Parents' stress and depression 'rise during lockdowns'
19/01/2021 | news | education | 123
Many parents struggle to meet their children's needs during the pandemic, say researchers.
1
19/01/2021 10:49:28 20 3
bbc
Home schooling + 2 full time jobs = an uninterrupted rotation of work, school, work, cook, sleep. Repeat. Occasionally we get outside the house!
6
19/01/2021 10:59:44 2 8
bbc
See my post and campaign for Govt. to change things.
7
19/01/2021 11:00:29 3 4
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
60
19/01/2021 13:29:30 2 0
bbc
At the present time that is all you should be doing.
2
PJ
19/01/2021 10:51:14 25 5
bbc
I'm not disadvantaged, a single parent or struggling with home schooling. But my anxiety levels are off the scale and I'm heartbroken over by my previously bubbly, school loving 15 year old having become withdrawn and anxious - not enjoying home learning but stressed by school with masks/endless covid testing. Both options seem awful to her and I'm powerless to help. So much uncertainty.
8
19/01/2021 11:01:14 7 8
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
61
19/01/2021 13:31:41 3 2
bbc
Hate to say it and apologies, but has your child taken her cues from you?
3
19/01/2021 10:53:18 20 6
bbc
Once the elderly and vulnerable are vaccinated, we should aim to get out of these lockdowns ASAP. The damaging effect on people's mental health and well-being has been largely hidden from view over the past year, and should be treated more seriously.
35
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:57:24 5 9
bbc
Mid Feb Priority categories should be vaccinated by end of next week or so. Then it take 2 weeks or so for vaccine to take effect
Schools must open last week of Feb. No excuses.
4
19/01/2021 10:57:03 21 10
bbc
We should never have closed schools. The harm this is doing will far outweigh how much school closures slow the virus down, particularly with primary schools where young children are much less likely to pass the virus on. A benefit-cost analysis should have been done, but in these times they seem to only care about the virus - which harms, but these measures also harms.
5
19/01/2021 10:58:43 11 5
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
15
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:10:35 4 5
bbc
Exactly and we all pay taxes for state education. If they don't think education is essential why are we paying?
78
19/01/2021 13:27:29 2 1
bbc
No,spend less on things you don't need,or don't have kids if you can't afford them.it isn't the taxpayers job to fund them.
1
19/01/2021 10:49:28 20 3
bbc
Home schooling + 2 full time jobs = an uninterrupted rotation of work, school, work, cook, sleep. Repeat. Occasionally we get outside the house!
6
19/01/2021 10:59:44 2 8
bbc
See my post and campaign for Govt. to change things.
1
19/01/2021 10:49:28 20 3
bbc
Home schooling + 2 full time jobs = an uninterrupted rotation of work, school, work, cook, sleep. Repeat. Occasionally we get outside the house!
7
19/01/2021 11:00:29 3 4
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
57
19/01/2021 13:23:04 4 1
bbc
It’s your own, on mass, fault.
Housing just soaks up the huge and double incomes you choose to have to outbid others for houses. They cost a fraction to build. Parents want it all, same house as the childless and children and holidays and cars, everything.
Schools should be closed, and the money divided per child. For you to use to educate them. Take it as pay if you are up to it alone.
59
19/01/2021 13:28:29 4 0
bbc
I'd suggest it would do a lot more good if people lived within their means, took parenting more seriously & only proceeded with it if they were confident they had the ability to cope with it economically , emotionally and logistically. Make it easy for people to get out of their depth and the weak or just unlucky will do so. we know that is true, we see it with gambling, drink, drugs, debt, etc.
2
PJ
19/01/2021 10:51:14 25 5
bbc
I'm not disadvantaged, a single parent or struggling with home schooling. But my anxiety levels are off the scale and I'm heartbroken over by my previously bubbly, school loving 15 year old having become withdrawn and anxious - not enjoying home learning but stressed by school with masks/endless covid testing. Both options seem awful to her and I'm powerless to help. So much uncertainty.
8
19/01/2021 11:01:14 7 8
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
9
19/01/2021 11:02:37 16 5
bbc
Not surprising at all. What is surprising is that is issue, plus the impact on children, is being completely ignored by all political parties. Apparently we can and should be able to homeschool (virtually independently) whilst holding down a fulltime job.
67
19/01/2021 13:42:13 3 2
bbc
It does rather beg the question of how would you cope if you or your child was ill or injured. It's nothing new, things like that have always happened. At least with the present Corvid problems if you can WFH or are furloughed you don't loose all your income, in more normal times it may well have been much worse.
77
19/01/2021 13:25:16 2 0
bbc
Is it using up your social media time
10
19/01/2021 10:51:13 3 2
bbc
Thanks for highlighting the issue, it's nice to know not alone.
11
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:06:05 8 9
bbc
Thank you teachers unions! My eldest son is a SEN pupil and we are homeworking. It's been almost 2 weeks since closure and it's a failure. School does one 30 minute zoom meeting a day rest we have to print and try o teach ourselves.
20
19/01/2021 11:41:40 8 4
bbc
Unions did not close the schools. The Government and the genius Williamson closed the schools.
41
19/01/2021 12:00:27 1 2
bbc
The zooms calls are a box ticking exercise for us. No educational content at all it’s really just a check in. This asynchronous (if we can even call it that) approach doesn’t work for children. It relies on there being a parent at home who can dedicate themselves full time to teaching. 70% of double parent families have 2 working parents.
43
19/01/2021 12:03:57 1 1
bbc
Your child should be classed as vulnerable and be in school. Due to a health condition my little one is in school for support and SENCO. No way could I support her remote home learning especially as I'm also a critical worker.
68
19/01/2021 13:23:40 1 0
bbc
And
12
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:09:01 12 2
bbc
Just before closures it was being reported most people wanted, polls like you gov. Now I get emails from school everyday saying there are too many key worker parents who have applied for school places. More than 50% are in school. So where is that majority who wanted school closures now?!
75
19/01/2021 13:48:55 5 1
bbc
Who knew we had so many key workers. Missing in action first lockdown time around.
13
19/01/2021 11:00:05 7 4
bbc
The first lockdown was different and new to us all and I think we coped well with it. With a full time job, a part time job and a very energetic and enthusiastic five year and an autistic 2 year old, this lockdown is having a significant impact this time round. Work meetings seem less accepting of the background noise this time round. Kids are less patient and tolerant of parents working.
14
19/01/2021 11:01:20 16 4
bbc
Both my children have now had their exams cancelled. My son who is in year 11 also has special educational needs, and has found it massively difficult to engage with online learning. It's been a big pressure constantly checking he's online and is staying focused. I feel for all concerned - children, teachers and parents.
66
19/01/2021 13:22:37 2 3
bbc
Well he's not done all the work,just hold them all back a year and reset
76
19/01/2021 13:50:54 0 1
bbc
Yes, WFH and distance learning do take some adapting to.
5
19/01/2021 10:58:43 11 5
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
15
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:10:35 4 5
bbc
Exactly and we all pay taxes for state education. If they don't think education is essential why are we paying?
22
19/01/2021 11:43:09 4 0
bbc
You are not paying enough that is the problem.
16
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:13:30 12 10
bbc
We need to get kids back to school back ASAP. Maximum not earliest beginning of half term last week of Feb. We all need to get together now and post to Boris and Gavin to tell them to do this.
17
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:16:04 13 5
bbc
What frustrates even more they keep Premier league open but not schools.
48
19/01/2021 12:19:40 11 4
bbc
Let's see...
School's closed
Universities open
Premier League open...

Could be that the one's that are open are cash cows and can be milked?
79
19/01/2021 13:51:51 2 2
bbc
Schools herd large numbers into confined jail like gulags, football is a few outdoors in a large field like space. Might have something to do with virus transmission conditions?
18
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:19:42 9 9
bbc
All the people who campaigned for school closures, I hope they are happy with themselves.
19
19/01/2021 11:40:44 17 7
bbc
So for those who have slagged off teachers on this forum. It is not as easy as you thought is it with two or three; try it with 30 or 35 children. Just saying.

Those of you that think its easy and money for old rope sign up loads of vacancies.
26
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:50:21 2 0
bbc
No need to worry now!
33
19/01/2021 11:50:37 8 3
bbc
I have always thought that teachers work very hard but you can’t compare teaching a class of children to teaching 2 or 3 children of different ages with no training and whilst simultaneously doing another full time job. This is the struggle that parents have.
34
19/01/2021 11:51:23 3 4
bbc
I think more teachers/ headteachers could be speaking up for how detrimental this approach is for our kids and calling for a time out on home learning. This isn’t an effective way to learn for anybody and I’d rather my kids repeated a year of school and put both them and us through this.
11
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:06:05 8 9
bbc
Thank you teachers unions! My eldest son is a SEN pupil and we are homeworking. It's been almost 2 weeks since closure and it's a failure. School does one 30 minute zoom meeting a day rest we have to print and try o teach ourselves.
20
19/01/2021 11:41:40 8 4
bbc
Unions did not close the schools. The Government and the genius Williamson closed the schools.
28
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:53:21 3 1
bbc
They wanted it and were demanding scientific proof. also blaming govt for future covid fatalities if they didnt
21
KJ
19/01/2021 11:43:02 8 10
bbc
anyone with children will not be at all suprised about this, surely the mental and physical health of our children far outwieghs the very low risk. How can the unions and (some) scientists defend the harm this is doing to kids (and parents) of all ages by continually insisting the schools are kept closed, doesnt make sense
23
19/01/2021 11:45:51 9 6
bbc
The unions did not close the schools the Government did. The unions do not have the power except for one union: 1922 Committee.
65
19/01/2021 13:19:50 4 0
bbc
Finding your kids hard to deal with teachers have them most days,and not allowed to punish them
74
19/01/2021 13:47:52 1 1
bbc
Teenagers are at risk, more to the point they transmit the virus to each other and to education staff. If you have significant numbers of staff off we cannot, safely, run schools. We want children back in front of us, we are struggling with live and remote teaching but we also want to be safe and not risk being a vector of this virus.
15
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:10:35 4 5
bbc
Exactly and we all pay taxes for state education. If they don't think education is essential why are we paying?
22
19/01/2021 11:43:09 4 0
bbc
You are not paying enough that is the problem.
29
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:55:17 2 1
bbc
Lol
30
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:55:43 0 1
bbc
Wait for Rishi on that...!!
21
KJ
19/01/2021 11:43:02 8 10
bbc
anyone with children will not be at all suprised about this, surely the mental and physical health of our children far outwieghs the very low risk. How can the unions and (some) scientists defend the harm this is doing to kids (and parents) of all ages by continually insisting the schools are kept closed, doesnt make sense
23
19/01/2021 11:45:51 9 6
bbc
The unions did not close the schools the Government did. The unions do not have the power except for one union: 1922 Committee.
24
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:49:40 2 2
bbc
Yes true, but they are the ones who pressured the govt to do it. Otherwise they would blame them for covid rates.
23
19/01/2021 11:45:51 9 6
bbc
The unions did not close the schools the Government did. The unions do not have the power except for one union: 1922 Committee.
24
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:49:40 2 2
bbc
Yes true, but they are the ones who pressured the govt to do it. Otherwise they would blame them for covid rates.
31
19/01/2021 11:56:19 4 3
bbc
The Unions do not have that power: if they did then teachers would earn more than MPs.
25
19/01/2021 11:49:48 13 16
bbc
Good! Perhaps these people will stop breeding now that they realize that children are a commitment and need looking after, not just shoving off onto childminders or nurseries.
27
19/01/2021 11:52:40 9 9
bbc
How heartless. Do you vote Tory by any chance?
37
19/01/2021 11:57:46 6 4
bbc
Brilliant post. Totally agree.
39
19/01/2021 11:59:37 4 2
bbc
I don't think anyone who had children over the last 18 years can be blamed for not predicting a pandemic!
44
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:04:05 4 2
bbc
Just cuz u failed in family life, doesn't mean we all aim for your standards
62
MX
19/01/2021 13:33:02 2 3
bbc
You for real?

The vast majority of parents now are working parents. Now think of those working parents that can still do a job by working at home. These are the people that are keeping the economy ticking over. I can’t believe I didn’t think of a pandemic 9 years ago! How stupid of myself!
19
19/01/2021 11:40:44 17 7
bbc
So for those who have slagged off teachers on this forum. It is not as easy as you thought is it with two or three; try it with 30 or 35 children. Just saying.

Those of you that think its easy and money for old rope sign up loads of vacancies.
26
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:50:21 2 0
bbc
No need to worry now!
25
19/01/2021 11:49:48 13 16
bbc
Good! Perhaps these people will stop breeding now that they realize that children are a commitment and need looking after, not just shoving off onto childminders or nurseries.
27
19/01/2021 11:52:40 9 9
bbc
How heartless. Do you vote Tory by any chance?
38
19/01/2021 11:58:50 1 1
bbc
No chance at all! I always vote for the underdog.
64
19/01/2021 13:18:03 3 0
bbc
What does their politics have to do with it,l'm sick of bratty kids running around with no parental control,take the phone out of your hand and watch your own kids
105
19/01/2021 15:48:20 2 0
bbc
ok the wording was a bit blunt but the underlying point still stands - there are a lot of people out there who had children without thinking it through and in normal times go through the motions re raising their kids. On-going restrictions and repeated lockdowns have brought these issues to the surface and laid them bare. Nothing heartless about asking parents to think hard in future.
20
19/01/2021 11:41:40 8 4
bbc
Unions did not close the schools. The Government and the genius Williamson closed the schools.
28
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:53:21 3 1
bbc
They wanted it and were demanding scientific proof. also blaming govt for future covid fatalities if they didnt
36
19/01/2021 11:58:13 1 2
bbc
What is wrong in wanting scientific proof; especially when the country is run by a proven liar.
22
19/01/2021 11:43:09 4 0
bbc
You are not paying enough that is the problem.
29
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:55:17 2 1
bbc
Lol
22
19/01/2021 11:43:09 4 0
bbc
You are not paying enough that is the problem.
30
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:55:43 0 1
bbc
Wait for Rishi on that...!!
24
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:49:40 2 2
bbc
Yes true, but they are the ones who pressured the govt to do it. Otherwise they would blame them for covid rates.
31
19/01/2021 11:56:19 4 3
bbc
The Unions do not have that power: if they did then teachers would earn more than MPs.
32
19/01/2021 11:47:10 13 12
bbc
The kids aren't happy bunnies either, with their education and mental health in tatters. And all for a virus that is of negligible risk to them, and a minute risk to both their teachers and their parents.

I'm pretty certain that most grannies, who these measures are supposed to benefit, would have chosen to keep all schools open.

So would all GOOD teachers!
42
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:02:52 3 5
bbc
Exactly I would have thought priority would be our future
85
19/01/2021 14:03:29 0 1
bbc
I'm pretty sure these grandparent would also do their uttermost to help out - if they were allowed to do so.
19
19/01/2021 11:40:44 17 7
bbc
So for those who have slagged off teachers on this forum. It is not as easy as you thought is it with two or three; try it with 30 or 35 children. Just saying.

Those of you that think its easy and money for old rope sign up loads of vacancies.
33
19/01/2021 11:50:37 8 3
bbc
I have always thought that teachers work very hard but you can’t compare teaching a class of children to teaching 2 or 3 children of different ages with no training and whilst simultaneously doing another full time job. This is the struggle that parents have.
40
19/01/2021 12:00:02 5 0
bbc
There are vertical classes in small village schools.
80
19/01/2021 13:55:10 2 0
bbc
Yes, almost like it's irresponsible to just anyone become a parent.
19
19/01/2021 11:40:44 17 7
bbc
So for those who have slagged off teachers on this forum. It is not as easy as you thought is it with two or three; try it with 30 or 35 children. Just saying.

Those of you that think its easy and money for old rope sign up loads of vacancies.
34
19/01/2021 11:51:23 3 4
bbc
I think more teachers/ headteachers could be speaking up for how detrimental this approach is for our kids and calling for a time out on home learning. This isn’t an effective way to learn for anybody and I’d rather my kids repeated a year of school and put both them and us through this.
3
19/01/2021 10:53:18 20 6
bbc
Once the elderly and vulnerable are vaccinated, we should aim to get out of these lockdowns ASAP. The damaging effect on people's mental health and well-being has been largely hidden from view over the past year, and should be treated more seriously.
35
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:57:24 5 9
bbc
Mid Feb Priority categories should be vaccinated by end of next week or so. Then it take 2 weeks or so for vaccine to take effect
Schools must open last week of Feb. No excuses.
55
19/01/2021 13:10:41 5 3
bbc
And the teaching staff who have yet to be vaccinated...and their families?
114
sue
20/01/2021 10:08:12 0 0
bbc
Have you seen the recently released chart showing teachers are twice as likely to contract Covid as the rest of the population? Staff in special schools are especially at risk. We can't expect teachers to keep putting themselves at risk. Until they are vaccinated schools should remain open only to critical worker and vulnerable kids.
28
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:53:21 3 1
bbc
They wanted it and were demanding scientific proof. also blaming govt for future covid fatalities if they didnt
36
19/01/2021 11:58:13 1 2
bbc
What is wrong in wanting scientific proof; especially when the country is run by a proven liar.
72
19/01/2021 13:46:07 0 4
bbc
Indeed, what proof did the government have that closing schools would be a good idea. I don't remember hearing objections or calls for proof from unions then.
25
19/01/2021 11:49:48 13 16
bbc
Good! Perhaps these people will stop breeding now that they realize that children are a commitment and need looking after, not just shoving off onto childminders or nurseries.
37
19/01/2021 11:57:46 6 4
bbc
Brilliant post. Totally agree.
27
19/01/2021 11:52:40 9 9
bbc
How heartless. Do you vote Tory by any chance?
38
19/01/2021 11:58:50 1 1
bbc
No chance at all! I always vote for the underdog.
25
19/01/2021 11:49:48 13 16
bbc
Good! Perhaps these people will stop breeding now that they realize that children are a commitment and need looking after, not just shoving off onto childminders or nurseries.
39
19/01/2021 11:59:37 4 2
bbc
I don't think anyone who had children over the last 18 years can be blamed for not predicting a pandemic!
83
19/01/2021 14:01:44 2 0
bbc
No, but you can certainly say that to not anticipate any sort of misfortune certainly is. Accidents do happen, people do get serious ill, get made redundant etc. The only thing different about Corvid is that it is happening to all of us at the same time.
33
19/01/2021 11:50:37 8 3
bbc
I have always thought that teachers work very hard but you can’t compare teaching a class of children to teaching 2 or 3 children of different ages with no training and whilst simultaneously doing another full time job. This is the struggle that parents have.
40
19/01/2021 12:00:02 5 0
bbc
There are vertical classes in small village schools.
45
19/01/2021 12:04:35 3 2
bbc
And do the (presumably also untrained?) teachers there do 40 hours a week on another job while teaching those vertical classes Frank? You’re choosing to miss the point I think.
11
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:06:05 8 9
bbc
Thank you teachers unions! My eldest son is a SEN pupil and we are homeworking. It's been almost 2 weeks since closure and it's a failure. School does one 30 minute zoom meeting a day rest we have to print and try o teach ourselves.
41
19/01/2021 12:00:27 1 2
bbc
The zooms calls are a box ticking exercise for us. No educational content at all it’s really just a check in. This asynchronous (if we can even call it that) approach doesn’t work for children. It relies on there being a parent at home who can dedicate themselves full time to teaching. 70% of double parent families have 2 working parents.
32
19/01/2021 11:47:10 13 12
bbc
The kids aren't happy bunnies either, with their education and mental health in tatters. And all for a virus that is of negligible risk to them, and a minute risk to both their teachers and their parents.

I'm pretty certain that most grannies, who these measures are supposed to benefit, would have chosen to keep all schools open.

So would all GOOD teachers!
42
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:02:52 3 5
bbc
Exactly I would have thought priority would be our future
11
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:06:05 8 9
bbc
Thank you teachers unions! My eldest son is a SEN pupil and we are homeworking. It's been almost 2 weeks since closure and it's a failure. School does one 30 minute zoom meeting a day rest we have to print and try o teach ourselves.
43
19/01/2021 12:03:57 1 1
bbc
Your child should be classed as vulnerable and be in school. Due to a health condition my little one is in school for support and SENCO. No way could I support her remote home learning especially as I'm also a critical worker.
25
19/01/2021 11:49:48 13 16
bbc
Good! Perhaps these people will stop breeding now that they realize that children are a commitment and need looking after, not just shoving off onto childminders or nurseries.
44
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:04:05 4 2
bbc
Just cuz u failed in family life, doesn't mean we all aim for your standards
40
19/01/2021 12:00:02 5 0
bbc
There are vertical classes in small village schools.
45
19/01/2021 12:04:35 3 2
bbc
And do the (presumably also untrained?) teachers there do 40 hours a week on another job while teaching those vertical classes Frank? You’re choosing to miss the point I think.
46
19/01/2021 12:14:57 6 1
bbc
I understand your point, but worth adding most teachers also have their own children to juggle. As we have to deliver to strict timetables or risk letting whole classes down, it is very difficult to afford anytime to our own children, except for evening etc. I fear for teachers own children.
47
19/01/2021 12:18:02 4 0
bbc
There is 30 in the vertical class. At this time the teacher would be teaching say half on line and the other half live. Sounds like two jobs to me. Untrained: the government say you can be untrained and work in an academy; so clearly training appears to be irrelevant.
45
19/01/2021 12:04:35 3 2
bbc
And do the (presumably also untrained?) teachers there do 40 hours a week on another job while teaching those vertical classes Frank? You’re choosing to miss the point I think.
46
19/01/2021 12:14:57 6 1
bbc
I understand your point, but worth adding most teachers also have their own children to juggle. As we have to deliver to strict timetables or risk letting whole classes down, it is very difficult to afford anytime to our own children, except for evening etc. I fear for teachers own children.
107
19/01/2021 17:08:21 1 1
bbc
I agree with you. I haven’t excluded the teaching profession from my comments. It’s an impossible task for any working parent in any profession to educate their children and do their job simulataneously.
45
19/01/2021 12:04:35 3 2
bbc
And do the (presumably also untrained?) teachers there do 40 hours a week on another job while teaching those vertical classes Frank? You’re choosing to miss the point I think.
47
19/01/2021 12:18:02 4 0
bbc
There is 30 in the vertical class. At this time the teacher would be teaching say half on line and the other half live. Sounds like two jobs to me. Untrained: the government say you can be untrained and work in an academy; so clearly training appears to be irrelevant.
17
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:16:04 13 5
bbc
What frustrates even more they keep Premier league open but not schools.
48
19/01/2021 12:19:40 11 4
bbc
Let's see...
School's closed
Universities open
Premier League open...

Could be that the one's that are open are cash cows and can be milked?
49
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:22:09 2 5
bbc
In 1st lockdown headteachers wanted 4 week notice for reopening. So that's next Monday. This means we all need to send posts to Boris and Gavin by end of this week to get this sorted.
87
19/01/2021 14:07:22 1 1
bbc
Four weeks notice? how ever do the cope with short closures like half terms, Christmas & Easter holidays, they must have to start their prep to reopen before they've even shutdown, a remarkable feat of logistics while simultaneously teaching too.
50
19/01/2021 12:24:00 6 8
bbc
I have a son in year 11 and a son just started his first year of uni, both have had their education decimated this year. Both of them are feeling the mental strain of repeated lockdowns and while i may not have to home school them my stress levels are rocketing worrying about their future. they need to be back in education now not in 3 months time!
51
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:53:33 3 7
bbc
Remote learning has been half hearted by our primary school. They got what they wanted now they can't even do the remote learning properly.
53
19/01/2021 12:55:54 1 0
bbc
Inform me what did they want?
71
19/01/2021 13:45:15 2 1
bbc
Maybe they don't want children sat in front of a screen all day. Have you considered that we are also teaching children face to face and cannot be in two places at once.
82
19/01/2021 13:34:03 2 0
bbc
Its primary do it yourself reading writing arithmatic bit of nature science and geography,not rocket science.
52
19/01/2021 12:54:29 1 3
bbc
Stress and depression are awful conditions and the people affected need extra help, M&G insurance announced last week that their Chairman has had to take time off with stress. Dreadful stress and depression can affect anyone.

https://www.sharecast.com/news/news-and-announcements/mg--7773743.html
81
19/01/2021 13:30:00 2 0
bbc
Yes they are if you realy have them,but two weeks with your own bratty kids is not it.
92
19/01/2021 14:13:20 1 0
bbc
My heart bleeds for him. We better hope our NHS and essential shops front line staff can cope with the strain on a lot less money and in far more dangerous conditions. They deserve our appreciation far more than we'll ever be able to bestow on them.
51
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:53:33 3 7
bbc
Remote learning has been half hearted by our primary school. They got what they wanted now they can't even do the remote learning properly.
53
19/01/2021 12:55:54 1 0
bbc
Inform me what did they want?
90
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:09:51 0 1
bbc
Closures
54
19/01/2021 13:08:31 11 7
bbc
Stressful and depressing having your children with you. Perhaps you should have brought them up better to be nicer to be with! Lol.

What a pathetic useless waste of time pretend research such junk is. Beats working for their fat living I suppose by these academics and charities. The invention of this garbage 'mental health' for normal life, is a cornucopia that keeps giving free funding fat pay.
70
Yeh
19/01/2021 13:44:43 3 5
bbc
You have missed the point. It's about teaching not about having your children with you.
35
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:57:24 5 9
bbc
Mid Feb Priority categories should be vaccinated by end of next week or so. Then it take 2 weeks or so for vaccine to take effect
Schools must open last week of Feb. No excuses.
55
19/01/2021 13:10:41 5 3
bbc
And the teaching staff who have yet to be vaccinated...and their families?
63
19/01/2021 13:35:26 4 2
bbc
They should been the high priorities. It's a lot easier for the retired , unemployed and vulnerable groups to isolate at home.
93
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:14:14 1 1
bbc
If they are in those priority groups then they will. Otherwise there isn't a priority category called teachers
56
19/01/2021 13:14:31 5 5
bbc
This is not news or interesting or even worthwhile discussing. We're in a pandemic - it's bleeding obvious that life's going to be more stressful for everyone. BBC need to have their wings trimmed so they report news not just make up complete rubbish. I rarely bother to visit BBC News site because it's full of woke nonsense and items which have no news value at all.
7
19/01/2021 11:00:29 3 4
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
57
19/01/2021 13:23:04 4 1
bbc
It’s your own, on mass, fault.
Housing just soaks up the huge and double incomes you choose to have to outbid others for houses. They cost a fraction to build. Parents want it all, same house as the childless and children and holidays and cars, everything.
Schools should be closed, and the money divided per child. For you to use to educate them. Take it as pay if you are up to it alone.
58
19/01/2021 13:25:01 3 5
bbc
I think people are missing the point here and blaming schools (which remain open) and parents whose parenting skills are somewhat lacking.

The pandemic is serving to bring many worries together such as health, money, work, children, the future etc and many folks are struggling more than they could ever imagine.

The research has simply highlighted another unwanted symptom of this awful virus.
69
Yeh
19/01/2021 13:43:28 1 3
bbc
Premier league and overseas cricket tours are fine.
95
19/01/2021 14:16:31 2 2
bbc
No, it just highlighted how close to the edge too many people are living. The only thing unusual about Covid is that it's happening to a lot of people at the same time.
7
19/01/2021 11:00:29 3 4
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
59
19/01/2021 13:28:29 4 0
bbc
I'd suggest it would do a lot more good if people lived within their means, took parenting more seriously & only proceeded with it if they were confident they had the ability to cope with it economically , emotionally and logistically. Make it easy for people to get out of their depth and the weak or just unlucky will do so. we know that is true, we see it with gambling, drink, drugs, debt, etc.
1
19/01/2021 10:49:28 20 3
bbc
Home schooling + 2 full time jobs = an uninterrupted rotation of work, school, work, cook, sleep. Repeat. Occasionally we get outside the house!
60
19/01/2021 13:29:30 2 0
bbc
At the present time that is all you should be doing.
2
PJ
19/01/2021 10:51:14 25 5
bbc
I'm not disadvantaged, a single parent or struggling with home schooling. But my anxiety levels are off the scale and I'm heartbroken over by my previously bubbly, school loving 15 year old having become withdrawn and anxious - not enjoying home learning but stressed by school with masks/endless covid testing. Both options seem awful to her and I'm powerless to help. So much uncertainty.
61
19/01/2021 13:31:41 3 2
bbc
Hate to say it and apologies, but has your child taken her cues from you?
25
19/01/2021 11:49:48 13 16
bbc
Good! Perhaps these people will stop breeding now that they realize that children are a commitment and need looking after, not just shoving off onto childminders or nurseries.
62
MX
19/01/2021 13:33:02 2 3
bbc
You for real?

The vast majority of parents now are working parents. Now think of those working parents that can still do a job by working at home. These are the people that are keeping the economy ticking over. I can’t believe I didn’t think of a pandemic 9 years ago! How stupid of myself!
55
19/01/2021 13:10:41 5 3
bbc
And the teaching staff who have yet to be vaccinated...and their families?
63
19/01/2021 13:35:26 4 2
bbc
They should been the high priorities. It's a lot easier for the retired , unemployed and vulnerable groups to isolate at home.
27
19/01/2021 11:52:40 9 9
bbc
How heartless. Do you vote Tory by any chance?
64
19/01/2021 13:18:03 3 0
bbc
What does their politics have to do with it,l'm sick of bratty kids running around with no parental control,take the phone out of your hand and watch your own kids
21
KJ
19/01/2021 11:43:02 8 10
bbc
anyone with children will not be at all suprised about this, surely the mental and physical health of our children far outwieghs the very low risk. How can the unions and (some) scientists defend the harm this is doing to kids (and parents) of all ages by continually insisting the schools are kept closed, doesnt make sense
65
19/01/2021 13:19:50 4 0
bbc
Finding your kids hard to deal with teachers have them most days,and not allowed to punish them
14
19/01/2021 11:01:20 16 4
bbc
Both my children have now had their exams cancelled. My son who is in year 11 also has special educational needs, and has found it massively difficult to engage with online learning. It's been a big pressure constantly checking he's online and is staying focused. I feel for all concerned - children, teachers and parents.
66
19/01/2021 13:22:37 2 3
bbc
Well he's not done all the work,just hold them all back a year and reset
9
19/01/2021 11:02:37 16 5
bbc
Not surprising at all. What is surprising is that is issue, plus the impact on children, is being completely ignored by all political parties. Apparently we can and should be able to homeschool (virtually independently) whilst holding down a fulltime job.
67
19/01/2021 13:42:13 3 2
bbc
It does rather beg the question of how would you cope if you or your child was ill or injured. It's nothing new, things like that have always happened. At least with the present Corvid problems if you can WFH or are furloughed you don't loose all your income, in more normal times it may well have been much worse.
11
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:06:05 8 9
bbc
Thank you teachers unions! My eldest son is a SEN pupil and we are homeworking. It's been almost 2 weeks since closure and it's a failure. School does one 30 minute zoom meeting a day rest we have to print and try o teach ourselves.
68
19/01/2021 13:23:40 1 0
bbc
And
58
19/01/2021 13:25:01 3 5
bbc
I think people are missing the point here and blaming schools (which remain open) and parents whose parenting skills are somewhat lacking.

The pandemic is serving to bring many worries together such as health, money, work, children, the future etc and many folks are struggling more than they could ever imagine.

The research has simply highlighted another unwanted symptom of this awful virus.
69
Yeh
19/01/2021 13:43:28 1 3
bbc
Premier league and overseas cricket tours are fine.
54
19/01/2021 13:08:31 11 7
bbc
Stressful and depressing having your children with you. Perhaps you should have brought them up better to be nicer to be with! Lol.

What a pathetic useless waste of time pretend research such junk is. Beats working for their fat living I suppose by these academics and charities. The invention of this garbage 'mental health' for normal life, is a cornucopia that keeps giving free funding fat pay.
70
Yeh
19/01/2021 13:44:43 3 5
bbc
You have missed the point. It's about teaching not about having your children with you.
51
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:53:33 3 7
bbc
Remote learning has been half hearted by our primary school. They got what they wanted now they can't even do the remote learning properly.
71
19/01/2021 13:45:15 2 1
bbc
Maybe they don't want children sat in front of a screen all day. Have you considered that we are also teaching children face to face and cannot be in two places at once.
89
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:09:19 0 1
bbc
As the saying goes"be careful what you ask for "
36
19/01/2021 11:58:13 1 2
bbc
What is wrong in wanting scientific proof; especially when the country is run by a proven liar.
72
19/01/2021 13:46:07 0 4
bbc
Indeed, what proof did the government have that closing schools would be a good idea. I don't remember hearing objections or calls for proof from unions then.
88
19/01/2021 14:08:36 1 2
bbc
Governments choice. A conservative Government that cannot stand up to the unions. Thatcher must be oscillating in her grave.
73
19/01/2021 13:47:36 6 5
bbc
Just think school teachers have to put up with the brats you brought up, created, and can’t stand being with, all day long in the old normal. Might this experience force you to take different attitudes to their behaviours and demands. Taking up your responsibilities not child dumping in nurseries and schools.
86
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:05:11 2 6
bbc
Yeh I can see you never went to school.
21
KJ
19/01/2021 11:43:02 8 10
bbc
anyone with children will not be at all suprised about this, surely the mental and physical health of our children far outwieghs the very low risk. How can the unions and (some) scientists defend the harm this is doing to kids (and parents) of all ages by continually insisting the schools are kept closed, doesnt make sense
74
19/01/2021 13:47:52 1 1
bbc
Teenagers are at risk, more to the point they transmit the virus to each other and to education staff. If you have significant numbers of staff off we cannot, safely, run schools. We want children back in front of us, we are struggling with live and remote teaching but we also want to be safe and not risk being a vector of this virus.
12
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:09:01 12 2
bbc
Just before closures it was being reported most people wanted, polls like you gov. Now I get emails from school everyday saying there are too many key worker parents who have applied for school places. More than 50% are in school. So where is that majority who wanted school closures now?!
75
19/01/2021 13:48:55 5 1
bbc
Who knew we had so many key workers. Missing in action first lockdown time around.
91
19/01/2021 14:12:31 1 1
bbc
Not fair the Government changed the definition of "key workers". But, don't let hold you back.
14
19/01/2021 11:01:20 16 4
bbc
Both my children have now had their exams cancelled. My son who is in year 11 also has special educational needs, and has found it massively difficult to engage with online learning. It's been a big pressure constantly checking he's online and is staying focused. I feel for all concerned - children, teachers and parents.
76
19/01/2021 13:50:54 0 1
bbc
Yes, WFH and distance learning do take some adapting to.
9
19/01/2021 11:02:37 16 5
bbc
Not surprising at all. What is surprising is that is issue, plus the impact on children, is being completely ignored by all political parties. Apparently we can and should be able to homeschool (virtually independently) whilst holding down a fulltime job.
77
19/01/2021 13:25:16 2 0
bbc
Is it using up your social media time
5
19/01/2021 10:58:43 11 5
bbc
Not surprising when most families HAVE to have two couples in full time work just to keep a roof over their head.

Suggest recognising stay at home partner [any gender] as a REAL [paid by Govt] job and allowing people to take that as an option. Lots would.

That would probably alleviate a lot of problems within Society.

People are "burned out" just running on the treadmill to just survive!
78
19/01/2021 13:27:29 2 1
bbc
No,spend less on things you don't need,or don't have kids if you can't afford them.it isn't the taxpayers job to fund them.
94
19/01/2021 14:14:20 0 0
bbc
This is a bit of a non sequitur.
17
Yeh
19/01/2021 11:16:04 13 5
bbc
What frustrates even more they keep Premier league open but not schools.
79
19/01/2021 13:51:51 2 2
bbc
Schools herd large numbers into confined jail like gulags, football is a few outdoors in a large field like space. Might have something to do with virus transmission conditions?
33
19/01/2021 11:50:37 8 3
bbc
I have always thought that teachers work very hard but you can’t compare teaching a class of children to teaching 2 or 3 children of different ages with no training and whilst simultaneously doing another full time job. This is the struggle that parents have.
80
19/01/2021 13:55:10 2 0
bbc
Yes, almost like it's irresponsible to just anyone become a parent.
52
19/01/2021 12:54:29 1 3
bbc
Stress and depression are awful conditions and the people affected need extra help, M&G insurance announced last week that their Chairman has had to take time off with stress. Dreadful stress and depression can affect anyone.

https://www.sharecast.com/news/news-and-announcements/mg--7773743.html
81
19/01/2021 13:30:00 2 0
bbc
Yes they are if you realy have them,but two weeks with your own bratty kids is not it.
51
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:53:33 3 7
bbc
Remote learning has been half hearted by our primary school. They got what they wanted now they can't even do the remote learning properly.
82
19/01/2021 13:34:03 2 0
bbc
Its primary do it yourself reading writing arithmatic bit of nature science and geography,not rocket science.
39
19/01/2021 11:59:37 4 2
bbc
I don't think anyone who had children over the last 18 years can be blamed for not predicting a pandemic!
83
19/01/2021 14:01:44 2 0
bbc
No, but you can certainly say that to not anticipate any sort of misfortune certainly is. Accidents do happen, people do get serious ill, get made redundant etc. The only thing different about Corvid is that it is happening to all of us at the same time.
84
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:03:12 2 2
bbc
After all the genuine concerned posts, now come all the losers who despise family life. Some of these questions they should as their own parents!
97
19/01/2021 14:20:10 3 2
bbc
I think what some people may be troubled by is how shoddy family life has become even in better times. Parenting is one of the rare things in life for which you do not need permission or competence and it shows.
32
19/01/2021 11:47:10 13 12
bbc
The kids aren't happy bunnies either, with their education and mental health in tatters. And all for a virus that is of negligible risk to them, and a minute risk to both their teachers and their parents.

I'm pretty certain that most grannies, who these measures are supposed to benefit, would have chosen to keep all schools open.

So would all GOOD teachers!
85
19/01/2021 14:03:29 0 1
bbc
I'm pretty sure these grandparent would also do their uttermost to help out - if they were allowed to do so.
73
19/01/2021 13:47:36 6 5
bbc
Just think school teachers have to put up with the brats you brought up, created, and can’t stand being with, all day long in the old normal. Might this experience force you to take different attitudes to their behaviours and demands. Taking up your responsibilities not child dumping in nurseries and schools.
86
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:05:11 2 6
bbc
Yeh I can see you never went to school.
49
Yeh
19/01/2021 12:22:09 2 5
bbc
In 1st lockdown headteachers wanted 4 week notice for reopening. So that's next Monday. This means we all need to send posts to Boris and Gavin by end of this week to get this sorted.
87
19/01/2021 14:07:22 1 1
bbc
Four weeks notice? how ever do the cope with short closures like half terms, Christmas & Easter holidays, they must have to start their prep to reopen before they've even shutdown, a remarkable feat of logistics while simultaneously teaching too.
104
19/01/2021 15:45:46 0 0
bbc
no they don't because all schools confirm the dates for standard terms a year in advance.
72
19/01/2021 13:46:07 0 4
bbc
Indeed, what proof did the government have that closing schools would be a good idea. I don't remember hearing objections or calls for proof from unions then.
88
19/01/2021 14:08:36 1 2
bbc
Governments choice. A conservative Government that cannot stand up to the unions. Thatcher must be oscillating in her grave.
71
19/01/2021 13:45:15 2 1
bbc
Maybe they don't want children sat in front of a screen all day. Have you considered that we are also teaching children face to face and cannot be in two places at once.
89
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:09:19 0 1
bbc
As the saying goes"be careful what you ask for "
53
19/01/2021 12:55:54 1 0
bbc
Inform me what did they want?
90
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:09:51 0 1
bbc
Closures
75
19/01/2021 13:48:55 5 1
bbc
Who knew we had so many key workers. Missing in action first lockdown time around.
91
19/01/2021 14:12:31 1 1
bbc
Not fair the Government changed the definition of "key workers". But, don't let hold you back.
52
19/01/2021 12:54:29 1 3
bbc
Stress and depression are awful conditions and the people affected need extra help, M&G insurance announced last week that their Chairman has had to take time off with stress. Dreadful stress and depression can affect anyone.

https://www.sharecast.com/news/news-and-announcements/mg--7773743.html
92
19/01/2021 14:13:20 1 0
bbc
My heart bleeds for him. We better hope our NHS and essential shops front line staff can cope with the strain on a lot less money and in far more dangerous conditions. They deserve our appreciation far more than we'll ever be able to bestow on them.
55
19/01/2021 13:10:41 5 3
bbc
And the teaching staff who have yet to be vaccinated...and their families?
93
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:14:14 1 1
bbc
If they are in those priority groups then they will. Otherwise there isn't a priority category called teachers
78
19/01/2021 13:27:29 2 1
bbc
No,spend less on things you don't need,or don't have kids if you can't afford them.it isn't the taxpayers job to fund them.
94
19/01/2021 14:14:20 0 0
bbc
This is a bit of a non sequitur.
58
19/01/2021 13:25:01 3 5
bbc
I think people are missing the point here and blaming schools (which remain open) and parents whose parenting skills are somewhat lacking.

The pandemic is serving to bring many worries together such as health, money, work, children, the future etc and many folks are struggling more than they could ever imagine.

The research has simply highlighted another unwanted symptom of this awful virus.
95
19/01/2021 14:16:31 2 2
bbc
No, it just highlighted how close to the edge too many people are living. The only thing unusual about Covid is that it's happening to a lot of people at the same time.
96
19/01/2021 14:18:48 3 2
bbc
Parents feel that they have got to put their employer and making money above their time with their children. Getting their children through this pandemic with as much support with education and mental health should be valued above all. Employers come and go and careers evolve, but there is only one chance to get your child’s foundation years correct without negatively impacting their future.
98
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:21:45 2 5
bbc
Yeh ur right and we all go on the dole. Whose gonna pay taxes to support NHS and education etc... ?! How are parents going to save for the future. Are you going to pay for all this?!
84
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:03:12 2 2
bbc
After all the genuine concerned posts, now come all the losers who despise family life. Some of these questions they should as their own parents!
97
19/01/2021 14:20:10 3 2
bbc
I think what some people may be troubled by is how shoddy family life has become even in better times. Parenting is one of the rare things in life for which you do not need permission or competence and it shows.
99
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:27:21 2 2
bbc
The news article is about teaching and school closures, it's not about how to bring up your children.
96
19/01/2021 14:18:48 3 2
bbc
Parents feel that they have got to put their employer and making money above their time with their children. Getting their children through this pandemic with as much support with education and mental health should be valued above all. Employers come and go and careers evolve, but there is only one chance to get your child’s foundation years correct without negatively impacting their future.
98
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:21:45 2 5
bbc
Yeh ur right and we all go on the dole. Whose gonna pay taxes to support NHS and education etc... ?! How are parents going to save for the future. Are you going to pay for all this?!
101
19/01/2021 14:54:58 1 2
bbc
Yes, we taxpayers, even those of us without children, will be paying up as usual. The question is, will you appreciate it and make sure you do your bit in maximising the opportunities for your children.
106
19/01/2021 16:05:09 3 2
bbc
Sorry not a penny 'dole'. Parents should plan one parent not working before having any children. Otherwise don’t have any. Children are parents chosen hobby and expense. Just stop expecting it all, the childless will be richer than you. Have a better house, cars, holidays etc.
108
19/01/2021 17:08:51 1 1
bbc
Many families make financial sacrifices to be involved parents. This particular article is talking about stress for parents at the moment which I understand, and I know each family has different financial situations. Tax contributions to wider society are still met in one income households. Other countries place value on having stay at home parents, and even pay them to do it.
97
19/01/2021 14:20:10 3 2
bbc
I think what some people may be troubled by is how shoddy family life has become even in better times. Parenting is one of the rare things in life for which you do not need permission or competence and it shows.
99
Yeh
19/01/2021 14:27:21 2 2
bbc
The news article is about teaching and school closures, it's not about how to bring up your children.
102
19/01/2021 14:59:06 3 1
bbc
Part of that is how you as a parent contribute (particularly out of the classroom) to your children's education or is that somebody else's problem? So yes, it is about how you bring up your children.
100
19/01/2021 14:52:12 4 4
bbc
When things go back to "normal" and the schools are open I wonder if there will be a reduction in the number of parents who insist on taking their kids out of school for an "educational" holiday and of those who do, will they at least appreciate the extra load this places on their teachers?