhile in the EU, they once again did not order enough of this new Moderna vaccine, vaccinations have stalled and the EMA has STILL no approved the AZ vaccine.
Going well then.
186
25/01/2021 15:21:27 51 90
bbc
meanwhile the UK's exports to the EU are dropping by at least 30% and GDP will take a big tumble. Brexit going well then.
193
VoR
25/01/2021 15:22:40 11 2
bbc
Shortages are down to suppliers not being able to deliver to the contracts they signed. Which is affecting everyone, not just the EU.
279
25/01/2021 15:32:22 15 6
bbc
UK MHRA has been very effective and deserves a lot of credit for that.

Just to note though...

MHRA was set up in 2003 under the previous government, and is run by a person who joined at the time it was set up. The actions of the MHRA are entirely disconnected from the incompetence and nepotism of this government.
Which probably explains why it has been effective.
732
25/01/2021 16:59:35 3 2
bbc
Stop harping. We are doing well with the vaccine rollout but badly with our import/exports.
52
25/01/2021 15:01:18 16 11
bbc
Seeing as the vaccine does NOT reduce your chances of catching COVID, it does NOT stop you spreading it & you would still have to follow all social distancing guidelines, can anyone tell me why anyone under the age of 40 would want to take the vaccine, when the overall IFR for people under 40 is 0.1%?

I'm not anti vaxx or looking for an argument, just seeing if anyone can give a good reason why?
97
25/01/2021 15:08:18 1 1
bbc
It is not yet known if the vaccine stops or greatly reduces the ability to spread covid.
64
25/01/2021 15:03:09 2 9
bbc
You mean like a government that has delivered over 6 million vaccines in a short space of time? That kind of government?
98
25/01/2021 15:08:34 7 2
bbc
It may be something to do with the fact that they didn't give this particular gig to their Eton chums.
99
25/01/2021 15:08:48 3 0
bbc
Appears so not news really until it does
100
25/01/2021 15:05:40 0 1
bbc
Good news and bods well for the other vaccines