School attendance in England higher than first lockdown
19/01/2021 | news | education | 63
The increase in pupil numbers is driven in part by children without laptops being allowed to go in.
1
19/01/2021 17:06:10 16 2
bbc
Because the definition of 'critical worker' is so broad that many, many jobs can be included (read the website). It is open to many interpretations. Some, of course, are not critical at all. Another failure of government. And to think, many of them are legally trained.
10
19/01/2021 18:41:38 9 3
bbc
Legally trained but not competent.
2
19/01/2021 17:17:00 26 1
bbc
Some days during the first lockdown the school where I work had 2 children out of about 120. Now it's around the 40 mark. I have 11 in my class alone, and I know for a fact some of the parents aren't key workers or they're working from home. They just don't like home schooling.
17
19/01/2021 19:50:03 4 24
bbc
Should you be on the BBC website whilst working so tirelessly?
30
20/01/2021 10:37:17 2 8
bbc
"They just don't like home schooling."

Or they realise that it's a complete and very sick joke that is selling kids down the river!
3
DG
19/01/2021 17:30:31 19 4
bbc
Some parents are being dishonest by claiming they are key workers.
I can see that some are doing this to pay the bills, but there are others that are doing it because they can
11
19/01/2021 18:42:08 4 2
bbc
Great British public.
22
20/01/2021 08:47:30 2 0
bbc
I know of some who have even had the vaccine by claiming to be key workers..sad but true. One of them is 40 something. I think society has become morally bankrupt by having people jump the queue. The situation will become worse later this year. Too much fraud in the UK, I cant imagine why...
29
20/01/2021 10:34:38 2 1
bbc
How wicked. Parents who will lie and do anything to protect the education and mental health of their children.

Hang on a minute, that's what good parents are supposed to do!
4
19/01/2021 17:41:11 4 2
bbc
So many people were furloughed first time round. Now, hardly any, so it's not really a surprise that so many kids are in school.
7
19/01/2021 17:56:49 9 0
bbc
The real 'critical / key' workers will never have been furloughed.
5
19/01/2021 17:42:14 11 0
bbc
Currently we have 50% of classes in. Today I taught more than half of my class of 26 with only 8 children at home. Last lock down 4 of my class were in the school. We have been receiving alot of blanket letters from companies regarding parents as key workers. Parents cried at school gates to pick them little or no social distancing.
18
Mum
19/01/2021 22:48:45 6 2
bbc
Not sure if you are a primary or secondary teacher, but as well as the obvious safety risk to teachers and children, it's also not fair on the pupils working from home, as they aren't getting the number of on-line lessons they should be, as understandably teachers can't stretch themselves all ways. My year 11 son will have missed 6 months of face to face GSCE teaching before long.
6
19/01/2021 17:55:31 10 1
bbc
In our school, though sad, the increase in children in the building is NOT in key worker children, it is in the vulnerable. Several families are now in this category that were not previously, partly due to money, but more due to neglect of their children that in turn triggers concern from social workers or the police.
4
19/01/2021 17:41:11 4 2
bbc
So many people were furloughed first time round. Now, hardly any, so it's not really a surprise that so many kids are in school.
7
19/01/2021 17:56:49 9 0
bbc
The real 'critical / key' workers will never have been furloughed.
8
19/01/2021 18:00:48 3 2
bbc
Last Thursday, I was surprised to see a Lollypop Lady at a crossing point, which was a salutary reminder that some schools are open.

Normally, I see kids and parents, or grandparents, going up and down my road which is very near a primary school.

I have really missed them and hope that things will normalise soon.
9
19/01/2021 18:12:03 3 0
bbc
I forgot to add that my daughter, who lives with us, has been furloughed from that school where she helps to run breakfast and after hours clubs.

Not enough demand from parents in catchment area.
16
19/01/2021 19:46:22 4 0
bbc
All schools are open for children of key workers and vulnerable children - now includes those with no space to work at home. It's very patchy across England though with some schools having less than 10% of students in whilst others are at 75%
8
19/01/2021 18:00:48 3 2
bbc
Last Thursday, I was surprised to see a Lollypop Lady at a crossing point, which was a salutary reminder that some schools are open.

Normally, I see kids and parents, or grandparents, going up and down my road which is very near a primary school.

I have really missed them and hope that things will normalise soon.
9
19/01/2021 18:12:03 3 0
bbc
I forgot to add that my daughter, who lives with us, has been furloughed from that school where she helps to run breakfast and after hours clubs.

Not enough demand from parents in catchment area.
1
19/01/2021 17:06:10 16 2
bbc
Because the definition of 'critical worker' is so broad that many, many jobs can be included (read the website). It is open to many interpretations. Some, of course, are not critical at all. Another failure of government. And to think, many of them are legally trained.
10
19/01/2021 18:41:38 9 3
bbc
Legally trained but not competent.
3
DG
19/01/2021 17:30:31 19 4
bbc
Some parents are being dishonest by claiming they are key workers.
I can see that some are doing this to pay the bills, but there are others that are doing it because they can
11
19/01/2021 18:42:08 4 2
bbc
Great British public.
12
19/01/2021 18:51:04 19 5
bbc
School staff are just cannon fodder to the Govt
27
20/01/2021 10:30:56 3 9
bbc
Well they make extremely hard targets to hit, as the risk posed to most of them by this virus is truly minute.
13
19/01/2021 19:10:25 17 1
bbc
Many employers who observed the first lockdown and made their employees WFH are now insisting they come to the work place. Regardless of whether these parents are critical workers, they have to put their kids into school so they can go into work. Unfortunately I can see this situation prolonging the lockdown.
The point of school closures is to reduce viral exposure, unfair to school staff too.
14
19/01/2021 19:21:17 9 9
bbc
Well of course it is, media have been explaining how everyone thinks they are 'key workers' this time round in order to dump their children on the state free childcare service.

Five times more disease spreading. Hence the current death and infection rates.

Utter rubbish the article whinging on about laptops when they managed the first time round. Plus the bbc doing lessons via tv! Get a pc.
15
19/01/2021 19:44:32 9 3
bbc
But they didn't manage first time around - we weren't delivering live lessons as we are now and many, many students had to depend on paper packs with no input.

You are correct about the key workers definition though, and only 1 parent needs to be a key worker to qualify even if the other parent is at home and not working
21
20/01/2021 08:01:14 3 1
bbc
What a vile comment. Whilst there are some truths in there, your privileged sneering negates and positivity.
Removed
14
19/01/2021 19:21:17 9 9
bbc
Well of course it is, media have been explaining how everyone thinks they are 'key workers' this time round in order to dump their children on the state free childcare service.

Five times more disease spreading. Hence the current death and infection rates.

Utter rubbish the article whinging on about laptops when they managed the first time round. Plus the bbc doing lessons via tv! Get a pc.
15
19/01/2021 19:44:32 9 3
bbc
But they didn't manage first time around - we weren't delivering live lessons as we are now and many, many students had to depend on paper packs with no input.

You are correct about the key workers definition though, and only 1 parent needs to be a key worker to qualify even if the other parent is at home and not working
38
20/01/2021 12:37:01 1 0
bbc
The problem is live lesson attitudes of schooling. Obviously trying to perpetuate schooling rather than switching to a proper home based Education will never work. The on/off & holding out the prospect of soon be back to the terrible old normal works against adapting. Books, paper, tv, online, recording dvds, plenty of ways available. End schooling childcare abrogation of education responsibility.
8
19/01/2021 18:00:48 3 2
bbc
Last Thursday, I was surprised to see a Lollypop Lady at a crossing point, which was a salutary reminder that some schools are open.

Normally, I see kids and parents, or grandparents, going up and down my road which is very near a primary school.

I have really missed them and hope that things will normalise soon.
16
19/01/2021 19:46:22 4 0
bbc
All schools are open for children of key workers and vulnerable children - now includes those with no space to work at home. It's very patchy across England though with some schools having less than 10% of students in whilst others are at 75%
2
19/01/2021 17:17:00 26 1
bbc
Some days during the first lockdown the school where I work had 2 children out of about 120. Now it's around the 40 mark. I have 11 in my class alone, and I know for a fact some of the parents aren't key workers or they're working from home. They just don't like home schooling.
17
19/01/2021 19:50:03 4 24
bbc
Should you be on the BBC website whilst working so tirelessly?
19
20/01/2021 05:19:07 15 0
bbc
Probably yes given that the comment was made at 5:17 pm. Why not calm down and head back to the Daily Mail.
34
20/01/2021 11:36:01 2 0
bbc
At 19.50 I think even a donkey is entitled to a break. Why are you not working?
5
19/01/2021 17:42:14 11 0
bbc
Currently we have 50% of classes in. Today I taught more than half of my class of 26 with only 8 children at home. Last lock down 4 of my class were in the school. We have been receiving alot of blanket letters from companies regarding parents as key workers. Parents cried at school gates to pick them little or no social distancing.
18
Mum
19/01/2021 22:48:45 6 2
bbc
Not sure if you are a primary or secondary teacher, but as well as the obvious safety risk to teachers and children, it's also not fair on the pupils working from home, as they aren't getting the number of on-line lessons they should be, as understandably teachers can't stretch themselves all ways. My year 11 son will have missed 6 months of face to face GSCE teaching before long.
20
20/01/2021 07:48:41 1 1
bbc
If only mums took that much care and knew what actual exams year 11s should be taking.
17
19/01/2021 19:50:03 4 24
bbc
Should you be on the BBC website whilst working so tirelessly?
19
20/01/2021 05:19:07 15 0
bbc
Probably yes given that the comment was made at 5:17 pm. Why not calm down and head back to the Daily Mail.
18
Mum
19/01/2021 22:48:45 6 2
bbc
Not sure if you are a primary or secondary teacher, but as well as the obvious safety risk to teachers and children, it's also not fair on the pupils working from home, as they aren't getting the number of on-line lessons they should be, as understandably teachers can't stretch themselves all ways. My year 11 son will have missed 6 months of face to face GSCE teaching before long.
20
20/01/2021 07:48:41 1 1
bbc
If only mums took that much care and knew what actual exams year 11s should be taking.
14
19/01/2021 19:21:17 9 9
bbc
Well of course it is, media have been explaining how everyone thinks they are 'key workers' this time round in order to dump their children on the state free childcare service.

Five times more disease spreading. Hence the current death and infection rates.

Utter rubbish the article whinging on about laptops when they managed the first time round. Plus the bbc doing lessons via tv! Get a pc.
21
20/01/2021 08:01:14 3 1
bbc
What a vile comment. Whilst there are some truths in there, your privileged sneering negates and positivity.
3
DG
19/01/2021 17:30:31 19 4
bbc
Some parents are being dishonest by claiming they are key workers.
I can see that some are doing this to pay the bills, but there are others that are doing it because they can
22
20/01/2021 08:47:30 2 0
bbc
I know of some who have even had the vaccine by claiming to be key workers..sad but true. One of them is 40 something. I think society has become morally bankrupt by having people jump the queue. The situation will become worse later this year. Too much fraud in the UK, I cant imagine why...
33
20/01/2021 11:35:14 1 0
bbc
They can only get the vaccine by having a letter from DHSC that gives them a code to book online. Frontline NHS staff and care home staff have to provide proof and this data along with vaccine batch numbers is added to their medical records So they must be classed as vulnerable or are they lying? If they have used someone else ID as proof that's fraud and very stupid.
23
20/01/2021 09:04:17 6 1
bbc
In my school a lot of the parents are struggling financialy before covid.
Closing schools would mean loss of income. Why do you think a lot of them are desperate to get their kids in?
24
20/01/2021 10:12:30 7 2
bbc
Claiming environments like schools are 'safe' or necessary is pure and simply a pretense. They are spreading nodes and anybody conniving enough to be a politician or policy adviser knows it. Just in schools, vulnerable children often have 1 to 1 support so in a lock down bubble of 10 you could reasonably expect 15 cross exposures. These exposures will have other bubbles at home or work. Be honest.
31
20/01/2021 11:27:47 2 4
bbc
If you look at the national surveillance data for flu and SARS viruses schools are very low down the list of places where there's the greatest spread. Highest on the list are care home, residential homes and hospitals
25
20/01/2021 10:26:58 5 6
bbc
To good people this is something to be pleased about, as less children are having their education and mental health damaged to the same degree.

No ifs, no buts, no maybes. If it where up to me schools would never have been closed, and no exams would have been cancelled.

But then, despite being 63 and single, young people's education and welfare is very high up my list of priorities.
51
Dea
20/01/2021 16:23:24 4 0
bbc
I have two school age children and I teach in another school. It is NOT safe in school with ALL the children in - Everywhere else, distancing has to take place - but not in schools, as it is not possible.
Children ARE being taught remotely.
How with a child's mental health be if they took the visus home and killed some of their more vunerable family members living with them?
14
19/01/2021 19:21:17 9 9
bbc
Well of course it is, media have been explaining how everyone thinks they are 'key workers' this time round in order to dump their children on the state free childcare service.

Five times more disease spreading. Hence the current death and infection rates.

Utter rubbish the article whinging on about laptops when they managed the first time round. Plus the bbc doing lessons via tv! Get a pc.
Removed
12
19/01/2021 18:51:04 19 5
bbc
School staff are just cannon fodder to the Govt
27
20/01/2021 10:30:56 3 9
bbc
Well they make extremely hard targets to hit, as the risk posed to most of them by this virus is truly minute.
35
20/01/2021 11:37:25 5 0
bbc
Schools are serious spreaders. Or can you indicate evidence otherwise.
28
20/01/2021 10:33:38 4 8
bbc
Just shut them. Currently the lock down is very weak. If the schools are open, the pubs may as well be too!
37
20/01/2021 11:28:55 3 4
bbc
Shutting pubs doesn't wreck kids' education and mental health!

And even though I'm not one for going to pubs or restaurants I'd like to see them all open. Call me an old softy, but I feel for those whose livelihood depends on them.

Those who are frightened, or genuinely at risk can stay at home.
52
20/01/2021 17:03:11 1 1
bbc
If you close schools to all pupils you will see a vast reduction in the staff available to care for Covid patients in hospital. That's what it boils down to.

We don't have a vast pool of childless, currently unemployed doctors and nurses waiting to pick up the slack. And medical staff can't take children into Covid wards with them. (Swap doctors for police, firemen etc you get the idea.)
3
DG
19/01/2021 17:30:31 19 4
bbc
Some parents are being dishonest by claiming they are key workers.
I can see that some are doing this to pay the bills, but there are others that are doing it because they can
29
20/01/2021 10:34:38 2 1
bbc
How wicked. Parents who will lie and do anything to protect the education and mental health of their children.

Hang on a minute, that's what good parents are supposed to do!
39
20/01/2021 12:40:54 1 1
bbc
Rather than take up what are only their responsibilities to educate their own children. Yes 'wicked' parents child dumping.
2
19/01/2021 17:17:00 26 1
bbc
Some days during the first lockdown the school where I work had 2 children out of about 120. Now it's around the 40 mark. I have 11 in my class alone, and I know for a fact some of the parents aren't key workers or they're working from home. They just don't like home schooling.
30
20/01/2021 10:37:17 2 8
bbc
"They just don't like home schooling."

Or they realise that it's a complete and very sick joke that is selling kids down the river!
24
20/01/2021 10:12:30 7 2
bbc
Claiming environments like schools are 'safe' or necessary is pure and simply a pretense. They are spreading nodes and anybody conniving enough to be a politician or policy adviser knows it. Just in schools, vulnerable children often have 1 to 1 support so in a lock down bubble of 10 you could reasonably expect 15 cross exposures. These exposures will have other bubbles at home or work. Be honest.
31
20/01/2021 11:27:47 2 4
bbc
If you look at the national surveillance data for flu and SARS viruses schools are very low down the list of places where there's the greatest spread. Highest on the list are care home, residential homes and hospitals
36
20/01/2021 11:49:04 3 2
bbc
That would be a strong point if flu and SARS had the same infection rate as COVID; they do not. COVID has a much higher transmission rate.
44
20/01/2021 15:37:51 2 1
bbc
That just records where infections are - not where they came from. How do viruses get into care homes, residential homes and hospitals?
47
20/01/2021 15:48:02 2 2
bbc
Rosy, it's like trying to convince a baying medieval mob not to burn some harmless old woman as a witch.

Fear has so taken over these people that you can't reason with them.
32
20/01/2021 11:30:21 4 1
bbc
So if the Government cannot bridge the the digital gap for poor pupils; then all they have to do is to declare the children vulnerable and send them to school. Have these additions to the vulnerability group improved or worsened the safety in schools?
40
20/01/2021 12:46:23 1 5
bbc
Yes schooling will develop into the place the poor or feckless dump their children while any other parents take control of their responsibilities to educate their children properly. It has been happening gradually anyway with the boom in home tutors. Schools will soon be seen as we think of the workhouse of old. Last resort worst option. The 'poor' need to stop holding back everyone else.
46
20/01/2021 15:45:06 1 1
bbc
Hard as people like you find it to accept, by far the best learning is done with a teacher physically present, and with BOOKS. Yes, those things we've been using so successfully for many centuries.

I.T. has it's place in education, but it's relatively minor. And with a M.Sc. in computer science and 20 years very successful software development behind me I'm hardly a Luddite.
22
20/01/2021 08:47:30 2 0
bbc
I know of some who have even had the vaccine by claiming to be key workers..sad but true. One of them is 40 something. I think society has become morally bankrupt by having people jump the queue. The situation will become worse later this year. Too much fraud in the UK, I cant imagine why...
33
20/01/2021 11:35:14 1 0
bbc
They can only get the vaccine by having a letter from DHSC that gives them a code to book online. Frontline NHS staff and care home staff have to provide proof and this data along with vaccine batch numbers is added to their medical records So they must be classed as vulnerable or are they lying? If they have used someone else ID as proof that's fraud and very stupid.
17
19/01/2021 19:50:03 4 24
bbc
Should you be on the BBC website whilst working so tirelessly?
34
20/01/2021 11:36:01 2 0
bbc
At 19.50 I think even a donkey is entitled to a break. Why are you not working?
27
20/01/2021 10:30:56 3 9
bbc
Well they make extremely hard targets to hit, as the risk posed to most of them by this virus is truly minute.
35
20/01/2021 11:37:25 5 0
bbc
Schools are serious spreaders. Or can you indicate evidence otherwise.
49
20/01/2021 15:53:17 0 1
bbc
Can you indicate that they are?

Didn't think so.
31
20/01/2021 11:27:47 2 4
bbc
If you look at the national surveillance data for flu and SARS viruses schools are very low down the list of places where there's the greatest spread. Highest on the list are care home, residential homes and hospitals
36
20/01/2021 11:49:04 3 2
bbc
That would be a strong point if flu and SARS had the same infection rate as COVID; they do not. COVID has a much higher transmission rate.
28
20/01/2021 10:33:38 4 8
bbc
Just shut them. Currently the lock down is very weak. If the schools are open, the pubs may as well be too!
37
20/01/2021 11:28:55 3 4
bbc
Shutting pubs doesn't wreck kids' education and mental health!

And even though I'm not one for going to pubs or restaurants I'd like to see them all open. Call me an old softy, but I feel for those whose livelihood depends on them.

Those who are frightened, or genuinely at risk can stay at home.
42
20/01/2021 13:41:08 1 1
bbc
Exactly.
15
19/01/2021 19:44:32 9 3
bbc
But they didn't manage first time around - we weren't delivering live lessons as we are now and many, many students had to depend on paper packs with no input.

You are correct about the key workers definition though, and only 1 parent needs to be a key worker to qualify even if the other parent is at home and not working
38
20/01/2021 12:37:01 1 0
bbc
The problem is live lesson attitudes of schooling. Obviously trying to perpetuate schooling rather than switching to a proper home based Education will never work. The on/off & holding out the prospect of soon be back to the terrible old normal works against adapting. Books, paper, tv, online, recording dvds, plenty of ways available. End schooling childcare abrogation of education responsibility.
48
20/01/2021 15:52:18 1 1
bbc
"The problem is live lesson attitudes of schooling."

You mean qualified and experienced teachers like me, who keep insisting that having the teacher physically present is a vastly better option.

The temerity of people like me, stating inconvenient TRUTHS!
29
20/01/2021 10:34:38 2 1
bbc
How wicked. Parents who will lie and do anything to protect the education and mental health of their children.

Hang on a minute, that's what good parents are supposed to do!
39
20/01/2021 12:40:54 1 1
bbc
Rather than take up what are only their responsibilities to educate their own children. Yes 'wicked' parents child dumping.
50
20/01/2021 15:56:46 1 1
bbc
Horses for courses old sport. Teachers, in a classroom = far better education.

Maybe they should also fill in for the doctor and the dentist too?
32
20/01/2021 11:30:21 4 1
bbc
So if the Government cannot bridge the the digital gap for poor pupils; then all they have to do is to declare the children vulnerable and send them to school. Have these additions to the vulnerability group improved or worsened the safety in schools?
40
20/01/2021 12:46:23 1 5
bbc
Yes schooling will develop into the place the poor or feckless dump their children while any other parents take control of their responsibilities to educate their children properly. It has been happening gradually anyway with the boom in home tutors. Schools will soon be seen as we think of the workhouse of old. Last resort worst option. The 'poor' need to stop holding back everyone else.
41
20/01/2021 13:02:21 1 1
bbc
Or we need to help the poor. Presumably you believe that if one is poor it is their fault always. Circumstances can change as it did in my case when my father died when I was very young; so that we had to go into council accommodation (could afford mortgage) etc was all my mothers fault!
40
20/01/2021 12:46:23 1 5
bbc
Yes schooling will develop into the place the poor or feckless dump their children while any other parents take control of their responsibilities to educate their children properly. It has been happening gradually anyway with the boom in home tutors. Schools will soon be seen as we think of the workhouse of old. Last resort worst option. The 'poor' need to stop holding back everyone else.
41
20/01/2021 13:02:21 1 1
bbc
Or we need to help the poor. Presumably you believe that if one is poor it is their fault always. Circumstances can change as it did in my case when my father died when I was very young; so that we had to go into council accommodation (could afford mortgage) etc was all my mothers fault!
56
20/01/2021 18:24:11 1 0
bbc
Schooling could be retained as that help for the poorest. Clearly it is second best option, but a safety net. Just as we have private schools or in the past proper grammar school streaming effects. Schooling at all could be for the lowest rung as a safety net. As education is largely effectively cheaper at home, in effect it would only be the 'bad' rather than the 'poor' which are not synonymous.
37
20/01/2021 11:28:55 3 4
bbc
Shutting pubs doesn't wreck kids' education and mental health!

And even though I'm not one for going to pubs or restaurants I'd like to see them all open. Call me an old softy, but I feel for those whose livelihood depends on them.

Those who are frightened, or genuinely at risk can stay at home.
42
20/01/2021 13:41:08 1 1
bbc
Exactly.
43
20/01/2021 13:43:38 2 3
bbc
A good news story at last!

These children are our future. They are the ones we will be relying on for country’s next years.

Every lockdown and closure singles out the young as somehow less important than the old.

I wish my own kids could be allowed into school to learn. Maybe then we would see less crying at home.
45
20/01/2021 15:39:51 1 3
bbc
Absolutely right! Unfortunately a lot of people are both too stupid and too frightened to appreciate this.
31
20/01/2021 11:27:47 2 4
bbc
If you look at the national surveillance data for flu and SARS viruses schools are very low down the list of places where there's the greatest spread. Highest on the list are care home, residential homes and hospitals
44
20/01/2021 15:37:51 2 1
bbc
That just records where infections are - not where they came from. How do viruses get into care homes, residential homes and hospitals?
43
20/01/2021 13:43:38 2 3
bbc
A good news story at last!

These children are our future. They are the ones we will be relying on for country’s next years.

Every lockdown and closure singles out the young as somehow less important than the old.

I wish my own kids could be allowed into school to learn. Maybe then we would see less crying at home.
45
20/01/2021 15:39:51 1 3
bbc
Absolutely right! Unfortunately a lot of people are both too stupid and too frightened to appreciate this.
32
20/01/2021 11:30:21 4 1
bbc
So if the Government cannot bridge the the digital gap for poor pupils; then all they have to do is to declare the children vulnerable and send them to school. Have these additions to the vulnerability group improved or worsened the safety in schools?
46
20/01/2021 15:45:06 1 1
bbc
Hard as people like you find it to accept, by far the best learning is done with a teacher physically present, and with BOOKS. Yes, those things we've been using so successfully for many centuries.

I.T. has it's place in education, but it's relatively minor. And with a M.Sc. in computer science and 20 years very successful software development behind me I'm hardly a Luddite.
54
20/01/2021 18:10:37 1 0
bbc
An adult's presence may be useful depending on the age ranges. Teachers in classrooms are not 'with' each child. They're either winging a live performance with no editing 'or' helping 1 to 1. Each child gets a tiny amount of teacher attention.

Yes IT is just a glorified book in effect. Much more powerful as a recorded spoken with pictures unimaginable in any crowded classroom live attempt at it.
31
20/01/2021 11:27:47 2 4
bbc
If you look at the national surveillance data for flu and SARS viruses schools are very low down the list of places where there's the greatest spread. Highest on the list are care home, residential homes and hospitals
47
20/01/2021 15:48:02 2 2
bbc
Rosy, it's like trying to convince a baying medieval mob not to burn some harmless old woman as a witch.

Fear has so taken over these people that you can't reason with them.
38
20/01/2021 12:37:01 1 0
bbc
The problem is live lesson attitudes of schooling. Obviously trying to perpetuate schooling rather than switching to a proper home based Education will never work. The on/off & holding out the prospect of soon be back to the terrible old normal works against adapting. Books, paper, tv, online, recording dvds, plenty of ways available. End schooling childcare abrogation of education responsibility.
48
20/01/2021 15:52:18 1 1
bbc
"The problem is live lesson attitudes of schooling."

You mean qualified and experienced teachers like me, who keep insisting that having the teacher physically present is a vastly better option.

The temerity of people like me, stating inconvenient TRUTHS!
55
20/01/2021 18:15:40 1 0
bbc
Yes. Your 'truths' that fit your needs. By all means do it properly as a tutor one to one. Classrooms mean tiny attention each. Held back by the slowest, to lost by the fastest being catered to. Herd based education will die out. We are all individuals and need to be. Only nannies and childcare issues 'needs' physical presence.
35
20/01/2021 11:37:25 5 0
bbc
Schools are serious spreaders. Or can you indicate evidence otherwise.
49
20/01/2021 15:53:17 0 1
bbc
Can you indicate that they are?

Didn't think so.
63
20/01/2021 23:44:18 0 0
bbc
Intensive Care for 10 days from the 28th Dec. Oxygen drugs a helluva fight. Consultant said it was my genetics and I was lucky

I teach, I got it from school. The Government lied when it said schools were safe. We followed protocol and then some. I have a biological degree, so not naive

I lost a friend who teaches NYE in Essex. I have another in ICU who got it off her husband who works in school
39
20/01/2021 12:40:54 1 1
bbc
Rather than take up what are only their responsibilities to educate their own children. Yes 'wicked' parents child dumping.
50
20/01/2021 15:56:46 1 1
bbc
Horses for courses old sport. Teachers, in a classroom = far better education.

Maybe they should also fill in for the doctor and the dentist too?
57
20/01/2021 18:33:58 1 0
bbc
Very far from it. 1 child 1 tutor better education. Choice of presenter, choice of style, of subject all not available in any school.

Well many doctor tasks are being done by non doctors with modern tech expert systems that can diagnose just as well if not better. So yes, as things progress many of even these tasks are going to be replaced. Though their jobs are more practical & will last longer.
25
20/01/2021 10:26:58 5 6
bbc
To good people this is something to be pleased about, as less children are having their education and mental health damaged to the same degree.

No ifs, no buts, no maybes. If it where up to me schools would never have been closed, and no exams would have been cancelled.

But then, despite being 63 and single, young people's education and welfare is very high up my list of priorities.
51
Dea
20/01/2021 16:23:24 4 0
bbc
I have two school age children and I teach in another school. It is NOT safe in school with ALL the children in - Everywhere else, distancing has to take place - but not in schools, as it is not possible.
Children ARE being taught remotely.
How with a child's mental health be if they took the visus home and killed some of their more vunerable family members living with them?
28
20/01/2021 10:33:38 4 8
bbc
Just shut them. Currently the lock down is very weak. If the schools are open, the pubs may as well be too!
52
20/01/2021 17:03:11 1 1
bbc
If you close schools to all pupils you will see a vast reduction in the staff available to care for Covid patients in hospital. That's what it boils down to.

We don't have a vast pool of childless, currently unemployed doctors and nurses waiting to pick up the slack. And medical staff can't take children into Covid wards with them. (Swap doctors for police, firemen etc you get the idea.)
53
20/01/2021 18:05:28 2 0
bbc
Limited evidence of role children play in transmission of the virus. Possible reason - children may be asymptomatic - don't get tested... therefore no/limited evidence. Children no longer going to be screened = no/limited evidence still. Data on school staff and Covid 19 contraction is no longer collected = little evidence. Children keep going and possibly spreading Covid due to little evidence.
46
20/01/2021 15:45:06 1 1
bbc
Hard as people like you find it to accept, by far the best learning is done with a teacher physically present, and with BOOKS. Yes, those things we've been using so successfully for many centuries.

I.T. has it's place in education, but it's relatively minor. And with a M.Sc. in computer science and 20 years very successful software development behind me I'm hardly a Luddite.
54
20/01/2021 18:10:37 1 0
bbc
An adult's presence may be useful depending on the age ranges. Teachers in classrooms are not 'with' each child. They're either winging a live performance with no editing 'or' helping 1 to 1. Each child gets a tiny amount of teacher attention.

Yes IT is just a glorified book in effect. Much more powerful as a recorded spoken with pictures unimaginable in any crowded classroom live attempt at it.
48
20/01/2021 15:52:18 1 1
bbc
"The problem is live lesson attitudes of schooling."

You mean qualified and experienced teachers like me, who keep insisting that having the teacher physically present is a vastly better option.

The temerity of people like me, stating inconvenient TRUTHS!
55
20/01/2021 18:15:40 1 0
bbc
Yes. Your 'truths' that fit your needs. By all means do it properly as a tutor one to one. Classrooms mean tiny attention each. Held back by the slowest, to lost by the fastest being catered to. Herd based education will die out. We are all individuals and need to be. Only nannies and childcare issues 'needs' physical presence.
41
20/01/2021 13:02:21 1 1
bbc
Or we need to help the poor. Presumably you believe that if one is poor it is their fault always. Circumstances can change as it did in my case when my father died when I was very young; so that we had to go into council accommodation (could afford mortgage) etc was all my mothers fault!
56
20/01/2021 18:24:11 1 0
bbc
Schooling could be retained as that help for the poorest. Clearly it is second best option, but a safety net. Just as we have private schools or in the past proper grammar school streaming effects. Schooling at all could be for the lowest rung as a safety net. As education is largely effectively cheaper at home, in effect it would only be the 'bad' rather than the 'poor' which are not synonymous.
60
20/01/2021 22:00:07 0 0
bbc
They off roll the ‘bad’ to protect their GCSE results, most have converted to academies, meaning they’re as much a business as an education provider, good schools bring great house prices within catchment area’s
It’s law unless a parent can provide evidence that their child is educated costing a small fortune for each exam they sit/tutors £’s by the hour
Most are 1 month away from poverty as is
50
20/01/2021 15:56:46 1 1
bbc
Horses for courses old sport. Teachers, in a classroom = far better education.

Maybe they should also fill in for the doctor and the dentist too?
57
20/01/2021 18:33:58 1 0
bbc
Very far from it. 1 child 1 tutor better education. Choice of presenter, choice of style, of subject all not available in any school.

Well many doctor tasks are being done by non doctors with modern tech expert systems that can diagnose just as well if not better. So yes, as things progress many of even these tasks are going to be replaced. Though their jobs are more practical & will last longer.
58
20/01/2021 20:47:36 1 0
bbc
Recent events highlight the gap between the poor and the middle-class well educated parents. The latter find home schooling an enjoyable experience and an opportunity to bond with their children. The former cannot teach their children anything and rely on teachers to educate their children and provide moral guidance. Society has a role to protect children and help elevate each generation.
59
20/01/2021 21:10:00 1 0
bbc
I’m sorry but I disagree
You can be poor and well educated
You can both be in well paying jobs working from home and also struggling
The difference is whether there is a parent available, enough money for devices, and if there are no SEN needs
Don’t demonise people
Middle class is an illusion
61
20/01/2021 23:29:10 0 0
bbc
I get what you are trying to say but the wording is a bit wrong. Home learning is definitely stacked against the poor, those with foreign parents and ethnic minorities who have difficulties for many different reasons. Regardless of how rich or well educated you are however, there are many tech illiterate parents and grandparents who may have to step in with teaching responsibilities.
58
20/01/2021 20:47:36 1 0
bbc
Recent events highlight the gap between the poor and the middle-class well educated parents. The latter find home schooling an enjoyable experience and an opportunity to bond with their children. The former cannot teach their children anything and rely on teachers to educate their children and provide moral guidance. Society has a role to protect children and help elevate each generation.
59
20/01/2021 21:10:00 1 0
bbc
I’m sorry but I disagree
You can be poor and well educated
You can both be in well paying jobs working from home and also struggling
The difference is whether there is a parent available, enough money for devices, and if there are no SEN needs
Don’t demonise people
Middle class is an illusion
56
20/01/2021 18:24:11 1 0
bbc
Schooling could be retained as that help for the poorest. Clearly it is second best option, but a safety net. Just as we have private schools or in the past proper grammar school streaming effects. Schooling at all could be for the lowest rung as a safety net. As education is largely effectively cheaper at home, in effect it would only be the 'bad' rather than the 'poor' which are not synonymous.
60
20/01/2021 22:00:07 0 0
bbc
They off roll the ‘bad’ to protect their GCSE results, most have converted to academies, meaning they’re as much a business as an education provider, good schools bring great house prices within catchment area’s
It’s law unless a parent can provide evidence that their child is educated costing a small fortune for each exam they sit/tutors £’s by the hour
Most are 1 month away from poverty as is
58
20/01/2021 20:47:36 1 0
bbc
Recent events highlight the gap between the poor and the middle-class well educated parents. The latter find home schooling an enjoyable experience and an opportunity to bond with their children. The former cannot teach their children anything and rely on teachers to educate their children and provide moral guidance. Society has a role to protect children and help elevate each generation.
61
20/01/2021 23:29:10 0 0
bbc
I get what you are trying to say but the wording is a bit wrong. Home learning is definitely stacked against the poor, those with foreign parents and ethnic minorities who have difficulties for many different reasons. Regardless of how rich or well educated you are however, there are many tech illiterate parents and grandparents who may have to step in with teaching responsibilities.
62
20/01/2021 23:39:04 0 0
bbc
is newsnight a bbc educational program? is that why we are paying for a bbc team to fly to the US during pandemic?
49
20/01/2021 15:53:17 0 1
bbc
Can you indicate that they are?

Didn't think so.
63
20/01/2021 23:44:18 0 0
bbc
Intensive Care for 10 days from the 28th Dec. Oxygen drugs a helluva fight. Consultant said it was my genetics and I was lucky

I teach, I got it from school. The Government lied when it said schools were safe. We followed protocol and then some. I have a biological degree, so not naive

I lost a friend who teaches NYE in Essex. I have another in ICU who got it off her husband who works in school