Schools may reopen region by region, says medical adviser
19/01/2021 | news | education | 594
Top medical adviser suggests schools in England may reopen region by region after lockdown.
1
19/01/2021 14:35:41 130 67
bbc
NO.

The regional tier system has already failed twice and only served to create more confusion about what the rules actually are. It may be a good idea in theory but this government is too incompetent to implement it effectively.

We need simple nation-wide rules - not regional confusion.
5
Bob
19/01/2021 14:38:42 43 21
bbc
Don't confuse dithering over moving areas into certain tiers with tier systems not working.
8
19/01/2021 14:40:10 19 13
bbc
I assume you do not have children who need school for mental and physical wellbeing !
200
19/01/2021 15:32:16 13 5
bbc
Oh, and nation wide rules work do they? Wake up man!
221
19/01/2021 15:39:26 12 2
bbc
Only difficult if you refuse to check. Tiers are an attempt to minimise the economic damage done if all regions are locked up according to the needs of the worst affected region. Protecting the NHS is rightly a priority, but after that it must be a balanced judgement between protecting people's health and people's livelihoods & enabling tax income for the govt to pay for much needed support
248
19/01/2021 15:49:37 8 4
bbc
Can anyone remember a time when Dr Harries made the right call? Remember her gem of a declaration from last March that continuing community testing wasn’t necessary? Whatever she says, do the opposite.

Everyone needs to move together. We stay together. We stay locked down until the main vaccinations are completed. One bad decision now & a new variant can wipe out all of our progress.
251
19/01/2021 15:50:06 5 4
bbc
yes make schools safer before they are re-opened or don't re-open them. It's not difficult unless are you are member of the carp UK cabinet...
256
19/01/2021 15:52:54 4 4
bbc
It did not fail. Indeed application of a tiered system proved effective in November where the infection rate was reversed BEFORE lockdown was implemented. Due to media and wanabe experts' shouting we endured an unnecessary lockdown at that time, possibly disguising and exacerbating the surge we are now experiencing
279
19/01/2021 16:02:55 5 10
bbc
Schools all need to reopen right now. Keeping them closed is a ridiculous, short termist policy which is creating untold damage to the futures of millions of children.
294
19/01/2021 16:06:08 5 4
bbc
The vast majority only need to understand the rules in the one region that they live, work and go to school in.
330
19/01/2021 16:18:34 4 1
bbc
Tiers have worked. In Lincolnshire we were very low rates until all the people in high tiers illegally came on holiday.

Once the holiday parks were closed, the local rates have dropped from being some of the highest in the country to now some of the lowest.

Tiers work... the level of adherence in tiers is different.
455
19/01/2021 17:00:20 2 0
bbc
Don't confuse "competence" with "accountability" - what happened in the various Tiers is that Local Authorities/Head Teachers did not want to be accountable for opening schools where Central Government said they could.

The Tier system will work if people did what they were told, and followed the rules.
2
19/01/2021 14:38:01 3 5
bbc
Totally agree
3
19/01/2021 14:38:06 18 21
bbc
I do and have always agreed with Dr Harries statement(s) that there is no scientific evidence that school pupils have been, are or ever will be "a significant driver" of "large-scale community infections". Get the kids back as soon as possible and get teachers teaching properly.
12
Jem
19/01/2021 14:42:10 10 9
bbc
Are or ever will be are your words. No evidence means no data as yet. It doesn't mean any study shows there is no evidence.
24
VoR
19/01/2021 14:45:37 6 2
bbc
A) One school age group has the highest case rates of all age groups, so we know they transmit it a lot to each other. Why would we not expect them to transmit to adults? They may have lower viral loads but that's still enough to transmit in many cases.
B) Kids have been bringing viruses home to their households pretty much since mass schooling existed.
42
19/01/2021 14:52:00 4 2
bbc
Try telling that to my son in law when 7 members of staff at his small staff when down with it on the last day of term as well as some pupils. One still very ill.
539
19/01/2021 18:22:04 0 1
bbc
They are teaching properly over the internet. Before the kids go back to school Give the the bloody jab. Or there will be testing in schools and whole classes sent home the minute 1 pupil has a positive test
4
19/01/2021 14:38:35 83 40
bbc
We have seen any attempt at tiers fail - far better to just wait until nationally we are in a good position and then reopen. Home education is working for many now so better to leave be rather than to open up and then to lockdown again a month or two later.
7
19/01/2021 14:39:52 31 13
bbc
Spot on!
16
Bob
19/01/2021 14:42:56 11 4
bbc
Third time's a charm then? Tiers did not fail in and of themselves. The tier system did help to bring down cases in the North West - but not at first. It took reinforcing it to bring that about. With lessons learned (perhaps wishful thinking) tiering can work.

If we see a repeat of the NW where only one region is suffering there's little point reducing the rest of the country to misery.
21
19/01/2021 14:44:40 28 8
bbc
How can you say home education is working? It might be for you but I can assure you not for the majority. This is not like the last lockdown when the national curriculum was suspended - it is mandatory this time and children are obliged to engage in the full school day. So parents now get to start their own working day from 3pm..how earth is that sustainable? Not everyone is on furlough.
111
19/01/2021 15:07:41 14 3
bbc
Home education is not working for my 3 children with not enough rooms and me trying to do a full time job working from home.
242
19/01/2021 15:46:51 8 4
bbc
Home education is not working. Kids are turning into wrecks by being on their own all the time with no interaction. They need to be back in schools ASAP.
278
19/01/2021 16:02:16 1 3
bbc
Me and the rest of my family caught and tested positive for Covid. None of us experienced significant or limiting symptoms. Following your logic and experience of home schooling in your comfortable, privileged, funded and secure home environment - from my experience Covid really is not a problem, so we should just go back to normal?
1
19/01/2021 14:35:41 130 67
bbc
NO.

The regional tier system has already failed twice and only served to create more confusion about what the rules actually are. It may be a good idea in theory but this government is too incompetent to implement it effectively.

We need simple nation-wide rules - not regional confusion.
5
Bob
19/01/2021 14:38:42 43 21
bbc
Don't confuse dithering over moving areas into certain tiers with tier systems not working.
6
19/01/2021 14:38:44 59 7
bbc
Setting up the Education Secretary for the inevitable U turn?
69
19/01/2021 14:58:58 30 13
bbc
This peer reviewed study from Stanford University concludes that whilst low intervention measures such as hygiene and SD did have an effect on the spread of the virus, full Lockdown did not.
Had the paper arrived at the opposite conclusion I can't help thinking it would be widely reported.
The fact that it has not been, should worry us all
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/eci.13484
4
19/01/2021 14:38:35 83 40
bbc
We have seen any attempt at tiers fail - far better to just wait until nationally we are in a good position and then reopen. Home education is working for many now so better to leave be rather than to open up and then to lockdown again a month or two later.
7
19/01/2021 14:39:52 31 13
bbc
Spot on!
1
19/01/2021 14:35:41 130 67
bbc
NO.

The regional tier system has already failed twice and only served to create more confusion about what the rules actually are. It may be a good idea in theory but this government is too incompetent to implement it effectively.

We need simple nation-wide rules - not regional confusion.
8
19/01/2021 14:40:10 19 13
bbc
I assume you do not have children who need school for mental and physical wellbeing !
170
19/01/2021 15:22:56 11 15
bbc
Can't just open schools because people want there kids to go back. If we do we could be back to square one.
9
19/01/2021 14:40:53 13 18
bbc
Close all schools until everyone is vaccinated, then reset.
91
19/01/2021 15:01:37 5 1
bbc
Everyone will be vaccinated by September, in the best case scenario? Are you suggesting to close all schools till September?
10
VoR
19/01/2021 14:41:19 63 6
bbc
The problem is, it's no good driving the rate down in one area if you allow it to rise in another. When you lift restrictions, it'll just return to the area you drove it down in, from the areas where it was allowed to rise.

Need a more joined up approach.
26
19/01/2021 14:46:16 32 4
bbc
As shown pre Christmas when London visited Oxfordshire for shopping and rates went sky high
The teacher who lives across from us is really enjoying her Covid holiday thank you very much... Removed
18
19/01/2021 14:43:55 26 5
bbc
That's odd because all the teachers I know are working doubly hard as they are in school (all schools have the children of key workers) as well as taking zoom classes and setting homework for the kids at home. Anyone would think you were making it up!
48
19/01/2021 14:50:47 1 3
bbc
So she has been ill ?

How about some empathy, Mrs Grump ?
49
bec
19/01/2021 14:51:07 3 3
bbc
What an unhelpful and bitter attitude. Any teacher I know has worked tirelessly throughout each lockdown with video lessons and student / family support to add. Each of those that I have spoken to have found this thankless when surrounded by furloughed neighbours sitting in gardens drinking all spring 2020 and having an extended Christmas this year. Teachers teach because they care.
55
Rob
19/01/2021 14:53:29 4 3
bbc
We don't enjoy being stuck at home. I work with kids who have difficulty accessing the curriculum, which is impossible to do remotely. I go to work masked and in a shield. Anyone can chose a different place to shop, but some kids have no choice about their education. If the government wants kids in school, it has to provide the means to allow schools to stay open.
103
19/01/2021 15:05:46 1 2
bbc
Well perhaps having a little more sleep due to no travel is nice. However, getting sick and tired of ppl who do not work in schools claiming teachers aren't working. Everyone that I know is working their but off!
3
19/01/2021 14:38:06 18 21
bbc
I do and have always agreed with Dr Harries statement(s) that there is no scientific evidence that school pupils have been, are or ever will be "a significant driver" of "large-scale community infections". Get the kids back as soon as possible and get teachers teaching properly.
12
Jem
19/01/2021 14:42:10 10 9
bbc
Are or ever will be are your words. No evidence means no data as yet. It doesn't mean any study shows there is no evidence.
29
Bob
19/01/2021 14:47:57 6 1
bbc
There is evidence. And PHE has made that evidence public. I suspect the reason you're turning a blind eye to it is because it doesn't sit with your preconceived view.

It found that in nearly all cases school age infections reflected the community at large, and not the other way around.

The new variant changes the dynamics a little in terms of scale, but the above remains true.
13
19/01/2021 14:42:18 19 16
bbc
To my mind it's not a case of how safe the kids are or the degree to which they spread the virus (although both are clearly important) - it's more a case that open schools give the green light to parents and families to mix and that's where the problem lies. So let's keep the schools closed at least until Easter and then review things for a health (and not a political) perspective.
80
19/01/2021 14:59:26 9 8
bbc
How about reviewing things from the children's perspective, for once? Do they not count, they are the future?
186
19/01/2021 15:27:35 3 5
bbc
People are at breaking point and you think we should stay locked down until mid-April or later? I am guessing you have no financial worries or concerns, don't have any need to socialise or to seek out any form of mental stimulation. Stay safe behind that sofa and be careful not to fall down the stairs, far more risky than COVID hiding in your home.
14
19/01/2021 14:42:20 38 8
bbc
If only they could decide on one policy and stick to it. Education is in complete and utter disarray. There has been no word on exams in 2022 for the current year 10's despite huge disruption to their studies.
19
Bob
19/01/2021 14:43:59 34 37
bbc
My new born wishes to know what they'll be doing in 2039 and still no information.

This government is the worst on record.
25
Mum
19/01/2021 14:46:12 11 6
bbc
It's a nightmare. Year 11's, by half term, will have missed six months of GCSE work and they haven't even figured out yet how they will be assessed. Not the detail anyway. The kids don't know where they are.
47
19/01/2021 14:53:47 9 4
bbc
You can't have one policy on anything Covid related. The situation is fluid and evolving, so policies have to be amended in the light of this.
159
19/01/2021 15:19:38 8 1
bbc
'If only they could decide on one policy and stick to it.'

Yeah - you go and talk to the virus and tell it very sternly to stop replicating and mutating.
15
19/01/2021 14:42:28 125 66
bbc
Not good enough! Our kids need to be back at school, learning, socialising and living. Sitting in front of a screen all day carrying out tasks they barely understand with little feedback from overstretched teachers struggling to teach kids still in school while setting work for those at home is NOT an education and quite frankly not healthy
23
19/01/2021 14:45:25 93 48
bbc
My kids have really enjoyed home learning - as have I. What you describe has not been my experience at all.
27
19/01/2021 14:46:29 40 21
bbc
I don't think anyone disagrees with you, but nearly 90,000 people have died from COVID-19. Don't you understand that we're being asked to save lives - or don't you think lives are important?
35
19/01/2021 14:49:44 29 7
bbc
I disagreed - my kids actually really enjoyed their classes - they are far more relax in their own environment (home, with a blanket etc) and for the 5-10mins I have listened it the classes were actually really informative and interesting.
157
Ben
19/01/2021 15:19:23 18 11
bbc
Sitting in front of a screen all day carrying out tasks they barely understand with little feedback - sounds like what a lot of people do for a job, so ideal preparation for the world of work, I'd have thought.

Schools open and infection rockets. That happens and people get ill. The effects of the illness aren't simply measured in deaths. 1 in 4 in hospital today with Covid are under 55.
172
19/01/2021 15:23:26 12 2
bbc
You just described the average workplace.
180
19/01/2021 15:24:59 26 12
bbc
Yes, your children should be back at school - and so should many people be back at their jobs, and so should people be able to meet families and friends as before.

But unfortunately there's a pandemic happening. Are you saying schools should be a special case and to hell with increasing infections and consequent deaths? Nobody wants them closed out of choice.
209
CJ
19/01/2021 15:34:29 10 7
bbc
Education can be caught up, lives cannot!
I fully understand the social aspects but we need to get on top of this virus otherwise their social life will continue to be disrupted!
223
19/01/2021 15:40:26 10 1
bbc
Their generation will be far stronger than us because of what they're going through now. They will be more tolerant and understanding and have a far better grasp of ethics and kindness than elder, frankly rude, generations.

Children will have great futures if we put in the effort at home now but just focusing on the inconvenience.

Isn't the whole point of raising Children to be better than us?
280
19/01/2021 16:03:05 3 5
bbc
It may not be healthy but it trains them for a bleak future working life.
334
19/01/2021 16:19:16 4 1
bbc
Nor is spreading a deadly pandemic.
355
19/01/2021 16:27:43 6 1
bbc
you're talking like they closed schools for the fun of it.
388
19/01/2021 16:40:08 4 1
bbc
WHATTTT? What about the huge transmission between kids, passing it from family to family?
422
19/01/2021 16:51:09 4 1
bbc
Children need parental interaction. It is perfectly feasible that parents can also help their children as well. As someone who is at risk I consider it a threat to life when I read posts like this.
480
SML
19/01/2021 17:16:10 2 2
bbc
I couldn't agree more! My son son needs to be back in school as soon as possible. He is not motivated to learn at home and is reluctant pupil at the best of times.
568
19/01/2021 21:09:56 2 0
bbc
What's not healthy is bringing home the virus to their parents who are going to be more vulnerable. I agree kids need to be in school but changes need to be made to make them safer - social distancing, masks worn in classrooms and much lower daily cases than we have at the moment. Then we can think about sending kids back to school.
4
19/01/2021 14:38:35 83 40
bbc
We have seen any attempt at tiers fail - far better to just wait until nationally we are in a good position and then reopen. Home education is working for many now so better to leave be rather than to open up and then to lockdown again a month or two later.
16
Bob
19/01/2021 14:42:56 11 4
bbc
Third time's a charm then? Tiers did not fail in and of themselves. The tier system did help to bring down cases in the North West - but not at first. It took reinforcing it to bring that about. With lessons learned (perhaps wishful thinking) tiering can work.

If we see a repeat of the NW where only one region is suffering there's little point reducing the rest of the country to misery.
17
19/01/2021 14:43:40 7 6
bbc
Yet another stupid idea!
The teacher who lives across from us is really enjoying her Covid holiday thank you very much... Removed
18
19/01/2021 14:43:55 26 5
bbc
That's odd because all the teachers I know are working doubly hard as they are in school (all schools have the children of key workers) as well as taking zoom classes and setting homework for the kids at home. Anyone would think you were making it up!
123
19/01/2021 15:11:36 2 2
bbc
Correct, my other half is a special needs teacher. All students are therfore eligible to attend school. Some are shielding for medical reasons but still need online teaching. Is in school by 7.45 to answer emails etc. and send lessons out. Closed the laptop last night at 8.45. So don't tell me teachers are not working. No PPE either in Special Schools and try telling a child with ASD to distance!
14
19/01/2021 14:42:20 38 8
bbc
If only they could decide on one policy and stick to it. Education is in complete and utter disarray. There has been no word on exams in 2022 for the current year 10's despite huge disruption to their studies.
19
Bob
19/01/2021 14:43:59 34 37
bbc
My new born wishes to know what they'll be doing in 2039 and still no information.

This government is the worst on record.
76
19/01/2021 14:59:46 5 1
bbc
Lockdown 43.v2?
20
19/01/2021 14:44:10 61 32
bbc
Where I live, the infection rate has significantly nosedived since the primary schools were close. The little spreaders need to stay at home at least until Easter.
34
Bob
19/01/2021 14:49:31 33 8
bbc
And restaurants shut. Pubs shut. Cinemas shut. No longer allowed to visit someone's home. No longer allowed outside in groups. No longer should be working when you can do so from home. And so on and so on.
58
19/01/2021 14:54:43 8 11
bbc
Do you have any kids I wonder, of primary school age?
67
19/01/2021 14:58:30 13 4
bbc
You can’t attribute this only to schools having closed as other restrictive measures have been put in place too. The benefits of keeping schools closed need to be weighed against the impact on child obesity, physical and sexual abuse, education, physical and mental well-being and social skills.
86
19/01/2021 15:02:46 11 7
bbc
You are quite right. The mad profs say children can't spread it, but we know differently as my school teacher daughter it caught it from an early years child. Forget the science use common sense!
586
20/01/2021 13:54:12 0 0
bbc
I'm 14. My best friend is about to kill herself because she can't escape her homophobic parents. My 9yo brother is spending 12 hours a day on a screen. My exams could be cancelled and my future is falling to pieces around me, because the country is run by people like you, who won't even live long enough to see the consequences of their decisions on the mental health of the "little spreaders".
4
19/01/2021 14:38:35 83 40
bbc
We have seen any attempt at tiers fail - far better to just wait until nationally we are in a good position and then reopen. Home education is working for many now so better to leave be rather than to open up and then to lockdown again a month or two later.
21
19/01/2021 14:44:40 28 8
bbc
How can you say home education is working? It might be for you but I can assure you not for the majority. This is not like the last lockdown when the national curriculum was suspended - it is mandatory this time and children are obliged to engage in the full school day. So parents now get to start their own working day from 3pm..how earth is that sustainable? Not everyone is on furlough.
30
19/01/2021 14:48:41 11 15
bbc
I'm not on furlough - I haven't had a day on furlough. But I don't find it that hard to juggle home learning and work. I see what they need to do and give them a few pointers and then come back and see how things are going 20-30 mins later. And if I need to catch up with my work of an evening I do. It's all about compromise.
190
19/01/2021 15:29:32 3 3
bbc
How can you be 'assured for the majority'? any facts behind that?
22
19/01/2021 14:44:43 9 10
bbc
Home education does not really work and is a bit unfair
Have been a it critical of teachers and now think kids should get back to school BUT teachers should be jabbed first
144
19/01/2021 15:15:36 2 2
bbc
Can you imagine the mess if everyone wanted the vaccination before going back to work?
15
19/01/2021 14:42:28 125 66
bbc
Not good enough! Our kids need to be back at school, learning, socialising and living. Sitting in front of a screen all day carrying out tasks they barely understand with little feedback from overstretched teachers struggling to teach kids still in school while setting work for those at home is NOT an education and quite frankly not healthy
23
19/01/2021 14:45:25 93 48
bbc
My kids have really enjoyed home learning - as have I. What you describe has not been my experience at all.
130
19/01/2021 15:13:13 12 7
bbc
I'm glad you have - and some bits have been fun - I agree. When it was for a week or two it's managable. When it's for longer there are issues.
185
19/01/2021 15:27:08 29 9
bbc
Some parents cant manage their own children sadly. Treat school like day care, pretending its all about vital education
206
19/01/2021 15:33:32 14 7
bbc
It’s ok if you don’t need to work, but most parent’s do..
359
19/01/2021 16:29:20 2 0
bbc
This.
364
vee
19/01/2021 16:30:47 2 0
bbc
Same here!
386
19/01/2021 16:39:40 0 2
bbc
Not mine.. they hate me right now.
468
SML
19/01/2021 17:06:40 0 2
bbc
Lucky you
474
19/01/2021 17:10:56 0 2
bbc
You lucky person. Can't say the same about my kids. It's been very painful.
549
19/01/2021 18:56:29 2 0
bbc
As a teacher parents should have more to do with their children's education and become involved. Blending the learning is going to give better chances in a modern era and empower parents more to make educational decisions with academic institutions. This way teachers must be more creative and adaptable
3
19/01/2021 14:38:06 18 21
bbc
I do and have always agreed with Dr Harries statement(s) that there is no scientific evidence that school pupils have been, are or ever will be "a significant driver" of "large-scale community infections". Get the kids back as soon as possible and get teachers teaching properly.
24
VoR
19/01/2021 14:45:37 6 2
bbc
A) One school age group has the highest case rates of all age groups, so we know they transmit it a lot to each other. Why would we not expect them to transmit to adults? They may have lower viral loads but that's still enough to transmit in many cases.
B) Kids have been bringing viruses home to their households pretty much since mass schooling existed.
14
19/01/2021 14:42:20 38 8
bbc
If only they could decide on one policy and stick to it. Education is in complete and utter disarray. There has been no word on exams in 2022 for the current year 10's despite huge disruption to their studies.
25
Mum
19/01/2021 14:46:12 11 6
bbc
It's a nightmare. Year 11's, by half term, will have missed six months of GCSE work and they haven't even figured out yet how they will be assessed. Not the detail anyway. The kids don't know where they are.
40
19/01/2021 14:51:40 8 8
bbc
At home aren't they ?
There, that's that sorted.
44
Bob
19/01/2021 14:52:48 11 2
bbc
Ever heard of the phrase prepare for the worst, hope for the best? It seems no one currently in the education system has.

You don't need the detail. It changes nothing. You should still be learning the curriculum at home. Assume there will be an exam. If there is, you are prepared. If there isn't - result, free A* for you.
10
VoR
19/01/2021 14:41:19 63 6
bbc
The problem is, it's no good driving the rate down in one area if you allow it to rise in another. When you lift restrictions, it'll just return to the area you drove it down in, from the areas where it was allowed to rise.

Need a more joined up approach.
26
19/01/2021 14:46:16 32 4
bbc
As shown pre Christmas when London visited Oxfordshire for shopping and rates went sky high
15
19/01/2021 14:42:28 125 66
bbc
Not good enough! Our kids need to be back at school, learning, socialising and living. Sitting in front of a screen all day carrying out tasks they barely understand with little feedback from overstretched teachers struggling to teach kids still in school while setting work for those at home is NOT an education and quite frankly not healthy
27
19/01/2021 14:46:29 40 21
bbc
I don't think anyone disagrees with you, but nearly 90,000 people have died from COVID-19. Don't you understand that we're being asked to save lives - or don't you think lives are important?
74
19/01/2021 14:58:28 22 11
bbc
It's a difficult one. The younger generation whose rights are being completely ignored in this pandemic, will be asked to foot the Covid bill which runs to billions of pounds. For many years after the current 80 and 90-year olds have passed away, our kids will struggle with mental health issues, getting jobs, paying bills...I totally understand the need for a lockdown in the situation though...
174
19/01/2021 15:23:51 25 23
bbc
Nearly 90,0000 people have not died from COVID, when will people actually reaslise this??? Nearly 90,000 people have died within 28 days of a positive test with COVID having been mentioned. They have not all died from COVID, in fact, very, very few will have died from COVID, most died with it. Do you understand or will you blame a lack of education on your complete lack of understanding?
583
20/01/2021 13:43:47 0 0
bbc
Loads of people die from other viruses like flu every year, but the decision to put children's mental health and the economic future of our country before a few lives was made a long time ago, and we shouldn't be re-evaluating that decision because of one more virus. Don't you understand that children's mental health is at stake here - or don't you think their lives and pain are important too?
28
19/01/2021 14:47:50 111 29
bbc
I try to be balanced in my criticism of govt (re)action to the crisis, but as far as schools, high streets, travel (local and national) seem to be concerned I get the impression that their approach has been "let's try it and see what happens".

Some countries around the world have absolutely nailed Covid and handled it brilliantly - look to them, set aside your pride, learn lessons.
73
Bob
19/01/2021 14:59:16 87 23
bbc
The countries that have 'nailed it' are the countries that didn't receive much of the virus in the first place.

NZ is everyone's go-to poster child but remember that they locked down only a couple of days prior to us. Our genomic analysis showed we'd received at least 1,000 imports by that point. They'd received 3.

Germany was another go-to to make fairer comparisons, but now look at them.
81
19/01/2021 14:59:37 14 55
bbc
Boris has handled covid best of any country FACT ! End of
197
19/01/2021 15:31:55 7 6
bbc
yep the old throw it at the wall and see what sticks approach. I have said this all along and i get call a nut for it. If you ever watch South Park there is a bit in there when the 2007 recession hit where if a bank failed they would chop a chickens head off and where the body fell thats what they would do. I think we have adopted the South Park mentality. Though its real life not a cartoon
374
19/01/2021 16:34:53 3 1
bbc
The current government appear to be good at bluster and soundbites, and very little else. Great for getting elected, not so good for actually running the country.
461
19/01/2021 17:02:57 2 0
bbc
The countries of Asia have led the way, universal masks early on, educated population following guidelines rather than formulating ridiculous conspiracy theories...
12
Jem
19/01/2021 14:42:10 10 9
bbc
Are or ever will be are your words. No evidence means no data as yet. It doesn't mean any study shows there is no evidence.
29
Bob
19/01/2021 14:47:57 6 1
bbc
There is evidence. And PHE has made that evidence public. I suspect the reason you're turning a blind eye to it is because it doesn't sit with your preconceived view.

It found that in nearly all cases school age infections reflected the community at large, and not the other way around.

The new variant changes the dynamics a little in terms of scale, but the above remains true.
21
19/01/2021 14:44:40 28 8
bbc
How can you say home education is working? It might be for you but I can assure you not for the majority. This is not like the last lockdown when the national curriculum was suspended - it is mandatory this time and children are obliged to engage in the full school day. So parents now get to start their own working day from 3pm..how earth is that sustainable? Not everyone is on furlough.
30
19/01/2021 14:48:41 11 15
bbc
I'm not on furlough - I haven't had a day on furlough. But I don't find it that hard to juggle home learning and work. I see what they need to do and give them a few pointers and then come back and see how things are going 20-30 mins later. And if I need to catch up with my work of an evening I do. It's all about compromise.
119
19/01/2021 15:10:44 4 3
bbc
My current compromise involves me getting up at 6am and going to bed at 2am - then sleeping in all day Saturday. I do this because I believe in following the spirit of the rules and not the letter. I note several family with one key work and the other otherwise at home and sending there kids to schools. Basically if you try and do what's right you get shafted.
168
19/01/2021 15:21:35 3 3
bbc
Good to know your personal experience, which is one of millions, should become the benchmark.
192
19/01/2021 15:29:58 3 1
bbc
They dont want to hear that....
243
19/01/2021 15:47:37 2 2
bbc
Maybe you don't, but millions do.
31
19/01/2021 14:48:53 40 12
bbc
Keep as many adults and children apart until the vaccination programme is much further on. Better to stay as we are, than keep having time off for isolation. Schools have had ample time to get set up, after last year's lockdown.
And before anyone thinks I have no idea, we have 2 children, one with disabilities, we are self employed, unable to work at home, the struggle is real.
365
19/01/2021 16:31:29 23 5
bbc
No teacher should be expected to be in a class with 30+ sniffling children until 3 weeks after they have had their 2nd dose of vaccine.
32
19/01/2021 14:49:16 19 15
bbc
This is driven by stupidity, not for the children’s education but to get people back to work and spending. Why have we such a dire death rate? Because the squeeze on lives v economy has driven Boris&Co agendas.
45
19/01/2021 14:52:49 2 8
bbc
Well said mattlock , got it in one
77
19/01/2021 15:00:10 2 5
bbc
Indeed, whatever they say to the contrary this Tory governement really care for very few of their citizens.......
133
19/01/2021 15:14:03 5 1
bbc
You think it's stupid to get people back to work?

Aspire to a life on benefits?
33
19/01/2021 14:49:18 32 4
bbc
Our primary school does a wonderful job providing online lesson daily, marking work sent in and providing education packs. As a gran I’m bubbled with my daughter and granddaughters (6). I’m fully involved with their learning whilst my daughter works from home. This is not easy. Additionally, the children miss their friends.
I hope that they will be able to return to school ASAP, when COVID allows.
347
19/01/2021 16:25:15 35 2
bbc
Well done to the teachers, TAs and other school staff. Another group of workers too much undervalued by too many.
20
19/01/2021 14:44:10 61 32
bbc
Where I live, the infection rate has significantly nosedived since the primary schools were close. The little spreaders need to stay at home at least until Easter.
34
Bob
19/01/2021 14:49:31 33 8
bbc
And restaurants shut. Pubs shut. Cinemas shut. No longer allowed to visit someone's home. No longer allowed outside in groups. No longer should be working when you can do so from home. And so on and so on.
120
19/01/2021 15:10:55 0 3
bbc
Doppppppppy
15
19/01/2021 14:42:28 125 66
bbc
Not good enough! Our kids need to be back at school, learning, socialising and living. Sitting in front of a screen all day carrying out tasks they barely understand with little feedback from overstretched teachers struggling to teach kids still in school while setting work for those at home is NOT an education and quite frankly not healthy
35
19/01/2021 14:49:44 29 7
bbc
I disagreed - my kids actually really enjoyed their classes - they are far more relax in their own environment (home, with a blanket etc) and for the 5-10mins I have listened it the classes were actually really informative and interesting.
213
19/01/2021 15:35:44 12 11
bbc
Learning in their pjs or under a blanket is not conducive to a good learning environment. May be ok for a week or 2 but longer then that it just doesn’t work. Fact
36
19/01/2021 14:50:02 4 5
bbc
Perhaps it’s a good idea. Opening up the schools in the north in February but leaving those in London and the SE shut until September would be a good start at ‘levelling up’?
84
19/01/2021 15:02:13 1 4
bbc
Can't have some open and some not. It's all or nothing. We need to do away with the tier system as it's proven it doesn't work as people still break the rules by going to lower tiered places. Schools re open in September, no earlier!
37
19/01/2021 14:49:06 13 11
bbc
Kids are the spreaders, but are allowed into supermarkets with no masks - you work it out!
50
19/01/2021 14:54:24 12 4
bbc
Primary children do not produce anywhere near the viral load that would class them as spreaders. The adults are the spreaders
51
19/01/2021 14:55:22 9 3
bbc
They’re not ‘the spreaders’. Yes, they will spread the virus but the evidence suggests they do not spread it as effectively as adults.
53
19/01/2021 14:52:19 7 5
bbc
Primary school age children are not spreaders, there is a huge amount of evidence to support that. As long as they/you keep your distance, you should be fine!
78
19/01/2021 15:00:20 3 1
bbc
Seen far more adults in supermarkets without masks. We do not take out children shopping at all
193
19/01/2021 15:30:03 3 2
bbc
Several very recent studies would agree, though the Icelandic study from December reckoned that the transition amongst children was half that of adults.

The new strain is much more transmissible however, which would put children *at least* around that of adults for the old strain, assuming that the 50% value from the participating children in that study was in equivalent crowding in classrooms.
38
19/01/2021 14:50:20 7 5
bbc
She needs to stick to the day job and get jabbing!
39
19/01/2021 14:51:07 22 13
bbc
As usual HYS full of rubbish......for months everyone has been complaining that the Government wasn't following the science. Now the science is starting to say that some schools could go back, lots now saying the Government shouldn't follow the science and should keep schools closed. Make your mind up!!!!!!
158
19/01/2021 15:19:34 9 13
bbc
Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda.

Normal Labour supporters then.
25
Mum
19/01/2021 14:46:12 11 6
bbc
It's a nightmare. Year 11's, by half term, will have missed six months of GCSE work and they haven't even figured out yet how they will be assessed. Not the detail anyway. The kids don't know where they are.
40
19/01/2021 14:51:40 8 8
bbc
At home aren't they ?
There, that's that sorted.
587
20/01/2021 15:17:52 0 0
bbc
No it isn’t. This is their future. These exams decide what they can do next and we have sacrificed children’s aspirations. Online learning is not as effective as face to face teaching. I teach chemistry, try demonstrating the reactions of halides and concentrated acid on your kitchen table.
41
19/01/2021 14:51:45 7 5
bbc
Home learning distinguishes the wheat from the chaff.
It is the great divider.
Pros or cons? Depends upon which side of the fence you are.
183
19/01/2021 15:26:12 4 4
bbc
It distinguishes those with a quiet space to work from those who share a bedroom, those with access to dictionaries and documentaries from those without, those with parents can support their learning from those who are carers for their parents or siblings. Home learning definitely widen the gaps but these are not the fault of the children, and do not reflect their abilities and potential.
3
19/01/2021 14:38:06 18 21
bbc
I do and have always agreed with Dr Harries statement(s) that there is no scientific evidence that school pupils have been, are or ever will be "a significant driver" of "large-scale community infections". Get the kids back as soon as possible and get teachers teaching properly.
42
19/01/2021 14:52:00 4 2
bbc
Try telling that to my son in law when 7 members of staff at his small staff when down with it on the last day of term as well as some pupils. One still very ill.
43
19/01/2021 14:52:07 24 7
bbc
"The new, more transmissible variant of the virus had been increasing *exponentially* in London...."

Meaningless. A bank account paying 1% per year has a balance increasing "exponentially". It just means "at a fixed rate", or "compounded". if infections were rising at 1 % a year it would be much less serious than "doubling every week".

Journalists have a responsibility to use the correct words.
63
19/01/2021 14:57:10 16 6
bbc
Maybe the journalist learnt through distance learning - would explain a lot about BBC journalists.
75
19/01/2021 14:59:43 1 5
bbc
I think everyone knows what it means by now, regardless of the maths. I mean technically, if R is under 1 it is still exponential even though the increase is getting smaller, but exponential is understood outside of technical use to mean that the increase is getting bigger and not the same each day.

What word would you use?
93
19/01/2021 15:03:49 4 1
bbc
Loosely speaking a rapid increase. More accurately defined by the appropriate mathematical formula. What you are describing is compound interest, which may, or may not be rapid, depending on the interest rate.
Comment contributors have a 'responsibility to use the correct word'.
25
Mum
19/01/2021 14:46:12 11 6
bbc
It's a nightmare. Year 11's, by half term, will have missed six months of GCSE work and they haven't even figured out yet how they will be assessed. Not the detail anyway. The kids don't know where they are.
44
Bob
19/01/2021 14:52:48 11 2
bbc
Ever heard of the phrase prepare for the worst, hope for the best? It seems no one currently in the education system has.

You don't need the detail. It changes nothing. You should still be learning the curriculum at home. Assume there will be an exam. If there is, you are prepared. If there isn't - result, free A* for you.
295
19/01/2021 16:06:20 5 5
bbc
Not that simple - y11s currently feel that every thing they touch could be the make or break piece of work. Its unsustainable pressure - like sitting their exams every single day. They need clarity as to which "worst case" they are working towards.
32
19/01/2021 14:49:16 19 15
bbc
This is driven by stupidity, not for the children’s education but to get people back to work and spending. Why have we such a dire death rate? Because the squeeze on lives v economy has driven Boris&Co agendas.
45
19/01/2021 14:52:49 2 8
bbc
Well said mattlock , got it in one
46
19/01/2021 14:53:08 5 3
bbc
Unfortunately, stopping spread in schools largely comes down to individual behaviour. There is no point having notices up reminding all to wear masks in communal areas, having hand gels everywhere and all the other written guidance, when it is all too frequently ignored (not just by the pupils either).
14
19/01/2021 14:42:20 38 8
bbc
If only they could decide on one policy and stick to it. Education is in complete and utter disarray. There has been no word on exams in 2022 for the current year 10's despite huge disruption to their studies.
47
19/01/2021 14:53:47 9 4
bbc
You can't have one policy on anything Covid related. The situation is fluid and evolving, so policies have to be amended in the light of this.
68
19/01/2021 14:58:50 7 9
bbc
Complete and utter balderdash, how can you undertake a two year course not knowing how, or what, you will be examined on. Its exactly that sort of thinking which has lead to the mess education is in today.
The teacher who lives across from us is really enjoying her Covid holiday thank you very much... Removed
48
19/01/2021 14:50:47 1 3
bbc
So she has been ill ?

How about some empathy, Mrs Grump ?
The teacher who lives across from us is really enjoying her Covid holiday thank you very much... Removed
49
bec
19/01/2021 14:51:07 3 3
bbc
What an unhelpful and bitter attitude. Any teacher I know has worked tirelessly throughout each lockdown with video lessons and student / family support to add. Each of those that I have spoken to have found this thankless when surrounded by furloughed neighbours sitting in gardens drinking all spring 2020 and having an extended Christmas this year. Teachers teach because they care.
37
19/01/2021 14:49:06 13 11
bbc
Kids are the spreaders, but are allowed into supermarkets with no masks - you work it out!
50
19/01/2021 14:54:24 12 4
bbc
Primary children do not produce anywhere near the viral load that would class them as spreaders. The adults are the spreaders
37
19/01/2021 14:49:06 13 11
bbc
Kids are the spreaders, but are allowed into supermarkets with no masks - you work it out!
51
19/01/2021 14:55:22 9 3
bbc
They’re not ‘the spreaders’. Yes, they will spread the virus but the evidence suggests they do not spread it as effectively as adults.
232
19/01/2021 15:43:23 3 1
bbc
Except within the home. Sage minutes from December show that children are more likely to spread the virus within the home and be the first person to bring it into the home. Especially secondary age children
52
19/01/2021 14:55:30 41 5
bbc
If Primary schools aren't going to reopen at Feb half term (which I accept they can't if the situation in hospitals isn't improving). Then the simple truth is that we can't reopen at all if the Govt is going to stick by it's promise that education would close last and open first.

If those advocating schools not reopening till Easter are happy for everything else to be closed till May that's fine!
92
19/01/2021 15:03:42 11 2
bbc
Absolutely, well said!
212
19/01/2021 15:33:23 3 2
bbc
Everything needs to be closed for ever. Once COVID is over, people will realise there are lots of other causes to death to stay at home to avoid.
411
19/01/2021 16:47:40 3 4
bbc
You're right of course... but if we keep everything closed until May that'll be GAME OVER for millions. They'll either be bankrupt, kill themselves or turn to a life of crime (or even all 3). This unjustifiable imprisonment cannot go on any longer. It's that simple. If you want to shield then go ahead... but let everyone else live.

I don't know how we've struggled on this long to be honest...
427
19/01/2021 16:51:49 1 2
bbc
If we keep schools (and therefore logically everything else) closed until Easter this country is FINISHED.

It's that simple folks.

FINISHED.
593
20/01/2021 19:45:10 0 0
bbc
yes, nothing should open until Easter
37
19/01/2021 14:49:06 13 11
bbc
Kids are the spreaders, but are allowed into supermarkets with no masks - you work it out!
53
19/01/2021 14:52:19 7 5
bbc
Primary school age children are not spreaders, there is a huge amount of evidence to support that. As long as they/you keep your distance, you should be fine!
54
19/01/2021 14:53:12 12 15
bbc
So many on here don't care about kids being uneducated. I guess it must be that if they don't get an education they're more likely to vote Labour in the future.
72
19/01/2021 14:59:09 6 8
bbc
Hilarious considering the most educated minds in this country vote labour. Thought we were brain washing your kids into becoming liberals? Make your mind up.
95
19/01/2021 15:03:54 3 3
bbc
What a nasty, pointless comment! You only have to look at the USA to see clearly in which direction the uneducated vote.
The teacher who lives across from us is really enjoying her Covid holiday thank you very much... Removed
55
Rob
19/01/2021 14:53:29 4 3
bbc
We don't enjoy being stuck at home. I work with kids who have difficulty accessing the curriculum, which is impossible to do remotely. I go to work masked and in a shield. Anyone can chose a different place to shop, but some kids have no choice about their education. If the government wants kids in school, it has to provide the means to allow schools to stay open.
56
19/01/2021 14:56:02 40 10
bbc
We didn’t lock down soon enough was shouted by everyone.

Then we go into lock down.

When are we coming out of lock down is then shouted by everyone!!!!!!

Make your minds up.
169
Ben
19/01/2021 15:22:20 25 6
bbc
The is the press's fault - including the BBC.
Every day for the last week on the Radio 4 programmes I listen to, supposedly educated interviewers have been pushing politicians and scientists for a re-opening date. WHY? The Govt eventually succumb to this pressure, infections rise, long-terms health effects rocket and people die. 1 in 4 in hospital with Covid are under 55.
57
19/01/2021 14:56:16 64 9
bbc
To be fair: Keeping the schools closed will cause fewer problems than opening them now just to close them again in a month.

Whatever you do, give people a chance to plan ahead. A situation where you announce that schools will close wit a one day notice - just like two weeks ago - is absolutely unacceptable.
316
19/01/2021 16:13:13 21 6
bbc
whatever this Govt decides, it will be last minute, on the hoof, and a reaction to what Scotland, Wales and NI will have already done.
479
19/01/2021 17:15:49 4 1
bbc
It is very misleading to refer to the schools as 'closed'. They are open and teaching a reduced number of children on site, although in some schools a high percentage of pupils are in because they are either vulnerable or their parents are key workers.
584
20/01/2021 13:47:14 1 1
bbc
Schools need to open whenever possible to give kids the social contact that could save lives. A surprising amount of teenagers struggle with mental health, and I'm sure we've lost far more kids' lives than we realise from this poor management of the schools, run by people like you who would rather kill kids than deal with a bit of hassle.
20
19/01/2021 14:44:10 61 32
bbc
Where I live, the infection rate has significantly nosedived since the primary schools were close. The little spreaders need to stay at home at least until Easter.
58
19/01/2021 14:54:43 8 11
bbc
Do you have any kids I wonder, of primary school age?
121
19/01/2021 15:10:59 2 1
bbc
I have grandchildren whose classes were only half full due to the rest isolating.
There is no joined up thinking from these clowns.Keep the schools closed until all clear is sounded.The kids can remain in school another year , which apparently won't do the male pupils any harm at all , as many of them do not have functioning brains until they reach 16 or 17 . Removed
96
19/01/2021 15:04:17 0 1
bbc
Where do you propose they put the new cohort in the broom cupboard? Likewise who’s going to teach them?
60
19/01/2021 14:57:16 11 9
bbc
Teachers and school staff should be pushed higher up the list than previously if schools are first to open. Both seems sensible to me.
112
19/01/2021 15:07:51 5 2
bbc
Trouble is there are many sectors who believe that they should be a higher priority than others.
61
19/01/2021 14:57:28 25 7
bbc
You hear a lot about ensuring “safety” in schools (even though it’s impossible to remove all risk). You hear about parents’ difficulties in working when schools are closed. You hear very little about the extent to which our children are slipping behind, how this will carry through their whole school life, and how that’s going to be rectified. Why? There’s no actual plan ...
125
19/01/2021 15:12:21 41 8
bbc
I wouldn't worry too much about the latter. Children raised as refugees and in concentration camps have become doctors and scientists.
405
19/01/2021 16:45:39 5 2
bbc
"Slipping behind" doesn't exist. Everyone is in the same boat. Slipping behind is the new "norm".
62
19/01/2021 14:57:41 14 6
bbc
Before Christmas, many school students were inadvertently bringing Covid-19 home & spreading it around their families. This was one major factor in the spread of the virus before Christmas! I don't think Dr Harries is being truthful about this! Is she just trying to back up Boris Johnsonov's "schools are safe" apparent lie on Sunday 3rd January? I don't have any confidence in Dr Harries' advice!
137
19/01/2021 15:14:24 4 2
bbc
Do you have any confidence with any of these advisers ?
43
19/01/2021 14:52:07 24 7
bbc
"The new, more transmissible variant of the virus had been increasing *exponentially* in London...."

Meaningless. A bank account paying 1% per year has a balance increasing "exponentially". It just means "at a fixed rate", or "compounded". if infections were rising at 1 % a year it would be much less serious than "doubling every week".

Journalists have a responsibility to use the correct words.
63
19/01/2021 14:57:10 16 6
bbc
Maybe the journalist learnt through distance learning - would explain a lot about BBC journalists.
64
19/01/2021 14:57:38 4 10
bbc
Just to make sure the virus keeps spreading they will open all the schools.Covid must be the best money making bug ever.
179
19/01/2021 15:24:34 2 2
bbc
What a ridiculous suggestion
65
19/01/2021 14:57:58 8 8
bbc
Nothing changed here the government is still not following the science. Schools are a risk to us all in the propagation of this virus, it may not affect the children but it does their teachers, who can not socially space or wear facecoverings in the classroom. Also the children can pass it on to their at risk parents and grandparents.
66
mj
19/01/2021 14:58:22 1 8
bbc
Great get the schools open but then offer vaccines to all schools kids on day one of their return, the over 50s aren't super spreaders and apart from some mindless morons they all know what the rules are, Children can't fully understand the rules (never will) so stop them being the super spreaders, simple logic.
88
Bob
19/01/2021 15:02:53 5 1
bbc
The vaccines are not approved for under 18s.
127
19/01/2021 15:12:37 0 2
bbc
Appreciate your thoughts but don't you it takes a while after the jab before protection. Like months
20
19/01/2021 14:44:10 61 32
bbc
Where I live, the infection rate has significantly nosedived since the primary schools were close. The little spreaders need to stay at home at least until Easter.
67
19/01/2021 14:58:30 13 4
bbc
You can’t attribute this only to schools having closed as other restrictive measures have been put in place too. The benefits of keeping schools closed need to be weighed against the impact on child obesity, physical and sexual abuse, education, physical and mental well-being and social skills.
367
19/01/2021 16:32:02 6 0
bbc
Actually we can attribute this to schools being closed. In many parts of the country, around here included, we have been in Tier 3/4 for months and months. Pretty much the only things that have remained open were schools. With schools closed, cases are falling.
47
19/01/2021 14:53:47 9 4
bbc
You can't have one policy on anything Covid related. The situation is fluid and evolving, so policies have to be amended in the light of this.
68
19/01/2021 14:58:50 7 9
bbc
Complete and utter balderdash, how can you undertake a two year course not knowing how, or what, you will be examined on. Its exactly that sort of thinking which has lead to the mess education is in today.
141
19/01/2021 15:14:40 12 4
bbc
Here is the news. Regardless of what the exam looks like, the curriculum wont change. Learn it. The problem is that nowadays students expect to be spoon fed what questions they'll be asked and how to answer them.
207
Bob
19/01/2021 15:33:49 8 2
bbc
You don't know what you will be in an exam during a normal year. An exam never covers the entire syllabus.

You should still, from home, be attempting to learn the whole thing as best you can. If you don't, you will come unstuck later on at uni or in work.

'Sorry boss, I never learnt that bit because it wasn't going to come up in an exam, can you give me a different task?'

No.
6
19/01/2021 14:38:44 59 7
bbc
Setting up the Education Secretary for the inevitable U turn?
69
19/01/2021 14:58:58 30 13
bbc
This peer reviewed study from Stanford University concludes that whilst low intervention measures such as hygiene and SD did have an effect on the spread of the virus, full Lockdown did not.
Had the paper arrived at the opposite conclusion I can't help thinking it would be widely reported.
The fact that it has not been, should worry us all
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/eci.13484
87
19/01/2021 15:02:51 13 9
bbc
Erm worked in NZ, Australia, IOM etc etc
178
Bob
19/01/2021 15:24:29 10 6
bbc
Having just read this paper it seems to be making the wrong conclusions. It seems too preoccupied with deaths in vulnerable settings (care homes, hospitals) and highlights how during stay-at-home measures these do not fall away.

Well of course not - the nurses and carers are not staying home!

It further requires idealistic behaviour in SD and hygiene. Stricter measures force that upon people.
218
19/01/2021 15:37:55 2 4
bbc
They only looked at England, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, South Korea, Sweden, & USA, and South Korea was the only one that did well with a lot of that due to the attitudes of the population as a whole, Sweden the only which at first had little measures is bad. Of the 8 that did, compliance was often late or poor. UK/US abysmal
Compare to Vietnam, Australia, NZ, Thailand.
263
19/01/2021 15:54:40 8 8
bbc
The evidence that lockdown reduces infections is irrefutable - just look at the graphs that show infections going down once lockdown has taken effect, then rising when lockdown is lifted without management measures being in place. Lockdown works. The reason thousands are dying every day after 3 lockdowns is the total failure of government to manage the pandemic between lockdowns.
333
19/01/2021 16:18:58 5 3
bbc
Could not agree more. I assume that this version of 'science' is not worthy of 'following' as it doesn't support the mainstream narrative. Of course it is far too late for any government to even consider accepting that, perhaps, lock-downs were not needed. Future analysis will, hopefully, add some much needed perspective.
472
19/01/2021 17:08:15 1 0
bbc
The paper doesn't speak to the compliance with lockdowns and the affect that might have.

If everyone did what they, at heart, knew what they had to do, rather than finding convoluted loopholes, I suspect the more restrictive Non Pharmaceutical Interventions may be more successful than the authors suggest.
70
19/01/2021 14:59:02 7 16
bbc
Let's be honest, realistically, they cannot reopen schools until after the summer holidays, when hopefully most people will be vaccinated. Opening early will cause early spreads and will be looking at lockdown 4 about may. This has to be the last lockdown, so let's get it right!
89
19/01/2021 15:02:58 5 3
bbc
Hi Rutland 3 please could you post links to the academic research that shows Primary school children are the carriers of this infection. It's just however hard I try I can't find any academic research that backs up your assertion. Meanwhile there is plenty of material now being produced that adults are passing it to each other predominantly in indoor settings.
122
19/01/2021 15:11:04 0 2
bbc
We all know this but GW doesn't understand. Petition to get rid of him urgently needed
71
19/01/2021 14:59:03 1 6
bbc
All teachers and parents/guardians should be receive the vaccine,and then after the incubation period lets get back to learning safely.
54
19/01/2021 14:53:12 12 15
bbc
So many on here don't care about kids being uneducated. I guess it must be that if they don't get an education they're more likely to vote Labour in the future.
72
19/01/2021 14:59:09 6 8
bbc
Hilarious considering the most educated minds in this country vote labour. Thought we were brain washing your kids into becoming liberals? Make your mind up.
28
19/01/2021 14:47:50 111 29
bbc
I try to be balanced in my criticism of govt (re)action to the crisis, but as far as schools, high streets, travel (local and national) seem to be concerned I get the impression that their approach has been "let's try it and see what happens".

Some countries around the world have absolutely nailed Covid and handled it brilliantly - look to them, set aside your pride, learn lessons.
73
Bob
19/01/2021 14:59:16 87 23
bbc
The countries that have 'nailed it' are the countries that didn't receive much of the virus in the first place.

NZ is everyone's go-to poster child but remember that they locked down only a couple of days prior to us. Our genomic analysis showed we'd received at least 1,000 imports by that point. They'd received 3.

Germany was another go-to to make fairer comparisons, but now look at them.
165
19/01/2021 15:20:53 21 25
bbc
"Germany was another go-to to make fairer comparisons, but now look at them."

Yes Germany has half the deaths and half the economic damage, I'm not too sure your argument holds water. Also didn't the UK response start once BJ got back from the 2 week holiday he took in Feb while the 1000+ infections were doing the same thing?
188
19/01/2021 15:29:13 15 17
bbc
What happened in Germany? Looks much much better than us. Even a couple of weeks ago they only had half of what were were getting in cases. Im lost.
214
19/01/2021 15:36:05 16 5
bbc
And why do you suppose they didn't get many cases AFTER they locked down?? Could it be anything to do with not allowing anyone with even the potential to be carrying the virus, into the country with freedom to roam?
This country has allowed anyone to come and go "as long as they promise to self isolate". Bonkers. Should have shut all airports months ago, in and out of the country.
250
19/01/2021 15:50:06 5 5
bbc
Accept your point but the figures show our performance has been worse than anyone else,for example,highest death rate per million of population
254
19/01/2021 15:51:32 4 4
bbc
Still doing much better than us and gave us the Pfizer vaccine
255
19/01/2021 15:52:50 0 1
bbc
'Look at them'. This isn't a contest. We are all human beings.
269
19/01/2021 15:58:32 4 4
bbc
UK has been one of the worst; they have made few sensible decisions but we have a lower competence government so it is in part to be expected. But their traits of blaming everyone else, refusal to accept they made a mistake, refusal to learn from mistakes/good practive, blatantly making promises they know can't be met, are all things they can correct despite their low competence.
348
19/01/2021 16:25:50 4 0
bbc
They closed their borders Bob, we saw it as a great excuse to get a cheap holiday. NZ lockdown EVERYTHING for 6 weeks, we said 'don't go to work unless you can't' at which point everyone went back to work where possible. Oz still has a 14 day quarantine, we get told to stay at home unless we need to go shopping once we come back from holiday. UK never locked down, we half baked closed shop.
383
19/01/2021 16:38:33 1 2
bbc
Germany still have around half the Coronavirus cases of the UK and half the deaths, but a much larger population. Just about everywhere ( except those others with right wing Govts, e.g. USA and Brazil) has handled the pandemic far more successfully than the UK.
401
19/01/2021 16:44:10 2 1
bbc
Yeah but we didn't close our borders! New Zealand did and they kept them closed for sometime. We didn't do it because Boris didn't have the cahonas to do it
512
SJ
19/01/2021 17:36:42 0 0
bbc
Bob, Parts of the USA have hendked covid well, despite the porous borders between states and counties.
27
19/01/2021 14:46:29 40 21
bbc
I don't think anyone disagrees with you, but nearly 90,000 people have died from COVID-19. Don't you understand that we're being asked to save lives - or don't you think lives are important?
74
19/01/2021 14:58:28 22 11
bbc
It's a difficult one. The younger generation whose rights are being completely ignored in this pandemic, will be asked to foot the Covid bill which runs to billions of pounds. For many years after the current 80 and 90-year olds have passed away, our kids will struggle with mental health issues, getting jobs, paying bills...I totally understand the need for a lockdown in the situation though...
43
19/01/2021 14:52:07 24 7
bbc
"The new, more transmissible variant of the virus had been increasing *exponentially* in London...."

Meaningless. A bank account paying 1% per year has a balance increasing "exponentially". It just means "at a fixed rate", or "compounded". if infections were rising at 1 % a year it would be much less serious than "doubling every week".

Journalists have a responsibility to use the correct words.
75
19/01/2021 14:59:43 1 5
bbc
I think everyone knows what it means by now, regardless of the maths. I mean technically, if R is under 1 it is still exponential even though the increase is getting smaller, but exponential is understood outside of technical use to mean that the increase is getting bigger and not the same each day.

What word would you use?
19
Bob
19/01/2021 14:43:59 34 37
bbc
My new born wishes to know what they'll be doing in 2039 and still no information.

This government is the worst on record.
76
19/01/2021 14:59:46 5 1
bbc
Lockdown 43.v2?
32
19/01/2021 14:49:16 19 15
bbc
This is driven by stupidity, not for the children’s education but to get people back to work and spending. Why have we such a dire death rate? Because the squeeze on lives v economy has driven Boris&Co agendas.
77
19/01/2021 15:00:10 2 5
bbc
Indeed, whatever they say to the contrary this Tory governement really care for very few of their citizens.......
136
19/01/2021 15:14:23 3 1
bbc
What, by wanting them to work?
37
19/01/2021 14:49:06 13 11
bbc
Kids are the spreaders, but are allowed into supermarkets with no masks - you work it out!
78
19/01/2021 15:00:20 3 1
bbc
Seen far more adults in supermarkets without masks. We do not take out children shopping at all
79
W 6
19/01/2021 15:00:53 1 5
bbc
At the time tiers made sense - it seemed absurd that Cornwall went into lockdown for instance because cases were on the rise in Liverpool. However, the results of how effective they are were at best inconclusive. I think schools opening needs to be done on a national level, and as soon as possible too - they should be the very first thing to go back. Kids' educations have been disrupted enough.
13
19/01/2021 14:42:18 19 16
bbc
To my mind it's not a case of how safe the kids are or the degree to which they spread the virus (although both are clearly important) - it's more a case that open schools give the green light to parents and families to mix and that's where the problem lies. So let's keep the schools closed at least until Easter and then review things for a health (and not a political) perspective.
80
19/01/2021 14:59:26 9 8
bbc
How about reviewing things from the children's perspective, for once? Do they not count, they are the future?
28
19/01/2021 14:47:50 111 29
bbc
I try to be balanced in my criticism of govt (re)action to the crisis, but as far as schools, high streets, travel (local and national) seem to be concerned I get the impression that their approach has been "let's try it and see what happens".

Some countries around the world have absolutely nailed Covid and handled it brilliantly - look to them, set aside your pride, learn lessons.
81
19/01/2021 14:59:37 14 55
bbc
Boris has handled covid best of any country FACT ! End of
134
19/01/2021 15:12:11 34 29
bbc
No country will come out of this is the paragon of virus control. Our Government has made mistakes but so have all the others. Its about time the constant moaners realised that their socialist utopia wont come about simply by constantly trying to conince us that it will, or that the opposition would have or could have done better.
151
19/01/2021 15:17:24 26 7
bbc
Errr.....On what evidence or measure would you base that claim?
I must assume that your comment is ironic.
Then I see your username.....
171
19/01/2021 15:23:06 12 5
bbc
Really? On what basis?
210
19/01/2021 15:34:46 18 6
bbc
Look at Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Vietnam. All had much closer links to China and all have very few deaths. What they did have (even Vietnam) is effective testing, tracing and isolation procedures.
239
19/01/2021 15:45:59 11 10
bbc
Fact Boris is the worst prime minister this country as ever had. He has overseen a true UK death toll approaching 120,000 & climbing. At every level there as been gross incompetence & fraud & he hasn't even delivered his promised Brexit that's turned out to be a bad version of BRINO
82
19/01/2021 15:00:45 7 8
bbc
I think the priority should be to re-open the economy, not schools. Before long, there will be no jobs for young people to go into. When you look at the 'inflections' graph, the increase in infections coincided with them reopening in September.
94
Bob
19/01/2021 15:03:51 5 5
bbc
And how do you reopen the economy with parents stuck at home making sure their children are being taught?
102
19/01/2021 15:05:11 2 1
bbc
the nail on the head you have hit
143
19/01/2021 15:15:21 0 1
bbc
COVID Cases on 2nd Sept (schools go back) - 338,676
COVID Cases on 21st Sept (Unis go back) - 399,045 (roughly +20%)
COVID Cases 19 days later (10th October) - 590,844 (roughly +50%)

It was the decision to let the largest internal migration that happens every year go ahead as normal that led to the surge just before the weather got worse.

That's what I got from the graph.
83
19/01/2021 15:02:07 16 7
bbc
Schools may reopen region by region, says medical adviser = Virus will start to spread again region by region says common sense
114
19/01/2021 15:08:39 8 8
bbc
Then so be it. Let those who are vulnerable isolate themselves if they so desire, and let's invest in our collective future by educating the nations kids.
115
19/01/2021 15:08:57 2 4
bbc
So accept it and get on with it. Thought people would have learned this by now.
36
19/01/2021 14:50:02 4 5
bbc
Perhaps it’s a good idea. Opening up the schools in the north in February but leaving those in London and the SE shut until September would be a good start at ‘levelling up’?
84
19/01/2021 15:02:13 1 4
bbc
Can't have some open and some not. It's all or nothing. We need to do away with the tier system as it's proven it doesn't work as people still break the rules by going to lower tiered places. Schools re open in September, no earlier!
85
19/01/2021 15:02:45 5 14
bbc
As parents of 11, 13 & 15 year old kids, schools should not have been closed the 1st time or now. Wonder if we will have mass education centres? Billions pumped in to make up the gaps? Police arresting people with new powers for those stopping schools from running? No, the selfish vax generation want their lives back now & kids will be forgotten about. Kids & parents have been totally shafted.
166
19/01/2021 15:21:17 10 3
bbc
Speak for yourself. Can't cope looking after your own children?
20
19/01/2021 14:44:10 61 32
bbc
Where I live, the infection rate has significantly nosedived since the primary schools were close. The little spreaders need to stay at home at least until Easter.
86
19/01/2021 15:02:46 11 7
bbc
You are quite right. The mad profs say children can't spread it, but we know differently as my school teacher daughter it caught it from an early years child. Forget the science use common sense!
69
19/01/2021 14:58:58 30 13
bbc
This peer reviewed study from Stanford University concludes that whilst low intervention measures such as hygiene and SD did have an effect on the spread of the virus, full Lockdown did not.
Had the paper arrived at the opposite conclusion I can't help thinking it would be widely reported.
The fact that it has not been, should worry us all
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/eci.13484
87
19/01/2021 15:02:51 13 9
bbc
Erm worked in NZ, Australia, IOM etc etc
150
Bob
19/01/2021 15:17:01 3 6
bbc
Apparently not - they're just really good at washing hands!
66
mj
19/01/2021 14:58:22 1 8
bbc
Great get the schools open but then offer vaccines to all schools kids on day one of their return, the over 50s aren't super spreaders and apart from some mindless morons they all know what the rules are, Children can't fully understand the rules (never will) so stop them being the super spreaders, simple logic.
88
Bob
19/01/2021 15:02:53 5 1
bbc
The vaccines are not approved for under 18s.
128
19/01/2021 15:12:50 0 2
bbc
Thank God. They don't need a vaccine.
70
19/01/2021 14:59:02 7 16
bbc
Let's be honest, realistically, they cannot reopen schools until after the summer holidays, when hopefully most people will be vaccinated. Opening early will cause early spreads and will be looking at lockdown 4 about may. This has to be the last lockdown, so let's get it right!
89
19/01/2021 15:02:58 5 3
bbc
Hi Rutland 3 please could you post links to the academic research that shows Primary school children are the carriers of this infection. It's just however hard I try I can't find any academic research that backs up your assertion. Meanwhile there is plenty of material now being produced that adults are passing it to each other predominantly in indoor settings.
90
19/01/2021 15:03:02 5 7
bbc
Johnsonov's govt has made very little effort to make schools safe! They could have organised more space for schools, better ventilation, mask wearing, found extra teachers, organised working lap tops much earlier, more social distancing etc! Johnsonov's government and Gavin Williamson have been hopeless and haven't protected our children, our teachers and our citizens generally! Gross negligence!
100
19/01/2021 15:04:46 7 1
bbc
Exactly where do you expect the extra space and teachers to magically appear from?
109
19/01/2021 15:06:12 4 4
bbc
Or the headteachers on 100k a year could have organised all of that - as it's what they're paid for.
139
19/01/2021 15:14:38 4 3
bbc
Safety of Pupils and Staff in any School is the job and first up responsibility of the School's Senior Leadership/Management Team and The Governing Body.. in consultation with Parents. Too many people playing politics with our young people and too many Senior teachers hiding their own failures behind government shortcomings.
9
19/01/2021 14:40:53 13 18
bbc
Close all schools until everyone is vaccinated, then reset.
91
19/01/2021 15:01:37 5 1
bbc
Everyone will be vaccinated by September, in the best case scenario? Are you suggesting to close all schools till September?
52
19/01/2021 14:55:30 41 5
bbc
If Primary schools aren't going to reopen at Feb half term (which I accept they can't if the situation in hospitals isn't improving). Then the simple truth is that we can't reopen at all if the Govt is going to stick by it's promise that education would close last and open first.

If those advocating schools not reopening till Easter are happy for everything else to be closed till May that's fine!
92
19/01/2021 15:03:42 11 2
bbc
Absolutely, well said!
43
19/01/2021 14:52:07 24 7
bbc
"The new, more transmissible variant of the virus had been increasing *exponentially* in London...."

Meaningless. A bank account paying 1% per year has a balance increasing "exponentially". It just means "at a fixed rate", or "compounded". if infections were rising at 1 % a year it would be much less serious than "doubling every week".

Journalists have a responsibility to use the correct words.
93
19/01/2021 15:03:49 4 1
bbc
Loosely speaking a rapid increase. More accurately defined by the appropriate mathematical formula. What you are describing is compound interest, which may, or may not be rapid, depending on the interest rate.
Comment contributors have a 'responsibility to use the correct word'.
82
19/01/2021 15:00:45 7 8
bbc
I think the priority should be to re-open the economy, not schools. Before long, there will be no jobs for young people to go into. When you look at the 'inflections' graph, the increase in infections coincided with them reopening in September.
94
Bob
19/01/2021 15:03:51 5 5
bbc
And how do you reopen the economy with parents stuck at home making sure their children are being taught?
161
19/01/2021 15:19:54 2 1
bbc
The majority or people in the workplace don't have children in Primary School, so the overall, this is a better approach
54
19/01/2021 14:53:12 12 15
bbc
So many on here don't care about kids being uneducated. I guess it must be that if they don't get an education they're more likely to vote Labour in the future.
95
19/01/2021 15:03:54 3 3
bbc
What a nasty, pointless comment! You only have to look at the USA to see clearly in which direction the uneducated vote.
There is no joined up thinking from these clowns.Keep the schools closed until all clear is sounded.The kids can remain in school another year , which apparently won't do the male pupils any harm at all , as many of them do not have functioning brains until they reach 16 or 17 . Removed
96
19/01/2021 15:04:17 0 1
bbc
Where do you propose they put the new cohort in the broom cupboard? Likewise who’s going to teach them?
97
19/01/2021 15:04:32 2 1
bbc
Get Williamson involved. He'll sort it out properly??
113
19/01/2021 15:08:01 3 2
bbc
Pay him to stay at home with no contact with anyone, then he can't keep changing his mind
98
19/01/2021 15:04:35 8 3
bbc
Wales rate started to fall when the schools closed
99
19/01/2021 15:04:36 8 13
bbc
Schools should reopen after Feb half term. No ifs. No buts. The Government promised to put kids first and they've not done this. Kids are being demoralized and mentally affected by not being able to go to school and it has to end somewhere. I'd encourage all parents whose kids are not at school now to apply to get their kids back after Feb half term regardless. Kids do not deserve to suffer.
106
19/01/2021 15:06:54 5 4
bbc
Sounds like a Boris post
110
19/01/2021 15:07:30 4 4
bbc
Kids will suffer if their parents and grandparents die! Johnsonov's government needs to make schools safe! They are doing nothing towards this aim!
162
19/01/2021 15:19:56 2 2
bbc
Nor do they "deserve" to transmit Covid. Daft.
Removed
90
19/01/2021 15:03:02 5 7
bbc
Johnsonov's govt has made very little effort to make schools safe! They could have organised more space for schools, better ventilation, mask wearing, found extra teachers, organised working lap tops much earlier, more social distancing etc! Johnsonov's government and Gavin Williamson have been hopeless and haven't protected our children, our teachers and our citizens generally! Gross negligence!
100
19/01/2021 15:04:46 7 1
bbc
Exactly where do you expect the extra space and teachers to magically appear from?
513
19/01/2021 17:37:03 1 2
bbc
Back in March schools suggested that only half of those on roll should come in e.g. Mon/Tues/Wed in week 1 and then Thurs/Friday week 2 with the other 50% doing the opposite. Johnson's response was a flat no. At least this way there would have been less disruption to learning and fewer children in school each day!