Shoppers stuck at home shun new clothes in 2020
22/01/2021 | news | business | 887
Clothing was the hardest-hit sector last year, seeing a 25% drop in sales overall.
1
22/01/2021 10:38:31 537 25
bbc
Retail sales should more be about quality, not quantity: buying low volumes of high quality goods that last relatively long, especially locally-sourced, is better than buying high volumes of low quality goods shipped halfway round the world and doesn’t last long, thus consuming more resources and damaging the environment more.
6
22/01/2021 10:41:33 412 11
bbc
Spot on. I'd extend that to a whole range of consumer goods. For eg, why is it deemed acceptable for white goods to last a couple of years, when they could be made more robustly & last longer. Huge waste of raw materials, huge pollution issue.
10
22/01/2021 10:42:49 60 3
bbc
More needs to be done to avoid clothes being disposed of to landfill too e.g. retailers taking back worn and unwanted clothing for recycling and proper disposal as a legal requirement
24
22/01/2021 10:45:24 29 5
bbc
Yes but that doesn't make a good clickbait headline.

I have bought more big ticket items this year with money I would have spent on foreign holidays. I have spent more in much fewer transactions.
81
22/01/2021 11:01:33 43 11
bbc
Maybe, but judging 'quality' by price is exceedingly misleading. People pay enormous premiums for brand names and many wouldn't know 'quality' if it was offered. Primark is often cited (negatively) but much of their stuff is as good as many desirable brand names offer.
139
22/01/2021 11:14:05 20 28
bbc
Unfortunately Breksh means increased long transport rates and less from Europe
142
22/01/2021 11:14:56 24 12
bbc
Do people buy cheap tat by choice or because it is all they can afford? Personally I don't buy things from places like Primark but then I don't have to.
203
22/01/2021 11:26:39 59 1
bbc
My 2007 mondeo with 194,000 miles has just got through another MOT. All it needed was £19 of bulbs, and an advisory on a tyre.
I was so stunned I had to have a drink!
It's all I need, so why change it?
Wealth, for most, is generated over time employing thrifty behaviour, not buy spaffing money unnecessarily.
268
22/01/2021 11:47:31 8 8
bbc
Sorry, but who made you God? Some people can't afford high quality goods, low quality cheap clothes still have a place.
304
22/01/2021 11:58:33 4 12
bbc
by the posters giving you upvotes i can tell very very few are in the clothing buisness , your veiw is only acceptable or intelligent if you were talking army or forces uniforms . other than that your comments are 40 yrs TO LATE
315
22/01/2021 12:02:09 3 8
bbc
In the middle class universe you live this makes sense, but for many environmental considerations get swept aside by the need for affordability
338
22/01/2021 12:13:48 6 6
bbc
They should also be taxing Amazon as an example of rigged event. This whole Covid thing has worked out well for Amazon, they still pay pay no taxes. "RIGGED"?.

But if you make no money from the likes of Amazon through taxation UK Gov, then you will understand why the UK is actually quite a poor country in reality, you are built up on debt, not actual solid hard saved money, you live on debt.
350
22/01/2021 12:18:14 2 0
bbc
I fully agree about quality. However, I disagree about things being locally sourced as that often impacts quality. We really need to develop a more sophisticated understanding of 'quality' and 'sustainability'. Far too many things in this world are over simplistic leading to the ultimate waste in my book, the waste of peoples time.
Locally sourced clothes that are made to last?

Huh?

Are you currently wearing an outfit made from tesco bags for life?
467
22/01/2021 12:56:57 2 1
bbc
Spot on!

It's unfortunate though that high volumes of cheap tat create more jobs than low volumes of high quality items so the challenge is how to dramatically reduce consumerism quickly without ending up with massive unemployment everywhere, especially in the poorer countries.
479
22/01/2021 13:05:08 2 1
bbc
Unfortunately all we have left in this country is consumerism and the financial sector. If we moved to your model we really would have no economy. We make very little in this country.
647
22/01/2021 14:28:08 0 0
bbc
I believe you to be correct. However..”All is Vanity” I’m told. Fashion changes though, hence the term fashion. Accessories such as phones & even pet pooches have become “fashionised”, along even with toddlers & their clothing. Why would anyone pay over £100, for an ordinary cotton T shirt, just because of a designer’s name on the label. Seems as if it’s all about “The Brand”. I blame breakfast TV
2
22/01/2021 10:39:44 362 14
bbc
Good, the planet is being buried under cheap throw away wear once clothing from slave labour
17
22/01/2021 10:43:42 237 8
bbc
Well said. Throwaway fashion, like all the worst excesses of consumerism, is a blight on the planet & on people.
259
22/01/2021 11:45:17 16 2
bbc
It’s time we removed plastic from clothing. Every wash puts millions of microplastics into the drains which find their way to the oceans.
410
22/01/2021 12:36:27 8 0
bbc
lets also remember the cheap fashion sites are aimed at teenagers and students who really cannot afford to buy two expensive well made things that will last years. The young like to change styles each year, not like us more mature adults who would have pieces that last years and are well made. i have spent hours trying to explain this to my teenage daughter lol!
420
22/01/2021 12:39:13 3 0
bbc
Unfortunately the winners in this pandemic are often the worst when it comes to cheap fast fashion created under awful conditions
724
22/01/2021 15:12:05 1 2
bbc
I would agree but you have just condemned the population of Bangladesh to poverty. It may well be considered slave labour but it is work for some of the world's poorest. Take that away to salve one part of your conscience & that could be deemed economic racism. Have a good weekend thinking about starving children caused by your high minded buying choices!
826
22/01/2021 17:00:22 1 0
bbc
Not worried about the labour force as long as the clothes are cheap. Up to the country they work in to deal with that!
3
Ann
bbc
Why is there no HYS on the ridiculous £500 idea ? Removed
12
22/01/2021 10:42:59 2 2
bbc
Covid one? Lots of Covid threads. I'm sure you could get in into one of those. It has popped up on this one today: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-55751915
14
22/01/2021 10:43:12 1 1
bbc
There is.
4
22/01/2021 10:40:40 244 9
bbc
Maybe people realised there were more important things in life than fashion. Especially when they realised they couldn't go out much.
8
22/01/2021 10:42:11 124 20
bbc
Fashion is fine but not throwaway fashion.
401
22/01/2021 12:34:36 7 0
bbc
I think we are beginning to realise how much money we throw away on impulse buying and how much cash we can have left at the end of the month .
462
22/01/2021 12:54:02 2 3
bbc
Maybe we could all just wear the same coloured coveralls. Maybe blue with a red sash?
5
jon
22/01/2021 10:41:09 45 7
bbc
With most people staying at home, new clothes are not a necessity. It’s also good for the planet. Cotton has an enormous environmental impact. How many pairs of jeans, each using thousands of gallons of water, do you really need?
144
22/01/2021 11:15:03 16 40
bbc
They don't "use" water. Water is recyclable ad infinitum.
601
BD
22/01/2021 14:00:56 0 0
bbc
Viscose should be the way to go - love my bamboo socks and bedding, but reading all sorts, I think viscose is the most planet-friendly way forward
...
1
22/01/2021 10:38:31 537 25
bbc
Retail sales should more be about quality, not quantity: buying low volumes of high quality goods that last relatively long, especially locally-sourced, is better than buying high volumes of low quality goods shipped halfway round the world and doesn’t last long, thus consuming more resources and damaging the environment more.
6
22/01/2021 10:41:33 412 11
bbc
Spot on. I'd extend that to a whole range of consumer goods. For eg, why is it deemed acceptable for white goods to last a couple of years, when they could be made more robustly & last longer. Huge waste of raw materials, huge pollution issue.
92
22/01/2021 11:04:04 11 2
bbc
The market decides!

I have a very basic small tumble drier which is now 40 years old (and probably far less efficient than a modern one). Had one cheap fix in that time. However, I found the sales receipt recently and when inflation was factored in it had cost over £300! Sales of that would now be zero.
112
22/01/2021 11:09:14 13 17
bbc
A strawman, many white goods last 15 years or more, and people rarely changed white goods before 5 years.
119
22/01/2021 11:10:28 44 2
bbc
Well our washing machine will be celebrating its 31st birthday in a couple of weeks. It has had repairs, of course, but we see no reason to scrap it until the day comes when parts are no longer available. Our spin dryer is 52 and getting a bit rusty, but still working almost daily. We are brainwashed into thinking we have to replace everything every four or five years; we don't.
208
22/01/2021 11:21:25 21 6
bbc
Depends who you buy them from. A Miele washing machine will last a lifetime.
248
22/01/2021 11:41:29 6 4
bbc
Because people want cheaper products... it's supply and demand. Years ago people used to 'make do and mend'. Now we are sadly in a throwaway society - things that are thrown away are either recycled or end up in charity shops/auctions for poorer people.... the 'trickle down' idea. We can't all afford (for example) a top end washing machine....
282
22/01/2021 11:50:37 6 4
bbc
If your white goods only last a couple of years then you have really purchased badly. Our fridge, freezer and washing machine are all > 20 years old. However they probably are not the most green as they were designed before energy use was a key criterion. But should we buy new ones with lower energy use, would that be greener?
308
22/01/2021 11:59:26 4 4
bbc
Buy Miele - I expect my new washing machine to outlive me.
344
22/01/2021 12:16:55 0 0
bbc
And options for repair and upgrades.
Replace just front of washer etc for new look / fashion color.
461
22/01/2021 12:53:24 2 1
bbc
People want to buy cheap and do not look at the long term. Sometimes this is caused by low incomes so any policy that forced prices up because of increased reliability would cause consumer 'poverty'.
554
Ch
22/01/2021 13:41:42 3 0
bbc
Its deemed acceptable because we live in a capitalist society. Capitalism and consumerism cannot be reconciled with environmentalism. The only environmental conclusion possible - is these products shouldn't exist. No matter how long they last. Because if you take even the most environmentally conscious product - and project its mass use 1,000 years into the future. It doesn't work.
618
22/01/2021 14:09:28 0 0
bbc
Totally agree. My Mum had the same clothes dryer for more than 40 years - obviously used to be really built to last!
634
22/01/2021 14:22:36 0 0
bbc
I agree with you! I recently moved house with a 25 year old washing machine in perfect working order. It was sold to me as being "built to last" and it certainly did. But the manufacturing company could not provide an engineer to install it in my new home because "it was too old". I have now bought a new machine of the same make which is not as good as my old one and is unlikely to last as long.
7
22/01/2021 10:42:04 17 7
bbc
That's odd, because in North London sales of tichels and sudras are up, maybe there was a wedding taking place...
21
22/01/2021 10:44:51 4 9
bbc
And pubs & parties & all sorts. Expect some of them were wearing new clothes, too, eh? But, sure, let's try to stigmatise one part of the population.
4
22/01/2021 10:40:40 244 9
bbc
Maybe people realised there were more important things in life than fashion. Especially when they realised they couldn't go out much.
8
22/01/2021 10:42:11 124 20
bbc
Fashion is fine but not throwaway fashion.
46
VoR
22/01/2021 10:55:36 23 1
bbc
The industry promotes throw away fashion because otherwise we don't buy as many clothes.
113
22/01/2021 11:09:20 23 4
bbc
"Fashion is fine but not throwaway fashion".

Surely fashion is throwaway by definition.
351
22/01/2021 12:18:42 6 0
bbc
Well even fashion changes yearly.. So it is a driver for more consumption. A waterproof coat is a waterproof coat it should last for years. Not one fashion per year coats.
668
22/01/2021 14:38:42 0 0
bbc
But it's 'fashion' itself that's one of the reasons people buy new clothes so often; wanting to be seen in the latest fashion styles means your existing wardrobe goes out of fashion, hence new, fashionable items are acquired.
Agree, this isn't the only reason folk keep buying more and more clothes, but it is a major motivator.
9
22/01/2021 10:42:42 122 10
bbc
Anything that helps the demise of fast fashion is a good thing, no?
371
22/01/2021 12:26:02 31 13
bbc
Unless your employment is linked to it perhaps?
809
22/01/2021 16:28:28 1 0
bbc
Fast fashion is a response to consumer demand. Its people buying behaviours that need to change. Business will then respond. As the saying goes, you can lead a horse to water but you cant make it drink.
1
22/01/2021 10:38:31 537 25
bbc
Retail sales should more be about quality, not quantity: buying low volumes of high quality goods that last relatively long, especially locally-sourced, is better than buying high volumes of low quality goods shipped halfway round the world and doesn’t last long, thus consuming more resources and damaging the environment more.
10
22/01/2021 10:42:49 60 3
bbc
More needs to be done to avoid clothes being disposed of to landfill too e.g. retailers taking back worn and unwanted clothing for recycling and proper disposal as a legal requirement
488
22/01/2021 13:08:54 4 0
bbc
Check out Patagonia - they have a re-buy to recycle programme, and also a second hand sales arm for goods they buy back from their customers.
11
22/01/2021 10:42:57 5 5
bbc
This is data based on sales volume (the number of transactions) not value. As such it is a pointless measure.

My wife bought me a very expensive Rolex watch for my 50th birthday in December, where usually she would buy me 3 or 4 smaller presents, but she spent about 30 times more.

If people order online, they will lump purchases together to save on delivery costs etc.
33
Bob
22/01/2021 10:48:34 5 3
bbc
And an important addendum there would be the inflation figures from earlier in the week which showed clothing as one of the few sectors contributing to upwards inflation.

So volume down, prices up. Hmm!
Why is there no HYS on the ridiculous £500 idea ? Removed
12
22/01/2021 10:42:59 2 2
bbc
Covid one? Lots of Covid threads. I'm sure you could get in into one of those. It has popped up on this one today: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-55751915
13
22/01/2021 10:43:07 7 17
bbc
It's all about destroying businesses on purpose for "The Great Reset", quote from the World Economic Forum " it's 2030, I own nothing and I've never been happier", lol they think we're all fool and gonna give up our freedom, NOT ME!!
You're a rare breed alright. I don't think fool adequately describes your stupidity Removed
61
22/01/2021 10:58:03 4 1
bbc
Why would owning less mean that you're giving up your freedom?

Surely the reverse is true, especially if you have to work and pay taxes to be able to own that stuff?
111
22/01/2021 11:09:14 2 4
bbc
I share their view that you, at least, are a fool.
Why is there no HYS on the ridiculous £500 idea ? Removed
14
22/01/2021 10:43:12 1 1
bbc
There is.
15
22/01/2021 10:43:22 194 12
bbc
Why is this even a surprise? Why get new clothes if you can't go anywhere?
283
22/01/2021 11:51:00 92 1
bbc
I am not suggesting wandering naked, but clothing purchases are largely discretionary.

Mostly they fall into the "you don't need them, you just want them".

Don't buy them, the environment benefits and your credit card stays in you pocket.
358
22/01/2021 12:21:12 4 0
bbc
Why ever get new clothes just to go out anywhere? No one else cares what you wear. Whether it is new or old. Worn a hundred times before or for the first time.
652
22/01/2021 14:29:19 2 0
bbc
Next blinking obviius headline. "Pubs & clubs struggling during lockdown" lol.
16
22/01/2021 10:43:27 35 11
bbc
The Retail industry was on a very downward spiral before Covid - this is just the straw that broke the camels back.

Unfortunately the quality of items and the whole "shopping experience" is terrible, bricks and mortar shops haven't updated their businesses models to accommodate online and they're suffering for it.
616
22/01/2021 14:08:25 0 17
bbc
JUST WAIT!! THE GOVT HAVE BEEN PLANNING TO HAMMER THE CARS/VANS/LORRIES,, WITH 8/9 TIMES MORE-TAXES,, TO SUPPOSEDLY FILL THE LOSS OF FUEL TAX/ROAD TAX,ETC,, FIGURES ARE THEIR TO SEE THAT ARE 8/9 TIMES THE CURRENT COSTS>> ITS CALLED PAY BACK, AND NO WORRIES,ABOUT THE PEOPLE,, WE WILL BE OK??
2
22/01/2021 10:39:44 362 14
bbc
Good, the planet is being buried under cheap throw away wear once clothing from slave labour
17
22/01/2021 10:43:42 237 8
bbc
Well said. Throwaway fashion, like all the worst excesses of consumerism, is a blight on the planet & on people.
96
22/01/2021 11:05:21 16 7
bbc
But it's the numpties who wear it once and throw it away who are the problem - not the employment given to the dirt poor which means they are slightly less poor. So much virtue signalling on this issue!
425
22/01/2021 12:40:22 5 0
bbc
Well that's Britain's debt driven consumer economy scr*wed then!
18
22/01/2021 10:43:46 92 4
bbc
Wasn't the ever-increasing sale of clothing linked with environmental issues. Combine that with slave labour and profiteering and arguably there are some positives to take from this news.
136
22/01/2021 11:13:38 54 14
bbc
It's hardly surprising, the BBC will no doubt tell us sales of other things are down, good news about Nissan investing more in Sunderland.
150
22/01/2021 11:15:39 8 3
bbc
About time people wised up and stopped buying shed loads of that Primark tat!

Good for the environment too!
19
22/01/2021 10:43:57 78 8
bbc
So people are buying less clothes, and since not everyone is going around naked they obviously didn't need the clothes they would have bought. So... less waste, less workers being paid next to nothing to make clothes in awful conditions... I see this as good news
25
22/01/2021 10:45:37 73 8
bbc
Unfortunately a lot of jobs depend on silly purchases of stuff we don’t need
102
22/01/2021 11:06:49 3 3
bbc
Actually, they're buying 'fewer' clothes - the ones they but are the same sizes!
497
22/01/2021 13:11:11 1 0
bbc
It is good news for the planet, but the workers who were paid next to nothing are now paid nothing - and that is a big difference to those individuals
598
22/01/2021 13:58:02 1 2
bbc
FOR YOU COMFY! IN YOUR COUNCIL HOUSE?POSSIBLY GETTING BENEFITS,! MAY BE YOURS! THOUSANDS WILL NEVER HAVE IT AS GOOD AS MOST IN THIS COUNTRY.. BUT THAT DOES NOT MATTER,, THOUSANDS COME HERE,, FOR (FREE HAND OUTS)??AND MORE EXPECT BENEFITS??
661
22/01/2021 14:35:06 0 0
bbc
Less workers being paid next to nothing, more people not working and being paid nothing.
733
22/01/2021 15:19:37 0 0
bbc
Fewer workers being paid next to nothing may not be a good thing for the workers, if they could find alternative better paid work they would not be in the clothes factories in the first place.
822
22/01/2021 16:59:33 0 0
bbc
I'm sure those 'fewer (not less) workers' who were being paid next to nothing in awful conditions are really gratified you see this as good news now that they're being paid nothing & living in, likely as not, even worse conditions.

Still, as long as you're OK eh!
20
22/01/2021 10:44:00 62 6
bbc
This trend will continue. Not a business stream to be lamented. Shame for the shop workers though. Need to get them into jobs making things for export.
120
22/01/2021 11:10:45 28 23
bbc
What about the families in far east relying on this stuff to feed their kids? No furlough there! It's a far more complex issue than you suggest.
189
22/01/2021 11:24:07 4 2
bbc
Does money really exist?
Globally, Humankind is at the technological point to be able to provide. Look how much waste there is to prove the point.

We all need to work together for the good of this beautiful Planet-our home and put all of our differences, fear and greed aside!
602
22/01/2021 14:01:07 0 0
bbc
NOBODY WANTS THEM !! THEY MAKE THEIR OWN ,,,WITHOUT THE UNIONS WHO DESTROYED THR U/K WITH STRIKES ETC,,
7
22/01/2021 10:42:04 17 7
bbc
That's odd, because in North London sales of tichels and sudras are up, maybe there was a wedding taking place...
21
22/01/2021 10:44:51 4 9
bbc
And pubs & parties & all sorts. Expect some of them were wearing new clothes, too, eh? But, sure, let's try to stigmatise one part of the population.
44
22/01/2021 10:54:50 9 1
bbc
If it means people attending a wedding get fined £200 and people attending a house party get fined £800, I think I will...
520
22/01/2021 13:13:26 4 0
bbc
so.you are saying alright for them,but not for others.the op was stating reported fact.
22
22/01/2021 10:44:53 155 5
bbc
If people are learning to live without wear-it-once-and-throw-it-away fashion, that can only be good for the planet. Too much water and energy is consumed in the production and distribution, and too much landfill space is occupied by this wasteful lifestyle!
106
Bob
22/01/2021 11:08:06 50 4
bbc
Except they probably are not because as the article points out the fast-fashion peddlers of the likes of BooHoo and ASOS have seen sales rise.

ASOS isn't as bad as others, but Boohoo is a big time player in cheap disposable clothing.
171
22/01/2021 11:19:59 10 1
bbc
People aren't "learning to live without" anything.
They're not buying expensive clothes because there is nowhere to wear them.
183
22/01/2021 11:22:24 5 2
bbc
BANG ON!

You have hit the nail on the head!
577
22/01/2021 13:50:41 0 1
bbc
YES! But many rely on this as a way of living!! along with the people here that need the job, for paying rent etc?there will be hundreds of thousands out of work due to home working!! and the govt are about to crucify!the few workers with taxes, road levies, and the poor, who rely on benefits!!NO MATTER THE POLITICIANS ARE O/K AND RICH ,ENOUGH! SO ITsFINE????
655
22/01/2021 14:31:44 0 0
bbc
Evidence it goes to landfill? Recycling rates of textiles is better than plastics almost as good as cardboards.
23
22/01/2021 10:45:01 5 3
bbc
I think we gave up clothes in general around September time.
39
22/01/2021 10:50:40 9 1
bbc
You must be a bit chilly right now :)
1
22/01/2021 10:38:31 537 25
bbc
Retail sales should more be about quality, not quantity: buying low volumes of high quality goods that last relatively long, especially locally-sourced, is better than buying high volumes of low quality goods shipped halfway round the world and doesn’t last long, thus consuming more resources and damaging the environment more.
24
22/01/2021 10:45:24 29 5
bbc
Yes but that doesn't make a good clickbait headline.

I have bought more big ticket items this year with money I would have spent on foreign holidays. I have spent more in much fewer transactions.
19
22/01/2021 10:43:57 78 8
bbc
So people are buying less clothes, and since not everyone is going around naked they obviously didn't need the clothes they would have bought. So... less waste, less workers being paid next to nothing to make clothes in awful conditions... I see this as good news
25
22/01/2021 10:45:37 73 8
bbc
Unfortunately a lot of jobs depend on silly purchases of stuff we don’t need
192
22/01/2021 11:24:50 10 1
bbc
The whole world needs a re-set and radical approaches and NOW!
569
22/01/2021 13:32:45 3 3
bbc
Then these people are surplus.
589
22/01/2021 13:52:51 2 1
bbc
Then we need to change how people are paid.

UBI is the way to go.

No excuses for taking on environment wrecking jobs then.
855
Rob
22/01/2021 19:33:47 0 0
bbc
But why Jude?

Why aren't people spending their time at useful jobs?

If we all spent a bit less (on stuff we don't need) and all worked a bit less (because we don't need the money to buy the stuff we don't need), we'd have more free time, be less stressed, and waste fewer of the world's precious resources, and no-one would be worse off.
26
22/01/2021 10:45:45 33 2
bbc
If we stay home there is less need to impress hence reduced need to buy clothes. With those most likely to dress up for work now working at home, smart clothes are becoming history, at least as workwear.

You realise the next stage is widespread wearing of nightwear and complete nudity in the summer! That's a bit far fetched, but quite possible.

I'm certainly not buying shares in clothes shops!
27
bbc
Surely its never been more important to have good clobber - how else are wives supposed to keep their husbands entertained during lockdowns Removed
13
22/01/2021 10:43:07 7 17
bbc
It's all about destroying businesses on purpose for "The Great Reset", quote from the World Economic Forum " it's 2030, I own nothing and I've never been happier", lol they think we're all fool and gonna give up our freedom, NOT ME!!
28
bbc
You're a rare breed alright. I don't think fool adequately describes your stupidity Removed
45
22/01/2021 10:55:26 1 3
bbc
True, but you can't post the word you want to as it upsets the squeamish BBC mods.
29
22/01/2021 10:42:02 5 9
bbc
I actually believe that we should all walk around starkers. That's fashion for you.
69
22/01/2021 10:59:23 4 1
bbc
And that, my friend, is how to expose yourself to illnesses more readily. Unlike other animals in the animal kingdom, we don't have a natural glossy coat to keep ourselves warm.
30
22/01/2021 10:43:07 2 10
bbc
Glad that my tax money has afforded people's splurge for online purchases
66
22/01/2021 10:58:51 8 1
bbc
Your tax money accounts for 1/1000000th of these people's spending after you take into account all your tax being spent on the things you use.

And most of them are tax payers too...
31
22/01/2021 10:47:56 9 15
bbc
In other news, Pope Francis is a catholic and in British Colombia a brown bear has been spotted relieving himself (or herself or itself, don’t want to upset the BBC) in the woods. why does the BBC keep spewing out this garbage. We know. And it is ALL the government’s fault. Not covid, not the pandemic, the government.
41
22/01/2021 10:52:55 10 7
bbc
You might get moderated for describing the colour of the bear :)
43
ike
22/01/2021 10:54:10 6 1
bbc
Why go on BBC if you don’t like them?
56
22/01/2021 10:56:54 3 1
bbc
And if the BBC had 1 new news article a day you'd complain...
98
22/01/2021 11:05:28 1 2
bbc
N you keep criticising the BBC - on the other note how do the print media keep going - they do the exact same trash - on real this n from here less than z list - n if you dont get the gist of the CV19 bit - remember its the Govt that could have stopped flights, stayed locked down longer, kept schools closed longer n not given £10 away to anyone who wanted a pizza... CV19 hasnt the power.
830
22/01/2021 17:06:43 0 0
bbc
Funny thing is... we all know all this too. You're not posting anything new or even original, yet you continue to post it.

Take a leaf out of your own book and stop posting such repetitive and boring drivel.
32
22/01/2021 10:48:19 6 3
bbc
Onesie and pyjama sales are soaring though
53
22/01/2021 10:56:34 5 2
bbc
but not deodorant! Poo!
11
22/01/2021 10:42:57 5 5
bbc
This is data based on sales volume (the number of transactions) not value. As such it is a pointless measure.

My wife bought me a very expensive Rolex watch for my 50th birthday in December, where usually she would buy me 3 or 4 smaller presents, but she spent about 30 times more.

If people order online, they will lump purchases together to save on delivery costs etc.
33
Bob
22/01/2021 10:48:34 5 3
bbc
And an important addendum there would be the inflation figures from earlier in the week which showed clothing as one of the few sectors contributing to upwards inflation.

So volume down, prices up. Hmm!
34
22/01/2021 10:48:52 241 16
bbc
Companies like M&S are suffering because they went the route of cheap manufacturing in the far east and abandoned the quality UK manufacturers that made M&S a trusted household name back in the day. Quality is the name of the game across the spectrum fro clothes to white goods. We have Miele appliances and they are pure quality. You pay more but our washing machine is 27 years old and still going
74
Bob
22/01/2021 10:59:49 128 13
bbc
I'm guessing the Boohoo Leicester factory furore passed you by. Shoddy conditions, shoddy pay and cheap clothes designed to last one season.

Just because something is made in a particular country does not mean it is automatically good or bad.

Cheap labour does not have to mean cheap materials. You can make decent products anywhere. You just have to use the right quality ingredients.
75
22/01/2021 11:00:18 8 1
bbc
As is my 28 years old Zanussi FL828 washing machine!
77
22/01/2021 11:01:00 2 1
bbc
And when sales start dropping as the cost of living - bills, mortgaes, rent etc go up and prople drift from costly quality to cheap - you either die or change... the UK may have low inflation on goods, but the rest costs most and that goes up to line pockets of people who have enough to buy the quality.
109
22/01/2021 11:09:12 15 4
bbc
If you buy ridiculously expensive Miele goods now they won't be the same quality and won't have a 10 year warranty - but will be far more energy efficient than your old one. I take your point but you'll pay a lot simply for the brand name.
170
22/01/2021 11:19:50 3 3
bbc
BANG ON!
202
22/01/2021 11:26:36 9 3
bbc
Wow, I thought our Miele washing machine was doing well after 18 years!
And you’re spot on about M&S.
223
22/01/2021 11:33:08 12 1
bbc
Alright.

Don't make a Miele out of it.

(I have a Miele too, they're great)
258
22/01/2021 11:44:24 14 1
bbc
Keep your old washing machine going for as long as you possibly can. You'll find that even Miele appliances today are nowhere near the quality they were 20 years ago. This is the case for almost all brands.
287
22/01/2021 11:52:23 7 1
bbc
But I bet if you brought one today it wouldn't last 28 years. We've noticed the life of hotpoint washing machines is decreasing, looks like in about ten years its life expectancy will be about 6 months
297
js
22/01/2021 11:55:11 0 1
bbc
Our Miele Washing machine is by far the best washing machine we've had in years - It has comfortably outlasted its warranty with no issues, and we've had plenty of cheap washing machines had have failed within 2-3 years.
324
22/01/2021 12:08:14 1 1
bbc
miele good british company lol
345
22/01/2021 12:17:08 0 3
bbc
There will be some gunk in there after 27 years. I'd buy a new one!
354
22/01/2021 12:19:35 4 1
bbc
It is cheaper to make abroad; M&S and Next to name 2 manufacture in India in state of the art factories. Shame they can't do that here. One of the problems is that even if were to manufacture in the UK the young don't necessarily want to work in a factory at sewing machine making clothes. May the effect of the pandemic may change that. Who knows!
362
22/01/2021 12:23:22 1 1
bbc
We had to replace our oven 1 year ago because the part that wasn't working is no longer available.
478
22/01/2021 13:04:58 5 1
bbc
Most of this comment rings true. . . .however i'd question the claims regarding the present day Miele who are a poor imitation of the Miele of 25 years ago and who's products are much less reliable than back then but no less expensive. . . . .
660
22/01/2021 14:34:26 0 2
bbc
miele is german , why would you buy a german product ?, know what i mean
806
22/01/2021 16:26:51 0 0
bbc
M & S failures in the clothing market have occurred because their designs were not popular. It wasn't the location of manufacture as other businesses who source from the east have not been met with the same type of response from customers.
833
22/01/2021 17:20:52 1 1
bbc
20 years ago our Miele washing machine broke down the first time we used it. We had it replaced. A couple of years ago it broke down. The repair was £460. I won't be buying Miele washing machines again.
863
22/01/2021 20:48:35 0 0
bbc
Absolutely right. I have always gone for quality clothing that lasts.
There's still some good wear left in these flares and tank top
35
22/01/2021 10:49:02 13 3
bbc
Well DUH!!!
36
22/01/2021 10:49:04 10 14
bbc
Plus in wales, you’re not even allowed to buy clothes as apparently they’re not essential...... end this now.
60
22/01/2021 10:58:01 7 4
bbc
Yeh lets open it all up - how many relative you want to put in the ground?... Just so you can shop for a few disposable t shirts.
37
22/01/2021 10:49:21 13 5
bbc
Pyjamas are the fashion of the future.
152
22/01/2021 11:15:53 5 1
bbc
Hopefully not striped ones!!
38
22/01/2021 10:49:42 43 15
bbc
I need to go clothes shopping. I look like Wurzel Gummidge nowadays.

Gonna wait for shops to reopen though. If we have any left.

Ain't gonna buy from Amazon.
80
22/01/2021 11:01:30 34 1
bbc
Just stay in then with a cup o' tea & a slice o' cake.
161
22/01/2021 11:17:59 4 5
bbc
Try Vinted!

Do you know how many trillions of tonnes of clothing there is and waste?

I'm sure you do not look like Wurzel Gummidge.

Have yu tried up cycling what you have?
23
22/01/2021 10:45:01 5 3
bbc
I think we gave up clothes in general around September time.
39
22/01/2021 10:50:40 9 1
bbc
You must be a bit chilly right now :)
40
22/01/2021 10:52:46 17 2
bbc
Perhaps shoppers are fed up with tat clothing in the shops.
149
22/01/2021 11:15:32 4 2
bbc
Hope so!!
527
22/01/2021 13:20:53 0 0
bbc
some Primark clothes
31
22/01/2021 10:47:56 9 15
bbc
In other news, Pope Francis is a catholic and in British Colombia a brown bear has been spotted relieving himself (or herself or itself, don’t want to upset the BBC) in the woods. why does the BBC keep spewing out this garbage. We know. And it is ALL the government’s fault. Not covid, not the pandemic, the government.
41
22/01/2021 10:52:55 10 7
bbc
You might get moderated for describing the colour of the bear :)
54
22/01/2021 10:56:38 3 2
bbc
Good point!
42
22/01/2021 10:53:10 80 3
bbc
To quote: "The fashion industry emits more carbon than international flights and maritime shipping combined." - so a reduction is good, surely?
148
22/01/2021 11:15:19 36 3
bbc
Bang on!

Hope the Fashion Houses will make it fashionable to make decent quality clothes, organic and to last! even if it is more costly to buy. It will begin to heal-and heal this Planet and peoples Mental Health.

We don't need to be addicted to buying clothes to make us feel good, or have to subscribe to the image, which is forced down our throats as "body image" touted around as the norm.
31
22/01/2021 10:47:56 9 15
bbc
In other news, Pope Francis is a catholic and in British Colombia a brown bear has been spotted relieving himself (or herself or itself, don’t want to upset the BBC) in the woods. why does the BBC keep spewing out this garbage. We know. And it is ALL the government’s fault. Not covid, not the pandemic, the government.
43
ike
22/01/2021 10:54:10 6 1
bbc
Why go on BBC if you don’t like them?
50
22/01/2021 10:56:07 3 5
bbc
I pay for them, I have a right to criticise. Good enough reasons for you?
21
22/01/2021 10:44:51 4 9
bbc
And pubs & parties & all sorts. Expect some of them were wearing new clothes, too, eh? But, sure, let's try to stigmatise one part of the population.
44
22/01/2021 10:54:50 9 1
bbc
If it means people attending a wedding get fined £200 and people attending a house party get fined £800, I think I will...
You're a rare breed alright. I don't think fool adequately describes your stupidity Removed
45
22/01/2021 10:55:26 1 3
bbc
True, but you can't post the word you want to as it upsets the squeamish BBC mods.
8
22/01/2021 10:42:11 124 20
bbc
Fashion is fine but not throwaway fashion.
46
VoR
22/01/2021 10:55:36 23 1
bbc
The industry promotes throw away fashion because otherwise we don't buy as many clothes.
47
22/01/2021 10:55:45 38 9
bbc
This just in from the Department of the Bleedin' Obvious!
48
22/01/2021 10:47:57 3 5
bbc
No %$£+ I wouldn't of believed there was going to be a slump what ever caused that. more brilliant non intelligent reporting by the BBC how about some descent reporting or is that going to slump as well, but I do really feel sorry for the staff
49
22/01/2021 10:56:00 11 2
bbc
And long may it continue. Maybe people will realise that a new outfit weekly is a waste.

30 items is all you really need - I did the challenge a few years back and it changed me a lot.

You will make 100s of different outfits and no one will bat an eye lid. If they do...stop hanging around with them and get better friends.
65
22/01/2021 10:58:24 6 2
bbc
Nobody I know buys a “new outfit weekly”.
Especially not now that they are unemployed because of Lockdowns.
125
22/01/2021 11:11:32 2 1
bbc
£0? I manage ten! Classic good quality items and mix up with accessories [if need be]. I applaud you!

Yes, it will become a better world when we can all realise it is a waste [lots of things we do] and make it fashionable to make that a trend, to alleviate waste and materialism.

What we need is more people with your attitude and ideas!

Gives me hope! Thank you!
43
ike
22/01/2021 10:54:10 6 1
bbc
Why go on BBC if you don’t like them?
50
22/01/2021 10:56:07 3 5
bbc
I pay for them, I have a right to criticise. Good enough reasons for you?
105
22/01/2021 11:07:22 2 1
bbc
The simple thing is sell em off, like the NHS is and anything else we have left in the barrel... lets sell the barrel - youre short sighted limit of what the BBC is doing is a shame - they are reporting just the same as all the media. Your falling for a political line cast by others.
51
DrR
22/01/2021 10:56:18 4 1
bbc
A new outfit for your vaccine jab perhaps?
73
ike
22/01/2021 10:59:43 4 2
bbc
I’d wait until September then.
52
Les
22/01/2021 10:56:27 3 3
bbc
What is more important, a new coat to keep out the cold in the winter or a bottle of whiskey? I would say clothes and shoes are more important than alcohol and tobacco
Yes alcohol and tobacco may be nice, and important if addicted, but for the vast majority , not a necessity, where is, where can I buy a new coat, jumper or any other cloths or shoes to replace worn out ones during this Lockdown
68
22/01/2021 10:59:20 4 2
bbc
And yet I might consider a bottle of whisky as more important having not worn half my clothes or gone out in about a year. I have clothes but that whisky is a necessity.
175
22/01/2021 11:20:28 0 2
bbc
Many a person has frozen to death on their way home believing their whiskey jacket would protect them the cold.
637
22/01/2021 14:23:29 1 0
bbc
On line of course!
32
22/01/2021 10:48:19 6 3
bbc
Onesie and pyjama sales are soaring though
53
22/01/2021 10:56:34 5 2
bbc
but not deodorant! Poo!
41
22/01/2021 10:52:55 10 7
bbc
You might get moderated for describing the colour of the bear :)
54
22/01/2021 10:56:38 3 2
bbc
Good point!
55
22/01/2021 10:56:40 5 2
bbc
Naturist clubs booming
164
22/01/2021 11:18:42 3 1
bbc
Not in the UK in winter!
31
22/01/2021 10:47:56 9 15
bbc
In other news, Pope Francis is a catholic and in British Colombia a brown bear has been spotted relieving himself (or herself or itself, don’t want to upset the BBC) in the woods. why does the BBC keep spewing out this garbage. We know. And it is ALL the government’s fault. Not covid, not the pandemic, the government.
56
22/01/2021 10:56:54 3 1
bbc
And if the BBC had 1 new news article a day you'd complain...
58
22/01/2021 10:57:33 3 4
bbc
If they had 1 it’d be a start!
57
22/01/2021 10:57:06 13 3
bbc
Media clamours for lockdowns.
Non-essential shops, such as clothing stores, forced to close.
Media reports on consequences of media-driven lockdowns.
56
22/01/2021 10:56:54 3 1
bbc
And if the BBC had 1 new news article a day you'd complain...
58
22/01/2021 10:57:33 3 4
bbc
If they had 1 it’d be a start!
103
22/01/2021 11:07:03 2 1
bbc
Go read your comics, then.
115
22/01/2021 11:09:31 1 1
bbc
Please brief up all on what constitutes news in your world... This is of interest and fills out peoples understanding of the effects of CV19 and broader economic issues... or are you only after stories - and reports that support the Govt, dont point to sad things but only sunny uplands n unicorns.
59
22/01/2021 10:57:41 69 3
bbc
My wife is still finding new clothes around the house she’d forgotten she bought 2 or 3 years ago.
83
Emu
22/01/2021 11:01:41 28 1
bbc
haha, love this, same with mine...
107
22/01/2021 11:08:09 12 6
bbc
I find that really quite distressing.
424
22/01/2021 12:40:20 1 2
bbc
Same here . When I buy an item I wear it almost immediately and keep it forever .
716
22/01/2021 15:04:15 1 0
bbc
I know this is funny, yes I did giggle at that, but really, this is so sad. If they're never going to be worn, what a waste of your income, and a waste of resources.
Hope she starts wearing them up, gives them to friends, sells them on Ebay or sends them to charity shops.
761
22/01/2021 15:42:45 0 0
bbc
My problem is i buy something to replace what looks old, but when the new item arrives i decides there is still some life in old item so new goes in bottom of wardrobe.
36
22/01/2021 10:49:04 10 14
bbc
Plus in wales, you’re not even allowed to buy clothes as apparently they’re not essential...... end this now.
60
22/01/2021 10:58:01 7 4
bbc
Yeh lets open it all up - how many relative you want to put in the ground?... Just so you can shop for a few disposable t shirts.
168
22/01/2021 11:19:31 3 1
bbc
The whole World needs a Re-set.

Materialism and buying has become an obsession, which is clearly bad for mental health and the Planet!
213
22/01/2021 11:29:19 0 3
bbc
This preaching doesn’t work when we can all see packed supermarkets.
13
22/01/2021 10:43:07 7 17
bbc
It's all about destroying businesses on purpose for "The Great Reset", quote from the World Economic Forum " it's 2030, I own nothing and I've never been happier", lol they think we're all fool and gonna give up our freedom, NOT ME!!
61
22/01/2021 10:58:03 4 1
bbc
Why would owning less mean that you're giving up your freedom?

Surely the reverse is true, especially if you have to work and pay taxes to be able to own that stuff?
184
22/01/2021 11:22:29 1 1
bbc
9/10ths of the law is possession, so they say.
62
22/01/2021 10:58:16 9 3
bbc
Having pairs of M&S trousers, all same size, all fitting fine, I ordered some more online but although they had the same size label they were 2 sizes smaller. So I gave up buying M&S trousers. If shops can't be consistent and control quality they don't deserve customers. Furloughing customer care won't do them much good, either. Forget profits for a few weeks and ask how to win back customers?
635
22/01/2021 14:22:48 1 0
bbc
Wife bought pair M&S trousers: 2 different leg lengths on same pair! Never had such issues with Primark!
63
22/01/2021 10:58:21 13 2
bbc
For many women, shopping is a fun activity to do with friends, incorporating perhaps a nice lunch and some impulse spending. Maybe a show afterwards fir a truly special day.

Even after lockdown last summer, these things were made so difficult. Frankly you’re better off putting the money under the mattress.
101
22/01/2021 11:06:48 9 2
bbc
You could still have nice day out with your friend, without the "need" to buy something you don't need?

Suggest you chat over coffee about how you've helped reduce carbon footprint, help save the planet by not buying, adding to the materialism of it all?

I haven't bought clothes in years. Not had the money and quite honestly I jumped off the "materialism bandwagon" and prisoner to image.
530
22/01/2021 13:22:14 0 2
bbc
son does that got a couple of pounds and a nerf gun
632
BD
22/01/2021 14:19:00 2 0
bbc
How patronising, and ignorant.
If you have a wife, please forward my sympathies to her ...
64
22/01/2021 10:58:24 2 8
bbc
This is creating major issues for my sweat shop.

Got all the workers on 'go slow' standing round with nothing to do.
49
22/01/2021 10:56:00 11 2
bbc
And long may it continue. Maybe people will realise that a new outfit weekly is a waste.

30 items is all you really need - I did the challenge a few years back and it changed me a lot.

You will make 100s of different outfits and no one will bat an eye lid. If they do...stop hanging around with them and get better friends.
65
22/01/2021 10:58:24 6 2
bbc
Nobody I know buys a “new outfit weekly”.
Especially not now that they are unemployed because of Lockdowns.
30
22/01/2021 10:43:07 2 10
bbc
Glad that my tax money has afforded people's splurge for online purchases
66
22/01/2021 10:58:51 8 1
bbc
Your tax money accounts for 1/1000000th of these people's spending after you take into account all your tax being spent on the things you use.

And most of them are tax payers too...
67
22/01/2021 10:59:02 8 2
bbc
Throwaway fashion is not only an environmental issue but a justice issue, if its that cheap to buy, what poor person has made it. Problem is we trust brands that we have no idea what their supply chain is like.

I think that clothes brands should have a star rating which shows how environmental they are, whether the conditions of workers are proper and the longevity of their clothes on average.
86
22/01/2021 11:02:31 5 2
bbc
There is an app called Good On You that does just that - ranking fashion brands by how ethical they are.
52
Les
22/01/2021 10:56:27 3 3
bbc
What is more important, a new coat to keep out the cold in the winter or a bottle of whiskey? I would say clothes and shoes are more important than alcohol and tobacco
Yes alcohol and tobacco may be nice, and important if addicted, but for the vast majority , not a necessity, where is, where can I buy a new coat, jumper or any other cloths or shoes to replace worn out ones during this Lockdown
68
22/01/2021 10:59:20 4 2
bbc
And yet I might consider a bottle of whisky as more important having not worn half my clothes or gone out in about a year. I have clothes but that whisky is a necessity.
29
22/01/2021 10:42:02 5 9
bbc
I actually believe that we should all walk around starkers. That's fashion for you.
69
22/01/2021 10:59:23 4 1
bbc
And that, my friend, is how to expose yourself to illnesses more readily. Unlike other animals in the animal kingdom, we don't have a natural glossy coat to keep ourselves warm.
396
22/01/2021 12:33:45 0 0
bbc
I know some hirsute folks that might argue with that...
71
22/01/2021 10:59:29 9 3
bbc
Capitalism baby! When are folks going to realise that you don't NEED a new dress, a new pair of trousers, a new pair of shoes every season? Geez, first world problems - are you living, got a roof over your head? If you want cheap stuff, then it has to be made abroad cos nobody in UK wants to work in a a sweatshop.... but it lifts living standards abroad too.... The moral maze.
158
22/01/2021 11:17:03 8 2
bbc
"nobody in UK wants to work in a a sweatshop..."

Never heard of the sweatshop in Leicester, then? Used to be plenty in London, too - maybe still are for all we know.
288
22/01/2021 11:52:50 1 1
bbc
Its a huge shame because the UK lead the way in the industrial revolution, we produced some of the best quality material & goods back then. Them were the days, Shame we can't do it anymore.
72
22/01/2021 10:59:37 3 3
bbc
Of course we didn't buy new clothes , nowhere to go !! I didn't go into town until November and that was just to get a filling at the dentist which I should have had in march !
51
DrR
22/01/2021 10:56:18 4 1
bbc
A new outfit for your vaccine jab perhaps?
73
ike
22/01/2021 10:59:43 4 2
bbc
I’d wait until September then.
34
22/01/2021 10:48:52 241 16
bbc
Companies like M&S are suffering because they went the route of cheap manufacturing in the far east and abandoned the quality UK manufacturers that made M&S a trusted household name back in the day. Quality is the name of the game across the spectrum fro clothes to white goods. We have Miele appliances and they are pure quality. You pay more but our washing machine is 27 years old and still going
74
Bob
22/01/2021 10:59:49 128 13
bbc
I'm guessing the Boohoo Leicester factory furore passed you by. Shoddy conditions, shoddy pay and cheap clothes designed to last one season.

Just because something is made in a particular country does not mean it is automatically good or bad.

Cheap labour does not have to mean cheap materials. You can make decent products anywhere. You just have to use the right quality ingredients.
379
22/01/2021 12:24:35 1 2
bbc
"I'm guessing the Boohoo Leicester factory furore passed you by"

You've missed the point completely Bob, perhaps look at your own use of the word 'furore' and see if you can then understand your lack of comprehension.

*Why* was there a furore bout the boohoo factory in leicester Bob, WHY?

;)
472
22/01/2021 13:01:30 1 1
bbc
People buying Boohoo have probably never heard of Leicester or cheap labour.
The bosses and the "entrepreneurs" have, though
645
22/01/2021 14:27:11 4 1
bbc
asian factories with asian workers making for asian BOOHOO bosses while they took no care in trying to sheild from covid and the bosses said if your not feeling well go home , and comeback in 2 days to start work again , leaving out important info , and while your doing that infect the rest of leicester , with in a week after that leicester had to be locked down , GOOD OLD tudor road
747
22/01/2021 15:29:12 0 0
bbc
well said Bob at 10.59
the irony of Boohoo sweatshops in Leicester struck me
one of my first jobs in the late 80's was dragging knitwear machinery out of Corah's in Leicester
it had been one of the largest knitwear manufacturers anywhere
Removed
34
22/01/2021 10:48:52 241 16
bbc
Companies like M&S are suffering because they went the route of cheap manufacturing in the far east and abandoned the quality UK manufacturers that made M&S a trusted household name back in the day. Quality is the name of the game across the spectrum fro clothes to white goods. We have Miele appliances and they are pure quality. You pay more but our washing machine is 27 years old and still going
75
22/01/2021 11:00:18 8 1
bbc
As is my 28 years old Zanussi FL828 washing machine!
137
22/01/2021 11:13:46 21 1
bbc
And so is my 31-year old Hotpoint, but the Hotpoint agent who repaired it some years ago was at pains to point out that the current models from the same firm are not built to the same standards. He advised us to keep it and we did.
140
22/01/2021 11:11:24 11 2
bbc
You won't get a Zanussi product to last more than 5 years anymore. They all, deliberately, use parts that perish relatively quickly !
76
22/01/2021 11:00:27 8 4
bbc
Surely President Xi cant believe his luck, as he sees the West self destruct before his very eyes.
114
VIP
22/01/2021 11:09:24 1 2
bbc
President Xi’s people are producing cloths as well. Can’t see him busting out the dancing dragon
34
22/01/2021 10:48:52 241 16
bbc
Companies like M&S are suffering because they went the route of cheap manufacturing in the far east and abandoned the quality UK manufacturers that made M&S a trusted household name back in the day. Quality is the name of the game across the spectrum fro clothes to white goods. We have Miele appliances and they are pure quality. You pay more but our washing machine is 27 years old and still going
77
22/01/2021 11:01:00 2 1
bbc
And when sales start dropping as the cost of living - bills, mortgaes, rent etc go up and prople drift from costly quality to cheap - you either die or change... the UK may have low inflation on goods, but the rest costs most and that goes up to line pockets of people who have enough to buy the quality.
78
22/01/2021 11:01:01 6 3
bbc
Shock horror, the country in in the middle of a pandemic crisis with 75% of businesses locked down and clothing sales are poor. Who’d have thought it.
79
DSA
22/01/2021 11:01:01 96 5
bbc
I'm surprised anyone is buying any new clothes, I for one don't need a new shirt or trousers to sit at my computer, watch TV, or cook lunch.

Whatever happened to good quality and permanent dyes? Back in the early 90's I bought a polo shirt that is still in far better condition than one bought last summer.

It is time to dump the cheap junk and restart quality British production.
365
22/01/2021 12:24:58 34 1
bbc
Agreed. Unfortunately, the attraction of cheap anything from Amazon and delivered next day is too much for most....
434
22/01/2021 12:43:27 2 2
bbc
The quality of American and Canadian clothes are much better than ours because they don’t put up with rubbish as we do . That also applies to tools , household appliances etc
605
22/01/2021 14:02:22 0 1
bbc
SUPPORTING THE RICH FEW???
803
22/01/2021 16:20:20 0 0
bbc
I actually need a new dressing gown - the 10 year old one I have has an ever-increasing hole in it. Where can I get a new one which is of good quality these days?
810
22/01/2021 16:31:12 1 0
bbc
"restart quality British production" this seems to be thrown around a lot lately. With what funding will this occur and who will provide that funding based on a competitive business plan? There's a reason why British manufactured clothes have disappeared, no-ones really cares about it and price is the ultimate determining factor. Base costs you cant compete with product sourced from Asia.
38
22/01/2021 10:49:42 43 15
bbc
I need to go clothes shopping. I look like Wurzel Gummidge nowadays.

Gonna wait for shops to reopen though. If we have any left.

Ain't gonna buy from Amazon.
80
22/01/2021 11:01:30 34 1
bbc
Just stay in then with a cup o' tea & a slice o' cake.
1
22/01/2021 10:38:31 537 25
bbc
Retail sales should more be about quality, not quantity: buying low volumes of high quality goods that last relatively long, especially locally-sourced, is better than buying high volumes of low quality goods shipped halfway round the world and doesn’t last long, thus consuming more resources and damaging the environment more.
81
22/01/2021 11:01:33 43 11
bbc
Maybe, but judging 'quality' by price is exceedingly misleading. People pay enormous premiums for brand names and many wouldn't know 'quality' if it was offered. Primark is often cited (negatively) but much of their stuff is as good as many desirable brand names offer.
246
22/01/2021 11:41:01 18 1
bbc
Please ..... cotton from Chinese slave labour, manufactured buy kids in Bangladesh in a building that could collapse on them at any second. Brand names are no better.
The bar for quality should not be set so low.
247
22/01/2021 11:41:01 2 2
bbc
Please ..... cotton from Chinese slave labour, manufactured buy kids in Bangladesh in a building that could collapse on them at any second. Brand names are no better.
The bar for quality should not be set so low.
82
22/01/2021 10:54:45 7 7
bbc
Shops decided last summer they wouldn't enforce the "face coverings" regulations.

They can't be surprised people stopped doing non-essential shopping. What person in their right mind wants to go into a shop and inhale Covid-ridden air?

And now shops are being forced to stay closed. Maybe they should have done more to enforce the "face coverings" regulations when they had the opportunity.
104
22/01/2021 11:07:08 6 2
bbc
"Covid-ridden air"

Lol. You are being ironic right?
126
22/01/2021 11:11:41 2 2
bbc
Treating their customers as adults capable of making their own decisions as to whether they do or do not wish to wear a mask. Listen to yourself.
131
22/01/2021 11:12:41 2 2
bbc
I think you'll find the majority of people think that having to wear "face coverings" puts people off entering shops.

Besides which the common fashion "nose bags" are absolutely useless at protecting the wearer from viruses in airborne droplets and very little use at protecting others if the wearer happens to be infectious. Surface and hand cleaning is much more effective.
59
22/01/2021 10:57:41 69 3
bbc
My wife is still finding new clothes around the house she’d forgotten she bought 2 or 3 years ago.
83
Emu
22/01/2021 11:01:41 28 1
bbc
haha, love this, same with mine...
791
22/01/2021 16:10:40 1 0
bbc
and mine - "its not new, haven't worn it yet though, its been in the wardrobe for a year"
84
22/01/2021 11:01:59 5 4
bbc
This is fantastic news and a trend that should continue covid or not. The fashion and textile industry is the worlds second largest polluter.
85
22/01/2021 11:02:19 2 4
bbc
People under vitual house arrest really don't need any clothes except pyjamas.
93
22/01/2021 11:04:12 5 5
bbc
It's not 'virtual' house arrest, it's actual house arrest.
67
22/01/2021 10:59:02 8 2
bbc
Throwaway fashion is not only an environmental issue but a justice issue, if its that cheap to buy, what poor person has made it. Problem is we trust brands that we have no idea what their supply chain is like.

I think that clothes brands should have a star rating which shows how environmental they are, whether the conditions of workers are proper and the longevity of their clothes on average.
86
22/01/2021 11:02:31 5 2
bbc
There is an app called Good On You that does just that - ranking fashion brands by how ethical they are.
87
22/01/2021 11:02:32 4 4
bbc
Quite ironic that the weather girls are carrying Primark bags.
88
22/01/2021 11:03:10 8 3
bbc
I work in the wedding industry. I could only wish my sales were down 25%. Are you sure they are the hardest hit sector?
143
22/01/2021 11:14:57 8 2
bbc
The most expensive weddings were fund to have the highest divorce rates. We do not half spend a lot on pointless things in this country. The most expensive fast German cars too. We can be happy without material things and showing off. Maybe it's karma that when tough times come, people stop buying pointless things?
89
22/01/2021 11:03:17 7 2
bbc
Well of course its down you can't go anywhere ...all you need is pair of leggings , slippers and dressing gown.
..........and for a walk to the park or shop stick the old jeans and boots on.
No need to preen oneself if you are stuck in all the time .

Come to think of it probably wont have to buy beachwear either this year.
697
22/01/2021 14:51:59 0 0
bbc
A boiler suit is the handiest. Just pop it on over your pyjamas and you're ready for the shops!
90
22/01/2021 11:03:26 6 6
bbc
Pointless article..we all know this and what do we expect..and to think how someone got taxpayers money to write this....not there fault...blame BBC.
121
22/01/2021 11:10:51 2 2
bbc
BBC - and the papers, ITV, Sky, Reuters etc - are just reporting the ONS announcement.
182
ike
22/01/2021 11:22:21 2 2
bbc
And your on BBC reading it.
91
22/01/2021 11:03:38 59 3
bbc
Wasn't it Coco Chanel that said that the only thing to go out of fashion was fashion itself (or words to that effect)?

Still wearing an overcoat I bought about 35 years ago, will never go out of fashion because it was never in fashion!
167
22/01/2021 11:19:13 10 25
bbc
No, it was Coco the Clown.
6
22/01/2021 10:41:33 412 11
bbc
Spot on. I'd extend that to a whole range of consumer goods. For eg, why is it deemed acceptable for white goods to last a couple of years, when they could be made more robustly & last longer. Huge waste of raw materials, huge pollution issue.
92
22/01/2021 11:04:04 11 2
bbc
The market decides!

I have a very basic small tumble drier which is now 40 years old (and probably far less efficient than a modern one). Had one cheap fix in that time. However, I found the sales receipt recently and when inflation was factored in it had cost over £300! Sales of that would now be zero.
504
22/01/2021 13:14:05 3 0
bbc
Nonsense.
Plenty of tumble dryers on Curry's website with prices well above £300 & they wouldn't be there if they didn't sell.
85
22/01/2021 11:02:19 2 4
bbc
People under vitual house arrest really don't need any clothes except pyjamas.
93
22/01/2021 11:04:12 5 5
bbc
It's not 'virtual' house arrest, it's actual house arrest.
94
22/01/2021 11:04:42 7 8
bbc
There are job at stake here!

The Govt flying a kite on giving people £500 to isolate is governing by populism. Leak it early, see what the reaction is and go with it if popular, plausibly deny it if unpopular.

We live in a tin pot regime, and it will get worse!
134
22/01/2021 11:12:54 4 2
bbc
But the press scrutinise it, the people get to hear all sides, then decide. Or would you rather we had an autocratic system with little input like when we were in the EU?
177
ike
22/01/2021 11:21:08 3 1
bbc
This was only a thought and will never be past by Boris, what about the people who have already had to isolate in the past 10 months and got nothing?
179
22/01/2021 11:21:27 2 1
bbc
"We live in a tin pot regime, and it will get worse!"

And the true culprits are "the media" combined with governments too worried about their image to challenge these unelected and unaccountable persons. Far too many policies and ideas are driven by media and "campaigners" and we have no say in their activities. Fashion is the classic example - "this season's new look" decided by journalists.
95
22/01/2021 11:04:47 1 2
bbc
Hmmm. I bought more clothes than usual, after realising I dressed like Worzel Gummidge. What can I say, I like to get my moneys worth.
162
ike
22/01/2021 11:18:00 2 2
bbc
And now you have spent all your furlough money.
17
22/01/2021 10:43:42 237 8
bbc
Well said. Throwaway fashion, like all the worst excesses of consumerism, is a blight on the planet & on people.
96
22/01/2021 11:05:21 16 7
bbc
But it's the numpties who wear it once and throw it away who are the problem - not the employment given to the dirt poor which means they are slightly less poor. So much virtue signalling on this issue!
97
22/01/2021 11:05:26 10 7
bbc
Every ruined business, every redundant retailer, every young person with damaged prospects, substandard education and damaged mental health - they are all the personal responsibility of the hysterical, irrational Lockdown Lucys.

Once the oldies have their jabs it's time to return to normal.
118
22/01/2021 11:10:26 11 7
bbc
I'm assuming you are a product of a failed education?
123
22/01/2021 11:11:27 3 4
bbc
YAWN.........
261
22/01/2021 11:45:53 2 2
bbc
Again it seems having material things appear to be more important that saving lives. Many big businesses out there do make huge profits each year, but instead of putting some of it away for a rainy day (or pandemic) they instead pay out huge dividends to share holders. Many big businesses wouldn't need government help now and more cash could be given to the smaller businesses to help them survive.
290
22/01/2021 11:53:01 5 2
bbc
Good to see the snowflakes are awake
532
22/01/2021 13:23:13 1 2
bbc
Behave yourself
31
22/01/2021 10:47:56 9 15
bbc
In other news, Pope Francis is a catholic and in British Colombia a brown bear has been spotted relieving himself (or herself or itself, don’t want to upset the BBC) in the woods. why does the BBC keep spewing out this garbage. We know. And it is ALL the government’s fault. Not covid, not the pandemic, the government.
98
22/01/2021 11:05:28 1 2
bbc
N you keep criticising the BBC - on the other note how do the print media keep going - they do the exact same trash - on real this n from here less than z list - n if you dont get the gist of the CV19 bit - remember its the Govt that could have stopped flights, stayed locked down longer, kept schools closed longer n not given £10 away to anyone who wanted a pizza... CV19 hasnt the power.
99
22/01/2021 11:05:40 4 1
bbc
Shocker, you close the high street for 12 months and end up with lower sales. Duh!
100
22/01/2021 11:06:25 6 6
bbc
I might buy some new clothes with the £500 windfall for having Covid. (or pretending to have Covid). Not like anyone would abuse the system?
138
22/01/2021 11:13:46 0 2
bbc
??????