Covid: Cash refusal 'creeping into UK economy'
19/01/2021 | news | business | 2,698
A survey by consumer group Which? raises concerns over coronavirus leading to more cashless stores.
1
19/01/2021 11:49:48 8 9
bbc
They can tell the Government to protect cash, but if they’re treating George Orwell’s works as blueprints they probably won’t listen.
2
19/01/2021 11:49:58 22 34
bbc
Why is this being reported in such a negative way? Transactions for goods and services evolve over time. Remember bartering? Anyway, can you imagine just how many germs have not been passed on as a result of cash not changing hands all the time? This is great news in general terms.
113
19/01/2021 12:01:46 11 1
bbc
I use contactless/switch and rarely use cash (even pre covid). My main concern is for the young people who will never have the experience of physical cash in hand and the ability to budget which the tap/paid culture just doesn't help with.
156
19/01/2021 12:06:03 7 1
bbc
Not everyone has a bank account so unless banks are forced to not refuse to give a bank account and debit card to anyone some people can’t pay without cash. Other people only have a limited amount and money is easier to keep track off. Guess you are ok when shops internet goes down and no card payments and cash machine is out.
202
19/01/2021 12:09:50 5 1
bbc
'how many germs have not been passed on'?
But how many germs have been passed on by people keying in their PIN numbers? It's not clear to me which is more probable.
3
19/01/2021 11:50:55 9 19
bbc
There is nothing to fear from going to a cashless society but it needs to be phased in over time. I'd be very surprised if people still used cash in say 50 years.
34
19/01/2021 11:54:59 11 6
bbc
Nothing to fear? try telling that to people that have been scammed through no fault of there own!!!
4
19/01/2021 11:51:03 1091 202
bbc
Without hard cash, how do you teach young children its value? They need the experience of taking a £1 coin and seeing what they can buy with it.
When it's just numbers on a screen, cash becomes an abstract concept. And so does debt.
37
19/01/2021 11:55:18 404 497
bbc
"cash becomes an abstract concept".
It already is. There is little or no value in little metal disks or pieces of paper, the whole concept of money is a rather odd concept based on trust in banks - and who trusts bankers?
64
19/01/2021 11:57:24 94 43
bbc
An excellent post - best one of the day and very sensible too.
90
19/01/2021 11:59:55 89 11
bbc
It's not even on a screen with contactless. Tap. Paid. No need to go to the cashpoint to get a few quid out. Becomes so remote from reality.

Debt is so easy to go into. Store cards, purchase spreading apps e.g. Klarna and so many pretty much guarantee acceptance. Scary.
101
19/01/2021 12:01:05 40 19
bbc
Money is already numbers on a screen for virtually everything.
Things like the national debt? Just made up numbers with lots of zeroes added, so real money from mr and mrs taxpayer can be siphoned off where the government pleases.
130
19/01/2021 12:03:29 109 148
bbc
Utter nonsense. Parents need to be innovative and find a modern way of explaining the concept, rather than bleating about change.
146
19/01/2021 12:04:57 50 36
bbc
Fair point, although children could still be taught the value of money in other ways. On the other hand though, crime could be significantly reduced if cash were to be ultimately abolished. Not saying it is the right thing to do, but there good be some positives as well as negatives.
OK boomer. Because of course, people getting into debt has only started happening since the digital age... Removed
176
19/01/2021 12:07:36 62 84
bbc
Modern banking apps make it possible to have areas that weekly/monthly pocket money goes into, my children instantly know what they have to spend at any given shopping trip. Its 2020, not 1920; cash is pointless.
187
19/01/2021 12:08:39 50 4
bbc
Everything about money and debt is 'abstract'.

Look up 'Fractional Reserve Banking' - it's the main 'banking system'.

TLDR; banks are only required to keep 10% of their deposits - the other 90% can be loaned out with interest. If you deposit £100 in the bank, £90 of that gets loaned out to someone else. Bank rely on you (and everyone else) not all going to withdraw your savings as once.
201
19/01/2021 12:09:48 8 15
bbc
I could not agree more, good point, well made
215
19/01/2021 12:10:22 27 28
bbc
You could consider moving into the 21st century and teach children 'spreadsheets' and how to budget their money. Much healthier than handling infected notes and coins.
219
19/01/2021 12:10:37 19 11
bbc
Whilst I'm in favor of a cashless society there are valid arguments against such a position. This is not one of them. Cash is already an abstract concept. It has no intrinsic value or use other than what has been agreed by the society in which it circulates. Also when was the last time you had a physical representation of your mortgage?
232
19/01/2021 12:12:21 7 7
bbc
your kids will learn about its value in a roundabout, non direct sort of way, when their phone network goes down/phone number gets sold and they can't pay by [smart]phone
238
19/01/2021 12:12:43 16 3
bbc
It's interesting what people want people children to learn and what children actually learn.
327
19/01/2021 12:18:40 7 2
bbc
They don’t want people to know the value of money, they want you to hand it over. Much easier to do that if people don’t have anything tangible
328
19/01/2021 12:18:45 11 19
bbc
Children value digital assets, and totally understand the value of digital currency. They'd rather see a Bitcoin or Dogecoin in their digital wallet than an old smelly dirty coin. The world is changing and money is going digital. There is no going back. Financial education, doesn't require physical objects. Teach entrepreneurship!
358
19/01/2021 12:21:13 1 8
bbc
Central Bank Digital Currencies are coming to a digital wallet to you all very soon. Look up "Bretton Woods 2.0" or "A New Bretton Woods Moment" by the IMF. The extinction of physical paper FIAT currency is just being accelerated because of Corona.
365
19/01/2021 12:21:55 1 3
bbc
Get a Rooster account.
370
19/01/2021 12:22:13 4 6
bbc
You need to adapt and stop being a dinosaur. I too prefer cash and I HATE Credit / finance with a passion. I will still encourage my children to SAVE and to NEVER get a Credit Card of Finance (with the exception of a mortgage).

It just means teaching my children with technology instead of cash.
378
19/01/2021 12:23:08 2 8
bbc
That is a great way to train children to accept a corrupt system. If all of us did not use money, there would be no homeless on the streets or children starving to death every day...
409
19/01/2021 12:11:48 1 7
bbc
People are confusing Money with Currency.
Money is tangible and has a defined value and is backed with something (like Gold) and is not easily expandable. Bitcoin is Money as it is backed with the Blockchain.
Currency is nothing, it has no value and is backed by nothing and can easily be expanded one. Example is all global currencies including coins, notes and digital balances.
451
19/01/2021 12:28:28 6 1
bbc
A coin or a "virtual" number on the account balance should make no difference. It's just a good excuse to close our eyes in the face of reality, spend more than we can afford then blame the plastic...
470
19/01/2021 12:29:39 6 0
bbc
Physical or digital, it already seems to be an abstract concept, the amount of debt people are living off these days from all economic backgrounds.

Interesting, for instance, to see the high amount of 2020 plate premium cars being driven around all areas, even those with lower than average household incomes.

Living off debt just seems to be the norm many these days.
502
19/01/2021 12:31:48 6 2
bbc
..and there lies the rub Mrs W and thank you for pointing it out.

Its also probably the reason why so many other adults are numbskulls and are irresponsible with money.....too easy to pay on plastic .
512
19/01/2021 12:33:01 1 2
bbc
Kids are used to abstract ideas on a screen, it brings games alive to them. They will be embracing changes we cannot even begin to imagine now. We should not automatically assume the old ways are the best but should assess them and if they are keep them.
531
19/01/2021 12:34:15 5 0
bbc
That’s probably the plan, make debt seem normal
549
19/01/2021 12:35:36 4 3
bbc
Technically a £1 coin is only a token.
Notes have value, but as bills of exchange for gold in the Bank of England. So no value there either.
It's the same thing just displayed a different way. Children today will be digital payment native. We only have problems with value because we adopted it so have to think about it in old terms.
All money is is the option to exchange something for something.
562
19/01/2021 12:36:19 1 6
bbc
Do you need to have seen £200k in a briefcase infront of you to understand the value of a house? Time for people to get with technology. Hopefully young people can continue this trend to get awkward to handle cash out of everyone's lives.
565
19/01/2021 12:36:27 5 4
bbc
I suppose you do it in the same way you teach children about the value of anything else intangible, such as compassion, respect and decency, that is by leading by example.

If you want children to value money, don't readily squander it. Children learn by following the behaviour of those around them, I'm not sure being able to touch and see hard currency is decisive in this regard.
589
19/01/2021 12:37:55 1 2
bbc
Society develops, method changes. There maybe worries when it moved from direct exchange of items to cash, how can I teach my kid this is for one apple or two apples if it’s only a sheet of paper with numbers on it? Financial literacy has long been based on the ‘untouchable’ than ‘touchable’.
672
19/01/2021 12:43:16 4 6
bbc
absolute twaddle. you don't need an arbitrary token to teach that. Cash is going away, so it's important to teach kids how to handle modern money in a modern world. Might as well teach them to trade in magic beans. Cash itself has no value at all.
5
19/01/2021 11:51:10 403 34
bbc
When states and banks can just 'turn you off' the potential for abuse will be crazy.

Some other gray Market Currency will eventually appear.

But giving up cash for convenience will lead to dark place for many people.
98
19/01/2021 12:00:58 174 225
bbc
Cash is of course a good way of keeping transactions from the attention of the authorities
Thereby avoiding taxes and laundering the proceeds of crime
105
dan
19/01/2021 12:01:16 12 29
bbc
Couldn't disagree more. In modern day life the vast majority of payments are made using online banking, it's not like fiat cash is used to buy most big name items (car, house etc) and hasn't for decades.
If this was going to be a problem, it would have happened a LONG time ago...
163
19/01/2021 12:06:29 26 16
bbc
Exactly. It has always been a plan to go into a cashless society. Anyone who doesn't agree with government or didn't have their 6 monthly Jab will all of a sudden realise they no longer can buy food. This is already happening in China
178
19/01/2021 12:07:42 10 28
bbc
A theoretical risk vs. the real life daily abuse of cash in hand businesses who pay no tax.
241
19/01/2021 12:12:49 2 18
bbc
All of that sounds like nonsense to me.
296
jay
19/01/2021 12:16:42 5 1
bbc
The grey market currency you are thinking about is Bitcoin. The problem with all your transactions being recoded as they are becoming now is there is no privacy, bitcoin provides that.
299
19/01/2021 12:16:50 1 0
bbc
you mean like bitcoin ? we take that aswell
439
19/01/2021 12:27:26 5 0
bbc
and a lot of lots and lots of money, for the (marketing) companies that collect all the data associated with your digital payment.
533
19/01/2021 12:34:27 3 1
bbc
This already happens in the large country the BBC doesn't wish to see mentioned on HYS in a negative light.
19/01/2021 13:16:37 0 1
bbc
If you define a debit card as a dark place, where debit cards count as a cash transaction by the way, you are rather odd. The issue isnt spending it, the issue is you feeling that you have something of value in your hand before you spend it, you are infact a magpie.
19/01/2021 14:37:21 0 0
bbc
Er, haven't you heard of BitCoin?
19/01/2021 15:02:32 0 0
bbc
It'll also mean that anyone who is self employed will pretty much have to pay the taxes they should do. No more cash in hand (vat and income tax free) transactions!
19/01/2021 15:12:42 0 1
bbc
As a taxpayer I'm happy for people to be tracked. People who avoid taxes by using un traceable cash are stealing from the rest of us.
19/01/2021 15:33:11 0 0
bbc
at last, some sense!
19/01/2021 16:06:04 0 0
bbc
Perhaps bartering will return.
6
19/01/2021 11:51:14 57 40
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it! Just means that those shops will get less trade from those who still use cash!
13
19/01/2021 11:52:48 41 3
bbc
Legal tender can be used to pay fines and taxes...that's it.
32
BH
19/01/2021 11:54:53 17 3
bbc
Well you're wrong, shops don't have to accept cash in payment.
33
19/01/2021 11:54:57 16 1
bbc
Of course they can refuse to take it. Just as they can refuse to take cheques.
51
19/01/2021 11:55:56 16 1
bbc
They can refuse to sell you anything if they choose.
59
19/01/2021 11:56:57 15 2
bbc
Shops have every right to refuse any means of payment. They can insist on being paid in rubber bands if they want to.
560
19/01/2021 12:36:13 5 0
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it!

So obviously you don't know what legal tender is then
574
19/01/2021 12:37:29 4 0
bbc
Shops are PRIVATE businesses so can refuse if they so wish. Most people use cards so I doubt these businesses are bothered about losing a few customers because they save on their business insurance which has higher premiums if there is cash on the premises.
727
19/01/2021 12:47:47 3 0
bbc
No sorry. It just means you can use it to settle a debt in court. Shops are well within their rights to refuse cash.
19/01/2021 13:29:34 2 0
bbc
That's not what legal tender means.
19/01/2021 13:54:41 2 0
bbc
Nope, 'legal tender' is about acceptable payment of debt. Any business can refuse your cash, and you can't pretend to be an armchair lawyer and tell them otherwise.
19/01/2021 16:15:27 1 0
bbc
Then you don't understand it. Shops do have a right to refuse cash payments.
19/01/2021 21:58:36 0 0
bbc
Nonsense
7
19/01/2021 11:51:18 19 21
bbc
Hate to say it, but this is probably a good thing overall. Will make the 'grey economy' more difficult to conceal and therefore, in theory, more funds for the public purse
38
Fug
19/01/2021 11:55:20 4 1
bbc
While that might seem like a natural benefit, I think you will find that cryptocurrency will simply replace cash for 'grey' / illegal transactions.
44
SJ
19/01/2021 11:56:14 2 2
bbc
This is a terrible development. Cashless transactions should be winning on their own merits, with systems improved to make this happen. If customers are forced to go cashless the impetus for better systems is gone. Also it discriminates against those who have difficulty with cashless, often seniors.
46
19/01/2021 11:56:28 3 1
bbc
No it will open up a whole new societal divide where those without access to internet banking or a proper bank account are locked out of the wider economy and will have to come up with other means to pay for goods which wont be Government backed and opens them up to fraud and abuse
8
19/01/2021 11:52:03 99 35
bbc
Cash is king, no matter what!
Plastic cards have expiration date, cash doesn't.
26
19/01/2021 11:54:13 64 32
bbc
Actually, cash does. Every time they change the design.
80
19/01/2021 11:58:19 4 4
bbc
Don't store your twenties under the bed. They'll change them next week.
605
19/01/2021 12:39:12 3 1
bbc
we don't have a king
19/01/2021 13:17:03 2 2
bbc
Yes it does when the central bank decides it is no longer legal tender, remember the old one pound coin?
19/01/2021 13:25:31 2 2
bbc
so, still using the old £1 cons which are no longer legal tender? of course not... they have expired. OOOOPS!
19/01/2021 13:40:36 0 4
bbc
Who uses cards nowadays?
19/01/2021 15:07:20 0 0
bbc
However, lose or have your cash stolen and it's gone. But your cards are replaceable.
19/01/2021 15:35:40 1 0
bbc
Try telling that to all those people who hoarded groats during the reign of Evil Prince John! :)
9
19/01/2021 11:52:06 21 16
bbc
Surely if cash is offered as a means of payment (perhaps no option in some cases) it must be acceptable?
"Legal Tender" and all that....
24
19/01/2021 11:53:55 21 2
bbc
A business has a choice, just as you do as to whether or not to frequent that business.
569
19/01/2021 12:37:00 0 0
bbc
So so wrong, try wikipedia it explains things using small words to you
10
19/01/2021 11:52:08 729 69
bbc
Until it is enshrined in law my cash is still good enough. If it’s not accepted I’ll simply go elsewhere.
155
19/01/2021 12:05:55 269 555
bbc
Cashless transactions especially using tap and go cards helps to avoid contact and with it the possibility of passing on COVID-19 and other infectious diseases
Therefore whenever possible we should all avoid using cash, which could be contaminated
231
19/01/2021 12:11:59 12 34
bbc
Well you'll have to won't you.
252
19/01/2021 12:13:50 74 13
bbc
It's legal tender, if the shops wont accept it then i'll go elsewhere and spend my money there
325
19/01/2021 12:18:30 29 5
bbc
the thing is. there are a lot of people and a lot of companies who make a lot of money, from selling the information that digital payments create (buying habits, gps location information, screen swipes, mouse clicks, etc)

collecting data is addictive (and creates businesses in itself - organising the data), and when you make money from it, it's even more addictive.
340
19/01/2021 12:19:32 10 10
bbc
Go elsewhere? No need.

"Here's payment. You're refusing it? That's very generous of you."
387
A C
19/01/2021 12:23:56 5 3
bbc
I do the same as you and will continue to do so. Ironically I recently went into a shop that insisted on cash for a purchase of less than £5
407
19/01/2021 12:08:41 13 4
bbc
I don't understand why posts like this get downvotes, are the downvoters forced to use cash everywhere?

No.

They're just being obstinate & petty.
596
19/01/2021 12:38:39 2 1
bbc
Well said.

Recently in a cafe I pulled out my credit card and the waitress pointed to the "CASH ONLY" sign - lucky I still keep notes in my wallet otherwise I'd be washing dishes.....!
685
19/01/2021 12:44:26 4 1
bbc
Nothing is “enshrined” in law because laws can be changed.
Removed
793
19/01/2021 12:53:21 2 4
bbc
You must be feeling very weary with all that walking about.
987
19/01/2021 12:51:58 0 1
bbc
Eh. That might not be convenient if you've run out of petrol.
19/01/2021 13:16:15 0 0
bbc
Me too
19/01/2021 13:30:46 1 1
bbc
Hmm.. try doing that in a city like Gothenburg in Sweden. You cant even pay for a tram ticket in Cash.
19/01/2021 13:39:00 2 2
bbc
I go elsewhere for if they don't accept card
11
19/01/2021 11:52:17 143 24
bbc
.it is not impossible that cyber hackers could crash the entire banking system.putin has an army of cyber hackers
131
19/01/2021 12:03:46 47 38
bbc
It is, but then if they did that the cash machines wouldn't work and you wouldn't be able to get your cash anyway. We have been card dependant for years.
757
19/01/2021 12:50:45 1 1
bbc
Putin has an army of Hackers, We have an army of Hackers as well , the US has, China has Also Big Business and probably uncle tom cobbly as well. They are all at it, you are correct, we are at the Mercy of Anyone who has the ability to cause disruption, not only banking Defence, Health, mobility, food, anything, we are heading for a computer age meltdown, this cannot be stopped.
19/01/2021 13:37:43 2 1
bbc
The banking system is already vulnerable, get over it.
19/01/2021 14:44:35 0 0
bbc
The banking system itself is set up to crash - have a Google of the upcoming inevitably of the Derivatives Collapse - Derivatives are currently trading at over 700% of the notional amount of stock available - it is gambling on thin air and assets that don't actually exist - we are past the point of everyone being able to cash in their bets and it's not if it will crash but when.
19/01/2021 14:47:26 0 0
bbc
Kind of like there are forgers of metal and paper money, so pretty much the same risks
19/01/2021 16:03:46 0 0
bbc
Quantum computers will enable every home/phone based banking App to become hackable in Milliseconds.
12
19/01/2021 11:52:27 9 6
bbc
Creeping in? I've had it rejected many times since Covid started which didn't seem right. Supermarket automated checkouts no longer accept it. It is highly prevalent already.
144
19/01/2021 12:04:49 2 1
bbc
The automated checkout at my local Sainsbury's accepts cash (or did the last time I went). That's just a small one, of course, and I don't know about the large ones, where I wouldn't use cash anyway. Those in Boots don't have a problem with cash, either. Don't know about other shops.
333
19/01/2021 12:19:13 1 0
bbc
My supermarket automated check outs still take cash. So not sure about highly prevalent.
6
19/01/2021 11:51:14 57 40
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it! Just means that those shops will get less trade from those who still use cash!
13
19/01/2021 11:52:48 41 3
bbc
Legal tender can be used to pay fines and taxes...that's it.
14
ljs
19/01/2021 11:52:54 10 13
bbc
END of CIVILISATION as we known it,

yet another step toward BIG BROTHER where nobody actually owns anything.
40
19/01/2021 11:55:27 3 2
bbc
Cash is just a lump of alloy or piece of printed paper with no inherent value anyway, this isn't even a tiny step to not owning anything, you already have nothing.
15
19/01/2021 11:53:12 299 43
bbc
Whilst in many ways this is a good thing, it also allows those in charge to have 100% control over your finances. Turning off access to your bank account would be simple.
45
19/01/2021 11:56:18 120 33
bbc
Just how do you think most people get their cash now?
By withdrawing it from their bank account
102
19/01/2021 12:01:07 5 2
bbc
This could happen anyway. Only takes the click of a button to stop you withdrawing cash. Your existing pocket cash will only last so long before you need to withdraw again...
123
19/01/2021 12:02:38 4 2
bbc
It is with cash, you need a card of some kind to get it out of the machine/post office so they can still stop you doing that if they pleased
435
19/01/2021 12:27:17 0 0
bbc
The government can already turn off access to one's bank account and have done so under the Unexplained Wealth Order investigations.
771
19/01/2021 12:51:42 1 1
bbc
If you even have a bank account, which is most people, the banks already have control over your account, regardless of whether you're spending cash or buying with a card. I honestly can't see the difference.
19/01/2021 14:28:01 0 1
bbc
Heard of Bitcoin? Well there's your answer. Cryptocurrencies in general offer the ability to make electronic transactions without a bank or government being able to restrict you. And no, they're not just for criminals.
19/01/2021 14:41:07 2 0
bbc
It paves the way for the introduction of social credit. Gov'ts & Corps could easily track every thing you do - rewarding 'good' behaviour and penalising 'bad'. Welcome to the Big Reset!
20/01/2021 16:08:05 0 0
bbc
To the general good as the info drives better goods, services and decisions.
16
19/01/2021 11:53:16 5 6
bbc
No banks and no cash machines going at a fair rate, the ones that you can use have some faceless bank/spiv demanding a quid, of your money with you having the privilege of keying in your own pin number. It stinks......
17
19/01/2021 11:53:20 5 3
bbc
What if customers insisted in having their change paid directly into their bank accounts? The Banks have a lot to answer for too - even mainly self service banks where I live have shut their doors untruly and without cause blaming it on Covid. Stupid as only one bank for transactions causes congregations of people & more likelihood of Covid spread to their own staff & to other customers.
18
19/01/2021 11:53:27 726 120
bbc
To all those wishing for a cashless society, consider this: a truly cashless society means you won't be able to put a £10 note into a Christmas card; you won't be able to leave an envelope for the binmen; you won't be able to leave a tip for table staff; you won't be able to have a 'fines jar' at the club; you won't be able to slip a tenner into a strippers' stocking without it being recorded....
36
19/01/2021 11:55:18 208 39
bbc
I'm guessing I know where your priorities are :-)
133
dan
19/01/2021 12:03:55 36 99
bbc
The fact you think most people are worried about being able "to have a fines jar at the club" suggests maybe you're a tiny bit out of touch with the average Joe on the street...
164
Bob
19/01/2021 12:06:29 41 63
bbc
You mean I won't have to contribute to whip-rounds for people I don't know? Oh no.
You mean I won't be forced into tipping for stuff they did poorly or should be doing anyway just because the employer isn't paying a fair wage? Oh no.

You've just listed a load of benefits as far as I am concerned.
179
19/01/2021 12:07:46 40 31
bbc
of course you will....you just do it in a different way. Many restaurants have accepted "tips" via card payment for years already!! You can also purchase "gift cards" to put in a Christmas card and have been able to for years.
197
19/01/2021 12:09:07 21 21
bbc
Wow. That’s a good reason for facilitating money laundering and cash in hand tax avoidance then.
217
19/01/2021 12:10:35 57 6
bbc
Imagine being homeless in a cashless society.
223
19/01/2021 12:10:53 2 3
bbc
but think of all the extra tax they can claim
227
19/01/2021 12:11:22 40 47
bbc
Every single part of that comment makes you sound like you live in 1978.
244
19/01/2021 12:13:08 14 32
bbc
Cash shouldn't be sent through the post - this has been the advice for years. Tips for table staff can be added to the bill when paying by card, some do it automatically. As for the 'fines jar' that could be charged via a swipe machine, easy enough to set up. From your examples, only the binmen and the strippers in the strip club lose out. Cashless wouldn't be totally cashless anyway!
250
19/01/2021 12:13:38 9 2
bbc
you can't make a database out of cash (a database which you can then sell)

you can with the information you get from wireless/digital/gps location tagged payments
305
19/01/2021 12:17:17 7 15
bbc
Majority of people don't do any of those things.
329
19/01/2021 12:18:48 14 1
bbc
It also means people will use your data to profile you. I have worked in Business Intelligence for many years. I can tell you that information about your politics, gender, religion, medical issues, family and just about everything else can be farmed from what you buy. Many people in WW2 wished their religion wasn't on census forms. Bad people don't even need access to that information any more.
375
19/01/2021 12:22:58 18 2
bbc
My local corner shop accepts card payments but only if its over £5. The transaction costs to them is too high. It seems that for small items the transaction charges are more t5han the item. Cashless will just put up the costs of items. Yes Sir that packet of sweets is 20p but I will have to charge you £1 to cover transaction charges. Be careful what you wish for.
383
19/01/2021 12:23:28 6 3
bbc
We are no longer living in 1970. Various cashless payment methods are available - cashless technology is even available for 'Big Issue' sellers to accept payment nowadays.
385
19/01/2021 12:23:41 1 0
bbc
you won't be able to slip a tenner into a strippers' stocking without it being recorded......

Oh I'm sure they'll find somewhere to swipe :)
392
Ben
19/01/2021 12:24:17 1 0
bbc
Strip clubs are way ahead of you. They sell "dirty dollars" that can be paid for by card.
492
19/01/2021 12:31:03 3 2
bbc
Bank transfer, presents instead of money, electronic tipping, self control and contactless payment devices. Can do all of what you've listed without cash.
495
19/01/2021 12:31:19 7 0
bbc
Where do you put the tenner once the stockings have been removed? Asking this on behalf of someone else........
521
19/01/2021 12:33:40 4 0
bbc
most of what you mention we can get around ......but the tenner in a strippers stocking is a real cause for concern.
I suppose you could always meet the stripper " out the back" with a card machine ..yes that's the way to go.
542
19/01/2021 12:35:11 3 0
bbc
I worry about the charity takings, no more "Just drop it in the tin" with your small change.
579
TF
19/01/2021 12:15:16 1 1
bbc
And yet with cash...you will allow criminals to thrive, tax not to be paid, fraud to persist, counterfeiting to be rife....time to go cashless and start to develop a framework to stop economic crimes...
586
Mal
19/01/2021 12:37:36 2 0
bbc
We strippers are aghast.
710
KO
19/01/2021 12:46:26 1 0
bbc
I (and my wider family) stopped sending anything of value in the post years ago when anything that looked like a greetings card went missing.
724
19/01/2021 12:47:29 1 2
bbc
Venmo, cash app, paypal, instant transfer.... there are plenty of ways. This is an absolute non issue.
745
19/01/2021 12:49:29 0 0
bbc
Sounds brilliant to me....
750
19/01/2021 12:50:02 1 0
bbc
So you'll have to think about presents and people should get paid a decent wage, thats not news... Can't help you out with the stripper though...
888
19/01/2021 13:01:27 1 1
bbc
Put a it in the kids isa, give the binmen a gift, tip electronically and stop compelling speech and defrauding your children.
944
19/01/2021 13:07:25 2 0
bbc
and anyone who doesn't have a bank account and a computer will form an alternative society, in fact some who have will join in, after all, what drug dealer is going to accept a credit card? Until drugs are legal our elite will still be after sourcing their coke etc .
961
19/01/2021 13:08:21 1 0
bbc
You won't be able to leave 50p under your child's pillow when their tooth falls out either ;-)
967
19/01/2021 13:09:20 2 1
bbc
You are simply wrong, most of those things can be done with an app. Cash itself is an unlinked concept i.e. the coins/notes are just representative and have no intrinsic value. The concept of cash is actually in your head, and like most humans you cling onto your preconceptions as if they were somehow real.
986
19/01/2021 12:51:15 1 0
bbc
Yes but on the plus side you won't be easily able to deal and charge for illegal substances, tipping can be done as an add on to a car apyment. A gift can be given in form of a gift card too! So many ways around all that!
Ans maybe your hooker/dancers could have a number on their knickers so you can tip them digitally!
19/01/2021 13:13:14 2 0
bbc
I know someone who went to a strip club once. He said "Can I use a card instead of cash". The lady said to him "Are you hard up?" He said "No. its just the way I`m standing"
mfc
19/01/2021 13:14:44 1 1
bbc
Those are good things? Fines jars? Notes in cards instead of a carefully chosen present? Tips instead of a proper wage for the waiters? Strippers? And where can one leave an envelope for binmen without it being picked up by someone else?

Even in these Covid times I went out (with facemask) to thank the binmen personally.
19/01/2021 13:16:59 2 0
bbc
and the binmen, strippers, minicab drivers, plumbers, electricians will all have to pay VAT and income tax on those transactions (table staff typically already do)
19/01/2021 13:17:05 1 1
bbc
Took you a while to get to your real concern. A bit creepy.
19
19/01/2021 11:53:32 6 6
bbc
Great way for the government to keep tabs on drug dealers and make them pay some tax!
20
19/01/2021 11:53:32 17 2
bbc
As long as the technology and assistance evolves in a user friendly way...not all of us are tech savvy.
19/01/2021 13:19:16 10 0
bbc
Imagine a world where banks charge you interest on your money, and you can't go and draw it out.
21
19/01/2021 11:53:37 7 16
bbc
We should not be trying to stop the decline of cash - alternatives are safer and reduce the harm done by the black economy
53
19/01/2021 11:56:41 1 1
bbc
Parts of the black economy will always be outside the banking system because it trades in illegal products in the first place.
61
19/01/2021 11:57:12 0 1
bbc
I would have though the "black economy" thrives on cash, which is why so many trades people don't want to take cheques, cards or bank transfers.

I wasn't a fan of contactless payments pre-Covid, now I never use cash, apart from for the window cleaner, and in summer, the ice cream man!
22
19/01/2021 11:53:46 243 16
bbc
Cashless is very convenient, but please be careful about letting cash be abolished. It puts tremendous control into the hands of governments to effectively freeze an individual from spending the money needed to live. I just don’t like the idea of the state being able to see every little exchange of money and analyse it to death.
58
19/01/2021 11:56:35 163 11
bbc
It happens in China and you are rated how good a citizen you are by what you buy - buy loots of booze and you are a bad citizen.
644
19/01/2021 12:41:26 1 3
bbc
They can do that already.... we all have bank accounts and need to use ATMs to withdraw funds. The only people you're talking to are the odd ones who still keep cash under their bed rather than in a bank or investment.
847
19/01/2021 12:57:25 9 0
bbc
If we get to pint where the government can freeze bank accounts held by bank without going through a legal process first we've got bigger problems than cash vs. cashless.
19/01/2021 13:31:55 0 0
bbc
Your store cards tell anyone who wants to know what you buy, with or without cash. You can choose not to have them but most people do have them and society hasnt fallen appart so far... The Gov already know what people on average buy and lets be honest, you are pretty average, more detailed information makes very little real diference.
19/01/2021 15:58:23 0 0
bbc
Too many people reading conspiracy theories on FaceB, the government is too busy making sure their mates get dodgy PPE contracts to worry about if you spend £5 at Tescos
23
19/01/2021 11:53:48 10 11
bbc
A big part of me is thinking so what? I literally haven't used cash at all in nearly a year

I know we need to support older people etc who refuse to do internet banking and such but this is always the way things were headed, covid just sped it up
9
19/01/2021 11:52:06 21 16
bbc
Surely if cash is offered as a means of payment (perhaps no option in some cases) it must be acceptable?
"Legal Tender" and all that....
24
19/01/2021 11:53:55 21 2
bbc
A business has a choice, just as you do as to whether or not to frequent that business.
174
19/01/2021 12:07:27 2 2
bbc
I agree if you attempt to buy something you have not yet consumed - you and the shop are still at the stage of deciding whether or not to trade with each other. However, if you receive a bill in a restaurant after eating a meal, is that still true? In that case, might you be settling a debt with the restaurant, which would make the law surrounding legal tender relevant?
25
19/01/2021 11:53:58 266 34
bbc
Big Brother is watching you. All your spending observed by big business and the state.
616
19/01/2021 12:39:49 91 130
bbc
I really don't care, I have nothing to hide. If someone is that interested in where I buy my groceries then more fool them.
630
19/01/2021 12:40:34 2 0
bbc
It already is for the vast majority of everyones spending. They know where you are what you bought etc. Good for creating alibis though, to prove you were where you said you were at a time and date, but for some that could be bad! :-)
687
19/01/2021 12:44:48 2 0
bbc
Big Brother's primary aim is to ensure you pay due tax. Cash-in-hand, drug deals will all be affected - I'm sure there'll be workarounds but ultimately to switch to/from Sterling will be traceable.
776
19/01/2021 12:51:53 6 11
bbc
Paranoia rules OK!
790
PJT
19/01/2021 12:53:11 0 0
bbc
Notes and Coins in the UK Money Supply are a key measure of the Black Economy in the UK. Governments usually want to keep this to determine the size of such a black economy so that they can target it.
833
19/01/2021 12:56:39 8 3
bbc
If people are honestly bothered by Big Brother watching them, I'm guessing they also don't use Amazon, Netflix, Apple, Microsoft, facebook, etc.

Don't blame Big Brother on a cashless society. Big Brother has been watching for decades.
891
19/01/2021 13:01:54 1 4
bbc
It already is....I buy online all the time and frankly if they want to analyse it then so be it, they can find out how effing strange my shopping habits can be with my eclectic purchases.
19/01/2021 13:13:05 1 4
bbc
and if you have nothing to hide then this becomes a non-issue. If someone is really that interested in where I shop for food and so on, then to be honest they need to get a life! Put your tin foil hat away, step into the fresh air and stop being so suspicious of everything. Contrary to the belief of many on social media etc, not everything is a conspiracy.
19/01/2021 13:21:29 0 1
bbc
Let me guess, you have a supermarket loyalty card, but that isnt a problem when they are running your numbers while big brother, who has better things to do, isnt and you stay awake at night worrying about him. The word you are looking for is hypocrit.
19/01/2021 14:52:50 0 0
bbc
Always has been. You say as you type into your phone / computer which has its ip recorded and the cookies record your every move
19/01/2021 15:12:55 1 0
bbc
It's not that I have something to hide. I just don't have anything I want them to see.

For all of those people saying it doesn't matter, how about a 15 year old afraid to buy condoms because they can't do so discreetly. Or a girl buying a pregnancy test kit in a religeous family who will punish her when they see the transaction? There are so many examples documented of why this is bad.
8
19/01/2021 11:52:03 99 35
bbc
Cash is king, no matter what!
Plastic cards have expiration date, cash doesn't.
26
19/01/2021 11:54:13 64 32
bbc
Actually, cash does. Every time they change the design.
63
19/01/2021 11:57:18 6 9
bbc
Still cash though & hardly matters if it expires once every 30 years or so, that's a generation long period.
70
19/01/2021 11:58:01 15 10
bbc
No you are wrong - All Cash whether old, pre decimalisation, not in circulation - can be taken to any bank and cashed in to its value
264
19/01/2021 12:14:31 6 2
bbc
No, while at some point a note may cease to be legal tender, it can be exchanged as long as the issuing authority, in our case the Bank of England, exists. There was Weimar of course!
780
19/01/2021 12:52:17 1 3
bbc
Wrong. The Promise to Pay the Bearer still stands. You had in old money to the gov.
19/01/2021 14:26:00 2 0
bbc
It is less stringent though, I'm still exchanging old pound coins for new ones at my bank, no argument, hand in the old coin, new one comes back.
27
19/01/2021 11:54:20 14 4
bbc
Cash is still king, or so my butcher told me the other day. All that 'cash in hand' money has to be spent somewhere so I don't think it's demise is imminent.
799
19/01/2021 12:53:47 2 0
bbc
It certainly is as the report recently saying there is a huge pile of cash unaccounted for by the BOE! They have no idea where it is, many millions of wise people hiding some away for emergencies and to avoid problems with Digital bank cyber attacks!
28
19/01/2021 11:54:24 8 6
bbc
If you want to increase tax receipts then you need to reduce cash payments in society, you cannot avoid tax on electronic payments as easily as cash. Therefore it's not in the governments interest to stop this trend.
97
19/01/2021 12:00:56 6 6
bbc
Wanna bet? Rees-Mogg and his cronies will still be able to avoid paying tax, why do you think we left the EU?
29
19/01/2021 11:54:38 2 3
bbc
This is going to be a drop in the ocean compared to what will happen when the full impact of Covid spending and endless quantities easing hit us.
43
19/01/2021 11:56:02 0 1
bbc
Sorry, meant ‘quantitive’.
30
ET
19/01/2021 11:54:42 7 18
bbc
Well, apart from vat avoidance, why would you want to use cash at this time?
If you don’t have a bank account with a card, there are mechanisms available to everyone to get one.
Benefits are paid via bank transfer...
Discounts are available for paying bills via direct debit...
Some builders still like cash, for obvious reasons involving HMRC
I can’t think of one positive point about cash.
71
19/01/2021 11:58:04 4 1
bbc
Cash you have to steal at source, electronic money can be stolen from anywhere in the World.
137
19/01/2021 12:04:18 1 1
bbc
Well... per Hiram Oysterburger III point above - have you every tried paying a stripper by sliding your credit card down her slot .... ;-0
31
Gaz
19/01/2021 11:54:53 4 7
bbc
It’s not only issues with the lack of banks. Less chance of being robbed, less chances of handling contaminated cash. On the plus side, those members of the community who ONLY deal with cash will end up with traceable accounts.
89
19/01/2021 11:59:49 1 1
bbc
'less chance of being robbed' Really? I'd be interested to know the numbers of people robbed of cash last year vs the number of people/businesses hacked online.
6
19/01/2021 11:51:14 57 40
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it! Just means that those shops will get less trade from those who still use cash!
32
BH
19/01/2021 11:54:53 17 3
bbc
Well you're wrong, shops don't have to accept cash in payment.
6
19/01/2021 11:51:14 57 40
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it! Just means that those shops will get less trade from those who still use cash!
33
19/01/2021 11:54:57 16 1
bbc
Of course they can refuse to take it. Just as they can refuse to take cheques.
3
19/01/2021 11:50:55 9 19
bbc
There is nothing to fear from going to a cashless society but it needs to be phased in over time. I'd be very surprised if people still used cash in say 50 years.
34
19/01/2021 11:54:59 11 6
bbc
Nothing to fear? try telling that to people that have been scammed through no fault of there own!!!
162
19/01/2021 12:06:25 2 5
bbc
you can pay cash and still get scammed - remember the old woman who paid the guy cash for a fake covid vaccine?
35
SAV
19/01/2021 11:55:00 11 14
bbc
Every time a shop has tried to reject cash payments, I have stood my ground telling them that it is illegal to refuse legal tender for payment in the UK. This has worked 90% of the time.
65
19/01/2021 11:57:28 9 1
bbc
it's not though. They are a private business they can just refuse to serve you
78
19/01/2021 11:58:35 4 1
bbc
The only thing is the shop has no legal obligation to serve you no matter how high and mighty you try to be. They can simply ask you to leave, and you must otherwise you are the one who is breaching the law.
96
19/01/2021 12:00:46 4 1
bbc
It's not illegal to refuse cash, they are private businesses.
118
Bob
19/01/2021 12:02:05 6 1
bbc
I hope the other 10% tell you that you're wrong - because you are.
190
19/01/2021 12:08:51 2 1
bbc
You are wrong..... It's not illegal for a retailer to refuse cash. It is their choice what types of payment they accept. Just accept it's their choice, just as it's your choice where you shop.
194
19/01/2021 12:08:59 2 1
bbc
It may work, but only if they misunderstand legal tender: the the refusal of legal tender for payment isn't illegal. Legal tender means payment which can't be refused in settlement of a debt, and a retail transaction isn't a debt: if they don't agree to sell you the goods (something which they're entitled to do) then you have no debt to pay. Thus legal tender has no relevance to shopping.
199
19/01/2021 12:09:25 2 1
bbc
But it isn't illegal.
19/01/2021 17:15:47 1 0
bbc
Bet they just love seeing you coming...
18
19/01/2021 11:53:27 726 120
bbc
To all those wishing for a cashless society, consider this: a truly cashless society means you won't be able to put a £10 note into a Christmas card; you won't be able to leave an envelope for the binmen; you won't be able to leave a tip for table staff; you won't be able to have a 'fines jar' at the club; you won't be able to slip a tenner into a strippers' stocking without it being recorded....
36
19/01/2021 11:55:18 208 39
bbc
I'm guessing I know where your priorities are :-)
83
GJ
19/01/2021 11:59:23 141 3
bbc
Yes I got thrown out of a strip club once after trying to swipe by card.
626
19/01/2021 12:40:18 1 0
bbc
Exactly, the binmen will have to go without ;-)
681
19/01/2021 12:44:04 0 0
bbc
Not very high if Hiram’s only doing tenners ;-)
19/01/2021 13:17:40 1 0
bbc
And I am guessing I know where yours are.
4
19/01/2021 11:51:03 1091 202
bbc
Without hard cash, how do you teach young children its value? They need the experience of taking a £1 coin and seeing what they can buy with it.
When it's just numbers on a screen, cash becomes an abstract concept. And so does debt.
37
19/01/2021 11:55:18 404 497
bbc
"cash becomes an abstract concept".
It already is. There is little or no value in little metal disks or pieces of paper, the whole concept of money is a rather odd concept based on trust in banks - and who trusts bankers?
150
19/01/2021 12:05:39 40 4
bbc
See bitcoin for an even more extreme example.
161
19/01/2021 12:06:19 64 3
bbc
Money as a token of exchange existed millennia before banks came into existence.
288
19/01/2021 12:16:10 18 8
bbc
Nobody trusts banks. A cashless society would give them more control, as all transactions would have to go through them.
344
19/01/2021 12:19:53 7 1
bbc
So how would going cashless change trust in banks? Would they just cease to exist?
Your point makes no sense.
348
19/01/2021 12:20:09 8 1
bbc
If you don't trust bankers, then how does a cashless society work. There has to be a record of your credit and it has to be secure. That's why we have banks and bankers.
540
19/01/2021 12:35:06 9 2
bbc
It's so easy to keep spending when it's just numbers on a spreadsheet / creditcard. When you limit yourself to having the cash in your hand before you spend it, you can see it running out & adjust your spending accordingly. Unfortunately, the emphasis on Covid safety leading to online spending and reduced handling of cash means it's not possible at present but perhaps we'll get back to it soon.
550
19/01/2021 12:35:38 1 3
bbc
Early June 2016 £1 got you 1.34 Euros. Now it is only 1.12 Euros based on demand and trading algorithms, nothing to do with the value of the coin or the health of the national reserves.
614
19/01/2021 12:23:20 3 1
bbc
Cash is promissory notes - IOUs from the bank to you. Remove cash and you have no way of proving that the bank owes you money...
7
19/01/2021 11:51:18 19 21
bbc
Hate to say it, but this is probably a good thing overall. Will make the 'grey economy' more difficult to conceal and therefore, in theory, more funds for the public purse
38
Fug
19/01/2021 11:55:20 4 1
bbc
While that might seem like a natural benefit, I think you will find that cryptocurrency will simply replace cash for 'grey' / illegal transactions.
39
19/01/2021 11:55:21 11 3
bbc
Its a 50/50 call in my view. Certainly everybody should carry some cash in an emergency, but the younger generation appear now to have shunned it completely.

Don't forget there are older people still around and those of us who like to see our money still exist too.

But, eventually when we are gone and maybe all those over 50 now are gone, then yes it will be a cashless society.
14
ljs
19/01/2021 11:52:54 10 13
bbc
END of CIVILISATION as we known it,

yet another step toward BIG BROTHER where nobody actually owns anything.
40
19/01/2021 11:55:27 3 2
bbc
Cash is just a lump of alloy or piece of printed paper with no inherent value anyway, this isn't even a tiny step to not owning anything, you already have nothing.
41
19/01/2021 11:55:29 18 6
bbc
Plenty of smaller shops in the town I live in have insisted on cash only since this pandemic started ....completely bucking the trend. Wonder why ?
73
19/01/2021 11:58:15 8 3
bbc
Yes, my dealer also stopped accepted Visa too. Cash or Crypto only.
119
19/01/2021 12:02:13 2 2
bbc
Exactly claiming furlough at the same time
748
19/01/2021 12:50:01 0 4
bbc
The opposite of what they should be doing, cash is FILTHY. No joke.
42
19/01/2021 11:55:43 244 20
bbc
What about the unbanked? Not everyone in society has a credit/debit card not everyone who has want to use them for everything, retailers pay a fee for accepting credit cards & for banking cash so understand the need to reduce cash handling costs but we must be an inclusive society & not reduce opportunity for some to buy goods & services they need A cashless society must provide a solution for all
95
Bob
19/01/2021 12:00:42 85 292
bbc
Before cash came about and we were using salt and other such things to trade and barter goods would you have said 'what about the uncashed' when salt began to fade away?

You will never make progress if you cling on to the past.

Get an account, it isn't difficult.
345
jay
19/01/2021 12:19:56 5 4
bbc
A cashless society is the government's wet dream they can monitor everything. Making exceptions for those that cannot or will not get a bank account is not going to happen. Banks will be forced to give accounts to everyone.
588
19/01/2021 12:37:44 4 20
bbc
Mandatory bank accounts. Easy.
802
19/01/2021 12:54:04 4 6
bbc
There is a solution... get a bank account! Everyone is entitled to a bank account in the UK, even those without a fixed address. Having physical cash doesn't make your bank account worth 'more' somehow.

Paying by cash "in the good old day" was a slow process because some people would literally empty their pockets of 1ps and 2ps, slowing down the queue of customers.
19/01/2021 13:26:23 2 0
bbc
You dont get to do whatever you want in society, some things you have to do (wear clothes in public for example), and some things you can choose not to do (you "could" buy a phone not made by apple). Not having a bank account prevents you doing quite a few things, being employed by a lot of companies, buying/selling property etc etc. Inclusive doesnt mean "doing whatever people want".
19/01/2021 13:39:42 2 0
bbc
As someone who was 'unbanked' for over a decade, there are plenty of options for people with no credit rating, etc. They do need to be more widely advertised though and certain safe guards so people will always have some access.
19/01/2021 14:53:29 1 4
bbc
The unbanked are dying out. You can’t stop the future for 0.0001% of people.

They lived through the war, they can handle cashless
19/01/2021 15:10:14 0 1
bbc
Agree. I like to do a job, get paid cash, spend the cash.

Why should I first have to take the cash to a man in a bank, pay it to him, explain who I am so that he can give me a plastic card, go back to the shop, use the card to pay, then go back to the bank and use the card again to get a little piece of paper that tells me how much I've got left to spend? Way too much faff.
19/01/2021 17:03:07 0 0
bbc
There won't be any retailers left soon to take payments.

Jeff Bezos and his team have got this one sewn up.
29
19/01/2021 11:54:38 2 3
bbc
This is going to be a drop in the ocean compared to what will happen when the full impact of Covid spending and endless quantities easing hit us.
43
19/01/2021 11:56:02 0 1
bbc
Sorry, meant ‘quantitive’.
7
19/01/2021 11:51:18 19 21
bbc
Hate to say it, but this is probably a good thing overall. Will make the 'grey economy' more difficult to conceal and therefore, in theory, more funds for the public purse
44
SJ
19/01/2021 11:56:14 2 2
bbc
This is a terrible development. Cashless transactions should be winning on their own merits, with systems improved to make this happen. If customers are forced to go cashless the impetus for better systems is gone. Also it discriminates against those who have difficulty with cashless, often seniors.
15
19/01/2021 11:53:12 299 43
bbc
Whilst in many ways this is a good thing, it also allows those in charge to have 100% control over your finances. Turning off access to your bank account would be simple.
45
19/01/2021 11:56:18 120 33
bbc
Just how do you think most people get their cash now?
By withdrawing it from their bank account
218
19/01/2021 12:10:37 1 1
bbc
Since my local bank branch closed, mainly through cashback, when I find I’ve only about £10 cash so pay by card and get £20 or £30 cash.
384
19/01/2021 12:23:33 8 7
bbc
Not those most dependant on it; your privilege is showing.
467
19/01/2021 12:29:26 6 0
bbc
no..no...no. if you try to withdraw a "suspicious amount", we will remove your account access. maybe temporarily.
19/01/2021 13:14:09 4 0
bbc
True, but once it is withdrawn, that is where the surveillance stops, unless you choose to spend in a manner that can be checked. Given a recent report mentioned billions in cash that the BOE has no idea about where it is, I suspect the cash economy is doing fine & good for it.
19/01/2021 13:20:19 0 5
bbc
Well said, furthermore most people get money into their bank account by their employer putting it there NOT by being paid in tenners in a brown envelope every friday afternoon. Cash is already a non valuable system of tokens channeled through the bank, in essence the physical notes/coins are an old fassioned distraction, a tradition serving no real purpose other than to look shiny.
19/01/2021 14:15:30 0 0
bbc
You could always stuff it under the mattress.
19/01/2021 14:24:30 1 0
bbc
Not if they're self employed.
19/01/2021 15:25:06 0 0
bbc
What! Don't you keep it under the mattress?
19/01/2021 15:49:38 0 0
bbc
Not sure of your point here. Preferring to use cash for transactions doesn't preclude having a bank account for larger transactions. No-one is suggesting people having hoards of cash on them whenever they go out to cover all their purchases. No-one buys a car with cash.

BTW if cash disappears tighten so does the annual poppy appeal. No-one would be buying a poppy from a street seller cashless.
19/01/2021 15:58:13 0 0
bbc
Yes but no one knows how what when and where it was used.
19/01/2021 16:04:20 0 0
bbc
In a cashless society, the banks will start charging you interest on your savings ?? and there is nothing you can do about it ??
7
19/01/2021 11:51:18 19 21
bbc
Hate to say it, but this is probably a good thing overall. Will make the 'grey economy' more difficult to conceal and therefore, in theory, more funds for the public purse
46
19/01/2021 11:56:28 3 1
bbc
No it will open up a whole new societal divide where those without access to internet banking or a proper bank account are locked out of the wider economy and will have to come up with other means to pay for goods which wont be Government backed and opens them up to fraud and abuse
47
19/01/2021 11:56:29 2 7
bbc
I lived in Houston Texas from 1981 to 1986 and in the larger stores like Sears and Montgomery Ward you had to walk all over the shop to find a till that took cash. 90% of them were card only so the UK is about 40 years behind in this respect.
88
19/01/2021 11:59:42 0 1
bbc
That would be about the only thing in the US domestic banking market which is ahead of the UK/Europe then - every other part of the US domestic banking market is 30+ years behind
48
19/01/2021 11:56:36 169 12
bbc
Our scout group relies on an annual jumble sale for a large part of its income. It is all cash based so how would we run such an event in a cashless future?
281
19/01/2021 12:15:49 33 38
bbc
Text 'scoutwin' to enter the tombola.
319
19/01/2021 12:07:56 10 2
bbc
Buy a (very) inexpensive card reader and link it to your bank account
346
19/01/2021 12:20:07 8 0
bbc
Invest in a £40 card reader that plugs into a phone? Like my local fish and chip shop has done.
503
19/01/2021 12:32:41 8 0
bbc
If big issue sellers can use QR codes for payment, so can you.

https://www.bigissue.com/payitforward/
620
19/01/2021 12:40:05 5 1
bbc
You can use tap and pay portable payment machines like charity workers and small business owners do. In fact you should look into that now, it might increase your jumble sale sales (I never carry cash).
684
19/01/2021 12:44:20 3 0
bbc
Maybe jumble sales will become obsolete....all those folk in close proximity....coughing and sneezing.
Shame...they are good fun
703
19/01/2021 12:25:46 0 2
bbc
Cryptocurrency and 3d barcodes :)
723
19/01/2021 12:47:27 3 0
bbc
Cash isn't going to be abolished - other forms of payment are simply becoming more common, and the current pandemic means shop workers don't want to be touching 100s of people's money every day if there is another way.

Cheques haven't been accepted in shops for years, but I expect you still receive plenty of cheques from parents paying membership fees?
860
19/01/2021 12:58:46 7 1
bbc
Find out... adapt. What life skills are you teaching scouts these days?
19/01/2021 13:13:11 3 1
bbc
you could use tokens, and at the exit an adult with a card reader (yes, individuals can get them) takes a total according to how many tokens are used. Beer festivals have used a similar scheme (with tokens purchased in advance) for many years. See, it's not difficult to find solutions.
19/01/2021 13:33:31 2 0
bbc
You can get a contactless payment system for about £20 which links to a mobile phone, its quite simple, no need to panic.
19/01/2021 13:40:43 1 0
bbc
Don't even really need a card reader if you have an NFC phone or a scanning app. You'd be surprised how easy that kind of thing can be with a little research
19/01/2021 13:52:26 2 1
bbc
Agreed - especially in an area that has very limited internet access (if any) and no mobile signal. The hall used by the Scout doesn't even have a phone line.
19/01/2021 13:57:54 1 0
bbc
put a card app on your phone its simple, raise more money
19/01/2021 14:12:49 1 0
bbc
Many events now have a facility for cashless payments - Stops the excuse of "I don't have any cash"
19/01/2021 15:14:41 0 0
bbc
You create your own kind of money for the day. People buy tokens by card and then buy goods for tokens. As long as you use different types of tokens for future events fraud is highly unlikely. We've been doing this for 10 years at a beer festival.
19/01/2021 15:48:34 0 0
bbc
Our similar group has just obtained a mobile card reader. Works off a 3G phone signal and allows card, contactless and the likes of Apple Pay straight into the group bank account less the 1.7% charge.
19/01/2021 16:17:09 0 0
bbc
Be prepared?
Some of the firms doing cashless payments for charities sell card readers that store up the transactions until you can get to someplace with signal. Charities have an exemption from needing to be online when accepting donations. You would have to check how it applied to a sale.
49
19/01/2021 11:54:31 236 26
bbc
The banks will be pleased. Another opportunity to fleece the public and retailers.
482
19/01/2021 12:30:24 128 2
bbc
as will marketing companies who want to buy the data from database companies who want to sell the information they've contracted from the companies that provide the data
634
19/01/2021 12:40:49 3 1
bbc
Yes the charge per transaction for cards is higher than an aggregated cash deposit.

And then there's the "minimum spend", if it's £5 and you just need some milk what do you do?
815
19/01/2021 12:55:11 0 0
bbc
It's not like cash only avoids all charges. There are ATMs that charge for cash withdrawals (a big problem in areas where they are the only ATMs, available). If you don't have bank account and get paid by cheque trying cashing that without charges!
19/01/2021 13:29:41 1 0
bbc
You realise taking cash as a small buisness means getting the till float FROM THE BANK and depositing the days takings IN THE BANK? No, apperently not.
19/01/2021 13:35:03 1 0
bbc
...and it's only a matter of time before the banks start charging customers to hold money in bank accounts, as interest rates are as good as zero.
19/01/2021 13:58:32 1 1
bbc
How so? By charges? Competition will sort that out and it'll be cheaper overall than all the security and cash handling processes
19/01/2021 14:10:09 2 0
bbc
One of the problems with giving banks full control over people's money is that you may see more of the current PornHub issue cropping up on a wider scale across the population.

Just wait until one of your held beliefs becomes controversial or downtrodden, banks in the future will be able to cut you off entirely from practically every financial transaction.
19/01/2021 15:03:44 0 0
bbc
It'll also mean that anyone who is self employed will pretty much have to pay the taxes they should do. No more cash in hand (vat and income tax free) transactions!
19/01/2021 16:05:45 1 0
bbc
Why? Have you any idea how much cash costs to process? From security, to transportation, production and distribution?

It would save a fortune
50
19/01/2021 11:54:48 81 5
bbc
@merlin 11:51
"Well as far as i understand it cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it!"

Legal tender does not mean that shops have no right to refuse to take it! It simply means that it's a legally accepted form of payment. Shops can refuse to take whatever they want in payment.
326
19/01/2021 12:18:31 20 2
bbc
Many shops & takeaways now say 'card payments only' - some did this even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
499
19/01/2021 12:31:39 3 1
bbc
Not so, please Google "legal tender"
504
19/01/2021 12:32:44 2 0
bbc
Sorry meant to reply to Merlin, whoops.
6
19/01/2021 11:51:14 57 40
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it! Just means that those shops will get less trade from those who still use cash!
51
19/01/2021 11:55:56 16 1
bbc
They can refuse to sell you anything if they choose.
189
19/01/2021 12:08:45 2 2
bbc
Indeed can refuse to take business. But another will take up the gap in provision.
52
GSP
19/01/2021 11:50:18 3 3
bbc
Looks like the inevitable has been brought forward somewhat!
21
19/01/2021 11:53:37 7 16
bbc
We should not be trying to stop the decline of cash - alternatives are safer and reduce the harm done by the black economy
53
19/01/2021 11:56:41 1 1
bbc
Parts of the black economy will always be outside the banking system because it trades in illegal products in the first place.
54
19/01/2021 11:56:44 2 1
bbc
Cash still being accepted by the black economy. It’s at a different ratio to card than pre Covid times, as the self employed need to show their books to receive some benefits.
There is still a ‘bangers’ economy though. Not everyone has a bank a/c, or online banking either.
55
19/01/2021 11:56:44 0 10
bbc
If cash is king then the monarchy looks like it's on the way out.

Still, if the high st truly dies, then I wonder if this will give a proper rise to crypto-currency.

*buys more bitcoin*
56
19/01/2021 11:56:48 577 83
bbc
If my cash is refused, I simply put down my shopping, say 'your loss' and walk out.
81
19/01/2021 11:58:56 220 354
bbc
In how many places have you done this? How many times would you do it before you paid by card or starved?
413
19/01/2021 12:25:33 15 54
bbc
You lose as well.. your lost time having to repeat the shop somewhere else... and conceivably paying a higher price if the cash handling retailer has increased their prices to cover the overhead of cash.
450
19/01/2021 12:28:21 35 63
bbc
Leaving the poor teenage shop assistant on minimum wage, who had no say whatsoever in the shop's policy of refusing cash, to have to put away your shopping while trying to serve impatient customers at the same time? How charming of you.

If my cash is refused, I realise this is not usually the fault of the person behind the till, shrug my shoulders and get out my credit card.
553
19/01/2021 12:35:51 6 3
bbc
"here here".............. and I would leave the drinks on the bar in a pub and walk out as well.
594
19/01/2021 12:38:33 12 4
bbc
I'll take "Things that never happened" for 500 points
643
19/01/2021 12:41:25 6 6
bbc
It is also "your loss" as you have wasted your time, and will have to go elsewhere for what you need.
646
19/01/2021 12:41:33 1 2
bbc
I like that??
922
19/01/2021 13:04:39 5 3
bbc
Can't imagine any business owners lying awake night worrying about your lost custom - after all, the vast majority of customers prefer to use cards. They are more hygienic, more efficient, used by almost everyone and are safer for the business (they don't have to take all that cash to the bank which may be miles away and charges for the service).
943
19/01/2021 13:07:23 3 6
bbc
They won't miss you, and the decent customers will be glad to see you gone
957
19/01/2021 13:08:02 1 3
bbc
How do you propose to do that if all the supermarkets and grocers go cashless? Do you think you can live without food?
19/01/2021 13:12:59 0 1
bbc
Well, it is your (and my) loss too, in terms of inconvenience and lost time.
19/01/2021 13:14:06 4 7
bbc
Quite likley the shop will be more attractive to prospective customers without a grumpy old git like you in it, their gain, your loss.
19/01/2021 13:21:19 1 0
bbc
Same here.
19/01/2021 13:57:04 0 1
bbc
? And the shop is bothered because ?
ike
19/01/2021 13:57:15 1 4
bbc
Do you ever think of the person on the till, they may have to handle dozens of cash transactions in a day.
Your a bit selfish
19/01/2021 14:35:09 4 0
bbc
I have done many times, leaving a full shopping trolley at the checkout
19/01/2021 14:48:34 2 4
bbc
Let's be realistic here, if you're really that emotionally insecure about making a simple financial transaction, then I'm sure your 'shopping' wont amount to much. Sensible people don't behave that way. They more than likely have plenty of other customers who spend more than and prefer the convenience of a card. The big loser is you, because you don't know how to carry yourself in public.
19/01/2021 15:01:31 0 2
bbc
Not be long before you're starving and naked then!
19/01/2021 15:12:29 0 2
bbc
Byeee
57
19/01/2021 11:56:49 16 11
bbc
Would not be suprised if the govt is not to fussed as it removes the cash in hand economy. Could help stop tax evasion.
568
19/01/2021 12:36:41 8 0
bbc
It's the serious tax evasion by the very wealthy that they should be going after...ah, but wait. How many of them are Tory donors ?
22
19/01/2021 11:53:46 243 16
bbc
Cashless is very convenient, but please be careful about letting cash be abolished. It puts tremendous control into the hands of governments to effectively freeze an individual from spending the money needed to live. I just don’t like the idea of the state being able to see every little exchange of money and analyse it to death.
58
19/01/2021 11:56:35 163 11
bbc
It happens in China and you are rated how good a citizen you are by what you buy - buy loots of booze and you are a bad citizen.
649
19/01/2021 12:41:44 2 16
bbc
Your point is irrelevant. You may not have noticed, but we aren't a communist country. Never have been, never will be.
667
19/01/2021 12:42:55 17 2
bbc
That's why I live here and not China, but many people have no choice where they live. Unfortunately in the west we are starting to see a more 'regardless' attitude to democracy, which is dangerous.
874
19/01/2021 12:44:04 7 1
bbc
Thank you I did not know this, now just fallen into an internet research hole about China's "Social Credit score" system. Interesting and concerning.
19/01/2021 13:17:27 1 1
bbc
pretty accurate. you are less likely to get duffed up by someone who buys a fine Chianti and some nice charcuterie than someone who goes to the bookies then buys a 24 pack of stella. Stereotypes exist because they follow observed patterns.
19/01/2021 14:53:54 0 0
bbc
Probably true
19/01/2021 15:10:53 0 0
bbc
I love Fergie,
China is cashless? Really?
The things you learn on HYS
6
19/01/2021 11:51:14 57 40
bbc
Well as far as i understand it..Cash is legal tender so shops have no right to refuse to take it! Just means that those shops will get less trade from those who still use cash!
59
19/01/2021 11:56:57 15 2
bbc
Shops have every right to refuse any means of payment. They can insist on being paid in rubber bands if they want to.
60
19/01/2021 11:57:07 4 2
bbc
Turkish hairdresser won't like it. HMRC will.
21
19/01/2021 11:53:37 7 16
bbc
We should not be trying to stop the decline of cash - alternatives are safer and reduce the harm done by the black economy
61
19/01/2021 11:57:12 0 1
bbc
I would have though the "black economy" thrives on cash, which is why so many trades people don't want to take cheques, cards or bank transfers.

I wasn't a fan of contactless payments pre-Covid, now I never use cash, apart from for the window cleaner, and in summer, the ice cream man!
62
alw
19/01/2021 11:57:13 4 5
bbc
I mean it's understandable. Since the 3rd lockdown people have become more relaxed with hand cleaning (no one in lidl used sanitiser when entering). Why should shop assistants take money from dirty people who can't clean their hands walking in. Cashless is cleaner
516
19/01/2021 12:33:06 0 0
bbc
I wear gloves to receive cash and take them off in a manner that is safe and they end up inside out, it's not a problem to accept cash if you adjust how you do it.
26
19/01/2021 11:54:13 64 32
bbc
Actually, cash does. Every time they change the design.
63
19/01/2021 11:57:18 6 9
bbc
Still cash though & hardly matters if it expires once every 30 years or so, that's a generation long period.
4
19/01/2021 11:51:03 1091 202
bbc
Without hard cash, how do you teach young children its value? They need the experience of taking a £1 coin and seeing what they can buy with it.
When it's just numbers on a screen, cash becomes an abstract concept. And so does debt.
64
19/01/2021 11:57:24 94 43
bbc
An excellent post - best one of the day and very sensible too.
35
SAV
19/01/2021 11:55:00 11 14
bbc
Every time a shop has tried to reject cash payments, I have stood my ground telling them that it is illegal to refuse legal tender for payment in the UK. This has worked 90% of the time.
65
19/01/2021 11:57:28 9 1
bbc
it's not though. They are a private business they can just refuse to serve you
122
19/01/2021 12:02:37 0 2
bbc
Use pink pounds, that will throw a spanner in their refusals and potentially land them in court.
66
19/01/2021 11:57:15 200 26
bbc
@david 11:50
"There is nothing to fear from going to a cashless society..."

I disagree. Cash is the only tangible evidence that we have any financial assets! Digitise finances and then who's in control of yours?
255
19/01/2021 12:13:57 176 20
bbc
Cash in your hand is yours. Cash in the bank belongs to the bank even if its your account.
282
19/01/2021 12:15:58 13 0
bbc
One cannot help think of the chap with all the Bitcoin who failed to memorise the password.
445
19/01/2021 12:27:52 9 3
bbc
Cash is a piece of paper which is supposed to represent something of underlying economic value. My mortgage, the ownership of my house, my bank balance are all digital. Cash is simply a promise to transfer electronic wealth at a later date.
455
19/01/2021 12:28:35 8 2
bbc
Example, the guy who wa ts to search the council tip, as he dumped a hard drive with millions in Bitcoins on it.
or TSB, losing their banking system, no access for some for 3 months.
658
19/01/2021 12:42:27 9 0
bbc
It's not. Cash is tokens as coins and an IOU for cash. None of it is tangible evidence of any financial assets. A gold bar on the other hand.
19/01/2021 13:19:15 2 0
bbc
completely untrue. Cash is merely a token, and doesn't belong to you anyway. A bank balance isn't a drawer filled with money, and there is no such thing as 'your' cash. By this logic, your house isn't actually part of your net worth either, nor is you car.... baffles me how people come up with these half baked theories.
19/01/2021 13:34:43 3 0
bbc
The cash is a "promise" of payment from the government, it is no more reliable than numbers in a bank acount. If you horde gold thats diferent, though equally flawed for other reasons. You "think" cash has value, does it? why? its just paper and cheap metal.
19/01/2021 13:52:17 2 2
bbc
Wait until the Green powered grid goes down, or Amazon's server farm boss decides that you don't fit the political profile they like. if the President of the US can be removed from the web, don't count on you always being welcome. Then how do you live?
19/01/2021 14:00:13 0 0
bbc
Give me the control, and ill have my cronies go over it all to exert more control. We'll use to sought out those "for sure" are opposed and those "with us" to pretty much seize everything. You want to avoid this, vote for whomever the Media/Elites are against. Simple.
19/01/2021 14:57:05 1 0
bbc
Cash is the only tangible evidence that we have any financial assets!
--
In what circumstances have you ever had to evidence your financial assets and done so by cash?? Every time I've had to evidence mine, it's been done via my banking.

I suppose you could say placing a bet down your local
67
19/01/2021 11:57:40 0 4
bbc
A cashless society to go with the till-less society already brought in in a lot of stores.
124
19/01/2021 12:02:42 0 1
bbc
There's no legal requirement for any business to use a till to record takings.
68
19/01/2021 11:57:55 8 6
bbc
In most towns, dozens of Chinese takeaways will only take cash (especially on weekends). About time Mr Taxman sat outside a few of those and counted how many deliveries they make on a Saturday night and compare with how much they declare...
107
19/01/2021 12:01:23 1 1
bbc
This is done more than you know, and not just takeaways.
Removed
69
19/01/2021 11:57:59 5 6
bbc
We Control Your Money Now.....
26
19/01/2021 11:54:13 64 32
bbc
Actually, cash does. Every time they change the design.
70
19/01/2021 11:58:01 15 10
bbc
No you are wrong - All Cash whether old, pre decimalisation, not in circulation - can be taken to any bank and cashed in to its value
324
19/01/2021 12:18:23 8 3
bbc
So? And expired cards will simply be replaced with a new one. Comparing apples and oranges.
30
ET
19/01/2021 11:54:42 7 18
bbc
Well, apart from vat avoidance, why would you want to use cash at this time?
If you don’t have a bank account with a card, there are mechanisms available to everyone to get one.
Benefits are paid via bank transfer...
Discounts are available for paying bills via direct debit...
Some builders still like cash, for obvious reasons involving HMRC
I can’t think of one positive point about cash.
71
19/01/2021 11:58:04 4 1
bbc
Cash you have to steal at source, electronic money can be stolen from anywhere in the World.
72
19/01/2021 11:58:14 2 12
bbc
Of course, as we continue to digitalise everything the real future is Bitcoin.

It doesn't really need understanding. Just buy it, hold it and watch it go up over the long term.
109
19/01/2021 12:01:43 1 1
bbc
Or down. You're forgetting the old 'your investment may go up as well as down' because that's what Bitcoin is, an investment and a seriously risky one at that.
169
19/01/2021 12:07:04 0 1
bbc
You can digitise everything with any currency that you want, not just ones which are insecure, ludicrously volatile and surrounded by criminals. It's called online banking.
41
19/01/2021 11:55:29 18 6
bbc
Plenty of smaller shops in the town I live in have insisted on cash only since this pandemic started ....completely bucking the trend. Wonder why ?
73
19/01/2021 11:58:15 8 3
bbc
Yes, my dealer also stopped accepted Visa too. Cash or Crypto only.
74
19/01/2021 11:58:15 3 3
bbc
Its all well and good saying cash must be accepted everywhere but then by the same token for those who don't want to use cash then card (or other electronic payment) should have to be an option everywhere too!

I never have any cash on me and usually have to make an effort to get some when it is needed therefore I actually avoid places that don't take card unless there isn't another option.
106
19/01/2021 12:01:19 3 2
bbc
Cards usually incur a cost for the person accepting them, so not good for some businesses.
75
Jim
19/01/2021 11:58:20 7 4
bbc
Hopefully this will make black market / cash in hand jobs harder to do.

On flip side this might make it harder for some to budget, and unfortunately see them into debt
147
19/01/2021 12:05:00 1 3
bbc
online banking should evolve - and allow virtual envelopes to be created to allow people to do what they might have done with physical cash
19/01/2021 13:38:24 0 0
bbc
budgeting has nothing to do with having cash in your pocket - half the time when people say they struggle to budget what they actually mean is they lack the willpower to do so. With online banking apps etc you can track your spending very effectively but like anything you do have put the effort in yourself.
76
19/01/2021 11:58:24 11 6
bbc
Chinese takeaways will struggle without cash.
529
19/01/2021 12:34:07 2 0
bbc
my local Chinese would cos its cash only - even though everyone here wants them to take card payments - they wont
744
19/01/2021 12:49:26 1 0
bbc
They'll just have to start paying their taxes then.
77
19/01/2021 11:58:26 9 9
bbc
It would be very good if cash transactions were banned. It would make HMRC's job much easier when investigating tradespeople who understate their profits......resulting in the rest of us having to pay more tax than we should do in order to 'balance the government's books'.
93
19/01/2021 12:00:26 4 2
bbc
And when the banks impose negative interest rates?
142
19/01/2021 12:04:41 1 1
bbc
Judging by the number of negative votes, there might be many of them.
460
19/01/2021 12:28:56 1 2
bbc
That's a facetious argument - you know as well as I do that if the government took 100% of our income they'd still think of something to waste the money on and be struggling with a budget deficit at the end of the year
35
SAV
19/01/2021 11:55:00 11 14
bbc
Every time a shop has tried to reject cash payments, I have stood my ground telling them that it is illegal to refuse legal tender for payment in the UK. This has worked 90% of the time.
78
19/01/2021 11:58:35 4 1
bbc
The only thing is the shop has no legal obligation to serve you no matter how high and mighty you try to be. They can simply ask you to leave, and you must otherwise you are the one who is breaching the law.
79
GSP
19/01/2021 11:57:44 2 13
bbc
Why do you hold back my comments BBC?
Is it because I’m a black transgender?
The diversity people are going to hear about this.
112
MVS
19/01/2021 12:01:45 0 1
bbc
You too?
8
19/01/2021 11:52:03 99 35
bbc
Cash is king, no matter what!
Plastic cards have expiration date, cash doesn't.
80
19/01/2021 11:58:19 4 4
bbc
Don't store your twenties under the bed. They'll change them next week.
249
19/01/2021 12:13:35 0 0
bbc
I keep Fifty :)
56
19/01/2021 11:56:48 577 83
bbc
If my cash is refused, I simply put down my shopping, say 'your loss' and walk out.
81
19/01/2021 11:58:56 220 354
bbc
In how many places have you done this? How many times would you do it before you paid by card or starved?
126
19/01/2021 12:03:13 9 9
bbc
keep forgetting my pin
177
19/01/2021 12:07:41 64 16
bbc
Have done it few times recently, cash is legal tender and if refused so do I and refuse to buy
185
19/01/2021 12:08:33 39 3
bbc
I haven’t done it, but there is the factor of not going back. As to starving - go to a street market.
233
19/01/2021 12:12:24 48 8
bbc
I would continue to do it, we should not be forced into a cashless society where the value of money is entirely lost..
286
19/01/2021 12:16:03 37 1
bbc
we do this and very few turn cash down
645
19/01/2021 12:41:33 7 2
bbc
Well I was from your school of thought until I recently whipped out my credit card but the cashier pointed to a sign which read "CASH ONLY"......

And YES I paid with cash. This is the 2nd time in a month...
During the pandemic an increasing number of struggling businesses cannot afford the additional costs of accepting 'fancy' electronic means of payment.....
969
19/01/2021 13:09:22 2 0
bbc
You can use cash in the self-service part of any supermarket, they'll never eradicate cash, well not unless this current Covid hysteria experiment proves to be permanent, and I doubt that.
19/01/2021 13:14:41 0 3
bbc
He gets a kick out of putting his foot down, it used to be called "being a real man", now there are other names for it.
19/01/2021 13:25:08 4 0
bbc
How else could I pay? I am incapable of remembering a pin number; are you suggesting that shops should encourage the disabled to starve?
19/01/2021 13:01:00 1 2
bbc
I would not because it is for my protection and I want it. At the moment I try to avoid places that demand cash
or starved - how OTT and stupid Removed
19/01/2021 14:06:35 1 0
bbc
thousands do not have the card necessary its just greed on the sellers part??
82
19/01/2021 11:59:17 166 22
bbc
If you live in rural environment, cashless will disenfranchise most of the people, especially where ther are no banks. How do you pay individuals for digging the garden, doing a favour, buying the milk off the farmer, is everyone then supposed to carry around a payment machine. Another idea by technology companies to screw people by forcing them to rent at 60£/m phone they have to grunt into
104
MVS
19/01/2021 12:01:13 31 117
bbc
Via an app. It will happen, whether we like it or not.
132
19/01/2021 12:03:47 11 12
bbc
You could use online banking. You may have heard of it.
347
19/01/2021 12:20:07 8 6
bbc
you are paying way to much for your phone rental...buy a half decent unlocked smart phone £145 (Redmi9)...get a £10 GiffGaf contract.
Set up a standing order for your gardener , cleaner, nanny...farmshop etc. Use the phone to transfer ad hoc payments when required. As an over 65 pensioner i am doing just fine with this.
462
19/01/2021 12:29:07 7 4
bbc
Good point, but I wonder if the farmer declares the cash as income. The black economy is massive. When you pay the window cleaner in cash how much will he put through his books, 50% maybe... If you are an employee or a pensioner, your income or pension is taxed. The cash only workers, still benefit from all the services the government provide, but pay little towards it.
532
19/01/2021 12:34:22 6 5
bbc
WIFI can be used, 4g, 5g

The Big Issue manage to use QR Codes, so can you.

https://www.bigissue.com/payitforward/
558
19/01/2021 12:36:04 8 2
bbc
We get eggs delivered to our door by local farmer - pay by bank transfer. Simples.
Also got Paypal, which basically acts like a bank.
Africa has significant number of 'mobile money' users (getting on for 500M) so it isn't rocket science.
However, there will be people on the margins who will need to be considered when dealing with any transitions.
682
19/01/2021 12:44:14 2 2
bbc
Bank transfer and Paypal, it's the easiest thing to do. I only use digital because I'm from a rural environment and you can't get any cash for miles even if you wanted it. There's more incentive for cashless in rural areas not less.
696
19/01/2021 12:45:36 1 1
bbc
Harry I can get you a phone for a tenner that'll do the job. I assume you already have internet access as you're on here though, so a couple of clicks on internet banking and your gardener is paid. Or phone the bank.
704
19/01/2021 12:26:17 3 1
bbc
Actually, as someone living rurally, cash is a nightmare because there are no banks to get/store cash! That's why, where I live, the milkman, the gardener, the favours, are all preferred to be paid by bank transfer! I think people need to realise that it's not all abacuses and horse drawn carts in rural parts.

The risk with cashless, is accessibility for elderly, disabled. That's the gap.
725
19/01/2021 12:47:34 2 1
bbc
I pay £5 for my phone after having bought it for £200 last year. Say it lasts me 2 years (likely to be longer) that's about £13 a month.
Luddites is a very appropriate term for this comment section
838
19/01/2021 12:37:52 3 0
bbc
My local dairy farm opened a ice cream shop, the bank gave them a NFC card reader that connects to a phone. Its cheaper than cash for them. My coffee man on the street has one. My local farm shop has gone cashless due to covid.

Sending money via banking app is trival. The only loser is a tradesman who wants cash to avoid tax. I'm ok with paying the extra tax.
19/01/2021 13:37:19 0 0
bbc
You know what a phone is right?
19/01/2021 13:59:59 0 0
bbc
put a card app on your phone,ditch your purse or wallet
19/01/2021 15:38:18 0 0
bbc
There are some Societies who do not bow to "The Money God".

They interact as a Community. Each giving when the can and trading things, which are needed when and how they can. It is a circle of kindness!

Perhaps we should abolish cash and turn to that instead.

I'd dig your garden if you would give me some veg from your Farm.

It's how it was done in days of old before money!
19/01/2021 15:51:58 0 0
bbc
You don’t need a mobile phone to have a card payment machine. You can get a card reader with a SIM built in and no contract fees, just the flat rate transaction fee.
Or you can do as our window cleaner has started doing, giving his bank account details and letting you do a transfer.
The milk shop at our local farm is totally cashless and a success.
Might also cut down in the amount of tax evasion.
19/01/2021 16:07:09 1 0
bbc
There are apps to transfer money in seconds, it's easy! Bank transfers on your phone! And if these people are as isolated as you say they are then they have to take a lot of that cash to a bank to bank it!! Surely more convenient is to have it straight into the account no?
19/01/2021 16:24:38 1 0
bbc
How do you pay individuals
1) for digging the garden, - Direct transfer to their bank/PO account
2) doing a favour, - It's a favour, why are you paying? (Alternatively in beer at your local)
3) buying the milk off the farmer - assuming he's not bringing the churn round in his van, via the card-reader at his place; he's running a business.
36
19/01/2021 11:55:18 208 39
bbc
I'm guessing I know where your priorities are :-)
83
GJ
19/01/2021 11:59:23 141 3
bbc
Yes I got thrown out of a strip club once after trying to swipe by card.
198
19/01/2021 12:09:18 28 3
bbc
Where on earth did you try to swipe it!
84
19/01/2021 11:59:31 4 8
bbc
When I visited Sweden last year it was pretty much a given that cash isn't used. I found it strange at first but it makes sense and it's just part of financial evolution. Makes more sense from a hygiene perspective too...
85
19/01/2021 11:59:32 9 8
bbc
What will Tory MPs have in their brown envelopes now?
117
19/01/2021 12:02:00 2 2
bbc
Probably the same as millions of shifties that do cash in hand and avoid paying tax :-)
314
19/01/2021 12:02:37 0 0
bbc
The same as Labour MPs. And Lib Dems. They're all crooks.
86
19/01/2021 11:59:33 3 14
bbc
Who still uses cash..dirty horrible stuff
108
19/01/2021 12:01:28 2 1
bbc
Your opinion.

Not shared by many.

We need a mix of payment options in order to protect society.
87
19/01/2021 11:59:41 485 60
bbc
You don't notice how much you are spending when you just swipe a card.

They want that. I assure you, you really don't.
128
19/01/2021 12:03:17 234 15
bbc
The Tooth fairy will be redundant, no money in child's Christmas cards from relatives.
247
19/01/2021 12:13:25 19 8
bbc
"You don't notice how much you are spending when you just swipe a card."

---

Yes I do.
251
19/01/2021 12:13:44 9 12
bbc
Online or Mobile Banking, you can easily see what you spend
310
19/01/2021 12:17:47 4 1
bbc
Well they always tell me how much they want me to pay...
452
19/01/2021 12:28:30 21 4
bbc
you also don't notice how much £$sellable data you are giving to marketing companies. why do you think facebook asks for your email twice, and password once, when you sign up? security schmecurity, but we want your email.
537
19/01/2021 12:34:54 10 5
bbc
I disagree - I find it much easier to keep track of what I am spending when I have an audit trail on my bank statement
566
19/01/2021 12:36:34 3 1
bbc
I do. Perhaps you need to adjust the way you think? All money is money.
587
19/01/2021 12:37:38 2 1
bbc
I know exactly what I spend.
683
19/01/2021 12:44:17 3 4
bbc
they want you to spend by card to get you into DEBT
791
Ken
19/01/2021 12:53:12 3 0
bbc
Only if you are an idiot!
896
19/01/2021 13:02:08 3 3
bbc
Nonsense, its far easier to keep track on card, right down to the last penny. Google pay for example can show you all of your transactions for that day. That level of accuracy is impossible with cash.
916
19/01/2021 13:04:05 2 1
bbc
My bank tells me whenever money goes out my account and how much I'm spending in a month so I do know.
923
19/01/2021 13:04:57 1 1
bbc
I do. I keep the receipts, and always check them against my statement.
970
19/01/2021 13:09:25 2 2
bbc
Absolutely bang on ...
978
19/01/2021 13:10:08 1 1
bbc
You don't? then you're a (Insert your preferred insult here).
19/01/2021 13:12:10 1 1
bbc
Only buy things you need and that will genuinely boost quality of life, stop buying cheap garbage consumer goods that don't last six months because someone tells you anyone who's anyone must have the latest gadget, and stop buying clothes you don't need because someone somewhere has dictated what is and isn't trendy. Apply rational thought and self discipline, problem solved
19/01/2021 13:14:58 2 1
bbc
You could pay attention?
19/01/2021 13:18:33 1 4
bbc
This isn't true. In my experience managing all of my money online makes me know exactly how much I have/spend and exactly where I have/spend it. It also ensures that my money is making a return.

Cash has had its day, but it's time to let it die.

If people want to give kids cash for Christmas they still can - just wire it to the kid's savings accounts on their birthday.
JHB
19/01/2021 13:41:44 1 1
bbc
If you don't read the screen and realise how much you are spending you are probably not fit to go out spending alone.
19/01/2021 13:58:50 1 1
bbc
Stupid people don't realise what they are spending .... How can you not realise when the screens tell you what you spend... And save .... And have.........
19/01/2021 14:18:18 2 1
bbc
That’s BS. With a card you have a paper trail. With cash you need to keep small paper receipts
Kes
19/01/2021 14:20:58 1 1
bbc
I have this thing called an app on my phone that shows me all my spending, my balance etc and I can look at it anytime and (almost) anywhere. Some banks wills even send you a notification on every transaction.
Ed
19/01/2021 14:22:42 0 0
bbc
Agreed. Especially when getting after-work rounds in the days we had pubs.
But you could argue that online shopping is the same.. I think we have to adjust to the changing world.
19/01/2021 14:53:54 1 0
bbc
Yeah I do notice. I get a notification on my phone that can take me straight into my online banking app where I can see all my transactions 24 hours a day. I can later export that data into excel or timeshed and do any accountancy analysis that I want.
19/01/2021 15:57:18 0 0
bbc
Its written on the bill or displayed on the screen.......pay attention!
19/01/2021 16:26:31 0 0
bbc
I found the opposite, if I spend cash I lose track of how much I spent and where. With cards I can look through statements and find where and how much I spent.
47
19/01/2021 11:56:29 2 7
bbc
I lived in Houston Texas from 1981 to 1986 and in the larger stores like Sears and Montgomery Ward you had to walk all over the shop to find a till that took cash. 90% of them were card only so the UK is about 40 years behind in this respect.
88
19/01/2021 11:59:42 0 1
bbc
That would be about the only thing in the US domestic banking market which is ahead of the UK/Europe then - every other part of the US domestic banking market is 30+ years behind
31
Gaz
19/01/2021 11:54:53 4 7
bbc
It’s not only issues with the lack of banks. Less chance of being robbed, less chances of handling contaminated cash. On the plus side, those members of the community who ONLY deal with cash will end up with traceable accounts.
89
19/01/2021 11:59:49 1 1
bbc
'less chance of being robbed' Really? I'd be interested to know the numbers of people robbed of cash last year vs the number of people/businesses hacked online.
4
19/01/2021 11:51:03 1091 202
bbc
Without hard cash, how do you teach young children its value? They need the experience of taking a £1 coin and seeing what they can buy with it.
When it's just numbers on a screen, cash becomes an abstract concept. And so does debt.
90
19/01/2021 11:59:55 89 11
bbc
It's not even on a screen with contactless. Tap. Paid. No need to go to the cashpoint to get a few quid out. Becomes so remote from reality.

Debt is so easy to go into. Store cards, purchase spreading apps e.g. Klarna and so many pretty much guarantee acceptance. Scary.
640
19/01/2021 12:41:21 2 2
bbc
Now that we are in the days where people have electronic devices glued to their hands it has never been easier or more convenient to manage your money and bank accounts. No excuse for overspending when you can check your balance whilst your queueing at the till.
91
19/01/2021 11:59:56 5 6
bbc
“Coronavirus has hastened a shift towards a cashless society”.

And still, still people can’t see it.
116
19/01/2021 12:01:54 1 2
bbc
Decentralised finance puts the pin in all the conspiracy theories
19/01/2021 15:50:18 0 0
bbc
We were well down the road to a cashless society before corona happened along.
92
MVS
19/01/2021 12:00:00 5 4
bbc
I am an old fuddy-duddy, but I have to admit that I have not been inside a bank branch for over 2 years, and the £50 cash I withdrew from the ATM just before Christmas is still in my wallet.
It may take many years before all cash transactions are replaced, but it seems to be inevitable sometime in the next 10 years or so.
77
19/01/2021 11:58:26 9 9
bbc
It would be very good if cash transactions were banned. It would make HMRC's job much easier when investigating tradespeople who understate their profits......resulting in the rest of us having to pay more tax than we should do in order to 'balance the government's books'.
93
19/01/2021 12:00:26 4 2
bbc
And when the banks impose negative interest rates?
94
19/01/2021 11:59:15 5 4
bbc
It will certainly reduce the grey economy.

New bathroom for cash? Not any more.
42
19/01/2021 11:55:43 244 20
bbc
What about the unbanked? Not everyone in society has a credit/debit card not everyone who has want to use them for everything, retailers pay a fee for accepting credit cards & for banking cash so understand the need to reduce cash handling costs but we must be an inclusive society & not reduce opportunity for some to buy goods & services they need A cashless society must provide a solution for all
95
Bob
19/01/2021 12:00:42 85 292
bbc
Before cash came about and we were using salt and other such things to trade and barter goods would you have said 'what about the uncashed' when salt began to fade away?

You will never make progress if you cling on to the past.

Get an account, it isn't difficult.
216
19/01/2021 12:10:22 52 0
bbc
I've thankfully never been homeless but I would imagine it is pretty hard to open and access a bank account without a permanent address.
240
19/01/2021 12:12:45 17 3
bbc
Get an account? Systems crash, and at some point last year people with only one current account couldn’t get money for about 24 hrs. All comes down to cash, debit, credit card to be fully equipped.
275
19/01/2021 12:15:27 40 5
bbc
Isn't difficult? It is for some people, especially at the moment.
351
19/01/2021 12:20:24 28 3
bbc
It can be difficult. If you're bankrupt, you aren't allowed to have a bank account.
423
19/01/2021 12:26:08 32 5
bbc
It is for those who do not have internet access, and.no banks within 20 miles. Plenty of examples on Mid-wales, Scotland, and rural England.
A friend has to go to a local Pist Office every week to collect her pension.
Not easy for a lot of older people, or those refused bank accounts.
432
A C
19/01/2021 12:26:55 18 1
bbc
Might be easy for an adult, but what about a 10 year old
779
19/01/2021 12:52:14 7 0
bbc
It is for some, and that's the problem. I volunteer my time for kids estranged from there parents/family they don't have a fixed address and can't get a bank account amongst a great many other things they don't have.
So yes it can be difficult. What about the homeless? how can I give a little to them? I'm not going to change their lives but I can make one day a little better.
788
19/01/2021 12:53:06 2 3
bbc
You describe shifting from one physically held unit of value to another. An intangible, digital-only currency could be devalued through NIRP/ZIRP to suit political purposes or to suit an increasingly confident elite of the very wealthy and you could do nothing about it.
19/01/2021 13:15:38 7 1
bbc
Not all progress is an improvement.
19/01/2021 13:20:45 3 1
bbc
It may not be difficult to get an account, but it is exceedingly difficult to find a bank branch (of your bank) especially in rural areas. We don't all live in a metropolis!
19/01/2021 13:27:17 1 1
bbc
Lol, great analagy, love it. Particularly amusing is the salt people are giving you for it. Bob, you are my hero!
19/01/2021 13:50:05 4 1
bbc
Salt & cash are monetary tokens - both similar ways of dealing with physical transactions.

This isn't about "clinging to the past". Some people don't have easy internet or bank access either because they're too expensive or they live remotely.

Also, some who can't get a phone line are already marginalised - perhaps you don't see them - doing away with cash will be even worse.
19/01/2021 14:26:55 3 1
bbc
"Get an account, it isn't difficult."

Actually it can be, even almost impossible for some people.
19/01/2021 14:35:25 1 0
bbc
Indeed - that's where the word "salary" comes from. Those Bl**dy Romans again...
KL
19/01/2021 16:31:20 0 0
bbc
Ridiculous statement, get an account. Most of us have accounts, I use a combination of card and cash. I don't want to pay for small items with a card I like to keep track of what money is going out of the bank. I like to have pockets of cash at home put aside for different things, it makes me feel more organised and more in control of my budget.
19/01/2021 21:01:32 0 0
bbc
You need 2 forms of photo identification, I can’t drive for medical reasons and don’t have a passport, I had to threaten my bank with the disability discrimination act before they’d accept my council tax bill and payslip as proof of identity
35
SAV
19/01/2021 11:55:00 11 14
bbc
Every time a shop has tried to reject cash payments, I have stood my ground telling them that it is illegal to refuse legal tender for payment in the UK. This has worked 90% of the time.
96
19/01/2021 12:00:46 4 1
bbc
It's not illegal to refuse cash, they are private businesses.
28
19/01/2021 11:54:24 8 6
bbc
If you want to increase tax receipts then you need to reduce cash payments in society, you cannot avoid tax on electronic payments as easily as cash. Therefore it's not in the governments interest to stop this trend.
97
19/01/2021 12:00:56 6 6
bbc
Wanna bet? Rees-Mogg and his cronies will still be able to avoid paying tax, why do you think we left the EU?
5
19/01/2021 11:51:10 403 34
bbc
When states and banks can just 'turn you off' the potential for abuse will be crazy.

Some other gray Market Currency will eventually appear.

But giving up cash for convenience will lead to dark place for many people.
98
19/01/2021 12:00:58 174 225
bbc
Cash is of course a good way of keeping transactions from the attention of the authorities
Thereby avoiding taxes and laundering the proceeds of crime
171
19/01/2021 12:07:16 36 4
bbc
That may be the case but just because some people abuse a system doesn't mean that the system should be abandoned. We don't stop people driving because some people drive carelessly. We don't ban the sale of alcohol because some people become dependent on it. We have to trust that the majority will not abuse the system and punish those that do.
196
19/01/2021 12:09:01 33 4
bbc
Its also a good way of giving a homeless person a bit of change for a cup of tea.
203
19/01/2021 12:09:53 3 4
bbc
Thanks for the advice.
222
19/01/2021 12:10:51 32 3
bbc
The vast majority of cash users are ordinary people.....
332
19/01/2021 12:19:07 19 1
bbc
I think you'll find that most white collar fraud involves little or no cash and steals billions
404
19/01/2021 12:25:16 12 1
bbc
Doesn't appear to have stopped Amazon avoiding tax. In addition, criminals always seem to be one step ahead. Theft and tax evasion simply take place on a much bigger scale.
481
19/01/2021 12:30:21 1 8
bbc
Correct. It enables various fraudulent activities such as working and claiming and under-declaration of earnings to the Revenue. No-one should mourn reduction in the scope for either of those.
642
19/01/2021 12:41:25 13 1
bbc
Most people are not criminals and cashless transactions do not solve the problems of tax evasion or money laundering.
759
19/01/2021 12:50:52 1 6
bbc
Exactly, that's why the death of cash is a good idea!
19/01/2021 13:11:53 2 1
bbc
and a good way of stopping the authorities controlling you and making you a 'non-person' - we are not here to be a cash cow for the Tax Man, he is there to serve us, though if you are a public servant with a gold-plated pension I can see how you'd want it the other way around. An attitude visible in the 'sacrifice the old to save the NHS' a complete reversal of why those old fought to get an NHS.
19/01/2021 13:17:30 1 0
bbc
Aye, the shady side of cash, doesnt go anywhere near a bank if you put it in your pocket and spend it quick. Apperently tax fraud isnt a real problem, at least not for the people posting here.
19/01/2021 13:22:10 0 0
bbc
I think criminals now use Bitcoin
19/01/2021 13:39:54 0 1
bbc
How many trades people such as mobile mechanics, hairdressers', window cleaners' etc etc carry card machines around with them?
19/01/2021 13:39:58 3 0
bbc
A lot more money is stolen from online and digital fraud than ever was by walking into a bank with a stocking mask and a sawn-off.
19/01/2021 13:51:06 1 1
bbc
Yes, of course everyone is paying cash in their local shops to avoid the taxman... ... and there is no card fraud or paypal fraud at all.
19/01/2021 14:49:32 0 1
bbc
or simply avoiding tax - my local Chinese will only take cash - we know what they are up to so we don't shop there anymore
19/01/2021 15:24:09 1 0
bbc
It is also a way for 'the authorities' to track your purchases, movement etc. . contributions to political parties. I don't trust this government at all and future governments could be even worse.
19/01/2021 16:05:15 0 0
bbc
exactly the same for cryptocurrency,,, what's your point?
19/01/2021 17:16:03 0 0
bbc
I don't like the sound of the idea of no cash, my back pockets will become redundant, so with that my wardrobe will change and I'll have to stop buying denim
99
19/01/2021 12:01:01 15 5
bbc
What happens to your money in a cashless society if the banks fail.......???
242
19/01/2021 12:12:52 6 1
bbc
Same as it does with cash you won't be able to spend anything. If the bank fails the cash machine won't give you anything.

Also you get £85k of protection per bank from the government
603
19/01/2021 12:39:06 1 0
bbc
What happens to my money now, if the banks fail?

Or do you have a nice idea that the bank currently has a box marked "Armchair Warriors savings"

Unless you have a deposit box, that's not how banks have worked for centuries...
739
19/01/2021 12:48:55 1 0
bbc
Where's your money now, in a bank account? Let's think about that.....
100
19/01/2021 12:01:05 4 3
bbc
Personally I rarely pay for anything in cash now (the window cleaner being the main exception). However it does still have a valuable role in society in my opinion. It helps children to learn the value of money. Paying pocket money or a little extra for helping with jobs around the house. It loses its effect if you have to transfer money into their account that they cannot access directly.
205
19/01/2021 12:09:54 2 0
bbc
good point, heres an idea. pay the kids with plastic toy money, then have them come to you to 'cash it in' and transfer to their online account. Of course charge them commission !! only joking...or am i?