Marmite maker Unilever to insist suppliers pay 'living wage'
21/01/2021 | news | business | 502
Unilever says that by 2030 suppliers must pay staff enough to cover a family's basic needs.
1
21/01/2021 11:00:19 12 12
bbc
Marmite is the greatest food on the face of the earth
48
21/01/2021 11:22:04 0 0
bbc
Another reason to love Burton-on-Trent.
52
21/01/2021 11:22:29 0 0
bbc
(Along with Branston pickle! Maybe.)
62
21/01/2021 11:24:28 2 0
bbc
If you like your food to taste like a dog's arse.

P. S
(I don't know what a dogs arse tastes like but I'm guessing it's marmite.)
2
21/01/2021 11:00:56 3 3
bbc
Love it.
55
21/01/2021 11:22:46 0 0
bbc
Hate it.
3
21/01/2021 11:01:22 45 2
bbc
It's a great goal to set but surely this can be done before 2030?
15
21/01/2021 11:08:00 40 9
bbc
Gives them time to switch all their suppliers to countries where the living wage is $50 a month.....
4
21/01/2021 11:01:37 22 10
bbc
Should be legislated for, also not profiting from slavery

Or climate damage for that matter
5
21/01/2021 11:03:06 3 7
bbc
I guess just an excuse to push up prices..
6
21/01/2021 11:01:52 7 11
bbc
Now we’ve left the EU firms are dealing the benefit of paying better wages and will be onshoring more production to avoid tariffs.

Win Win,
14
21/01/2021 11:07:28 12 5
bbc
Lolz, only yesterday the Tories announced a review of workers rights....
7
21/01/2021 11:03:17 13 7
bbc
“...by 2030”. May as well say by 2099.
8
21/01/2021 11:03:50 135 4
bbc
"Food services giants Sodexo and Compass Group, which are on the Living Wage Foundation's list of recognised service providers, have made similar supply chain commitments in the UK." -
That'll be the Compass Group that produced the children's packed lunches we saw 2 weeks ago - more work needed on the "social responsibility" side of their business methinks!
54
21/01/2021 11:22:44 65 32
bbc
" "We will ensure that everyone who directly provides goods and services to Unilever earns at least a living wage or income, by 2030." "

The key word being "directly."

This massive multinational has very publicly absolved itself of all ills from its sprawling supply chains, most of which begin in developing countries.

Hypocritical, but hey, free advertising from the Impartial BBC for them.
59
21/01/2021 11:23:14 10 4
bbc
Chasing positive PR whilst maintaining a capitalist approach. Far from ethical.
131
21/01/2021 11:55:06 9 1
bbc
Why wait until 2030? Do it now if you want any credibility.
152
21/01/2021 12:02:09 2 9
bbc
Overpaying staff clearly results in all the money for the food disappears. This grandstanding politicised nonsense is not acceptable.
154
21/01/2021 12:03:36 5 6
bbc
I'll take a lecture from a company that hasn't been fined on multiple occasions for price fixing and cartel behaviour, this isn't one of them and I hate marmite.
240
21/01/2021 12:33:25 5 4
bbc
What they are actually saying is ‘ You can screw your workers for another 10 years at least, by which time you will be retired to the Seychelles’.
Another advertisement from the either bone idle or corrupt BBC news team.

They could have said ‘many firms including etc’
348
21/01/2021 13:14:59 0 1
bbc
EU nationals were paid minimum wage in UK. Their contracts were based in Poland Romania etc
428
21/01/2021 15:46:32 0 1
bbc
Not really. I imagine the spec is make up food parcels & this is the price / unit, that 's what they will do to that unit price as they will have to factor in staff pay, packaging, storage & transport, & still make a profit. They will work to the spec provided. Not too much fresh stuff as that could 'go off' before it gets handed out. Which would just create more problems.
441
21/01/2021 17:46:22 1 1
bbc
Sodexo paying a living wage? I don't think so, unless they sack loads of their workers so the wage bill stays the same.
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
17
21/01/2021 11:08:21 26 3
bbc
Agreed, I can only bring myself to buy it on offer
19
21/01/2021 11:11:03 6 2
bbc
Toast, lots of marmite, cheese, baked beans, more cheese on top. Heaven ??
30
21/01/2021 11:17:35 10 6
bbc
Because people are clearly prepared to pay an "insanely expensive" price for it - i.e. Unilever are more than happy to rip people off.

So maybe Unilever are not so virtuous as this news story makes out they are ?
31
Bob
21/01/2021 11:17:57 8 2
bbc
Well it'll be even more expensive once the supplier starts paying living wage, so best stock up now.
60
21/01/2021 11:23:46 7 6
bbc
And the relevance of this comment is??
64
BD
21/01/2021 11:24:51 6 2
bbc
A little goes a long, long way on your toast, unlike say jam ...
142
21/01/2021 11:57:48 3 0
bbc
But you still pay for it ??
244
21/01/2021 12:34:39 0 3
bbc
You are paying for their huge advertising campaign. Also for their weird (and surely loss-making) experiments with Marmite chocolate, Marmite body spray etc...

And no I'm not making it up:
https://www.lynxformen.com/uk/products/deodorant-antiperspirant/deodorant/lynx-africa-marmite-bodyspray.html
268
21/01/2021 12:44:06 0 1
bbc
It is, and their Colmans Mustard.
Both are big shop treats for me.

Anyone else hear that 'Low Rider' song whenever they see Marmite lol?
271
21/01/2021 12:44:52 1 0
bbc
It hasn't been a "byproduct" for decades.
349
21/01/2021 13:15:41 1 3
bbc
it tastes horrid
358
21/01/2021 13:28:53 1 2
bbc
If my wife or kids bring it in to the house, its straight in the outside bin when they are not looking. Foul disgusting, product that has no place in any reasonably minded house.
391
21/01/2021 13:58:33 2 1
bbc
No, not really as a jar lasts ages.
392
21/01/2021 13:58:42 0 1
bbc
More of a Bovril man myself but yeah Unever really have raked up the price of both ??
440
21/01/2021 17:43:21 1 0
bbc
true
my preferred by-product of the brewing industry is beer
10
21/01/2021 11:05:05 32 13
bbc
"Unilever, whose products include Marmite, Ben & Jerry's ice cream and Dove soap"

---

I'm not sure which one tastes best - Dove soap I think.
11
Bob
21/01/2021 11:05:07 3 5
bbc
Idealistic, unfortunately. Wage-inflation feedback loop is a thing.

It could also further push automation efforts at suppliers to keep the wage bill the same, even if the hourly rates are higher.
12
21/01/2021 11:05:18 85 14
bbc
So... only 9 years to implement it. Nothing like being an "agile" and "nimble" company eh?
58
21/01/2021 11:23:05 53 7
bbc
Why should it take them until 2030 to do this?
107
21/01/2021 11:46:26 14 4
bbc
Big ships take longer to turn. At least they are making a commitment.
158
21/01/2021 12:04:40 7 1
bbc
Maybe it’s suppliers need the time? Just a thought.
13
21/01/2021 11:07:19 5 4
bbc
Why wait until 2030 ?
6
21/01/2021 11:01:52 7 11
bbc
Now we’ve left the EU firms are dealing the benefit of paying better wages and will be onshoring more production to avoid tariffs.

Win Win,
14
21/01/2021 11:07:28 12 5
bbc
Lolz, only yesterday the Tories announced a review of workers rights....
3
21/01/2021 11:01:22 45 2
bbc
It's a great goal to set but surely this can be done before 2030?
15
21/01/2021 11:08:00 40 9
bbc
Gives them time to switch all their suppliers to countries where the living wage is $50 a month.....
85
21/01/2021 11:33:45 2 0
bbc
You assume that the ingredients are available from such countries.
161
21/01/2021 12:05:18 1 1
bbc
Bet you’re a great laugh at parties
466
21/01/2021 23:20:46 0 1
bbc
Nah.
They will simply buy from middlemen who will run an office with a handful of staff (on good salaries).
and the same low pay suppliers will sell to the middlemen.
16
21/01/2021 11:07:19 3 1
bbc
As mining is high-risk, should they not get ‘danger money’ on top?!
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
17
21/01/2021 11:08:21 26 3
bbc
Agreed, I can only bring myself to buy it on offer
454
21/01/2021 20:29:52 0 2
bbc
Can't stand the stuff. should be banned in any civilised country.
18
21/01/2021 11:09:42 177 5
bbc
We need either a proper minimum wage & scrap all tax credits or we go the way we are, supporting large companies like Amazon &Tesco by supplementing their employees incomes via tax credits
Tax payers in this country are shafted at every turn
If we all earn decent pay & pay tax we are all better off
We need some basic manufacturing jobs for less academic people to do & to get the UK off its arse
27
21/01/2021 11:16:04 67 30
bbc
Regardless of how many people Amazon employ, we should not be supplementing the richest person in the Worlds company, it is an insult to all of us, even those in Government. I agree with you, but this is the UK, they do not know how to do efficiency or how to be fair here, you know this. We know the Gov protect banks and big corporation. We do not matter, until we decide enough is enough.
69
21/01/2021 11:26:58 19 5
bbc
Essentially taxpayers are funding shareholder dividends. It is outrageous that we allow this. MSM and government manipulate the poorer sections of society to fight each other whilst the rich get richer.
98
21/01/2021 11:38:30 7 12
bbc
Issue is if we pay a real living wage then companies will invest more in technology/self service etc to remove jobs thus significantly reducing employment; Governments have chosen to keep employment high and supplement with tax credits etc.
159
21/01/2021 12:04:57 4 6
bbc
Pay is plenty and excessive. When you start paying large amounts extra for stuff you want instead of the better value then pontificate deeming others must have more pay, like you probably get given.
250
21/01/2021 12:35:45 8 12
bbc
It is not an aim of Conservatives to improve the general well-being.

It is simply to consolidate and to extend their power.

Poverty, ignorance, and insecurity among the populace all empower their elite.

So don't expect them to help, eh?
341
21/01/2021 13:22:40 2 5
bbc
All that will happen with higher wages is businesses will automate quicker and/or take manufacturing oversees to areas where wage rates are lower. This means even less UK jobs for the lower paid. Many businesses could not survive in the UK with higher wages. They would not be sustainable. The level of economic naivety is unbelievable.
347
21/01/2021 13:14:39 1 0
bbc
EU nationals were paid minimum wage. Their contracts were based in Poland Romania etc ..
368
21/01/2021 13:36:37 5 5
bbc
If only we had free access to the World's biggest trading block it might make sense to base factories here.
379
21/01/2021 13:46:18 2 4
bbc
Or people need to learn to live within their means......
408
21/01/2021 14:15:43 2 1
bbc
Absolutely agree. Scrap tax credits and up the minimum wage by a corresponding amount.
439
21/01/2021 17:42:07 1 0
bbc
only larger on-line retailers will be able to absorb the costs of moving products across the borders
they'll still import in to Britain and in to Europe from places with lower costs

this is a smart move by a brand
branded products have been on the slide in terms of market share for a while
holding surrounding business to wage standards means the worker as consumer can actually afford the product
484
22/01/2021 11:39:06 0 0
bbc
One of the best solutions ever. Well said. Working should be the way out of poverty. Not handouts.
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
19
21/01/2021 11:11:03 6 2
bbc
Toast, lots of marmite, cheese, baked beans, more cheese on top. Heaven ??
20
21/01/2021 11:12:03 17 5
bbc
Given Unilevers new ethical stance they are on a long term track to refuse to engage and deal with the UK's HMRC. HMRC is an organisation who struggle to pay some of their lowest grade clerical staff anything more than the absolute legal minimum at the moment. We live in interesting times...
21
21/01/2021 11:12:16 3 3
bbc
If they are so ethical, why is it taking them 10 years to implement this?
40
21/01/2021 11:20:04 5 4
bbc
Yeah, let's pick holes in a positive step forward.
22
21/01/2021 11:12:19 40 3
bbc
I applaud Unilever's stance. No one should work for a pittance.
361
21/01/2021 13:31:03 9 18
bbc
Nobody has a god given right to a certain rate of pay. Someone wants something done, they offer a rate. Take it or leave it. If no one wants to for that rate it tells them they are not offering enough. The correct rate is when people are prepared to do it, ie market rate. Supply & demand dictates this. Nothing else should influence the rate, otherwise you are messing with the basics of economics
468
21/01/2021 23:34:08 0 1
bbc
The idea that some rate of pay is 'fair' and less is not is puerile.
Each employee must add to a firm's profit more than he/she earns. Many UK firms barely break even. We are not competitive.
If you think you are undervalued, change jobs or start your own company.
With automation, outsourcing, AI, etc, (real) pay rises will be the exception. Brexit is more likely to bring pay cuts.
23
21/01/2021 11:12:27 0 8
bbc
Do you pay well then do you Marmite?. It is all very well the propaganda about pay here, but Marmite probably do not pay great themselves, of course they can look great up against another company that is paying less than they are?. I would lay £, that Marmites production lines have cheap labour and when I say cheap, I mean just earning above the wage they are going on about here. Contradicting.
36
21/01/2021 11:18:58 5 0
bbc
Speculative drivel. Why don't you post facts?
41
21/01/2021 11:20:25 1 1
bbc
If they are paying, as you say, just above the wage they are on about here, then there's no contradiction. they are doing exactly as they expect suppliers to do.
47
BD
21/01/2021 11:22:03 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you should re-read the article before laying your £ ...
24
21/01/2021 11:12:58 4 1
bbc
Well, you either love the minimum wage or you hate it.
49
21/01/2021 11:22:09 1 1
bbc
'Wonderif' the Min Wage was a good idea at the time - like most ideas i.e. CSA - but in fact the hidden agenda for the MW was that it amounted to state aid for business to make the books look better?
25
MVP
21/01/2021 11:13:10 4 2
bbc
Great news for workers. But why wait until 2030?

If Unilever really wanted this they could insist on it sooner
26
21/01/2021 11:15:03 4 9
bbc
Seems like a Great Idea.
Probably lead by a boss who has Children & wants the best in the future.

Too many companies are run by fools on steroids aka birth control pills & have lost their moral values or by men who have been influenced by terrible women & get angry & selfish at the world.
46
21/01/2021 11:21:33 4 2
bbc
Have you taken your medication today; if so you must increase the dose.
18
21/01/2021 11:09:42 177 5
bbc
We need either a proper minimum wage & scrap all tax credits or we go the way we are, supporting large companies like Amazon &Tesco by supplementing their employees incomes via tax credits
Tax payers in this country are shafted at every turn
If we all earn decent pay & pay tax we are all better off
We need some basic manufacturing jobs for less academic people to do & to get the UK off its arse
27
21/01/2021 11:16:04 67 30
bbc
Regardless of how many people Amazon employ, we should not be supplementing the richest person in the Worlds company, it is an insult to all of us, even those in Government. I agree with you, but this is the UK, they do not know how to do efficiency or how to be fair here, you know this. We know the Gov protect banks and big corporation. We do not matter, until we decide enough is enough.
78
21/01/2021 11:30:01 9 20
bbc
People voted for Brexit because enough was enough. Look where it got you.
112
21/01/2021 11:49:02 3 5
bbc
I'm assuming you don't buy anything from Amazon .
220
21/01/2021 12:26:54 8 2
bbc
"but this is the UK, they do not know how to be fair here" I don't really see any other countries standing up to Amazon either!
Experience has shown that when it comes to commercial interests, consumer action is far more effective. Vote with your feet and don't buy from Amazon. Small firms need your support more than ever.
373
21/01/2021 13:38:41 0 3
bbc
Any other conspiracy theories?
28
21/01/2021 11:16:42 49 3
bbc
You either love this move or hate it.
29
21/01/2021 11:16:47 25 5
bbc
While I applaud Unilever for this move which is most welcome, I can't help but wonder WHY it's going to take them almost 10 YEARS to implement it !!!

Surely 2 or 3 years at most should be their target, yes I get they are a huge business with many bodies to negotiate with over this but in 10 years time the poorer will have become even more poorer...

It's welcome but it's way too slow in ambition.
38
21/01/2021 11:19:31 38 2
bbc
Because they will have to put the clause into contracts as they renew, as cancelling existing contracts to add the new clause could lead to litigation and compensation claims.
350
21/01/2021 13:16:33 0 1
bbc
EU nationals were paid minimum wage in UK. Their work contracts were based in Poland Romania etc
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
30
21/01/2021 11:17:35 10 6
bbc
Because people are clearly prepared to pay an "insanely expensive" price for it - i.e. Unilever are more than happy to rip people off.

So maybe Unilever are not so virtuous as this news story makes out they are ?
81
21/01/2021 11:32:02 19 1
bbc
It is a commercial product and there are alternatives in a competitive market, so Unilever are not "ripping people off". People elect to pay that price. They could purchase an alternative or boycott the product entirely. Too many people ready to assume "the public" need someone to make decisions for them.
303
21/01/2021 13:05:27 4 0
bbc
"i.e. Unilever are more than happy to rip people off."

Unilever are ripping off no one.
Once associated costs are met the final price is set according to customer demand. If the customer deems the price is too high and stopy buying, the company will either reduce the price of cease production.
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
31
Bob
21/01/2021 11:17:57 8 2
bbc
Well it'll be even more expensive once the supplier starts paying living wage, so best stock up now.
32
21/01/2021 11:17:57 9 6
bbc
Surely a living wage is anti-tory: if you start lifting people out of poverty, then how are the elite going to profit?
155
21/01/2021 12:03:54 0 5
bbc
By now we should realise that it isn’t benefits that raise people out of poverty. It certainly helps to keep them alive but in the same sorry state. The only way to leave poverty behind is through education & ambition. Labour great at chucking benefits at people but lousy at giving the poor a leg up. They like people to be eternally grateful but know their place.
33
21/01/2021 11:18:29 43 2
bbc
Let’s hope this spreads!
190
21/01/2021 12:18:06 21 3
bbc
Not sure it will.

Workers at the Tiptree factory have been told to expect jam tomorrow and I bet that workers at the Sun-Pat factory will still be getting peanuts .
34
ken
21/01/2021 11:18:34 19 5
bbc
This is basic economics it is mainly poor who spend nearly all they earn on the essentials to live. So increase their income increase their spending power increased sales and profit and growth. For far too long the system has concentrated on the wealthy so called wealth earners who mostly hide their money not invest as described. It is everyday people and their taxes and buying. Good news.
74
21/01/2021 11:28:03 28 1
bbc
You are so right, and this is basic economics. The pity of it all is that instead of this being a guiding principle, we get all this guff about trickle-down, incentives for management, etc. Paying those at the bottom greatly-increased wages would have a massive impact on the economy, leading to more profits, more employment and more taxes. Giving money to the rich is pointless.
295
21/01/2021 13:00:51 0 3
bbc
At what point does the circle stop?

Supplier pays minimum wages and increases cost of wages to the business, they pass this increases on to the cost of the product, the cost of living increases, required living wage increases. Repeat
35
21/01/2021 11:18:52 2 1
bbc
Good move but why 9 years to implement.
That picture of the toast is making me hungry. Pity theres no marmite in the house.
51
21/01/2021 11:22:28 6 0
bbc
60,000 suppliers in 190 countries - that's quite an alignment task. It would be easy just to tell their suppliers to do it but very difficult to police effectively.

I suspect if they could do it more quickly then they would.
53
21/01/2021 11:22:37 2 0
bbc
Its to do with the contracts they have with suppliers, new clauses cant just be inserted into a 6 or 7 year contract, and cancelling the contract would result in compensation being sought.

It would also push the price of goods supplied up above the agreed contracted rate, so that the other company can pay the extra wages without going bankrupt.
23
21/01/2021 11:12:27 0 8
bbc
Do you pay well then do you Marmite?. It is all very well the propaganda about pay here, but Marmite probably do not pay great themselves, of course they can look great up against another company that is paying less than they are?. I would lay £, that Marmites production lines have cheap labour and when I say cheap, I mean just earning above the wage they are going on about here. Contradicting.
36
21/01/2021 11:18:58 5 0
bbc
Speculative drivel. Why don't you post facts?
37
21/01/2021 11:19:22 5 2
bbc
Why wait until 2030? It's just marmite tomorrow.
29
21/01/2021 11:16:47 25 5
bbc
While I applaud Unilever for this move which is most welcome, I can't help but wonder WHY it's going to take them almost 10 YEARS to implement it !!!

Surely 2 or 3 years at most should be their target, yes I get they are a huge business with many bodies to negotiate with over this but in 10 years time the poorer will have become even more poorer...

It's welcome but it's way too slow in ambition.
38
21/01/2021 11:19:31 38 2
bbc
Because they will have to put the clause into contracts as they renew, as cancelling existing contracts to add the new clause could lead to litigation and compensation claims.
135
21/01/2021 11:56:11 3 1
bbc
Still shouldn't take 10 years in most cases, transport/ distribution contracts are generally only a year or two long at most and put out for tender on a regular basis by big business who are always looking for the best deal.

As said their move is welcome but for the most part a 10 year timetable is too long and will not help most of those they are seeking to help in a reasonable timely fashion.
255
21/01/2021 12:38:04 1 4
bbc
Rubbish, contracts can easily be changed as the terms & conditions of any well written contract will have amendment clauses
39
21/01/2021 11:16:40 3 0
bbc
Does anyone have trouble getting marmite stains out using Unilever products?
76
21/01/2021 11:29:24 4 0
bbc
Before or after consumption?
21
21/01/2021 11:12:16 3 3
bbc
If they are so ethical, why is it taking them 10 years to implement this?
40
21/01/2021 11:20:04 5 4
bbc
Yeah, let's pick holes in a positive step forward.
67
21/01/2021 11:26:07 1 1
bbc
... well you do every single day, whether it be Covid (vaccinations), or Brexit (Yipeeee ... we are out !).

you really are a complete hypocrite muppet.
23
21/01/2021 11:12:27 0 8
bbc
Do you pay well then do you Marmite?. It is all very well the propaganda about pay here, but Marmite probably do not pay great themselves, of course they can look great up against another company that is paying less than they are?. I would lay £, that Marmites production lines have cheap labour and when I say cheap, I mean just earning above the wage they are going on about here. Contradicting.
41
21/01/2021 11:20:25 1 1
bbc
If they are paying, as you say, just above the wage they are on about here, then there's no contradiction. they are doing exactly as they expect suppliers to do.
42
Me
21/01/2021 11:20:35 4 2
bbc
If all compnies did this other than inflation what would change?
491
22/01/2021 11:58:37 0 0
bbc
The lives of everyone would get better. Including the already wealthy.

There would be a financial "levelling up" and other people would have a better standard of living, clean water, things like that.

There would be less economic pressures to migrate away from poverty & to start wars.

Sounds good to me.
43
21/01/2021 11:20:43 2 3
bbc
" "We will ensure that everyone who directly provides goods and services to Unilever earns at least a living wage or income, by 2030." "

The key word being "directly."

This massive multinational has very publicly absolved itself of all ills from its sprawling supply chains, most of which begin in developing countries.

Hypocritical, but hey, free advertising from the Impartial BBC for them.
44
21/01/2021 11:21:03 3 8
bbc
Every wage is a "living" wage. It's level just determines how well you live.
86
21/01/2021 11:33:54 2 0
bbc
It depends more on where you live.

I lived in Brighton for yeas working for local Gov and retail. In 5 years I still had no savings, car, or went out more tha once a week for a couple of pints. I had colleagues living on their own who spent 75% of their wages just on rent.
87
21/01/2021 11:34:08 2 0
bbc
Explain the need for in work benefits then
45
21/01/2021 11:21:21 5 5
bbc
Unilever wants to increase its profits. So find out how this virtue signalling achieves that goal.
26
21/01/2021 11:15:03 4 9
bbc
Seems like a Great Idea.
Probably lead by a boss who has Children & wants the best in the future.

Too many companies are run by fools on steroids aka birth control pills & have lost their moral values or by men who have been influenced by terrible women & get angry & selfish at the world.
46
21/01/2021 11:21:33 4 2
bbc
Have you taken your medication today; if so you must increase the dose.
251
21/01/2021 12:36:05 0 0
bbc
Ask the females that.

I can tell by the changes in their voices if they take them or not, can you ?

You really are thick & brainwashed
23
21/01/2021 11:12:27 0 8
bbc
Do you pay well then do you Marmite?. It is all very well the propaganda about pay here, but Marmite probably do not pay great themselves, of course they can look great up against another company that is paying less than they are?. I would lay £, that Marmites production lines have cheap labour and when I say cheap, I mean just earning above the wage they are going on about here. Contradicting.
47
BD
21/01/2021 11:22:03 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you should re-read the article before laying your £ ...
1
21/01/2021 11:00:19 12 12
bbc
Marmite is the greatest food on the face of the earth
48
21/01/2021 11:22:04 0 0
bbc
Another reason to love Burton-on-Trent.
24
21/01/2021 11:12:58 4 1
bbc
Well, you either love the minimum wage or you hate it.
49
21/01/2021 11:22:09 1 1
bbc
'Wonderif' the Min Wage was a good idea at the time - like most ideas i.e. CSA - but in fact the hidden agenda for the MW was that it amounted to state aid for business to make the books look better?
492
22/01/2021 12:00:45 0 0
bbc
The MW was paid by the employer, not the government.

The hidden agenda is simple: to raise people out of poverty & penury. Not very hidden.

"State aid" means "aid given by the state", not "laws made by the state"
50
21/01/2021 11:22:27 3 6
bbc
Really! 8yrs. Pathetic. Body Shop Int were doing this 20yrs ago. Shameful. And the Media carry the story, like its good News. :(
35
21/01/2021 11:18:52 2 1
bbc
Good move but why 9 years to implement.
That picture of the toast is making me hungry. Pity theres no marmite in the house.
51
21/01/2021 11:22:28 6 0
bbc
60,000 suppliers in 190 countries - that's quite an alignment task. It would be easy just to tell their suppliers to do it but very difficult to police effectively.

I suspect if they could do it more quickly then they would.
1
21/01/2021 11:00:19 12 12
bbc
Marmite is the greatest food on the face of the earth
52
21/01/2021 11:22:29 0 0
bbc
(Along with Branston pickle! Maybe.)
35
21/01/2021 11:18:52 2 1
bbc
Good move but why 9 years to implement.
That picture of the toast is making me hungry. Pity theres no marmite in the house.
53
21/01/2021 11:22:37 2 0
bbc
Its to do with the contracts they have with suppliers, new clauses cant just be inserted into a 6 or 7 year contract, and cancelling the contract would result in compensation being sought.

It would also push the price of goods supplied up above the agreed contracted rate, so that the other company can pay the extra wages without going bankrupt.
8
21/01/2021 11:03:50 135 4
bbc
"Food services giants Sodexo and Compass Group, which are on the Living Wage Foundation's list of recognised service providers, have made similar supply chain commitments in the UK." -
That'll be the Compass Group that produced the children's packed lunches we saw 2 weeks ago - more work needed on the "social responsibility" side of their business methinks!
54
21/01/2021 11:22:44 65 32
bbc
" "We will ensure that everyone who directly provides goods and services to Unilever earns at least a living wage or income, by 2030." "

The key word being "directly."

This massive multinational has very publicly absolved itself of all ills from its sprawling supply chains, most of which begin in developing countries.

Hypocritical, but hey, free advertising from the Impartial BBC for them.
139
21/01/2021 11:57:03 11 2
bbc
Any opportunity to have a pop. Why are you even here?
153
21/01/2021 12:03:02 8 2
bbc
How exactly would you like a company to control its tier 3 suppliers wage structure? I’m sure you considered that when writing your response....?
304
21/01/2021 13:05:45 3 4
bbc
the have to use directly or for example someone working for a supplier to unilever buys a pen, the pen supplier and all the suppliers of plastic etc all have to be paying it also, the audit trail would effectively make the pen cost a fortune
380
21/01/2021 13:48:17 2 1
bbc
A direct supplier can be requested to provide evidence - an indirect one can't. The indirect supply chain can be very long and if 'everyone' is supposed to take some responsibility, you can't ask for a full list of everyone involved in the supply chain and then refuse to deal with your main supplier simply because one of a myriad of smaller ones don't quite meet a criteria. Economic reality.
2
21/01/2021 11:00:56 3 3
bbc
Love it.
55
21/01/2021 11:22:46 0 0
bbc
Hate it.
56
21/01/2021 11:22:50 20 12
bbc
Ensuring your suppliers pay a living wage by 2030? Wow,that's awfully good of you.So basically ,it's ok to pay workers bugger all until then.
367
21/01/2021 13:35:43 4 7
bbc
Business is not there to look after your well being. Its there to look after its own. It offers work at a rate. Take it or leave it. You dont have to take it. If people dont take up the offer, they would have to put the rate up to get staff. Of course you could always set up a business yourself and not rely on anyone else to sort your life out and make it nice and comfy for you?? How about that?
57
21/01/2021 11:22:56 26 14
bbc
2030... No rush then. Just sit back and feel noble for the next nine years while doing actually nothing.
12
21/01/2021 11:05:18 85 14
bbc
So... only 9 years to implement it. Nothing like being an "agile" and "nimble" company eh?
58
21/01/2021 11:23:05 53 7
bbc
Why should it take them until 2030 to do this?
143
21/01/2021 11:58:19 8 0
bbc
Though I upvoted this, till the UK population (among others) realise the days of cheap food are over the aim will not be met - It will need legislation to drag companies into this or some will take advantage of the race to the cheapest.
278
21/01/2021 12:50:48 6 0
bbc
Harsh, I mean its 1250 now, I don't think just over 7 1/2 hours is excessive
464
21/01/2021 23:16:04 1 1
bbc
Unilever don't own their suppliers. They need to persuade them to raise wages. If they cut them off without giving time for restructuring, etc, Unilever would be causing widespread unemployment - poverty rather than better pay.
8
21/01/2021 11:03:50 135 4
bbc
"Food services giants Sodexo and Compass Group, which are on the Living Wage Foundation's list of recognised service providers, have made similar supply chain commitments in the UK." -
That'll be the Compass Group that produced the children's packed lunches we saw 2 weeks ago - more work needed on the "social responsibility" side of their business methinks!
59
21/01/2021 11:23:14 10 4
bbc
Chasing positive PR whilst maintaining a capitalist approach. Far from ethical.
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
60
21/01/2021 11:23:46 7 6
bbc
And the relevance of this comment is??
365
21/01/2021 13:33:55 2 0
bbc
You must be fun at parties.
61
21/01/2021 11:23:53 10 8
bbc
Shouldn't the headline read "Unilever commits to additional 10 years of exploitation of people on below living wages."
71
21/01/2021 11:26:59 3 3
bbc
So if you buy or use a Unilever product (which I'm sure you do) you are exploiting people.
489
22/01/2021 11:55:34 0 0
bbc
You're really saying, every other comapny is commited to open-ended exploitation and, at least Unilever has done something, even if you don't quite know why it might take 10 years to fully implement acros their global business.

Which other company that has made as similar commitment with any timescale at all?
1
21/01/2021 11:00:19 12 12
bbc
Marmite is the greatest food on the face of the earth
62
21/01/2021 11:24:28 2 0
bbc
If you like your food to taste like a dog's arse.

P. S
(I don't know what a dogs arse tastes like but I'm guessing it's marmite.)
63
21/01/2021 11:24:49 3 5
bbc
About time. It's ridiculous that so many companies don't pay enough to live on, while still making huge profits. What's worse their profits often get subsidised by the tax payer through in work benefits. This should be mandated by government, but of course the Tories are always on the side of business profits not workers whatever they might say.
9
21/01/2021 11:04:46 82 13
bbc
I absolutely love Marmite, but does anyone else think it is insanely expensive for what is effectively a byproduct of the brewing industry?
64
BD
21/01/2021 11:24:51 6 2
bbc
A little goes a long, long way on your toast, unlike say jam ...
65
21/01/2021 11:25:09 7 6
bbc
By 2030

Really - come back in 2030 if you want some PR

BBC swallowed this one hook, line and sinker
66
21/01/2021 11:25:53 5 2
bbc
It would probably take me until 2030 to get through a jar of marmite.And that would probably be at gunpoint.
40
21/01/2021 11:20:04 5 4
bbc
Yeah, let's pick holes in a positive step forward.
67
21/01/2021 11:26:07 1 1
bbc
... well you do every single day, whether it be Covid (vaccinations), or Brexit (Yipeeee ... we are out !).

you really are a complete hypocrite muppet.
68
21/01/2021 11:24:52 0 2
bbc
Yup : a mix of grandad 'jokes' and hatred of business...............

Comme toujours..
18
21/01/2021 11:09:42 177 5
bbc
We need either a proper minimum wage & scrap all tax credits or we go the way we are, supporting large companies like Amazon &Tesco by supplementing their employees incomes via tax credits
Tax payers in this country are shafted at every turn
If we all earn decent pay & pay tax we are all better off
We need some basic manufacturing jobs for less academic people to do & to get the UK off its arse
69
21/01/2021 11:26:58 19 5
bbc
Essentially taxpayers are funding shareholder dividends. It is outrageous that we allow this. MSM and government manipulate the poorer sections of society to fight each other whilst the rich get richer.
345
21/01/2021 13:25:37 3 5
bbc
Its not for businesses to decide how much a person/family needs to survive and meet that expectation. If someone needs more to survive, get a better paid job or work longer hours. If I have to pay staff even more per Hr, business is not sustainable & I will not take the risks for less reward. I'll be automating & taking production oversees. Its a simple fact of economic life in a world economy.
70
21/01/2021 11:26:58 2 5
bbc
The price of their products are going to shoot up if Unilever insist that everyone in its supply chain gets paid a 'living wage'. How will that affect sales & dividends? Will Unilever pay their suppliers on time as well? Will other companies supplied by a supplier that supply Unilever accept higher costs? Great news if every company does it but I suspect that won't happen. The new Dutch Cadbury!?
73
21/01/2021 11:27:57 14 5
bbc
They used the same argument against the abolition of slavery.
61
21/01/2021 11:23:53 10 8
bbc
Shouldn't the headline read "Unilever commits to additional 10 years of exploitation of people on below living wages."
71
21/01/2021 11:26:59 3 3
bbc
So if you buy or use a Unilever product (which I'm sure you do) you are exploiting people.
79
21/01/2021 11:31:25 0 1
bbc
Absolutely, yes. You would be part of the problem not part of the solution.
As they test on animals we don't buy anything from Unilever.
91
21/01/2021 11:35:37 1 0
bbc
That most likely depends on the product. Try thinking in a less binary manner.
490
22/01/2021 11:56:15 0 0
bbc
Or any other product or service at all, presumably. Except Unilever, who have actually started to improve.
72
21/01/2021 11:27:34 4 7
bbc
Another BBC headline from this interview could have been that when asked if Unilever were having supply chain problems due to Brexit he said "No". "You mean you are not experiencing any teething troubles" he said maybe one or two perhaps but nothing to worry about. Disappointed interviewer moved on.
70
21/01/2021 11:26:58 2 5
bbc
The price of their products are going to shoot up if Unilever insist that everyone in its supply chain gets paid a 'living wage'. How will that affect sales & dividends? Will Unilever pay their suppliers on time as well? Will other companies supplied by a supplier that supply Unilever accept higher costs? Great news if every company does it but I suspect that won't happen. The new Dutch Cadbury!?
73
21/01/2021 11:27:57 14 5
bbc
They used the same argument against the abolition of slavery.
34
ken
21/01/2021 11:18:34 19 5
bbc
This is basic economics it is mainly poor who spend nearly all they earn on the essentials to live. So increase their income increase their spending power increased sales and profit and growth. For far too long the system has concentrated on the wealthy so called wealth earners who mostly hide their money not invest as described. It is everyday people and their taxes and buying. Good news.
74
21/01/2021 11:28:03 28 1
bbc
You are so right, and this is basic economics. The pity of it all is that instead of this being a guiding principle, we get all this guff about trickle-down, incentives for management, etc. Paying those at the bottom greatly-increased wages would have a massive impact on the economy, leading to more profits, more employment and more taxes. Giving money to the rich is pointless.
75
21/01/2021 11:26:40 5 2
bbc
There are own-brand yeast extracts that are good alternatives. In the meantime choose a supermarket that pays its staff and suppliers’ staff top $ and buy from there. Doesn’t have to be only spreads. Consumer buying power has immense potential.

Buy British
????
Removed
84
21/01/2021 11:32:42 2 0
bbc
Sainsburys do their own brand, it's cheaper and has a lower sodium content.
126
21/01/2021 11:54:10 0 1
bbc
I'm looking for british lemons and limes oh and a few kiwi fruit do you know where I can find them?
39
21/01/2021 11:16:40 3 0
bbc
Does anyone have trouble getting marmite stains out using Unilever products?
76
21/01/2021 11:29:24 4 0
bbc
Before or after consumption?
77
21/01/2021 11:29:52 4 2
bbc
It would be nice if they could stop all testing on animals too!
316
21/01/2021 12:39:48 1 0
bbc
Unilever are leaders in scrapping animal testing and only test where they are legally required to do so. They are currently leading a campaign against the European Union Chemicals Agency who insist on animal testing to show safety of ingredients and working to influence countries like China to end animal testing. It is politicians that are forcing unnecessary animal testing on companies.
27
21/01/2021 11:16:04 67 30
bbc
Regardless of how many people Amazon employ, we should not be supplementing the richest person in the Worlds company, it is an insult to all of us, even those in Government. I agree with you, but this is the UK, they do not know how to do efficiency or how to be fair here, you know this. We know the Gov protect banks and big corporation. We do not matter, until we decide enough is enough.
78
21/01/2021 11:30:01 9 20
bbc
People voted for Brexit because enough was enough. Look where it got you.
228
21/01/2021 12:30:03 15 5
bbc
"People voted for Brexit because enough was enough. Look where it got you."

Yeah.....I for one won't sleep tonight worrying about that poor young woman in London who was so shocked to discover she had to pay duty on her £200 coat ordered directly from a European boutique.
I bet that will make your average minimum wage working class Northerner think "oh if only I had not voted for Brexit!!!"
249
Ben
21/01/2021 12:35:41 4 0
bbc
Helpful.
301
21/01/2021 13:04:19 9 1
bbc
What on earth has this subject got to do with Brexit, the answer is absolutely nothing. Can we not now have any debate on HYS without someone trying to introduce Brexit into it.
71
21/01/2021 11:26:59 3 3
bbc
So if you buy or use a Unilever product (which I'm sure you do) you are exploiting people.
79
21/01/2021 11:31:25 0 1
bbc
Absolutely, yes. You would be part of the problem not part of the solution.
As they test on animals we don't buy anything from Unilever.
90
21/01/2021 11:35:13 0 0
bbc
I was making a statement not asking a question.
80
21/01/2021 11:31:38 0 1
bbc
Many essentials are made by Unilever, slighly higher payin that sector may move people off own brands onto Unilever brands. This is not an off hand comment Unilever will have throughly analaysed the long term benifit to share holders.
30
21/01/2021 11:17:35 10 6
bbc
Because people are clearly prepared to pay an "insanely expensive" price for it - i.e. Unilever are more than happy to rip people off.

So maybe Unilever are not so virtuous as this news story makes out they are ?
81
21/01/2021 11:32:02 19 1
bbc
It is a commercial product and there are alternatives in a competitive market, so Unilever are not "ripping people off". People elect to pay that price. They could purchase an alternative or boycott the product entirely. Too many people ready to assume "the public" need someone to make decisions for them.
150
21/01/2021 12:01:05 4 0
bbc
Exactly. The monetary value of a commodity is whatever people are willing to pay for it. Marmite clearly sells well enough to justify its price. If some people refuse to pay that much, that makes them an outlier, and not representative of consumers.
82
21/01/2021 11:32:03 3 2
bbc
Perhaps it would be just as fair if they were to target their sellers as well as their suppliers.
Don't provide goods to those supermarkets etc. that are still failing to pay living wages as well, and then I will be on board with this.
75
21/01/2021 11:26:40 5 2
bbc
There are own-brand yeast extracts that are good alternatives. In the meantime choose a supermarket that pays its staff and suppliers’ staff top $ and buy from there. Doesn’t have to be only spreads. Consumer buying power has immense potential.

Buy British
????
Removed
75
21/01/2021 11:26:40 5 2
bbc
There are own-brand yeast extracts that are good alternatives. In the meantime choose a supermarket that pays its staff and suppliers’ staff top $ and buy from there. Doesn’t have to be only spreads. Consumer buying power has immense potential.

Buy British
????
84
21/01/2021 11:32:42 2 0
bbc
Sainsburys do their own brand, it's cheaper and has a lower sodium content.
15
21/01/2021 11:08:00 40 9
bbc
Gives them time to switch all their suppliers to countries where the living wage is $50 a month.....
85
21/01/2021 11:33:45 2 0
bbc
You assume that the ingredients are available from such countries.
44
21/01/2021 11:21:03 3 8
bbc
Every wage is a "living" wage. It's level just determines how well you live.
86
21/01/2021 11:33:54 2 0
bbc
It depends more on where you live.

I lived in Brighton for yeas working for local Gov and retail. In 5 years I still had no savings, car, or went out more tha once a week for a couple of pints. I had colleagues living on their own who spent 75% of their wages just on rent.
44
21/01/2021 11:21:03 3 8
bbc
Every wage is a "living" wage. It's level just determines how well you live.
87
21/01/2021 11:34:08 2 0
bbc
Explain the need for in work benefits then
88
21/01/2021 11:34:50 0 3
bbc
JW. Look at what footballers earn per week and do it percentage wise then people in normal everyday jobs should be getting a minimum wage of a thousand pounds per week.
120
21/01/2021 11:52:26 0 1
bbc
My average is around 800 per week after tax working as a domestic in a nhs hospital ??
89
21/01/2021 11:35:08 2 3
bbc
So they cannot use people in India.
The workers cannot afford their own homes and have to live with parents.

It is not uncommon for flats in central Mumbai to cost £1 million passed on from generation to generation. A dead asset as of sold they have nowhere to live.

Servants sleep on the streets and if lucky outside the flat near the stairs and women on the balcony floor.
79
21/01/2021 11:31:25 0 1
bbc
Absolutely, yes. You would be part of the problem not part of the solution.
As they test on animals we don't buy anything from Unilever.
90
21/01/2021 11:35:13 0 0
bbc
I was making a statement not asking a question.
71
21/01/2021 11:26:59 3 3
bbc
So if you buy or use a Unilever product (which I'm sure you do) you are exploiting people.
91
21/01/2021 11:35:37 1 0
bbc
That most likely depends on the product. Try thinking in a less binary manner.
92
21/01/2021 11:37:15 4 0
bbc
Having worked for Unilever for almost 15 years, I really applaud their Sustainability programmes and this is another initiative that, were I still there, I would be really proud of.
I'm not still there as they showed little regard for their UK employees with years of pay freezes or 0.25% average increases. I wasn't in poverty but worked all hours and had very little left over each month.
93
21/01/2021 11:37:45 2 0
bbc
You just wait for the launch of Primarmite ...made with actual tears of slave labour
94
21/01/2021 11:37:52 7 0
bbc
Who's going to remember in 2030 what Unilever said in 2021 to keep shareholders happy?
130
21/01/2021 11:55:03 0 0
bbc
It isn't keeping me happy as a shareholder.

Not because I want people to work for peanuts, but because it is the role of governments to ensure people are not exploited .. by ALL COMPANIES.

What concerns me is that this takes management resources to implement. Diverting from their core business.

BUT .. lets see what happens. Good company, so not selling.
95
21/01/2021 11:37:58 5 1
bbc
By 2030 Unileaver will have sold most current brands and moved on so nice PR
96
21/01/2021 11:38:01 4 1
bbc
The entire ethos of Unilever, since its foundation, is to make big money out of waste products. Hey presto!! Soap and ice cream from waste fats. Sandwich spreads from waste yeast. Marketing campaigns which are a waste of time...
97
21/01/2021 11:38:26 6 3
bbc
Meanwhile in Johnsons wonderful 'Brexitland' where unicorns roam free. They are looking at ways of curtailing workers rights.
Tell me again. Who was Brexit meant to free?
18
21/01/2021 11:09:42 177 5
bbc
We need either a proper minimum wage & scrap all tax credits or we go the way we are, supporting large companies like Amazon &Tesco by supplementing their employees incomes via tax credits
Tax payers in this country are shafted at every turn
If we all earn decent pay & pay tax we are all better off
We need some basic manufacturing jobs for less academic people to do & to get the UK off its arse
98
21/01/2021 11:38:30 7 12
bbc
Issue is if we pay a real living wage then companies will invest more in technology/self service etc to remove jobs thus significantly reducing employment; Governments have chosen to keep employment high and supplement with tax credits etc.
103
21/01/2021 11:43:43 13 1
bbc
Yes, reducing our productivity as a nation and our international competitiveness. Short term thinking is the British way.
99
21/01/2021 11:38:35 6 2
bbc
2030? Way to kick that can down the road for the next CEO to have to deal with (or more likely, quietly sweep under the rug).
100
21/01/2021 11:39:24 1 1
bbc
A case of marmite tomorrow but not today? Why as long as 2030?