Primark refuses to go online despite £1bn lockdown loss
14/01/2021 | news | business | 619
The retailer insists it has no plans to move online, despite warning shop closures could cost it £1bn.
1
14/01/2021 14:30:25 12 6
bbc
Hardly surprising. The cost of delivery well outweighs the value of the cheap goods from Primark
2
14/01/2021 14:31:46 22 6
bbc
Good, well done for bucking the trend
3
14/01/2021 14:32:50 76 11
bbc
I agree with them.

I use Primark from time to time, but they wouldn’t make any profit by accepting and fulfilling online orders for 5 polo shirts at £3 each, or a few T-shirts at £2 each etc. Or some kids Spiderman pyjamas at £2.
91
Bob
14/01/2021 15:11:56 38 11
bbc
Except there's nothing wrong in choice. And I bet someone would say the same about paying rent on huge stores only to sell such low value items.

If someone doesn't mind paying £1 extra for a t-shirt or above average delivery fee in lieu of visiting the store, then that's a good for business.

I suspect the real reason is they don't want the high return rates that online clothes orders have.
185
14/01/2021 15:47:47 5 0
bbc
I don’t live anywhere near a Primark and I wish I did. Even the nearest big town near me hasn’t got one. I would gladly pay a few pounds for delivery.
258
14/01/2021 16:11:35 7 5
bbc
How much does the person making this tat get paid?
4
14/01/2021 14:33:15 2 12
bbc
I am not convinced that setting up online would drive up the cost`s that much and if so I am sure they would have recouped some of the lost sales and cost`s by now. Even is they just outsourced it to a fulfillment company. I must assume their return rates are sky high.
176
14/01/2021 15:43:52 2 0
bbc
Just like all the on line crap.
5
14/01/2021 14:34:51 4 15
bbc
Oh well. When this doesn't save them, they can't blame anyone but themselves. Evolve or die
28
14/01/2021 14:45:14 6 1
bbc
Primark wont die there sales go through the roof when they reopen one of the few high street shops that arent struggling and i hope they stay offline, when Primark shut in Belfast a few year's ago the city
centre was a ghost town, when it reopened the footfall rised sharply.
6
14/01/2021 14:34:51 12 6
bbc
Good for them, to be applauded
7
14/01/2021 14:34:59 102 9
bbc
When a t-shirt costs 90p wholesale, and your shopping demographic like to send lots of things back, margins evaporate! No surprise from Primark on their steadfastness.
131
14/01/2021 15:27:16 54 36
bbc
Yes this nonsense of ever sending clothes back has to be stopped. I have never needed to. I suspect almost all returns are scamming, not wanted all ordered anyway. Needs a national fixed sizing and measurements system. Then you order wrong it is your fault.
246
14/01/2021 16:06:55 11 3
bbc
If a T shirt costs 90p to produce, then the wages for making that T shirt cost 30p for each garment max.

Neck rib + labels x 1
Shoulder seams x 2
Sleeve x 2
Side seams + labels x 2
Hems x 3

Could you do that all day and expect to earn a living wage even if you were quick?

I don't think so...!
492
14/01/2021 17:43:19 1 1
bbc
yep I'm afraid that the young instragram crowd have a lot to answer for. It's well known that young girls order items just to take selfies and then send the items back. theres a reason why returns for female fashions are something like 60%
8
14/01/2021 14:35:07 28 6
bbc
It’s their business model and they can do what they please. Can’t see how my occasionally buying socks and T-shirt’s is going to rake in the bucks. And it’s practically a high street anchor.
9
14/01/2021 14:35:15 10 23
bbc
They are probably not worried about the loss, they know as soon as the lock down is over their usual clientele will be back in there, en masse, with the children, Mercedes, Brittany, Levi and Tyrone to buy their jumpsuits and onesies.
10
14/01/2021 14:37:09 10 6
bbc
Some miseries just can’t stand seeing others smile.
15
FF
14/01/2021 14:38:53 8 3
bbc
Could you be anymore of a pretentious git? Brittany and Mercedes need to be clothed and if not paying for it yourself, I don't see your problem here.
16
14/01/2021 14:37:29 5 3
bbc
Do you feel better now?
27
14/01/2021 14:43:31 3 3
bbc
you need to get out more.
37
14/01/2021 14:46:30 5 3
bbc
Mark ,Marcus , Marki , Marc , Marky ....... bit chavvy too init.
111
14/01/2021 15:18:06 1 1
bbc
You've never been have you? Narrow minded and prejudiced or what!
9
14/01/2021 14:35:15 10 23
bbc
They are probably not worried about the loss, they know as soon as the lock down is over their usual clientele will be back in there, en masse, with the children, Mercedes, Brittany, Levi and Tyrone to buy their jumpsuits and onesies.
10
14/01/2021 14:37:09 10 6
bbc
Some miseries just can’t stand seeing others smile.
11
14/01/2021 14:37:32 14 8
bbc
Absolutely the right decision. Primark customers go into browse and end up buying far more than they probably intended; they wouldn't do that online. Rock on, Primarni!
57
14/01/2021 14:57:39 3 1
bbc
That depends on the person. If I go into a clothes shop (or supermarket, or any other crowded store), I go straight to what I want, buy and get out (because I hate being there).
If I am browsing an online store, I will continue browsing for a while, and normally buy more than I intended.
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
29
14/01/2021 14:45:16 3 2
bbc
otherwise known as... "was the pre covid way of life (ie, life) sustainable"
36
14/01/2021 14:46:22 1 3
bbc
The carbon footprint is pretty negligible. You can research it.
39
14/01/2021 14:48:45 3 2
bbc
Whereas people usually glide into town on an electric salad leaf. One car making several deliveries is more efficient than several people making individual journeys.
46
14/01/2021 14:51:37 4 1
bbc
1 van making 6 drop offs in an order defined by an algorithm to reduce time, fuel and money is more efficient than 6 people in 6 cars making individual journeys
55
14/01/2021 14:55:28 1 1
bbc
It's not overly efficient to individually drive into town, getting stuck in traffic jams, or to drive top out of town shopping centres either. It is more efficient to have items delivered, which is then on a planned route which often minimises distance.

Also, they do pay extra tax to do so: VED and fuel duty.
99
14/01/2021 15:14:17 0 0
bbc
Agreed - we get at least half a dozen big diesel vans delivering to our little close most days - then add all the 'clothes miles' for the returns because they don't fit or don't look like the photo!
303
14/01/2021 16:28:38 0 0
bbc
They should double the vat on online purchases.
For lots of reasons e.g. maintaining the hightrstreet, offetting the no business rates on premises, etc
13
14/01/2021 14:38:03 4 9
bbc
Primark are owned by ABF who produce a lot of sugar. Perhaps they don't need to worry about tring to sell clothes online. Personally, I think that is very short-sighted.
41
14/01/2021 14:45:07 7 2
bbc
ABF "produce" many jobs also !!!
14
14/01/2021 14:36:09 93 18
bbc
Next story: How On-Line Shopping is Killing the High Street.

Can't have it both ways all you loyal Amazonians.
18
14/01/2021 14:40:31 15 29
bbc
And the next story is how ON-line shopping is pollution the streets
126
14/01/2021 15:24:22 9 11
bbc
I will be happy for there not to be any high street at all. Not been in one for a decade or so. Absolutely no use whatever.
9
14/01/2021 14:35:15 10 23
bbc
They are probably not worried about the loss, they know as soon as the lock down is over their usual clientele will be back in there, en masse, with the children, Mercedes, Brittany, Levi and Tyrone to buy their jumpsuits and onesies.
15
FF
14/01/2021 14:38:53 8 3
bbc
Could you be anymore of a pretentious git? Brittany and Mercedes need to be clothed and if not paying for it yourself, I don't see your problem here.
9
14/01/2021 14:35:15 10 23
bbc
They are probably not worried about the loss, they know as soon as the lock down is over their usual clientele will be back in there, en masse, with the children, Mercedes, Brittany, Levi and Tyrone to buy their jumpsuits and onesies.
16
14/01/2021 14:37:29 5 3
bbc
Do you feel better now?
25
14/01/2021 14:44:07 3 5
bbc
Much, thank you!
17
14/01/2021 14:38:30 4 9
bbc
I've bought clothes and shoes online for the first time this lockdown. Unlikely I'll do all that in-store ever again.
26
14/01/2021 14:44:11 9 3
bbc
I never buy clothes online. always need to try them on first. shoes are the only thing I've bought online and they can be wrong
30
14/01/2021 14:45:22 1 1
bbc
For many vulnerable people the lockdown has shown them another way to get vital purchases.
145
14/01/2021 15:33:40 0 0
bbc
Have you tried them on yet?
14
14/01/2021 14:36:09 93 18
bbc
Next story: How On-Line Shopping is Killing the High Street.

Can't have it both ways all you loyal Amazonians.
18
14/01/2021 14:40:31 15 29
bbc
And the next story is how ON-line shopping is pollution the streets
33
01
14/01/2021 14:43:59 8 15
bbc
It does, just look at all those diesel vans pumping out fumes and blocking residential streets.
139
14/01/2021 15:31:03 3 5
bbc
and, at some point, governments will conclude online deliveries are one of the few things they can add tax to - an increasing market and one that needs to be reined in if we are to reach Net Zero Carbon.
164
14/01/2021 15:38:59 3 6
bbc
white vans in profusion spewing out polluting fumes
213
14/01/2021 15:57:46 6 0
bbc
Such drivel- massive reduction on pollution with online shopping, please give some sensible thought before posting such ridiculous notions!
263
14/01/2021 16:14:09 2 6
bbc
Half empty vans driving between various destinations is polluting.
It should be stopped.
Convenience is killing the planet and making people entitled.
19
14/01/2021 14:40:49 23 12
bbc
Thank you for not going online, your store is a reason why thousands still go to the city centre. People would rather support workers in other countries than there own, when High Street shops close because they can sell online you support workers in the warehouse in another country why local people live of the government, cant pay bills or feed there kids. Its a joke.
24
14/01/2021 14:43:29 9 8
bbc
98% of retail orders in the U.K. come from fulfilment centres in the UK. 95% of Primarks goods are made overseas. A website after outlay to Bild is very cheap.
31
14/01/2021 14:45:41 7 2
bbc
You are joking, Primark pay the lowest rates in the poorest countries to supply cheap goods to UK consumers. There is nothing in those shops that support British workers apart from a handful of retail staff. Supporting British is not just about where it sold!
254
14/01/2021 16:10:08 0 2
bbc
Well done for coming online to make that point.
20
14/01/2021 14:42:27 29 28
bbc
Good! Thank you Primark

If everyone closed their Amazon account the high street might actually have a chance. Don't moan that high streets become boarded up, deserted miserable places to be if you continue to buy from Amazon

What's better, bustling high streets with people having decent jobs in shops, or already obese people ordering tat from their sofa while robot like staff work in warehouses
48
14/01/2021 14:51:56 20 6
bbc
You do know that high street shops can choose to sell online too, don't you? This isn't just a Big Bad Amazon vs Highstreet. Those willing to innovate and embrace the future will stand a chance of flourishing, those who doggedly stick in the past will wither away. It has always been the case.
78
14/01/2021 15:06:27 5 1
bbc
Those high street shops are themselves stocked by 'robot like staff' working in warehouses (soon to be replaced with actual robots) and that 'tat' bought online is very often the same 'tat' sold by the same high street retailer.

People who buy online aren't moaning about the state of the high street, people who buy on the high street are.
140
14/01/2021 15:32:18 4 5
bbc
I do not want the high street! Almost no one does. Good riddance. Appalling horrible way to get goods, near impossible to find anything.
200
14/01/2021 15:53:26 5 1
bbc
Like so many others of the "blame Amazon" brigade, you appear to be completely unaware that the internet is awash with businesses that are NOT Amazon but manage to sell on-line. I buy loads on-line but rarely use Amazon. "Other retailers are available."
231
14/01/2021 16:02:53 1 1
bbc
Amazon and online shopping any day of the week for me, I cant stand "Bustling high streets". Amazon is only a market place you know, I don't understand the hate. If you dont like a shop in a shopping centre, just move onto the next. Just do you're research. I guess the hate is down to those who cant understand computers and believe in conspiracy theories and ghosts.
21
14/01/2021 14:42:37 43 28
bbc
389 global stores
190 in the UK stores.

=========
I guess people in the UK have no problem with modern day slavery.

Most people here couldn't make breakfast for £2 let alone an item of clothing.
135
14/01/2021 15:29:38 26 16
bbc
No problem at all with local pay not being huge western overpay. It is not remotely ‘slavery'. It is what we once did as the workshop of the world, worked for a living.
153
14/01/2021 15:35:29 6 1
bbc
the big retailers selling online and the big brand names are buying at the same prices. The difference in pricing is marketing 'professionals' over loading the price to pay for their ads and overheads.
250
14/01/2021 16:09:21 3 2
bbc
As long as people earn enough to house, clothe and feed themselves (and their families), does it matter if the vagaries of foreign exchange rates suggest that a particular income is 'equivalent' to £2 in the UK?
257
14/01/2021 16:11:08 1 1
bbc
The high end stores buy from the same suppliers. I can remember 50 years ago in Kowloon buying my girlfriend genuine Christian Dior dresses from market traders at rock bottom prices. They were the 'surplus' stock made in Kowloon but never shipped to Europe/USA but taken out the back door to local traders.
605
14/01/2021 22:11:13 0 0
bbc
But in the countries that make the clothes you could as the cost of living is much cheaper
22
14/01/2021 14:43:01 0 4
bbc
is primark good or bad for the environment:

a) yes
b) no
c) pret
d) profits
52
14/01/2021 14:53:15 6 2
bbc
Good because they are on the high street.

Bad because of the shoddy goods, poor manufacturing practices, and the high percentage of imported goods destroying quality British manufacturing
23
14/01/2021 14:43:02 7 15
bbc
It would be no great loss if it closed. It only has a certain target group anyway and majority of people couldn't care less that it's closed
35
14/01/2021 14:46:12 16 4
bbc
I'm not sure your opinion technically counts as the majority view, just because it's all that rattles around inside your head.
92
14/01/2021 15:12:16 1 0
bbc
I'm an over 60 male, I'm retired, I'm worth a couple of £million, I have a good house, several good cars, I live well. But I hate wasting money on overpriced 'designer' rubbish with a label that costs more than the clothes. I love Primark. I've had great service from their products.

Am I your 'target group'? Kids! Narrow minds!
114
14/01/2021 15:19:01 0 0
bbc
You could not be more wrong.
19
14/01/2021 14:40:49 23 12
bbc
Thank you for not going online, your store is a reason why thousands still go to the city centre. People would rather support workers in other countries than there own, when High Street shops close because they can sell online you support workers in the warehouse in another country why local people live of the government, cant pay bills or feed there kids. Its a joke.
24
14/01/2021 14:43:29 9 8
bbc
98% of retail orders in the U.K. come from fulfilment centres in the UK. 95% of Primarks goods are made overseas. A website after outlay to Bild is very cheap.
74
14/01/2021 15:04:29 6 1
bbc
And where do those 'fulfilment centres' get their stock? You really haven't thought this through, have you!
142
14/01/2021 15:32:31 5 0
bbc
All the products are made overseas which ever way they get sold!
424
14/01/2021 17:15:22 1 0
bbc
But it is very expensive to run and maintain a retail website, the call centres, the additional accounting, the costs of returns, etc....Even Next have said that their profit margin on online business is a third of that of bricks and mortar. https://theconversation.com/the-hidden-costs-of-online-shopping-for-customers-and-retailers-109694
16
14/01/2021 14:37:29 5 3
bbc
Do you feel better now?
25
14/01/2021 14:44:07 3 5
bbc
Much, thank you!
17
14/01/2021 14:38:30 4 9
bbc
I've bought clothes and shoes online for the first time this lockdown. Unlikely I'll do all that in-store ever again.
26
14/01/2021 14:44:11 9 3
bbc
I never buy clothes online. always need to try them on first. shoes are the only thing I've bought online and they can be wrong
59
14/01/2021 14:58:01 2 1
bbc
None of the stores in my city have been allowing people to try on the clothes in store, even when they are open. So you have to buy stuff, take it home to try it on, then take it back for a refund or a different size. Much easier to buy online and have it delivered to your door
151
14/01/2021 15:34:42 0 0
bbc
especially shoes
9
14/01/2021 14:35:15 10 23
bbc
They are probably not worried about the loss, they know as soon as the lock down is over their usual clientele will be back in there, en masse, with the children, Mercedes, Brittany, Levi and Tyrone to buy their jumpsuits and onesies.
27
14/01/2021 14:43:31 3 3
bbc
you need to get out more.
5
14/01/2021 14:34:51 4 15
bbc
Oh well. When this doesn't save them, they can't blame anyone but themselves. Evolve or die
28
14/01/2021 14:45:14 6 1
bbc
Primark wont die there sales go through the roof when they reopen one of the few high street shops that arent struggling and i hope they stay offline, when Primark shut in Belfast a few year's ago the city
centre was a ghost town, when it reopened the footfall rised sharply.
136
14/01/2021 15:30:24 0 0
bbc
I hope you are right. I fear you are not
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
29
14/01/2021 14:45:16 3 2
bbc
otherwise known as... "was the pre covid way of life (ie, life) sustainable"
171
14/01/2021 15:40:32 0 0
bbc
will the post one?
17
14/01/2021 14:38:30 4 9
bbc
I've bought clothes and shoes online for the first time this lockdown. Unlikely I'll do all that in-store ever again.
30
14/01/2021 14:45:22 1 1
bbc
For many vulnerable people the lockdown has shown them another way to get vital purchases.
19
14/01/2021 14:40:49 23 12
bbc
Thank you for not going online, your store is a reason why thousands still go to the city centre. People would rather support workers in other countries than there own, when High Street shops close because they can sell online you support workers in the warehouse in another country why local people live of the government, cant pay bills or feed there kids. Its a joke.
31
14/01/2021 14:45:41 7 2
bbc
You are joking, Primark pay the lowest rates in the poorest countries to supply cheap goods to UK consumers. There is nothing in those shops that support British workers apart from a handful of retail staff. Supporting British is not just about where it sold!
362
14/01/2021 16:56:55 3 2
bbc
at least they are honest! Branded goods are often made for the same price and in the same factories. Marketing, ads and bloated boardrooms cause the higher prices you seem willing to pay.
32
14/01/2021 14:43:50 11 9
bbc
In the same update the BBC doesn't tell you

"Our businesses were well prepared for the end of the Brexit transition period. As a result of the free trade agreement with the EU, together with the UK's negotiation of trade continuity agreements with other countries, we expect to see little impact from changes in tariffs. At this early stage, we have seen no material disruption to our supply chains"
45
14/01/2021 14:51:14 5 3
bbc
And where do you think all the sweat shops are that make their products ?
70
14/01/2021 15:02:53 5 2
bbc
I doubt that Primark does ANY business with EU countries! Is that really too hard to work out? Are you one of those people who think the world is made up only of 'us' and 'foreigners' perhaps?
18
14/01/2021 14:40:31 15 29
bbc
And the next story is how ON-line shopping is pollution the streets
33
01
14/01/2021 14:43:59 8 15
bbc
It does, just look at all those diesel vans pumping out fumes and blocking residential streets.
175
14/01/2021 15:43:11 5 1
bbc
Can't see any from here.
189
14/01/2021 15:48:50 10 0
bbc
Just look at the dozens or scores of private cars NOT driving to the shops because one van delivers to loads of homes.
34
01
14/01/2021 14:44:58 2 23
bbc
Good, Primark disappearing (they will soon) won't be a bad thing. I'll never forgive them for taking over a once great BHS site.
53
14/01/2021 14:54:42 15 0
bbc
What’s BHS got to do with Primark? BHS was Run into the ground by another bafoon who remains titled
87
14/01/2021 15:09:53 0 0
bbc
I'll have you a £100 charity bet that they will outlast M&S
100
14/01/2021 15:14:32 0 0
bbc
So you would prefer an empty derelict site.
107
14/01/2021 15:17:30 1 0
bbc
I hope Primark continues to stay afloat. I see just how good value the clothes are, especially for kids. I'm sure there are many parents out there, especially with how the world is today, who appreciate the value of cheap school uniforms, shoes, clothes that kids will quickly grow out of. And not just parents benefit in this way. There aren't many stores around that can offer the same value sadly.
116
14/01/2021 15:19:50 1 0
bbc
Wow! They saved a redundant retail site to help keep a high street alive and this is all your little brain can construct? That Phil Green is such a nice chap too!
23
14/01/2021 14:43:02 7 15
bbc
It would be no great loss if it closed. It only has a certain target group anyway and majority of people couldn't care less that it's closed
35
14/01/2021 14:46:12 16 4
bbc
I'm not sure your opinion technically counts as the majority view, just because it's all that rattles around inside your head.
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
36
14/01/2021 14:46:22 1 3
bbc
The carbon footprint is pretty negligible. You can research it.
9
14/01/2021 14:35:15 10 23
bbc
They are probably not worried about the loss, they know as soon as the lock down is over their usual clientele will be back in there, en masse, with the children, Mercedes, Brittany, Levi and Tyrone to buy their jumpsuits and onesies.
37
14/01/2021 14:46:30 5 3
bbc
Mark ,Marcus , Marki , Marc , Marky ....... bit chavvy too init.
215
14/01/2021 15:58:21 1 0
bbc
Who mentioned chavy, I am just stating what I observed and heard on my one and only ever visit to a Primark. If my observations make you think chav then thats your own social prejudice, not mine!
38
AK
14/01/2021 14:46:48 52 8
bbc
Good Primark good. I still have a Primark winter coat I bought 6 yrs ago for £35 and it still going strong. Next wanted £120 for a similar coat.
77
14/01/2021 15:06:07 23 3
bbc
Not knocking Primani, but you can usually tell the difference between Primani and Next, which is obviously reflected in the price. Same with George. I saw a coat in George - very nice, and £60 cheaper than I'd paid in Next for a very similar one, but you could see and feel the difference in the fit and finish. Have to say, though, that I'd have bought the George coat if I'd seen that first!
266
14/01/2021 16:15:26 2 0
bbc
I wonder what the two paid their workers?
554
DWM
14/01/2021 18:23:51 0 0
bbc
I do miss Jaeger on the high street.
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
39
14/01/2021 14:48:45 3 2
bbc
Whereas people usually glide into town on an electric salad leaf. One car making several deliveries is more efficient than several people making individual journeys.
40
14/01/2021 14:49:22 6 11
bbc
I'm worried about great high street clothes chains going bust. I tend to go out and buy a couple of tops every Saturday afternoon, or some shoes from places like Primark. The problem with online buying is that you don't exactly know whether the clothes will suit you. Plus, with lockdowns, it's been so hard to stay in season. I was still in springwear well into June last year.
49
14/01/2021 14:52:28 3 1
bbc
Lol ??
65
14/01/2021 15:00:40 0 0
bbc
Must have been hell for you daaaaaaaaaaaahhhhling.......
71
14/01/2021 15:03:23 1 0
bbc
I can't tell if this comment is sarcastic or not! You shouldn't be needing to buy clothes every week. If you feel the need to do this, please buy second-hand or rent, the planet cannot sustain this level of shopping!
75
14/01/2021 15:05:31 1 0
bbc
First world problems of an airhead?
13
14/01/2021 14:38:03 4 9
bbc
Primark are owned by ABF who produce a lot of sugar. Perhaps they don't need to worry about tring to sell clothes online. Personally, I think that is very short-sighted.
41
14/01/2021 14:45:07 7 2
bbc
ABF "produce" many jobs also !!!
42
14/01/2021 14:45:24 0 22
bbc
Any retail store without an ecommerce site deserves to fail
80
14/01/2021 15:08:12 6 0
bbc
Really?
43
01
14/01/2021 14:47:37 6 4
bbc
Don't worry, there'll be plenty more Wetherspoons, charity shops, betting shops, CEX, mobile phone tacky accessory shops, coffee shops, Cosmo (God Forbid!) and, dare I say it, pawn shops taking over our high streets. What was the cause of this? Shoppers!
44
14/01/2021 14:49:49 5 18
bbc
It's Primark, went there once and never went back. Although I do feel for the staff if they lose their jobs, Primark itself would be no great loss.
66
14/01/2021 14:56:29 6 1
bbc
Perhaps you might like to consider all the Tax the company pays ....to fund items like the NHS?!
32
14/01/2021 14:43:50 11 9
bbc
In the same update the BBC doesn't tell you

"Our businesses were well prepared for the end of the Brexit transition period. As a result of the free trade agreement with the EU, together with the UK's negotiation of trade continuity agreements with other countries, we expect to see little impact from changes in tariffs. At this early stage, we have seen no material disruption to our supply chains"
45
14/01/2021 14:51:14 5 3
bbc
And where do you think all the sweat shops are that make their products ?
56
14/01/2021 14:54:11 4 2
bbc
Suggest you check up the ethics of the ABF group, before shouting your mouth off !
89
14/01/2021 15:10:43 3 1
bbc
Leicester, apparently
109
14/01/2021 15:17:56 0 0
bbc
The same place as all the online stores but at least you can see and try on before tou buy.
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
46
14/01/2021 14:51:37 4 1
bbc
1 van making 6 drop offs in an order defined by an algorithm to reduce time, fuel and money is more efficient than 6 people in 6 cars making individual journeys
72
14/01/2021 15:03:31 1 3
bbc
And who uses their car to make just one pickup? One car visit to the high street picks up many goods.

This versus delivery drivers delivering at most just a couple of items per household thus being far less efficient
104
14/01/2021 15:16:30 0 0
bbc
Those deliveries didn't start in that van! Pobably picked up in 6 places, consolidated at a warehouse, sent in various trucks to various distribution hubs, transferred to local hubs, transferred to delivery vans...
47
14/01/2021 14:51:45 5 4
bbc
"the cost of manning such an operation and handling returns would mean it could no longer offer such low prices."

Just to keep the Amazonians happy a subsidary branding of Primark could be opened up online with higher prices than their retail branches.

Good economical thinking.
20
14/01/2021 14:42:27 29 28
bbc
Good! Thank you Primark

If everyone closed their Amazon account the high street might actually have a chance. Don't moan that high streets become boarded up, deserted miserable places to be if you continue to buy from Amazon

What's better, bustling high streets with people having decent jobs in shops, or already obese people ordering tat from their sofa while robot like staff work in warehouses
48
14/01/2021 14:51:56 20 6
bbc
You do know that high street shops can choose to sell online too, don't you? This isn't just a Big Bad Amazon vs Highstreet. Those willing to innovate and embrace the future will stand a chance of flourishing, those who doggedly stick in the past will wither away. It has always been the case.
158
14/01/2021 15:37:11 4 2
bbc
the problem is Amazon and others are little more than margin hoovers sucking gross profit out of the country
40
14/01/2021 14:49:22 6 11
bbc
I'm worried about great high street clothes chains going bust. I tend to go out and buy a couple of tops every Saturday afternoon, or some shoes from places like Primark. The problem with online buying is that you don't exactly know whether the clothes will suit you. Plus, with lockdowns, it's been so hard to stay in season. I was still in springwear well into June last year.
49
14/01/2021 14:52:28 3 1
bbc
Lol ??
50
14/01/2021 14:52:43 6 20
bbc
Incredibly myopic view. All businesses need to adapt to changing times, they don't have a right to exist.
54
14/01/2021 14:55:10 15 0
bbc
And yet they do exist - and appear to be thriving. Good for them.
69
14/01/2021 15:01:59 1 0
bbc
If their current business model allows them to stay profitable, then there is little point in fixing what ain't broken.

But there have been many retail casualties in recent years largely due to them not sufficiently adapting to the online world...
51
14/01/2021 14:53:13 153 18
bbc
It's the clothes equivalent of a pound shop in that they make pennies an item but bank on selling many items... a pound shop doesn't trade online for obvious reasons so it's not surprising that Primark won't
58
14/01/2021 14:57:43 19 4
bbc
Poundland did try online sales for a while but ceased this sometime ago
147
14/01/2021 15:34:12 3 1
bbc
You can easily find pound shops online.
245
14/01/2021 16:06:50 5 1
bbc
There's plenty of stuff being sold on eBay for around £1 to £2, including postage. Profit margins are low, but for small high street businesses, these are bonus sales they wouldn't otherwise get from their shop.
419
14/01/2021 17:20:30 1 0
bbc
High volume, low quality model. High visibility of shops and keeping up with fashion trends to cater to the quick fashion brigade on board. the 'want it now' and want it 'cheap' brigade.
439
Tim
14/01/2021 17:28:18 1 8
bbc
Wrong - That is exactly how Amazon and ebay work, they sell cheap items very cheaply. Online makes that easier, much lower overheads. Why do you think all of the £1 shops are all going bust?

Ever heard of Alibaba?

Primark are simply missing the boat - Top post? seriously?

Please research first, then post.
22
14/01/2021 14:43:01 0 4
bbc
is primark good or bad for the environment:

a) yes
b) no
c) pret
d) profits
52
14/01/2021 14:53:15 6 2
bbc
Good because they are on the high street.

Bad because of the shoddy goods, poor manufacturing practices, and the high percentage of imported goods destroying quality British manufacturing
79
14/01/2021 15:07:04 0 0
bbc
Err - UK clothes manufacturing - can you name some (Leicester sweatshops don't count!)?
127
14/01/2021 15:24:25 0 0
bbc
British clothing manufacturing stopped years ago because it was too expensive for the majority.
163
14/01/2021 15:38:54 0 0
bbc
I do agree - but shoddy manufacturing practices/bad working conditions.....how do we know dolce/prada/name an expensive brand's working practices are any different? Louis Vuitton's warehouses might be just as ****, but the brand is more expensive so we don't question it as much
34
01
14/01/2021 14:44:58 2 23
bbc
Good, Primark disappearing (they will soon) won't be a bad thing. I'll never forgive them for taking over a once great BHS site.
53
14/01/2021 14:54:42 15 0
bbc
What’s BHS got to do with Primark? BHS was Run into the ground by another bafoon who remains titled
84
14/01/2021 15:09:11 1 0
bbc
I think 01 is just clutching at attention seeking
50
14/01/2021 14:52:43 6 20
bbc
Incredibly myopic view. All businesses need to adapt to changing times, they don't have a right to exist.
54
14/01/2021 14:55:10 15 0
bbc
And yet they do exist - and appear to be thriving. Good for them.
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
55
14/01/2021 14:55:28 1 1
bbc
It's not overly efficient to individually drive into town, getting stuck in traffic jams, or to drive top out of town shopping centres either. It is more efficient to have items delivered, which is then on a planned route which often minimises distance.

Also, they do pay extra tax to do so: VED and fuel duty.
45
14/01/2021 14:51:14 5 3
bbc
And where do you think all the sweat shops are that make their products ?
56
14/01/2021 14:54:11 4 2
bbc
Suggest you check up the ethics of the ABF group, before shouting your mouth off !
11
14/01/2021 14:37:32 14 8
bbc
Absolutely the right decision. Primark customers go into browse and end up buying far more than they probably intended; they wouldn't do that online. Rock on, Primarni!
57
14/01/2021 14:57:39 3 1
bbc
That depends on the person. If I go into a clothes shop (or supermarket, or any other crowded store), I go straight to what I want, buy and get out (because I hate being there).
If I am browsing an online store, I will continue browsing for a while, and normally buy more than I intended.
51
14/01/2021 14:53:13 153 18
bbc
It's the clothes equivalent of a pound shop in that they make pennies an item but bank on selling many items... a pound shop doesn't trade online for obvious reasons so it's not surprising that Primark won't
58
14/01/2021 14:57:43 19 4
bbc
Poundland did try online sales for a while but ceased this sometime ago
354
14/01/2021 16:54:32 2 3
bbc
How would they be able to survive, the cost of sending out any parcel would be more than a pound.
26
14/01/2021 14:44:11 9 3
bbc
I never buy clothes online. always need to try them on first. shoes are the only thing I've bought online and they can be wrong
59
14/01/2021 14:58:01 2 1
bbc
None of the stores in my city have been allowing people to try on the clothes in store, even when they are open. So you have to buy stuff, take it home to try it on, then take it back for a refund or a different size. Much easier to buy online and have it delivered to your door
155
14/01/2021 15:36:33 0 0
bbc
and then have to send it back because it does not fit
60
14/01/2021 14:58:07 0 5
bbc
The market for retail goods is moving increasingly online. It has been doing so for the last 20 years but the current crisis is exacerbating the situation. In the mass retail market if you do not have an online offering you will go out of business. So better to start making the move and transferring jobs to the online section of your company to save jobs and stay affloat. That's just it!
61
JGC
14/01/2021 14:58:16 1 6
bbc
They will have too eventually no doubt. Folly not to get themselves on that path as soon as
85
14/01/2021 15:09:19 1 0
bbc
I would imagine they will have done their sums, and decided that the economics of going online just don't work for them at their prices. Personally, I'd rather them keep their prices, than unnecessarily go online and hike prices because of it.
62
14/01/2021 14:58:40 60 9
bbc
A lot of bizzare wishing for Primark to go bust just because they 'aren't moving with the times'. Boggles the mind.
86
14/01/2021 15:04:52 6 3
bbc
Not of you’re Klaus Schwab it doesn’t
219
14/01/2021 16:00:47 0 5
bbc
Not so much 'moving with the times', but under present circumstances, the safest way to shop. Hope Primark remember that when things get back to normal and they aren't so selective. I for one will not be purchasing any of their clothing ever again.
290
14/01/2021 16:26:07 1 0
bbc
Even if they did go bankrupt I'm sure some firm would definatly buy it, I know I would if I had that sort of money
566
14/01/2021 18:46:16 0 0
bbc
I dont wish they would go bust, but I do wish they would commit to ethical sourcing of their garments. There is simply no way in hell anyone can sell a 90p tee shirt with any profit at all without exploiting people in the production chain.
63
14/01/2021 14:59:28 35 11
bbc
Clearly they can easily afford to lose £1b in sales if they are still steadfastly refusing to go online. There is an awful lot of snobbery about Primani, but clearly they are doing something very right indeed - providing goods that a lot of people want, at a price that a lot of people are willing to pay. Perhaps other retailers could take a leaf out of their book!
73
14/01/2021 15:03:45 10 5
bbc
Yep, jealousy or snobbery, take your choice, neither of which are attractive features.

So one of my personal tailors is shut for a few weeks, I can wait.
150
14/01/2021 15:34:40 1 2
bbc
I’ve never shopped at Primani. So I can’t comment.
530
14/01/2021 18:00:53 0 0
bbc
It's not "easily afford". They and their backers have little choice and they see there is no money in online selling to their demographic.
569
14/01/2021 18:55:58 0 1
bbc
There is an awful lot of snobbery about Primani.
That's because there's a lot it should be ashamed of.
64
14/01/2021 15:00:05 21 7
bbc
Wheres the fun in Primark being online?

You can't chuck the clothes on the floor, join a long queues or keep coming back for refunds.

Primary is made for the high street only, just like prestigious companies such as Poundland, 99p store and betting shops.
40
14/01/2021 14:49:22 6 11
bbc
I'm worried about great high street clothes chains going bust. I tend to go out and buy a couple of tops every Saturday afternoon, or some shoes from places like Primark. The problem with online buying is that you don't exactly know whether the clothes will suit you. Plus, with lockdowns, it's been so hard to stay in season. I was still in springwear well into June last year.
65
14/01/2021 15:00:40 0 0
bbc
Must have been hell for you daaaaaaaaaaaahhhhling.......
44
14/01/2021 14:49:49 5 18
bbc
It's Primark, went there once and never went back. Although I do feel for the staff if they lose their jobs, Primark itself would be no great loss.
66
14/01/2021 14:56:29 6 1
bbc
Perhaps you might like to consider all the Tax the company pays ....to fund items like the NHS?!
67
14/01/2021 15:01:00 7 3
bbc
The biggest problem with eCommerce is that nobody can tell what it is they are buying.
An old adage says "Never buy a pig in a poke", yet that is exactly what it has become.

Buy your telly online and you do not see hoe good the picture is nor the fidelity of the sound is to your liking.

Return items? If the goods are working properly you are wasting your time and money.
68
14/01/2021 15:01:05 5 7
bbc
There was once a joy in shopping for pleasure, wandering stores which were unique; Next, Gap, HoF, River Island etc. All had differences. Christmas was special, decoration and warmth added enhanced feelings. Now half the shops do little, just a window! And clothes products are all similar. So price is it! Cheapest available will win the race to the bottom
50
14/01/2021 14:52:43 6 20
bbc
Incredibly myopic view. All businesses need to adapt to changing times, they don't have a right to exist.
69
14/01/2021 15:01:59 1 0
bbc
If their current business model allows them to stay profitable, then there is little point in fixing what ain't broken.

But there have been many retail casualties in recent years largely due to them not sufficiently adapting to the online world...
32
14/01/2021 14:43:50 11 9
bbc
In the same update the BBC doesn't tell you

"Our businesses were well prepared for the end of the Brexit transition period. As a result of the free trade agreement with the EU, together with the UK's negotiation of trade continuity agreements with other countries, we expect to see little impact from changes in tariffs. At this early stage, we have seen no material disruption to our supply chains"
70
14/01/2021 15:02:53 5 2
bbc
I doubt that Primark does ANY business with EU countries! Is that really too hard to work out? Are you one of those people who think the world is made up only of 'us' and 'foreigners' perhaps?
117
14/01/2021 15:19:38 1 1
bbc
Another one shouting their mouth off ! Presume you have checked where the branches are located?? I think it might be you who is the little Englander!!
40
14/01/2021 14:49:22 6 11
bbc
I'm worried about great high street clothes chains going bust. I tend to go out and buy a couple of tops every Saturday afternoon, or some shoes from places like Primark. The problem with online buying is that you don't exactly know whether the clothes will suit you. Plus, with lockdowns, it's been so hard to stay in season. I was still in springwear well into June last year.
71
14/01/2021 15:03:23 1 0
bbc
I can't tell if this comment is sarcastic or not! You shouldn't be needing to buy clothes every week. If you feel the need to do this, please buy second-hand or rent, the planet cannot sustain this level of shopping!
46
14/01/2021 14:51:37 4 1
bbc
1 van making 6 drop offs in an order defined by an algorithm to reduce time, fuel and money is more efficient than 6 people in 6 cars making individual journeys
72
14/01/2021 15:03:31 1 3
bbc
And who uses their car to make just one pickup? One car visit to the high street picks up many goods.

This versus delivery drivers delivering at most just a couple of items per household thus being far less efficient
112
14/01/2021 15:18:28 0 0
bbc
All of my nearest neighbours (and yes I do know this as I talk to them) use their cars to drive to our local Asda which is less than 5 minutes walk away to do their weekly, and often daily shops. Whereas my local delivery driver has on average 85 parcel drops per day for different retailers within a five miles radius. Who's costing the environment more?
63
14/01/2021 14:59:28 35 11
bbc
Clearly they can easily afford to lose £1b in sales if they are still steadfastly refusing to go online. There is an awful lot of snobbery about Primani, but clearly they are doing something very right indeed - providing goods that a lot of people want, at a price that a lot of people are willing to pay. Perhaps other retailers could take a leaf out of their book!
73
14/01/2021 15:03:45 10 5
bbc
Yep, jealousy or snobbery, take your choice, neither of which are attractive features.

So one of my personal tailors is shut for a few weeks, I can wait.
24
14/01/2021 14:43:29 9 8
bbc
98% of retail orders in the U.K. come from fulfilment centres in the UK. 95% of Primarks goods are made overseas. A website after outlay to Bild is very cheap.
74
14/01/2021 15:04:29 6 1
bbc
And where do those 'fulfilment centres' get their stock? You really haven't thought this through, have you!
40
14/01/2021 14:49:22 6 11
bbc
I'm worried about great high street clothes chains going bust. I tend to go out and buy a couple of tops every Saturday afternoon, or some shoes from places like Primark. The problem with online buying is that you don't exactly know whether the clothes will suit you. Plus, with lockdowns, it's been so hard to stay in season. I was still in springwear well into June last year.
75
14/01/2021 15:05:31 1 0
bbc
First world problems of an airhead?
76
14/01/2021 15:05:34 4 1
bbc
Still holding confidence in the High street. Having seen a large percentage of the competition disappear. They can see a future. But for how long? Online sales have increased year on year. The pendemic has accelerated it. Will we have high streets in 10 years time.
38
AK
14/01/2021 14:46:48 52 8
bbc
Good Primark good. I still have a Primark winter coat I bought 6 yrs ago for £35 and it still going strong. Next wanted £120 for a similar coat.
77
14/01/2021 15:06:07 23 3
bbc
Not knocking Primani, but you can usually tell the difference between Primani and Next, which is obviously reflected in the price. Same with George. I saw a coat in George - very nice, and £60 cheaper than I'd paid in Next for a very similar one, but you could see and feel the difference in the fit and finish. Have to say, though, that I'd have bought the George coat if I'd seen that first!
211
14/01/2021 15:57:28 5 2
bbc
never been impressed by NEXT - overhyped
312
14/01/2021 16:33:07 1 2
bbc
There is a difference (although Next isn't as quality conscious as it was) but too many people want everything for as close to free as it's possible to get then wonder why shops close and manufacture moves overseas. I have shopped at Primark as ideal for the kids on holiday. Wear it, trash it, bin it. It's not going to last for years.
20
14/01/2021 14:42:27 29 28
bbc
Good! Thank you Primark

If everyone closed their Amazon account the high street might actually have a chance. Don't moan that high streets become boarded up, deserted miserable places to be if you continue to buy from Amazon

What's better, bustling high streets with people having decent jobs in shops, or already obese people ordering tat from their sofa while robot like staff work in warehouses
78
14/01/2021 15:06:27 5 1
bbc
Those high street shops are themselves stocked by 'robot like staff' working in warehouses (soon to be replaced with actual robots) and that 'tat' bought online is very often the same 'tat' sold by the same high street retailer.

People who buy online aren't moaning about the state of the high street, people who buy on the high street are.
52
14/01/2021 14:53:15 6 2
bbc
Good because they are on the high street.

Bad because of the shoddy goods, poor manufacturing practices, and the high percentage of imported goods destroying quality British manufacturing
79
14/01/2021 15:07:04 0 0
bbc
Err - UK clothes manufacturing - can you name some (Leicester sweatshops don't count!)?
42
14/01/2021 14:45:24 0 22
bbc
Any retail store without an ecommerce site deserves to fail
80
14/01/2021 15:08:12 6 0
bbc
Really?
81
14/01/2021 15:08:52 2 3
bbc
A earth resources exploitative company. A manufactory workers exploiter. With their throw away products, disgusting. Not going online another dinosaur company not reacting to retail changes, but who would miss it?
119
14/01/2021 15:21:00 2 1
bbc
but who would miss it?
--
All those folks who shop there , which henever we visit our local store, seems to be rather a large section of the local community. Plus of course any visitors who happen to be in the area at the time.
82
14/01/2021 15:03:23 1 1
bbc
I don’t think they got the memo from Klaus Schwab and the WEF!
110
14/01/2021 15:15:33 2 2
bbc
I love how someone downvoted a comment like this. What’s to downvote? “You will own nothing, and be happy about it” that’s a statement from the WEF. There will be no shops, no commerce as you recognise it. This is fact. Check their own material before getting all funky about it. Then see the IMF and BIS stating the same things and think. Jig saws anyone? ??
83
14/01/2021 15:04:13 4 12
bbc
Primark - the Greggs of the clothing world.

Tells us all we need to know about the state of the UK
Snob. Not every is as comfortably off as you.

#okboomer
Removed
Removed
102
14/01/2021 15:15:32 3 1
bbc
Oh come on! They do an excellent range of coffees & patisseries... Greggs that is, not Primark.

Let's not be snobbish about this, spare a thought for those on furlough & lower income groups generally. Budget stores selling affordably priced goods are a godsend.
108
14/01/2021 15:17:51 1 1
bbc
Are Greggs online? I havent even noticed if they are open
191
14/01/2021 15:49:29 3 0
bbc
Snob
53
14/01/2021 14:54:42 15 0
bbc
What’s BHS got to do with Primark? BHS was Run into the ground by another bafoon who remains titled
84
14/01/2021 15:09:11 1 0
bbc
I think 01 is just clutching at attention seeking
61
JGC
14/01/2021 14:58:16 1 6
bbc
They will have too eventually no doubt. Folly not to get themselves on that path as soon as
85
14/01/2021 15:09:19 1 0
bbc
I would imagine they will have done their sums, and decided that the economics of going online just don't work for them at their prices. Personally, I'd rather them keep their prices, than unnecessarily go online and hike prices because of it.
62
14/01/2021 14:58:40 60 9
bbc
A lot of bizzare wishing for Primark to go bust just because they 'aren't moving with the times'. Boggles the mind.
86
14/01/2021 15:04:52 6 3
bbc
Not of you’re Klaus Schwab it doesn’t
34
01
14/01/2021 14:44:58 2 23
bbc
Good, Primark disappearing (they will soon) won't be a bad thing. I'll never forgive them for taking over a once great BHS site.
87
14/01/2021 15:09:53 0 0
bbc
I'll have you a £100 charity bet that they will outlast M&S
83
14/01/2021 15:04:13 4 12
bbc
Primark - the Greggs of the clothing world.

Tells us all we need to know about the state of the UK
Snob. Not every is as comfortably off as you.

#okboomer
Removed
45
14/01/2021 14:51:14 5 3
bbc
And where do you think all the sweat shops are that make their products ?
89
14/01/2021 15:10:43 3 1
bbc
Leicester, apparently
90
14/01/2021 15:11:11 30 3
bbc
Funny how people who complain about primark don’t even realise that majority of clothing from M&S, Next, H&M etc are all made in the same countries, the only difference is the agreed manufacture and business model that the companies align to their brand.
98
14/01/2021 15:14:06 40 2
bbc
That is why M&S sales have dropped, rubbish quality. When manufacturing was offshored M&S lost a lot of customers.
3
14/01/2021 14:32:50 76 11
bbc
I agree with them.

I use Primark from time to time, but they wouldn’t make any profit by accepting and fulfilling online orders for 5 polo shirts at £3 each, or a few T-shirts at £2 each etc. Or some kids Spiderman pyjamas at £2.
91
Bob
14/01/2021 15:11:56 38 11
bbc
Except there's nothing wrong in choice. And I bet someone would say the same about paying rent on huge stores only to sell such low value items.

If someone doesn't mind paying £1 extra for a t-shirt or above average delivery fee in lieu of visiting the store, then that's a good for business.

I suspect the real reason is they don't want the high return rates that online clothes orders have.
166
14/01/2021 15:39:21 18 4
bbc
Nonsense. Retail isn't about providing the public choice, it's about profit. They're not going online because it wouldn't be profitable for them as a strategy. If they could increase profits by going online, then they would. Simple as that - there's no conspiracy / cover-up about not wanting returns.
23
14/01/2021 14:43:02 7 15
bbc
It would be no great loss if it closed. It only has a certain target group anyway and majority of people couldn't care less that it's closed
92
14/01/2021 15:12:16 1 0
bbc
I'm an over 60 male, I'm retired, I'm worth a couple of £million, I have a good house, several good cars, I live well. But I hate wasting money on overpriced 'designer' rubbish with a label that costs more than the clothes. I love Primark. I've had great service from their products.

Am I your 'target group'? Kids! Narrow minds!
93
14/01/2021 15:10:05 3 5
bbc
Peasants. Who shops here!? Should be buying quality items like Moncler, Balenciaga & Stone Island.
83
14/01/2021 15:04:13 4 12
bbc
Primark - the Greggs of the clothing world.

Tells us all we need to know about the state of the UK
Removed
95
14/01/2021 15:13:04 2 1
bbc
Online shoppers - about half 50% of items are often returned to eCommerce shops.

Are you a fraudulent returner (someone who’s deliberately buying something, using it, and then sending it back) or just a 'addicted' online buyer / returner?
96
14/01/2021 15:13:44 41 5
bbc
I have work in buying & merchandising.

They work on lower profit margins in than other retailers do - hence why they are so cheap.
Returns on ecom are terrible especially for clothing (30% is considered good).
Return postage is free to the customer - not to the retailer.
The retailer then incurs a 2nd handling charge.

They have done the sums - it just doesn't add up !
260
14/01/2021 16:12:36 12 4
bbc
I've had to pay for both shipping to me and return postage that I was not refunded for from outdoors stores. Maybe it's time to an end to free returns.
527
14/01/2021 17:56:40 0 0
bbc
No, the retailer only has to pay return postage (and refund the original postage) if the item is faulty or not as described. If the customer just changes her mind, she has to pay return postage.

Sadly Primark’s sums only consider direct profits and losses... they don’t account for “indirect” losses eg. loss of market share, loss of customer loyalty, loss of brand recognition in an online world.
97
14/01/2021 15:13:47 41 4
bbc
Not surprised they are resisting online sales. The delivery costs would far outstrip the cost of the goods, cheaper to stay as they are!!
103
14/01/2021 15:16:03 18 5
bbc
Generally I expect to pay P&P. What extra I pay on delivery, I save in parking charges and time
172
14/01/2021 15:41:07 2 0
bbc
Not if they had minimum order values. Paying all the big personal transport costs to go to a shop and get one cheap bit of clothing is very expensive in reality.

As with Amazon, wait and group low price items with others and get free delivery.
203
14/01/2021 15:54:02 3 0
bbc
I just hope when things open up later in the year that they open a few more Primark stores in larger towns that don’t have one at the moment. Some of the empty department stores would be ideal.
90
14/01/2021 15:11:11 30 3
bbc
Funny how people who complain about primark don’t even realise that majority of clothing from M&S, Next, H&M etc are all made in the same countries, the only difference is the agreed manufacture and business model that the companies align to their brand.
98
14/01/2021 15:14:06 40 2
bbc
That is why M&S sales have dropped, rubbish quality. When manufacturing was offshored M&S lost a lot of customers.
125
14/01/2021 15:24:06 7 0
bbc
Aye . Same tat with a lovely M&S label .
418
14/01/2021 17:19:51 1 0
bbc
Same with next.. When they stopped using UK factories the quality went downhill fast
421
14/01/2021 17:20:43 0 1
bbc
M&S have seen the light and are moving up market by buying Jaeger brand to sell instore and online. It will be interesting if they are successful in buying Topshop too which they would sell online to the younger demographic. Pity they lost out to Next who bought Victoria’s Secrets.
444
Dee
14/01/2021 17:29:37 1 1
bbc
M&S clothes are not stylish enough. It has nothing to do with offshoring manufacturing.
465
14/01/2021 17:36:54 2 0
bbc
Not true. It is better quality. Primark is garbage
12
14/01/2021 14:37:54 8 9
bbc
Isn't anybody worried about the pollution effects of yet more individual journeys to deliver goods.

It is not efficient at all.

There should be a small tax levied onto the suppliers to cover the additional environmental impact
99
14/01/2021 15:14:17 0 0
bbc
Agreed - we get at least half a dozen big diesel vans delivering to our little close most days - then add all the 'clothes miles' for the returns because they don't fit or don't look like the photo!
34
01
14/01/2021 14:44:58 2 23
bbc
Good, Primark disappearing (they will soon) won't be a bad thing. I'll never forgive them for taking over a once great BHS site.
100
14/01/2021 15:14:32 0 0
bbc
So you would prefer an empty derelict site.