GCSE and A-level pupils could sit mini exams to aid grading
13/01/2021 | news | education | 1,185
Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said this would help teachers to decide "deserved grades".
1
jon
13/01/2021 10:37:20 17 17
bbc
Teacher assessments usually produce grade inflation which is best avoided.
62
13/01/2021 10:56:07 14 3
bbc
Teachers know what their pupils are capable of achieving. Most grade inflation in this situation will be down to the fact that there are pupils who may have panicked and underperformed in an actual exam. If you try to maintain the same grades as previous years you're having to choose that some pupils will be the ones to underperform without a chance to prove otherwise.
94
13/01/2021 11:02:02 0 8
bbc
So are deadly pandemics, but unfortunately some people voted in a government that is incapable of doing anything right. How's that for grade inflation?
95
13/01/2021 11:03:57 2 3
bbc
That's why you have moderation
145
13/01/2021 11:16:58 0 2
bbc
Thing is we get the usual crowd concerned about grade inflation every year when the exam results come out anyway (and the usual politicians feeding off it). Nothing's going to assuage them, so I suggest not bothering to try
200
13/01/2021 11:28:40 1 2
bbc
If you can do better. Well.
2
13/01/2021 10:38:12 1 13
bbc
So what if the teacher's up the grades a bit

They are saying "this student can/cannot cope with the next degree stage in education"
6
13/01/2021 10:40:07 11 6
bbc
It's "teachers" not "teacher's"...
8
13/01/2021 10:40:23 1 4
bbc
Cut this generation some slack

They'll never catch up to the one before
3
13/01/2021 10:38:36 51 23
bbc
Its alright kids...Williamson doesnt have any qualifications and look where he is !
48
13/01/2021 10:50:43 26 12
bbc
"Williamson doesnt have any qualifications"

He has a degree
86
13/01/2021 10:59:20 12 4
bbc
Like Toby Young! Perfect example of failing upwards.
4
13/01/2021 10:39:43 15 13
bbc
Just leave it alone Gav you muppet, you have said no exams, don't put the kids through more upheaval. Teachers, by and large, know what their students are capable of, there is no incentive to cheat/push for grade inflation. Some will overstate, but those kids will ultimately be found out.
5
13/01/2021 10:40:07 28 10
bbc
What a joke. Bad enough trying to motivate a child or children to stare at a screen all day reading and working which is not a natural way to teach or learn, now this! Can't the government just make up its mind rather than keep swinging between exams/no exams??
2
13/01/2021 10:38:12 1 13
bbc
So what if the teacher's up the grades a bit

They are saying "this student can/cannot cope with the next degree stage in education"
6
13/01/2021 10:40:07 11 6
bbc
It's "teachers" not "teacher's"...
19
13/01/2021 10:44:16 1 4
bbc
it matters
22
13/01/2021 10:45:10 4 1
bbc
Sorry Sir/Miss ??
7
CPJ
13/01/2021 10:40:08 9 15
bbc
yet another example of an irresponsible piece of reporting by the BBC. When children are worried enough about their futures let them worry even more by publishing details of discussions over something that may never happen. Or if it does then the details will have been ironed out. Shame on you BBC
18
13/01/2021 10:44:12 8 5
bbc
If you don't like reading the news, stop reading the news. Stop complaining
Removed
2
13/01/2021 10:38:12 1 13
bbc
So what if the teacher's up the grades a bit

They are saying "this student can/cannot cope with the next degree stage in education"
8
13/01/2021 10:40:23 1 4
bbc
Cut this generation some slack

They'll never catch up to the one before
88
13/01/2021 11:00:47 1 3
bbc
Yeah. I mean the standards of education in the generation that voted for Brexit and then for this shower are obviously stunning!
9
13/01/2021 10:40:27 48 12
bbc
Wiiiiiinged strategy.

Williamson is better when he’s just awol. Just guessing now
922
Jim
13/01/2021 17:36:12 5 3
bbc
True, would have been better to just stick with running the exams. And maybe a little more effort at delivering the curriculum unlike 2020's shambles
10
13/01/2021 10:40:36 165 34
bbc
They need to hurry up and decide how they are going to facilitate this. The uncertainty and stress this is causing our children is absurd and extremely unfair. They have enough to deal with as it is!!!
75
13/01/2021 10:59:05 162 29
bbc
How long will it take Williamson to get the message - make a policy, stick to it, don't keep changing or adding new bits.

He is plain incompetent.
227
13/01/2021 11:35:23 12 4
bbc
Sarah, the very simple truth is that Downing Street doesn't give a damn about most of our young people. Why would they? Most of them can't vote, and the few of them that can almost certainly wouldn't vote Tory.
412
13/01/2021 12:13:45 9 3
bbc
This could have been agreed in July / Aug as a back up plan and implemented in October when we could all see lockdowns were inevitable.
419
13/01/2021 12:28:14 3 2
bbc
Nick Gibb written all over this decision. Don't blame poor dim Gavin.
877
13/01/2021 16:46:54 1 1
bbc
Stress.....what stress?
921
13/01/2021 17:36:03 1 1
bbc
Maybe you could advise them ?
974
ET
13/01/2021 18:39:04 1 1
bbc
Stress? There’s only two options. Exam or no exam. Anyone with an ounce of sense is studying hard. They’ll be at university soon enough, every scrap of knowledge that can be gained now will likely be useful in future.
The only stress should be relief if there’s no exam in the end and then it’s down to reacher assessment. We all know how that will go. +10 to 20% on last year.
D
13/01/2021 19:15:01 2 2
bbc
Oh, the poor dears. How will they cope in the real world when they leave school? Most of the stress they have is put on them by their parents.
13/01/2021 20:32:40 1 0
bbc
Modern children are spoilt and need to learn to deal with change and disaster. When I was a child, I walked 30 miles to school without shoes and breakfast.
11
13/01/2021 10:41:11 17 9
bbc
I've really had enough of this fireplace salesmen... I'm beginning to think he is a bit simples.
12
13/01/2021 10:41:29 9 5
bbc
All these exam results mean nothing if the major employers do not except them.
29
13/01/2021 10:46:42 8 11
bbc
What employers?

Jobs today go to nieces, nephews and next door neighbours.........
30
13/01/2021 10:47:03 3 4
bbc
You think major employers are going to reject at least 2 school years worth of future employees? Mass immigration it is then.
31
13/01/2021 10:47:11 1 3
bbc
What major employers?
33
MVS
13/01/2021 10:47:54 5 3
bbc
They probably will except them but may not accept them
78
13/01/2021 10:56:44 1 2
bbc
GCSEs aren't going to matter to anyone except universities, nobody goes out to work direct from school in any sort of decent job these days.
13
13/01/2021 10:41:31 9 15
bbc
Just declare "everyone a winner" and give everyone the grades they want.

No, this won't equip them for the real world but no one seems bothered about that anyway.
79
13/01/2021 10:57:08 3 2
bbc
How did being a failure equip you, then?
14
13/01/2021 10:41:51 376 58
bbc
This is, in my view ridiculous - you either get them to sit exams or you don't. It strikes me that if you can provide a mini examination system you can do a full one. For once in this it would be nice for someone to be blinking well consistent on something and make a decision. You either trust teachers or you don't.
39
Bob
13/01/2021 10:48:59 161 83
bbc
No I think it is a wise option to have.

If they've not been able to cover the entire course then at least have them sit an exam on the stuff they have gone through.

Better to prove their worth on what they know rather than have a teacher guess at what they might know.
128
13/01/2021 11:12:04 36 1
bbc
They do a mock exam under exam conditions that is marked by the teacher - the exam covers matter that they have been able to cover in the curriculum. It makes sense
164
13/01/2021 11:21:44 10 14
bbc
Looking at the grade inflation the teacher results produced last year then it is conclusive that we shouldn't.
170
aya
13/01/2021 11:19:12 2 13
bbc
One kid in uni who went to uni for one day.but paid full tuition fees . another in A level and waiting response from unis
Another in GCSE which i m worried as don't know how they cope in A level s
So take their external exams at least they try to fight don't spoil
Our future generation
187
13/01/2021 11:24:52 21 13
bbc
But we expect the ridiculous from Williamson. In case people haven't noticed, he isn't the sharpest pencil in the box!
259
13/01/2021 11:45:28 3 7
bbc
It's not about teachers - it's about individuals across the country - no 2 teachers judgements are the same and some of them will be NQT's who cannot possibly have enough experience to make these life changing calls

Exams are merely objective although not necessarily fair

Teachers are cannot be objective almost certainly full of gender, race and class bias in both directions - got to be bad
295
13/01/2021 11:52:25 3 4
bbc
do you know what will happen by June/July, if so publish it.
The Government has to be flexible with its proposals else the same politically agenda complainers will only complain again if the plan is changed again due to NATURE changing its mind and taking a different development.
"PPPPP" and plan for the worse and hope (and be ready to change) for the best
314
Jim
13/01/2021 11:56:50 5 2
bbc
Mini exams are great idea. Students are likely not to have covered full curriculum, but should have covered at least one topic (if not then what on earth have schools been doing).

So an exam could consist of 1 question from 6 topics rather than 2 from 4.
377
13/01/2021 12:16:50 1 3
bbc
Have you noticed how the government are trying to use psychology to let the public down gently about when society will return to normal, it it ever will? They keep using excuses to push back dates, Xmas, new year, Easter, exams etc. If they can keep the public arguing among themselves, so much easier it will be for them
397
13/01/2021 12:07:14 2 3
bbc
I couldn't agree more. Its way to late in the academic year to try this now!
402
13/01/2021 12:23:19 2 2
bbc
you cannot offer a full examination system as students have not been in school so its not fair. So the only option rather than teachers giving them all A& is a shorter version of the main one - simple
416
13/01/2021 12:26:23 4 1
bbc
We know from 2020 that:

1) not going to school or sitting exams.
2) students being assessed by the teachers.

resulted in higher grades for the students.

Which, if grades are supposed to mean anything, means that the 2020 students were better educated than the 2019 group by staying out of school. Also that less contact with teachers results is advantageous.

Discuss.
497
13/01/2021 13:00:09 2 2
bbc
You cannot trust teachers. You have a student, parents, school profile, your own perceived performance, community and all sorts of other pressures on teachers. There is no hope that they can deliver an objective view on how well their charges have performed, or their capability. There simply has to be exams or moderation
527
13/01/2021 13:16:19 1 0
bbc
I welcome these mini exams. They will give me evidence on which I can give a realistic grade for each of my Yr11 students. I have seen them for only about 3 weeks since the start of lockdown back in March - Year bubbles out due to Covid last term meant students at home again for weeks at a time, so not confident about being able to rank order them or given a sensible predicted grade this year.
566
13/01/2021 13:23:23 1 0
bbc
Schools must remain open
Schools must all close (later the same day)
We will have exams
There will be no exams
We might have little exams

Always good to see a clear, decisive Govt strategy.
683
13/01/2021 14:06:01 1 3
bbc
Teachers usually grade students accordingly on how rich their parents are and how often they donate to the school usually
15
13/01/2021 10:41:51 8 14
bbc
Children will miss most of the curriculum again this year, but for some reason with teacher predicted grades I imagine it will be another record breaking year for top grades.
77
13/01/2021 10:56:21 6 1
bbc
Yep. Blame the teachers. Not the government that got us into this situation in the first place and who have made things worse at every stage.
16
13/01/2021 10:42:07 19 9
bbc
Williamson needs to be educated and for his own preservation he needs to learn to shut up and drop the soundbites.
72
13/01/2021 10:55:09 7 6
bbc
Why would anyone want to preserve the fireplace salesman? There's plenty of other inadequate failures in the Brexi-tory party to take his place and continue to make things worse.
17
13/01/2021 10:43:24 9 14
bbc
All must have prizes. A* grades for all.....save a lot of work for hard pressed teachers.....
25
13/01/2021 10:46:12 10 6
bbc
I take it you didn't win any prizes. A colouring book perhaps?
7
CPJ
13/01/2021 10:40:08 9 15
bbc
yet another example of an irresponsible piece of reporting by the BBC. When children are worried enough about their futures let them worry even more by publishing details of discussions over something that may never happen. Or if it does then the details will have been ironed out. Shame on you BBC
18
13/01/2021 10:44:12 8 5
bbc
If you don't like reading the news, stop reading the news. Stop complaining
36
13/01/2021 10:48:38 1 2
bbc
I think the problem is that you no longer read the news, its just opinion and speculation.
6
13/01/2021 10:40:07 11 6
bbc
It's "teachers" not "teacher's"...
19
13/01/2021 10:44:16 1 4
bbc
it matters
20
MVS
13/01/2021 10:44:25 2 4
bbc
Does it matter if there are exams this year or not? This cohort of children have had there education blighted completely by being forced out of their classrooms by draconian measures aimed at protecting the blushes of every politician of the past 30 years who have failed to properly organise and reform the NHS.
It is not fit for purpose, but then few religions are!
68
13/01/2021 10:53:37 0 2
bbc
Say what you mean, Tory troll. Privatise the NHS is what you mean.
Like Farage wants to?
Instead of going after the tax dodgers the Brexi-tories pander to, siezing the billions they steal from us every year and properly funding the NHS.
21
13/01/2021 10:44:34 39 13
bbc
when is an exam not an exam Gavin?
6
13/01/2021 10:40:07 11 6
bbc
It's "teachers" not "teacher's"...
22
13/01/2021 10:45:10 4 1
bbc
Sorry Sir/Miss ??
23
13/01/2021 10:45:31 12 7
bbc
Why can I already see a U turn?
24
13/01/2021 10:45:39 6 7
bbc
At the moment, the pupils are at the mercy of the teacher. What if a pupil doesn't get on with the teacher. When I was at school, there were several teachers that I would not have liked deciding my future. Exams are always best and take the responsibility off the teacher. I did my exams with chickenpox, the schools should be able to enable enough space between pupils as the whole school is empty.
38
13/01/2021 10:48:45 1 6
bbc
Those teachers need to remember league tables an Ofsted.
55
13/01/2021 10:53:10 6 1
bbc
Given that it was several teachers has it ever occurred to you that you were the problem, not the teachers?
104
13/01/2021 11:07:20 2 1
bbc
I'm guessing your unpopularity continued beyond your school days
169
mac
13/01/2021 11:19:08 0 1
bbc
He could have been a contender!
17
13/01/2021 10:43:24 9 14
bbc
All must have prizes. A* grades for all.....save a lot of work for hard pressed teachers.....
25
13/01/2021 10:46:12 10 6
bbc
I take it you didn't win any prizes. A colouring book perhaps?
51
13/01/2021 10:51:38 1 2
bbc
Making snide remarks doesn't do you any favours
137
13/01/2021 11:14:06 1 1
bbc
you've got it, I can only use crayons 'cos I'm not allowed anything sharp....
26
13/01/2021 10:46:21 38 6
bbc
I feel really sorry for the students going from GCSE to A-Level and A-Level to university. Intellectually both are a real 'step up' and hard enough.........goodness knows how tough it will be with almost a years' curriculum missed........
45
13/01/2021 10:50:30 9 11
bbc
Unis are empty as no international students an£ all working from home. Getting in won’t be a problem. I’d be more concerned experience will be rubbish and kids fleeced by landlords paying rent on property they can’t live in anyway.
219
13/01/2021 11:33:50 1 1
bbc
Not all students have missed a year, a lot have been working really hard and are doing better than if they’d been in school. But yes I do feel sorry for the students
873
13/01/2021 16:44:50 0 0
bbc
This is a fair point, and I hope that the universities and colleges are adjusting their first year courses to take account of this. Perhaps pre-entry modules or summer schools could be offered to their new intake.
27
13/01/2021 10:46:27 132 21
bbc
So , Williamson cancels exams, as it would not be fair or consistent to all pupils, and then wants to replace them with........more exams. Mini-exams, but still exams. You couldn't make this stuff up.
50
13/01/2021 10:51:37 65 10
bbc
Williamson did. And on the fly.
96
13/01/2021 11:04:08 8 2
bbc
Like many in government this man is unfit for purpose, and a waste of space.
305
13/01/2021 11:54:15 2 5
bbc
But don't we all want exams? We know they're needed and we know the value of them. Aren't these mini-exams a practical solution in a difficult world?
And when were these mini-exams proposed; I'm guessing, but i suspect they are new.
727
SM
13/01/2021 14:25:44 0 4
bbc
Better than just sitting there and moaning at suggestions others make to try and improve stuff - you lot are never happiest unless you have someone to criticise.
Shame on you all for jumping at first to criticise, rather than working with him to find a way that gives our kids a better chance of qualifications that have some added degree of credibility.
Teacher marked only as we know has less.
13/01/2021 21:35:40 0 0
bbc
Spider-boy rides again. The single most incompetent ministry in living memory. Even worse than failin' Grayling, God help us all!
28
13/01/2021 10:46:32 17 5
bbc
There's a danger here that the kids that perform best won't necessarily be the best kids. They will be the kids at schools where the teachers (and parents potentially) are best able to prepare the kids for something brought in at short notice.
46
13/01/2021 10:50:41 25 2
bbc
Isn't this always the case?
103
13/01/2021 11:07:16 3 1
bbc
Surely that could be applied to all examinations? Why we still need exams at 16 is beyond me. We are the only country in Europe that still does this.
319
13/01/2021 11:57:27 2 1
bbc
And your argument is circular, surely the "best" kids are the best kids by definition?
12
13/01/2021 10:41:29 9 5
bbc
All these exam results mean nothing if the major employers do not except them.
29
13/01/2021 10:46:42 8 11
bbc
What employers?

Jobs today go to nieces, nephews and next door neighbours.........
52
MVS
13/01/2021 10:51:49 2 3
bbc
Yes, last time I was in my local supermarket I noticed the name badges on so many of the staff had Sainsbury on them.
12
13/01/2021 10:41:29 9 5
bbc
All these exam results mean nothing if the major employers do not except them.
30
13/01/2021 10:47:03 3 4
bbc
You think major employers are going to reject at least 2 school years worth of future employees? Mass immigration it is then.
12
13/01/2021 10:41:29 9 5
bbc
All these exam results mean nothing if the major employers do not except them.
31
13/01/2021 10:47:11 1 3
bbc
What major employers?
32
13/01/2021 10:47:49 7 4
bbc
The key part here is that they will be carried out and marked by the regular teachers. No invigilation, no external marking. It's almost not about COVID it's just easing ofquals staffing
12
13/01/2021 10:41:29 9 5
bbc
All these exam results mean nothing if the major employers do not except them.
33
MVS
13/01/2021 10:47:54 5 3
bbc
They probably will except them but may not accept them
34
Bob
13/01/2021 10:48:07 6 4
bbc
Half of students miss predicted grades by two or more grades.
https://www.tes.com/news/pupils-poor-backgrounds-and-ethnic-minorities-less-likely-meet-predicted-level-grades-study

Over 80% of teacher predictions are wrong. With only 1 in 10 being an under-prediction.
https://www.tes.com/news/five-out-six-level-grade-predictions-teachers-are-wrong-study-shows
44
13/01/2021 10:50:11 5 2
bbc
The published accuracy of written exams is plus or minus one grade... not that accurate as many believe.
54
13/01/2021 10:52:40 1 2
bbc
Won’t matter this year. It’s a “buyers market” as no international students. Most unis dropping required grades to get in anyway. So if students miss grades will easily be compensated by lower requirement.
265
13/01/2021 11:47:21 1 1
bbc
An article from 2016 on predictions, is not a suitable source for modern educational data methods. Afterall, Brexit was very different in 2016 than what has transpired ey! Pupils now have a UCAS grade (in which they are usually one grade higher than expected) and expected grade, usually much more accurate and based on tests and lessons.
35
13/01/2021 10:48:33 78 16
bbc
More confusion.......just let the teachers decide this year. Grade inflation, so what? job market non existent and uni’s need to fill places by lack of international students so not gonna be a problem there if a few get in by chance that normally wouldn’t.

Just for once let it go and give them a break.
18
13/01/2021 10:44:12 8 5
bbc
If you don't like reading the news, stop reading the news. Stop complaining
36
13/01/2021 10:48:38 1 2
bbc
I think the problem is that you no longer read the news, its just opinion and speculation.
37
13/01/2021 10:45:17 77 26
bbc
Yet another potential U turn. More stress for students and teachers. Just make a decision and stick too it, it's not really that difficult.
61
13/01/2021 10:56:04 34 10
bbc
My daughter is 'Trying' to complete BTEC qualifications. She has now had 2yrs worth of exams cancelled. The last ones cancelled 3 days before she was meant to sit them. WHAT are her qualifications going to be worth?

Kids will be going into a job market with huge unemployment after April. What are their prospects of getting a job with 'estimated'exams?
852
13/01/2021 16:11:20 1 0
bbc
As both a parent the situation is madness.The goalposts are constantly moving -exams are on , then off, now maybe not off. I know a pandemic is unpredictable but surely we can come up with a robust and effective plan. It is untenable to be in the position where the education situation is constantly changing
24
13/01/2021 10:45:39 6 7
bbc
At the moment, the pupils are at the mercy of the teacher. What if a pupil doesn't get on with the teacher. When I was at school, there were several teachers that I would not have liked deciding my future. Exams are always best and take the responsibility off the teacher. I did my exams with chickenpox, the schools should be able to enable enough space between pupils as the whole school is empty.
38
13/01/2021 10:48:45 1 6
bbc
Those teachers need to remember league tables an Ofsted.
14
13/01/2021 10:41:51 376 58
bbc
This is, in my view ridiculous - you either get them to sit exams or you don't. It strikes me that if you can provide a mini examination system you can do a full one. For once in this it would be nice for someone to be blinking well consistent on something and make a decision. You either trust teachers or you don't.
39
Bob
13/01/2021 10:48:59 161 83
bbc
No I think it is a wise option to have.

If they've not been able to cover the entire course then at least have them sit an exam on the stuff they have gone through.

Better to prove their worth on what they know rather than have a teacher guess at what they might know.
133
13/01/2021 11:12:58 41 5
bbc
Problem with that is some one has to then produce a bunch of exams that covers "what they have covered", leaving aside "what they have covered" is going to vary school by school, creating exams is actually a rather involved process
136
13/01/2021 11:13:50 27 7
bbc
That always assumes that every child has been taught exactly the same things in every school across the country, and all are at precisely the same point in the national curriculum as the same time. From what we are hearing about the variable standard of on-line teaching, is this really feasible?
201
13/01/2021 11:28:05 35 5
bbc
Very badly flawed reasoning. You are obviously not a teacher.

Topics are taught in very different order by different teachers. So this could actually make things MORE unfair, with some students finding mini exams a stroll in the park, and others finding them impossible.
207
13/01/2021 11:30:54 10 6
bbc
My point was more around make a consistent decision. As a parent of a teenager who was due their GCSE's this year I want to know what I am preparing them for!
I am personally (like many others I suspect) sick plans changing weekly / daily! Also, just as a small point - we blame the teachers - but the marking algorithm used by the exam boards has hardly been proven to be accurate!
229
vpj
13/01/2021 11:35:42 6 7
bbc
Teachers don't Guess. Teachers assess. Afraid you don't sound very informed Bob.
317
13/01/2021 11:57:12 3 1
bbc
if a teacher who has taught my child for the last 4 or 5 years in prep for exams, cant accurately assess predicted grade will achieve, that would reflect on the teacher. Not all pupils have the same teacher throughout but are constantly assessed at secondary school, to the point of distraction, if they cancel exams, then cancel, if not then so be it but one simple message is what is required.
351
13/01/2021 12:08:24 1 2
bbc
Except not everyone follows the syllabus in the same order, so are you suggesting some sort of pick and mix?
362
pjw
13/01/2021 12:11:58 3 3
bbc
Each school has probably covered topics in different order. Also some pupils have missed more education because of living in a higher COVID dense area or through self isolation based in the close proximity of the local popular or social poverty. If a paper is set centrally how would it really reflect local problems? As with Gavin, you haven’t got a clue!
394
13/01/2021 12:05:57 4 3
bbc
Teachers are absolutely not guessing. They have been testing and tracking learner achievement since they have been 4 years old. A Teachers judgment is a far more rounded view of a young persons potential than a single two hour high pressure 'snap shot' exam after 11 or 13 years in academic study.
431
13/01/2021 12:33:23 1 2
bbc
Not all pupils will have covered the same topics - it is often up to teachers to teach topics in the order they wish in many subjects - logistically this makes a suit-all exam unworkable.
433
13/01/2021 12:33:59 1 1
bbc
That's totally dumb. There's no plan, no clarity, no consistency. Different schools, different classes, different pupils have all done different things. It would need different test for every single pupil. Or be 100% unfair.
Schools don't all do the same things at the same time you know, they are not drones.
Gove caused this mess by scrapping course work as part of exam grades. NEver forget.
578
13/01/2021 13:36:47 1 1
bbc
So how can you have a consistent and fair mini-exam on "what has been studied". You will have one pupil in the same school/class who has studied it effectively and one that has not because of self-isolation challenges.

My daughter is been school attendance in, out, in, out... do the hokey-cokey with various classmates/parents self-isolating and pretty patchy on-line learning until Jan 2021.
662
13/01/2021 13:55:58 1 0
bbc
In theory it is a good idea. Exams are obviously a tried and tested way of proving learning. When the subject material in the exam can be prepared for.

In practise the number of permutations/combinations of modules individual schools have actually taught means that the exam boards will need to create hundreds of exams per subject. Not a level playing field.
674
13/01/2021 14:05:21 0 0
bbc
It might be a wise option if this shower of incompetents had managed to show the ability to administer even simple solutions. But they haven't. This will advantage the advantaged. As usual.
40
13/01/2021 10:49:03 36 22
bbc
The cancelling of the exams last year was a disaster followed by a media led witch hunt which then turned into the farcical A-level grading and inflated numbers going to universities. Result? We now have a back-log for 2021 (and 2022) and now many students will miss out - something the BBC has ignored.

To cancel this years exams at the beginning of January is complete and utter madness.
975
13/01/2021 18:39:25 0 1
bbc
not exactly going to university are they, mostly doing onlne, no real limits to number of students for most courses.
I know why not wait until just before the exam dates to decide.
41
13/01/2021 10:49:29 143 22
bbc
Brush up your maths, minister! This could have been a good idea six months ago. But allow a month or two for a consultation, then time to prepare, check and approve the "mini-exam" papers, then to provide guidance to teachers and student ... you're late again.
If my kids were late this often, I'd be a frequent visitor for (socially distanced) visits to the head's office.
595
13/01/2021 13:44:14 29 58
bbc
Of course, YOU knew how the pandemic would develop 6 months ago, didn't you.
846
13/01/2021 16:05:56 1 0
bbc
Wales managed to have a plan in place which makes a mockery of the fact that England seem surprised by it all!
42
13/01/2021 10:48:03 13 6
bbc
You think maybe some private school nutrition migh "level up" things a bit, Gavin?
You clearly haven't put in place any checks or legally binding contractual standards for these suppliers.
Whose to blame for that, Gavin? Teachers? Trade unions? Single parents? Or YOU.. again?
https://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/news/19005769.chartwells-free-school-meals-vs-private-school-meals/
43
13/01/2021 10:49:56 110 20
bbc
In a previous jobs I attended many customer meetings with managers from my business who had clearly failed to prepare for them and made things up as they went along. Their aim was to get to the end of meeting. Nothing more. That's Gavin "paperboy" Williamson, that is.
867
13/01/2021 16:39:25 25 3
bbc
Training and Support?
The only person in the land who needs this is Gavin Williamson.
He's going to cock up the grades this Summer, again, isn't he.
923
13/01/2021 17:36:37 2 0
bbc
The entire government have been winging it since this time last yr
At some point the tower of cards is gunna come crashing down
And Johnson and co are gone
939
13/01/2021 17:57:55 1 0
bbc
Be interesting to know what sort of exam grades those managers achieved in school...
34
Bob
13/01/2021 10:48:07 6 4
bbc
Half of students miss predicted grades by two or more grades.
https://www.tes.com/news/pupils-poor-backgrounds-and-ethnic-minorities-less-likely-meet-predicted-level-grades-study

Over 80% of teacher predictions are wrong. With only 1 in 10 being an under-prediction.
https://www.tes.com/news/five-out-six-level-grade-predictions-teachers-are-wrong-study-shows
44
13/01/2021 10:50:11 5 2
bbc
The published accuracy of written exams is plus or minus one grade... not that accurate as many believe.
26
13/01/2021 10:46:21 38 6
bbc
I feel really sorry for the students going from GCSE to A-Level and A-Level to university. Intellectually both are a real 'step up' and hard enough.........goodness knows how tough it will be with almost a years' curriculum missed........
45
13/01/2021 10:50:30 9 11
bbc
Unis are empty as no international students an£ all working from home. Getting in won’t be a problem. I’d be more concerned experience will be rubbish and kids fleeced by landlords paying rent on property they can’t live in anyway.
105
aya
13/01/2021 11:04:19 0 1
bbc
Who says unis r empty and actually last year is the best for them full tuition fees ,full hostel fees
And all online lecture s.and after cancellation of A level exams no response from unis so far just imagine who is happy
837
13/01/2021 15:58:28 0 1
bbc
Hear hear. Not content with using them as cash cows for the unis themselves, they're also being fleeced by parasitic landlords for whom the notion of any risks attached to their ownership of " mah propeteh" is unacceptable. Truly gruesome people.
28
13/01/2021 10:46:32 17 5
bbc
There's a danger here that the kids that perform best won't necessarily be the best kids. They will be the kids at schools where the teachers (and parents potentially) are best able to prepare the kids for something brought in at short notice.
46
13/01/2021 10:50:41 25 2
bbc
Isn't this always the case?
404
13/01/2021 12:24:08 0 2
bbc
With many teachers currently having to firefight covid arrangements, never mind focus on a revised exam curriculum, the inequality would be exacerbated compared to what normally happens. That's the point I was making.
47
13/01/2021 10:50:43 8 24
bbc
If history tells us anything teachers just cannot be trusted to mark their own work.

Passes for everyone.
56
13/01/2021 10:53:41 10 2
bbc
What evidence are you using to support this?
82
13/01/2021 11:01:18 4 2
bbc
Evidence? You state it’s historical, so I’m sure you’ll be able to articulate the data and direct us to the reliable source/s. No, thought not.
85
13/01/2021 11:02:10 5 1
bbc
Do inform of this history. If history has taught me anything, it is that it appears that sweeping statements and false information sticks with the unenlightened and ignorant.
99
13/01/2021 11:05:07 0 2
bbc
Keith. Says it all
106
mac
13/01/2021 11:04:28 0 1
bbc
Perhaps you could provide some evidence or facts from your armchair to support this? Another expert who knows nothing about everything.
110
13/01/2021 11:09:12 0 1
bbc
What but an algorithm and a bunch of incompetent ministers is better?!What a daft comment.
3
13/01/2021 10:38:36 51 23
bbc
Its alright kids...Williamson doesnt have any qualifications and look where he is !
48
13/01/2021 10:50:43 26 12
bbc
"Williamson doesnt have any qualifications"

He has a degree
122
13/01/2021 11:11:17 5 4
bbc
Only just
149
13/01/2021 11:17:36 15 4
bbc
Yes, but sadly not a degree of common sense
185
13/01/2021 11:25:01 1 3
bbc
...says it all.
204
13/01/2021 11:30:02 6 4
bbc
Third degree incompetent
226
13/01/2021 11:36:01 5 4
bbc
What's his degree in? Weilding whips?
635
13/01/2021 13:36:05 1 1
bbc
Does a 3rd class degree in fireplace sales count?
771
13/01/2021 15:03:20 0 1
bbc
A degree in what subject?
894
13/01/2021 17:08:05 3 1
bbc
Must be in Incompetence
13/01/2021 22:58:26 0 1
bbc
in making paper kites?
49
13/01/2021 10:50:43 7 9
bbc
Will someone please get rid of this incompetent minister. Everything he touches goes down the pan. Doesn't take much of a brain to work out that young people, who are not in danger from this virus, will just carry on as normal, schools/colleges etc included and infections will rise and rise. You can't just lock them up but it's the older folk who are paying the price. Ditch the schooling stuff.
27
13/01/2021 10:46:27 132 21
bbc
So , Williamson cancels exams, as it would not be fair or consistent to all pupils, and then wants to replace them with........more exams. Mini-exams, but still exams. You couldn't make this stuff up.
50
13/01/2021 10:51:37 65 10
bbc
Williamson did. And on the fly.
25
13/01/2021 10:46:12 10 6
bbc
I take it you didn't win any prizes. A colouring book perhaps?
51
13/01/2021 10:51:38 1 2
bbc
Making snide remarks doesn't do you any favours
29
13/01/2021 10:46:42 8 11
bbc
What employers?

Jobs today go to nieces, nephews and next door neighbours.........
52
MVS
13/01/2021 10:51:49 2 3
bbc
Yes, last time I was in my local supermarket I noticed the name badges on so many of the staff had Sainsbury on them.
53
13/01/2021 10:51:51 7 7
bbc
Why do you say GCSE and A level students could 'face' mini exams? You make it sound like something dreadfull?! Why would the BBC want to do that? Responsible journalism please!
59
13/01/2021 10:54:32 3 3
bbc
Reporting accurately what a Minister does is responsible journalism. And that is exactly what the BBC have done.m
34
Bob
13/01/2021 10:48:07 6 4
bbc
Half of students miss predicted grades by two or more grades.
https://www.tes.com/news/pupils-poor-backgrounds-and-ethnic-minorities-less-likely-meet-predicted-level-grades-study

Over 80% of teacher predictions are wrong. With only 1 in 10 being an under-prediction.
https://www.tes.com/news/five-out-six-level-grade-predictions-teachers-are-wrong-study-shows
54
13/01/2021 10:52:40 1 2
bbc
Won’t matter this year. It’s a “buyers market” as no international students. Most unis dropping required grades to get in anyway. So if students miss grades will easily be compensated by lower requirement.
116
13/01/2021 11:08:03 1 1
bbc
I’m not sure that’s true. I’ve walked through my sons application process this year and not noticed and grade difference compared to my other son who applied 2 years ago. The better uni’s are still asking for top grades
24
13/01/2021 10:45:39 6 7
bbc
At the moment, the pupils are at the mercy of the teacher. What if a pupil doesn't get on with the teacher. When I was at school, there were several teachers that I would not have liked deciding my future. Exams are always best and take the responsibility off the teacher. I did my exams with chickenpox, the schools should be able to enable enough space between pupils as the whole school is empty.
55
13/01/2021 10:53:10 6 1
bbc
Given that it was several teachers has it ever occurred to you that you were the problem, not the teachers?
47
13/01/2021 10:50:43 8 24
bbc
If history tells us anything teachers just cannot be trusted to mark their own work.

Passes for everyone.
56
13/01/2021 10:53:41 10 2
bbc
What evidence are you using to support this?
74
13/01/2021 10:55:45 4 1
bbc
Keith's imagination would be my guess.
102
13/01/2021 11:06:00 0 1
bbc
Well they have skin in the game. Maybe not quite the same as last year, if they mark students down it reflects on their teaching. After so much disruption the overall results must logically be down this time and not up as in 2020.
490
13/01/2021 12:57:49 0 0
bbc
Keith is using "I reckon". Again.
57
13/01/2021 10:54:05 3 3
bbc
Sensible, in fact there should be at least 2 to provide a bed rock of data in which the results can be determined.
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
66
13/01/2021 10:57:10 6 2
bbc
Schools have not been closed
69
13/01/2021 10:57:49 5 1
bbc
Schools are not closed, they are open to children of NHS staff and the vulnerable. Teachers are also now teaching electronically whilst doing the aforementioned live teaching for these children. Like much of the public sector they are doing a stellar job despite the rhetoric of those who dislike them.
70
13/01/2021 10:58:24 5 1
bbc
Most teachers if not all have been in school, teaching the vulnerable and the children of key worker, and giving online lessons to the students at home.
Exams are marked by humans apart from multi choice tests.
Your lack of knowledge is considerable.
76
13/01/2021 10:59:46 3 1
bbc
They haven’t been closed, so we we won’t take your question as being a serious and legitimate one.
81
13/01/2021 10:58:14 4 1
bbc
Schools are not closed! We have students in and as a teacher I am teaching online during the day. I assume you are not a teacher so do not know what is actually going on and so have no real right to comment
83
Pam
13/01/2021 11:01:26 4 1
bbc
Why post things on here when you have no idea what you are talking about?
Or are just a troll?
If so the BBC should remove your comments
91
13/01/2021 11:03:23 4 1
bbc
Another uneducated comment from a happy furlough-grabber
98
mac
13/01/2021 11:02:45 4 1
bbc
Apart from being in school since March, preparing and teaching lessons in person and now online, they have been sat on their backsides like you! What has your contribution to the pandemic been? As an ex teacher and husband to a hardworking teacher, I am absolutely sick of reading garbage from totally un-informed, armchair 'experts'. Another one who knows nothing about everything.
114
mac
13/01/2021 11:06:30 0 2
bbc
Clueless.
53
13/01/2021 10:51:51 7 7
bbc
Why do you say GCSE and A level students could 'face' mini exams? You make it sound like something dreadfull?! Why would the BBC want to do that? Responsible journalism please!
59
13/01/2021 10:54:32 3 3
bbc
Reporting accurately what a Minister does is responsible journalism. And that is exactly what the BBC have done.m
60
13/01/2021 10:55:01 108 26
bbc
All I can say is who doesn't feel for the kids in this. No matter how good or bad they preform in education no employer will take grades from this year or last year seriously.
184
13/01/2021 11:24:45 106 10
bbc
Any potential employer who looks at grades alone is quite frankly an idiot, you need to have the ability to see beyond an exam mark and identify with the person. Results are an indicator of ability not a definition of an individual.
263
13/01/2021 11:46:25 9 4
bbc
The way the teachers inflated the grades last time makes them worthless anyway.
As an employer the interview is 99% of the decision.
270
13/01/2021 11:47:39 2 4
bbc
Then what do you think they will use?

There may be some uncertainty around the grade, but it'll still be used.
542
13/01/2021 13:23:06 0 2
bbc
Ah yes especially all those skeletal children you see everywhere...how will they cope now that McDs is takeaway only?
770
13/01/2021 15:03:16 0 0
bbc
One of the questions a prospective employer should ask is: During the pandemic and your prolonged absence from formal education, what did you do to improve your knowledge of the 'three 'R's''?
790
13/01/2021 15:06:04 0 0
bbc
Should take them more seriously as they will be based on how a student has performed over time
803
13/01/2021 15:29:26 1 0
bbc
To be fair though its unlikely an employer will be too concerned. Its the problem for further education providers to rank this year and last (higher education courses are still full). Employers will judge on degree results not GCSEs. Those leaving school at 16 are unlikely to be in jobs where GCSEs actually matter. Its ability to do the job that does.
13/01/2021 20:58:43 0 0
bbc
What’s the other option?
37
13/01/2021 10:45:17 77 26
bbc
Yet another potential U turn. More stress for students and teachers. Just make a decision and stick too it, it's not really that difficult.
61
13/01/2021 10:56:04 34 10
bbc
My daughter is 'Trying' to complete BTEC qualifications. She has now had 2yrs worth of exams cancelled. The last ones cancelled 3 days before she was meant to sit them. WHAT are her qualifications going to be worth?

Kids will be going into a job market with huge unemployment after April. What are their prospects of getting a job with 'estimated'exams?
218
13/01/2021 11:33:42 5 4
bbc
Goodluck to luck to your poor daughter Rachel. I can't see what was contentious enough to get any down votes, in your plea for help!
255
13/01/2021 11:43:58 3 1
bbc
I invigilated BTec exams last week. Perhaps the decision to cancel was taken by the school, not by government.
287
13/01/2021 11:51:08 10 1
bbc
I suspect that they'll still be assessed on their grades and employers will look for people with the right attitude. Teach your daughter to be positive.
983
ET
13/01/2021 18:45:22 1 0
bbc
Unfortunately it’s unlikely the currency value of BTECs will be affected. Since they’re largely coursework or non examined assessed then she should be fine if she has competent teachers/lecturers. If she is unfortunate in that regard, I suggest searching online for help. Sadly, you might have to pay for it.
1
jon
13/01/2021 10:37:20 17 17
bbc
Teacher assessments usually produce grade inflation which is best avoided.
62
13/01/2021 10:56:07 14 3
bbc
Teachers know what their pupils are capable of achieving. Most grade inflation in this situation will be down to the fact that there are pupils who may have panicked and underperformed in an actual exam. If you try to maintain the same grades as previous years you're having to choose that some pupils will be the ones to underperform without a chance to prove otherwise.
147
CJR
13/01/2021 11:17:08 1 1
bbc
That’s part of taking exams
63
13/01/2021 10:56:08 1 5
bbc
They are between a rock and a hard place - just using teachers' grades is unfair (I'd give all of my pupils A*s) - exams would be unfair as pupils have missed education (online is nowhere near the same). What the government could at least do is make sure as many bodies (teachers, heads, Ofqual) buy in or at least feel listened to. We are in the middle of the Blitz and there is no really good fix.
64
13/01/2021 10:56:27 296 74
bbc
As an a level student myself, I really am sick and tired. I don’t understand the need for this “U turn”. Why make public mini exams but cancel the larger ones? It is still a public exam! If you say you will use teacher assessed grades, then stick by it! The more you change the plan, the greater the mess you’ll end up in. It’s far too late to add “mini exams” now. Too stressful: futures ruined...
131
13/01/2021 11:10:11 68 21
bbc
Agreed
134
Bob
13/01/2021 11:13:19 43 23
bbc
As a student yourself shouldn't you be spending your time in a virtual lesson or be nose-deep in your work? Why are you spending time on here during school hours.

This time is for us layabouts and remote working skivers.
192
13/01/2021 11:26:19 5 3
bbc
Couldn’t agree more
224
13/01/2021 11:33:10 6 6
bbc
You are so right. By June/July all the vulnerable will have been vaccinated for months. So exams will be perfectly safe, and marking them to a curve will account for less teaching.

Also, without exams, those no longer at school, who are relying on retakes, are being sold down the river. Due to curtailed teaching last year and a crap university year there are LOTS who would have done retakes.
238
13/01/2021 11:41:05 12 17
bbc
You are absolutely right. However, the people who make these decisions are incompetent and refuse to consult with anyone. I despair for students in your situation and I despair for teachers too. Imagine being given a different directive every few days.
252
13/01/2021 11:43:38 11 2
bbc
It's a step into formal exams - the external assessment will help the teachers compare with other schools. It's not intended to take away or undermine the teachers.
National exams provide a standard assessment; which helps employers and further education compare students from different schools.

Also your future will be great! You just need to keep working.
260
13/01/2021 11:45:37 1 5
bbc
I agree, but you forget to include money and how certain people will want exams to extract legitimate money from government.
280
13/01/2021 11:49:44 6 3
bbc
Because a mini exam does not have to include all the content which will help schools or students who have not managed because of situations out of their control (poor IT).
300
13/01/2021 11:51:38 6 3
bbc
Agreed. The differences in the subject matter taught to pupils due to time out, lack of access to technology, and self-isolation will vary so much across the country, so how is it possible to set national tests that takes every child's experience into account?
346
Jim
13/01/2021 12:06:33 20 14
bbc
Too stressful if mini exams are added now?

Flipping eck we are becoming a weak nation if this is too stressful. As a student you will have been expecting exams originally. So an exam should not be too surprising. Indeed, it could be easier as you might have more choice re the topics you chose to answer.

Put you big boy or girl pants on and be brave.

Or in the vernacular, just grow a pair
370
13/01/2021 12:14:45 1 3
bbc
I totally agree!
396
13/01/2021 12:06:50 0 3
bbc
Well said - I hope Gavin Williamson is listening. but I guess not!
417
13/01/2021 12:27:20 0 2
bbc
Williamson needs his head examined [ a full one ] or should that be a fool's one
438
13/01/2021 12:36:49 5 0
bbc
Stressful? Wait until you have a house and family to provide for.
439
13/01/2021 12:37:02 2 0
bbc
You should know as an A level student that you have not covered the whole course and therefore it would be unfair to set the exam that was written 2 years ago,. You would be the first to complain therefore setting a shorter more relevant exam is the best way, and perhaps publishing it alongside the farcical teacher estimates.
475
13/01/2021 12:52:12 1 4
bbc
Absolutely right. I will officially become an OAP later this month. I recently applied for a job and I had to provide details of what I had achieved at 16 and 18 years old. Even now employers are more concerned about whether I failed or passed my 11+ than about the quality of my degree. "Gav' hasn't got a clue.
498
13/01/2021 12:50:33 4 0
bbc
I would rather I am able to show to my teacher my worth by doing formal exams than my teacher guessing based on a few class tests. Stop complaining ffs.
503
13/01/2021 13:03:52 2 0
bbc
Your future is not ruined, good grief! It doesn’t matter who us right and who is wrong but at the age of 17 ish I guess, to say that your future is ruined us laughable
504
13/01/2021 13:04:10 3 1
bbc
If this is all it takes to defeat you, then you aren't going to survive in any sort of corporate environment.
My "highest" priority changes almost daily - and I have lots of others things to look after at the same time.
After education, you'll likely be working for upwards of 40 years. If this is all it takes to "ruin your future", then, I'm sorry, but it wasn't that bright in the first place.
509
13/01/2021 13:06:43 2 1
bbc
My sympathies are with you and all other exam age young people. It's a travesty you are being used like ping pong balls in a match that neither side can win. My granddaughter is one of the young people caught in this shambles, she has the unstinting support of all her family, I fear others do not.
612
13/01/2021 13:51:25 4 0
bbc
The last time teachers graded the exams it was some of the highest results on record. That shows they overexaggerated in many cases and they cannot be trusted. Not a problem if you go on to get a degree etc. but if you just have your A levels then your CV will go to the bottom of the pile because employers cannot trust the grade. You need to satisfy employer, not students. The Gov understand this.
827
13/01/2021 15:48:29 1 0
bbc
get used to that stress, it gets worse as you grow up.
863
13/01/2021 16:36:03 0 0
bbc
Gavin Williamson is a complete and utter failure at his Job. So out of his depth its untrue.
874
13/01/2021 16:46:04 1 0
bbc
Oh, you poor dear! Stressed out because you don't know whether you'll have to take a little test or not.....Bless!
911
Ben
13/01/2021 17:29:55 3 0
bbc
This sounds a lot like "please let me keep my gifted grades, which are all but certain to be higher than what I am going to get if I sit my exams".

Sitting an exam on stuff you have already learnt isn't unfair. Count yourself lucky that your grades are going to be propped up by generous teacher predictions. Most of us studied hard and had to work for ours.
916
13/01/2021 17:34:05 0 0
bbc
Futures are not ruined. you'll probably live to a hundred, a couple of years won't matter at all.
972
ET
13/01/2021 18:36:15 1 0
bbc
Too late? It’s January! Five months is plenty of time to get ready for a mini exam. I can teach Y13 A Level Maths in full in 5 months. So a mini exam on part of the syllabus is perfectly possible.
13/01/2021 19:12:14 1 0
bbc
One problem is the historic inconsistency / inaccuracy of teacher predicted grades. Academic studies of predicted grades vs actual results over the last few years have shown some areas with significant grade inflation and others much closer to the eventual grade. Mini exams for a sample of pupils stand a chance of re-calibrating the grades given out to something closer to those actually deserved
13/01/2021 20:31:42 0 0
bbc
If you don't understand the need for this u-turn then you would probably have got bad grades in your A levels exams and should be grateful the government will make life easier for you by giving you an A* this summer.
13/01/2021 23:09:18 0 0
bbc
The problem is that people read the headlines not the detail. Johnson cancelled exams as they were normally sat. no exams doesn't mean no assessments and the idea of doing some mini assessments, externally set and marked, which could inform the final grades would be very useful.
13/01/2021 23:20:52 0 0
bbc
When they said formal exams would not take place they did also state they were looking into alternative arrangements.
65
13/01/2021 10:56:55 214 26
bbc
Oh, for goodness sake.

Look at the situation, consider the options, make a decision, deliver the plan. Reconsider only if the situation changes.

I pity those running schools & students having to try to keep up with these continuous contradictory diktats!
256
13/01/2021 11:44:19 71 100
bbc
Hmm. This virus has been consistent all the way from day one.... not!

Reconsidering options when circumstances change is not a 'U-turn', it's responsible.
337
Ben
13/01/2021 12:02:23 6 1
bbc
It's Gavin's last stand, fighting back against Boris/Gove/Hancock who cancelled exams without telling him.
Gavin will be sacked before the results are out.
345
Bob
13/01/2021 12:06:01 2 8
bbc
I don't think he ever made a firm announcement on what would replace exams - only that he wouldn't use 'that' algorithm.

A mini exam is a good potential solution, especially when the data shows 80% of A level teacher predictions are wrong.

There are many months left in the educational year in order to rip a load of questions out of exam papers and teach what is left to a high standard.
606
13/01/2021 13:48:53 1 0
bbc
The only thing students have to keep up is the learning material.
698
SM
13/01/2021 14:12:54 0 3
bbc
He’s trying to help teachers cos the next item on their moan agenda will be being solely responsible for grading and we all know they don’t like responsibility and accountability, it’s always someone else’s fault. Chances are they’ve asked for some support and this is what he’s suggesting to help, if it can be covered and helps what is the issue
822
13/01/2021 15:46:56 0 0
bbc
You don't count the random emergence of a new much more contagious virus mutation as a change in situation?
919
13/01/2021 17:35:34 0 0
bbc
My daughters school is amazing..depends where you live I guess. Full 5 day a week lessons , poor kid is still working at 6pm...we need them in school with teachers.
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
66
13/01/2021 10:57:10 6 2
bbc
Schools have not been closed
67
13/01/2021 10:57:22 7 4
bbc
The real problem here is GCSEs have been a mess since they came in to being in 1989.
O-Levels and CSEs were not about meeting league tables, they were just about indicating ability against the rest of your cohort and educating you, missing half a term wouldn't matter as you'd still be able to rank ability, GCSEs just teach to the test.
Unis will just bring in entrance exams to compensate.
143
13/01/2021 11:16:04 2 2
bbc
GCSE's combined both the old GCE and CSE into one exam. They are still 'norm' referenced as before. Changes have been made, in particular by Gove, which in the current circumstances have proved a hinderance. However, I don't see how GCSEs per se are the problem. It doesn't help that most people think GCSE's and GCE's are criteria referenced.
20
MVS
13/01/2021 10:44:25 2 4
bbc
Does it matter if there are exams this year or not? This cohort of children have had there education blighted completely by being forced out of their classrooms by draconian measures aimed at protecting the blushes of every politician of the past 30 years who have failed to properly organise and reform the NHS.
It is not fit for purpose, but then few religions are!
68
13/01/2021 10:53:37 0 2
bbc
Say what you mean, Tory troll. Privatise the NHS is what you mean.
Like Farage wants to?
Instead of going after the tax dodgers the Brexi-tories pander to, siezing the billions they steal from us every year and properly funding the NHS.
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
69
13/01/2021 10:57:49 5 1
bbc
Schools are not closed, they are open to children of NHS staff and the vulnerable. Teachers are also now teaching electronically whilst doing the aforementioned live teaching for these children. Like much of the public sector they are doing a stellar job despite the rhetoric of those who dislike them.
191
13/01/2021 11:26:14 0 2
bbc
How many pupils is that per school then, 10, 100? Teaching is the only profession that has a guaranteed 6 week holiday each year! Come on they don't deserve a pay rise over and above police and nurses, get real.
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
70
13/01/2021 10:58:24 5 1
bbc
Most teachers if not all have been in school, teaching the vulnerable and the children of key worker, and giving online lessons to the students at home.
Exams are marked by humans apart from multi choice tests.
Your lack of knowledge is considerable.
71
Bob
13/01/2021 10:58:43 0 3
bbc
Sounds cute
16
13/01/2021 10:42:07 19 9
bbc
Williamson needs to be educated and for his own preservation he needs to learn to shut up and drop the soundbites.
72
13/01/2021 10:55:09 7 6
bbc
Why would anyone want to preserve the fireplace salesman? There's plenty of other inadequate failures in the Brexi-tory party to take his place and continue to make things worse.
73
13/01/2021 10:55:12 97 23
bbc
Having Gavin Williamson in control of my 18 year old daughters destiny sends a cold shudder up my spine!
183
13/01/2021 11:24:41 68 25
bbc
Actually, your adult daughter is in control of her own destiny. If she continues to work & study hard, despite the many obstacles & difficulties, she will progress. Good luck to her.
499
Bob
13/01/2021 13:02:03 8 7
bbc
What spine would that be? Your daughter is an adult & controls her own destiny surely or are you one of those control freak monkeys?
521
13/01/2021 13:12:04 6 4
bbc
Your daughters destiny is in her own hands. Unfortunately too many people make excuses for their own failures.
Removed
56
13/01/2021 10:53:41 10 2
bbc
What evidence are you using to support this?
74
13/01/2021 10:55:45 4 1
bbc
Keith's imagination would be my guess.
10
13/01/2021 10:40:36 165 34
bbc
They need to hurry up and decide how they are going to facilitate this. The uncertainty and stress this is causing our children is absurd and extremely unfair. They have enough to deal with as it is!!!
75
13/01/2021 10:59:05 162 29
bbc
How long will it take Williamson to get the message - make a policy, stick to it, don't keep changing or adding new bits.

He is plain incompetent.
125
CJR
13/01/2021 11:11:41 5 19
bbc
In your eyes
308
13/01/2021 11:54:54 3 11
bbc
so do you know what the virus will do next?
I would love to see complainers do this job and handle the pressure and answer the 60 million different and personal scenarios the UK has to make individuals happy.
732
13/01/2021 14:29:14 1 0
bbc
I'm afraid this is the whole sector - not incompetence, but in a way too much competence to make a decision. You only have to trawl through opinions in TES and sector journals to see that.
He also can't say 'tough' if someone gives a better idea a few days later.
So he's really just the cherry on top of some kind of cake.
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
76
13/01/2021 10:59:46 3 1
bbc
They haven’t been closed, so we we won’t take your question as being a serious and legitimate one.
15
13/01/2021 10:41:51 8 14
bbc
Children will miss most of the curriculum again this year, but for some reason with teacher predicted grades I imagine it will be another record breaking year for top grades.
77
13/01/2021 10:56:21 6 1
bbc
Yep. Blame the teachers. Not the government that got us into this situation in the first place and who have made things worse at every stage.
12
13/01/2021 10:41:29 9 5
bbc
All these exam results mean nothing if the major employers do not except them.
78
13/01/2021 10:56:44 1 2
bbc
GCSEs aren't going to matter to anyone except universities, nobody goes out to work direct from school in any sort of decent job these days.
157
CJR
13/01/2021 11:19:02 1 4
bbc
That’s because the kids are so lazy today
13
13/01/2021 10:41:31 9 15
bbc
Just declare "everyone a winner" and give everyone the grades they want.

No, this won't equip them for the real world but no one seems bothered about that anyway.
79
13/01/2021 10:57:08 3 2
bbc
How did being a failure equip you, then?
7
CPJ
13/01/2021 10:40:08 9 15
bbc
yet another example of an irresponsible piece of reporting by the BBC. When children are worried enough about their futures let them worry even more by publishing details of discussions over something that may never happen. Or if it does then the details will have been ironed out. Shame on you BBC
Removed
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
81
13/01/2021 10:58:14 4 1
bbc
Schools are not closed! We have students in and as a teacher I am teaching online during the day. I assume you are not a teacher so do not know what is actually going on and so have no real right to comment
47
13/01/2021 10:50:43 8 24
bbc
If history tells us anything teachers just cannot be trusted to mark their own work.

Passes for everyone.
82
13/01/2021 11:01:18 4 2
bbc
Evidence? You state it’s historical, so I’m sure you’ll be able to articulate the data and direct us to the reliable source/s. No, thought not.
100
Bob
13/01/2021 11:05:51 0 2
bbc
There is plenty of history and data. There have been numerous published studies. Here are just two articles covering some of them.

https://www.tes.com/news/five-out-six-level-grade-predictions-teachers-are-wrong-study-shows
https://www.tes.com/news/pupils-poor-backgrounds-and-ethnic-minorities-less-likely-meet-predicted-level-grades-study

80% of predictions are wrong, quite damning, isn't it?
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
83
Pam
13/01/2021 11:01:26 4 1
bbc
Why post things on here when you have no idea what you are talking about?
Or are just a troll?
If so the BBC should remove your comments
84
13/01/2021 11:01:54 0 2
bbc
"How many Gav Level points do I need to get into Liverpool now??" says my son sarcastically
47
13/01/2021 10:50:43 8 24
bbc
If history tells us anything teachers just cannot be trusted to mark their own work.

Passes for everyone.
85
13/01/2021 11:02:10 5 1
bbc
Do inform of this history. If history has taught me anything, it is that it appears that sweeping statements and false information sticks with the unenlightened and ignorant.
3
13/01/2021 10:38:36 51 23
bbc
Its alright kids...Williamson doesnt have any qualifications and look where he is !
86
13/01/2021 10:59:20 12 4
bbc
Like Toby Young! Perfect example of failing upwards.
87
13/01/2021 11:02:25 40 6
bbc
Make a decision and stick with it! Things are stressful enough already.
887
Jim
13/01/2021 17:00:35 5 0
bbc
And try and include private candidates in that decision. Rather than just ignore them as in 2020.
8
13/01/2021 10:40:23 1 4
bbc
Cut this generation some slack

They'll never catch up to the one before
88
13/01/2021 11:00:47 1 3
bbc
Yeah. I mean the standards of education in the generation that voted for Brexit and then for this shower are obviously stunning!
89
13/01/2021 11:02:51 2 9
bbc
Oh dear, it's all a bit of mess however the private schools seem far more capable of delivering a better learning experience in these times but perhaps they don't have to deal with bolshie unions trying to throw a spanner in the works for political reasons.
118
13/01/2021 11:10:47 2 1
bbc
Or perhaps because they spend about five times per head on the education they provide?
139
mac
13/01/2021 11:14:37 1 1
bbc
What a clueless comment. Just like every HYS on education it is full of armchair educationalists who haven't got a clue.
90
13/01/2021 11:03:17 3 2
bbc
Is Gavin Williamson STILL Education Secretary?

Wow.
117
13/01/2021 11:10:04 2 1
bbc
I think he should be required to sit an externally moderated exam to test his capability for this role - and made to sit in a cupboard until he passes...
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
91
13/01/2021 11:03:23 4 1
bbc
Another uneducated comment from a happy furlough-grabber
92
DBM
13/01/2021 11:03:26 1 1
bbc
All we want is a consistent vision that Schools, Parents, and Pupils can work towards. At this moment continual assessment is all that is available so lets concentrate on delivering that and forget mini exams. They are a distraction and will add confusion, a bit like Gavin's brain...confused.
93
13/01/2021 11:01:07 4 6
bbc
External examinations need to happen. I don't trust the incompetent teaching staff at my local secondary. They already have formed their opinion of who is 'worthy' of taking up what subjects and will not consider efforts made by students who pick up late in the year. League table pressure means they will force students to give up subjects. Zero guidance, one teacher teaching 3 subjects (badly!)
1
jon
13/01/2021 10:37:20 17 17
bbc
Teacher assessments usually produce grade inflation which is best avoided.
94
13/01/2021 11:02:02 0 8
bbc
So are deadly pandemics, but unfortunately some people voted in a government that is incapable of doing anything right. How's that for grade inflation?
1
jon
13/01/2021 10:37:20 17 17
bbc
Teacher assessments usually produce grade inflation which is best avoided.
95
13/01/2021 11:03:57 2 3
bbc
That's why you have moderation
27
13/01/2021 10:46:27 132 21
bbc
So , Williamson cancels exams, as it would not be fair or consistent to all pupils, and then wants to replace them with........more exams. Mini-exams, but still exams. You couldn't make this stuff up.
96
13/01/2021 11:04:08 8 2
bbc
Like many in government this man is unfit for purpose, and a waste of space.
97
13/01/2021 11:04:10 2 1
bbc
Just after the first announcement that Ofsted scraps all exams and uses teachers assessment there already was doubt that a clear policy will be established

So, here we go, that what happen when politicians are involved in matters which require experience – utter nonsense and chaos as usual
58
13/01/2021 10:54:13 1 24
bbc
Once upon a time, exams were marked by a person not by a machine.

Most schools and colleges have been closed for some time, so dare I ask what exactly have all these teachers been up to..? I mean serious question, it's our taxpayers money after all..or has the £2trn debt escaped these mortals?
98
mac
13/01/2021 11:02:45 4 1
bbc
Apart from being in school since March, preparing and teaching lessons in person and now online, they have been sat on their backsides like you! What has your contribution to the pandemic been? As an ex teacher and husband to a hardworking teacher, I am absolutely sick of reading garbage from totally un-informed, armchair 'experts'. Another one who knows nothing about everything.
336
13/01/2021 12:01:25 0 1
bbc
Most of your comments are "What has your contribution to the pandemic been?"

You are suited to the school environment because you sound nothing more than a playground bully!

It seems to me that YOUR contribution has been sitting on your backside watching football...
47
13/01/2021 10:50:43 8 24
bbc
If history tells us anything teachers just cannot be trusted to mark their own work.

Passes for everyone.
99
13/01/2021 11:05:07 0 2
bbc
Keith. Says it all
82
13/01/2021 11:01:18 4 2
bbc
Evidence? You state it’s historical, so I’m sure you’ll be able to articulate the data and direct us to the reliable source/s. No, thought not.
100
Bob
13/01/2021 11:05:51 0 2
bbc
There is plenty of history and data. There have been numerous published studies. Here are just two articles covering some of them.

https://www.tes.com/news/five-out-six-level-grade-predictions-teachers-are-wrong-study-shows
https://www.tes.com/news/pupils-poor-backgrounds-and-ethnic-minorities-less-likely-meet-predicted-level-grades-study

80% of predictions are wrong, quite damning, isn't it?
271
13/01/2021 11:47:39 0 1
bbc
An article from 2016 on predictions, is not a suitable source for modern educational data methods. Afterall, Brexit was very different in 2016 than what has transpired ey! Pupils now have a UCAS grade (in which they are usually one grade higher than expected) and expected grade, usually much more accurate and based on tests and lessons.