Retail sales in 2020 'worst for 25 years'
12/01/2021 | news | business | 624
A slump in demand for fashion and homeware during lockdown left many retailers struggling.
1
12/01/2021 10:24:47 238 31
bbc
Perhaps this will be the turning point in which we realise we need to learn to live with less stuff.

Constantly buying, then throwing away stuff, and buying even more, especially things we don’t necessarily need, is damaging to the environment, given Earth doesn’t have infinite resources, especially if this is replicated for its 7.8 billion population.
20
12/01/2021 10:31:46 131 30
bbc
Sadly I doubt this will happen. People in this country will always want a car with a badge, clothes with a label etc to try and be Posh and Becks and to keep up with the neighbours. Maxing out credit cards to keep up. Me me me culture here in UK...
24
12/01/2021 10:33:50 42 6
bbc
Indeed

I'm no Hippy Happy Clapper Mother Earth type but sometimes it does feel like Covid coming into existence was the Planet's way of dealing with overpopulation, CO2 emissions and wasteful behaviour by the Human Race
70
12/01/2021 10:48:38 11 22
bbc
We will need the consumerism to pay of the 500 Billion debt.
83
12/01/2021 10:51:23 25 3
bbc
Perhaps, although I suspect as soon as all the shops are open again the treasury will be desperate for us to get spending again on stuff we don't really need.
125
12/01/2021 11:00:41 8 29
bbc
It was lockdown which caused the retail sector to suffer, not people buying too much stuff. I don't understand your point
142
12/01/2021 11:05:07 12 13
bbc
Problem is, if we don't buy all this unnecessary tat, if we eat and drink out less and if we forgo other unnecessaries in the future, then how of earth are we going to find jobs for all the unskilled labour that will be made redundant?
179
12/01/2021 11:20:19 5 1
bbc
Less stuff means less capitalism and consumerism... our 'elected officials' aren't about to let that happen.
207
12/01/2021 11:27:36 2 1
bbc
7.8 billion population, half of which don't have enough to eat or clean water to drink.
218
12/01/2021 11:30:29 4 1
bbc
covid and capitalism are mutually exclusive, capitalism cannot cope with a shutdown of the economy. It heightens inequality and now is a perfect opportunity for changing tack towards a better distribution of resources and more respect for Mother Earth.
229
12/01/2021 11:33:09 5 1
bbc
There are too many people on the planet.
255
12/01/2021 11:42:18 2 1
bbc
I don’t buy stuff and throw it away, unless it’s potato peelings etc
263
12/01/2021 11:44:48 1 2
bbc
Has anyone noticed that the vast majority of people buying useless tat are women? Womens empowerment is great for business but is killing the planet among other things.
431
12/01/2021 12:43:47 1 0
bbc
Everyone is skint, no expendable income, overdrafts, borrowed money. Capitilism's not working anymore...
461
12/01/2021 13:22:42 1 0
bbc
Well said we don't need so much stuff especially electronics why can't they recycle with bins and take back for old electronics parts to make mone
477
12/01/2021 13:26:23 0 0
bbc
Utter bilge!
2
12/01/2021 10:26:11 49 9
bbc
I wonder if that's because all the shops have been forced to shut ?
223
12/01/2021 11:31:57 12 1
bbc
Don't be silly :)
545
12/01/2021 13:47:23 0 0
bbc
and plane crashes are because a plane fell out of the sky, but that doesn't mean it isn't news.
3
12/01/2021 10:26:50 10 6
bbc
who knew?
4
12/01/2021 10:27:26 109 16
bbc
I didnt expect this during a pandemic and lockdown. Im pleased the beeb has pointed this out.
5
12/01/2021 10:27:33 39 13
bbc
How much did it cost to produce a report stating the obvious?
82
12/01/2021 10:51:17 9 4
bbc
about £150 p/p.
259
12/01/2021 11:43:11 1 1
bbc
47 small businesses were hurt in the making of the report.
514
12/01/2021 13:39:39 3 0
bbc
Depends who did it and who was paying. If it was one of the Tory party's mates and it was paid for with our taxes then probably £1bn.
6
12/01/2021 10:27:42 30 11
bbc
which is very good news, yes? less material, less resources, the environment may thank us. well done BBC for the good news.
37
12/01/2021 10:37:04 0 3
bbc
Fridays for Future has now been downgraded to Friday mornings for future.
7
12/01/2021 10:28:17 68 2
bbc
It would be nice if we could start the value things more in the long term - buying less, better quality stuff that lasts longer. It would mean things cost more, and the general public would need to help this along.

Saying that, I work in retail and its been a terribly sad time and extremely difficult for those employed in this industry, constantly threatened with losing our livelihoods
136
12/01/2021 11:03:17 31 3
bbc
Companies and modern-day consumers will never allow this to happen sadly.

FOMO (Fear of missing out) is such an easy thing to exploit with young people, take these new Xbox's and PS5's for example, the games look a bit better + the loading times are quicker (a problem created only by it's predecessors), that is pretty much all it is yet people are desperate to shell out hundreds of pounds for it.
550
12/01/2021 13:43:19 0 1
bbc
Thanks to Brexit even the tat is going to cost more.
8
12/01/2021 10:28:28 13 10
bbc
To me it was not Brexit or Covid that has decimated the UK economy, it was the London Government who has decimated our economy, just remember that. Out of all of the countries in Europe as an example, it has been farcical what the London Government has done since Covid. Then we have the removal of freedom of speech online and other oppressive things being introduced by top 1% and Goverments, why?
77
12/01/2021 10:50:35 2 5
bbc
London Government? Don't know what that means but, furlough kind of ruins your argument if your talking about economics. Uk Gov was first to approve vaccines and one of the first to produce one, the vaccine that holds all the cards around the world due to its transportability. This Gov secured enough vaccines, while the EU didn't. UK has vaccinated more people than every European country.
9
12/01/2021 10:29:02 11 9
bbc
More like, bbc reporting, worst for 25 years
112
12/01/2021 10:58:34 1 2
bbc
More like stick to the Mail and Express They’ll tell you the news you want to hear whether it’s true or not is a different matter
10
12/01/2021 10:29:09 38 2
bbc
The High Street and retail in shops has been in decline for years with the rise in online purchasing, competitive nature of Supermarkets, high rents by retail landlords and high car parking prices set by Councils

Covid has accelerated this trend for the past 10 months and it's hard to see high street retail returning in popularity making job losses in this sector almost certain to continue
25
12/01/2021 10:34:15 20 4
bbc
I think the nature of high streets will continue to change - more cafes, services and small shops replacing department stores. But there's likely to be a big difference between high streets in large city centres and those in struggling towns. This disparity will continue to grow.
428
12/01/2021 13:03:18 0 0
bbc
Did people have the hatred for supermarkets when they accelerated their relocation to out of town locations which absolutely decimated high street footfall or do we save it for Amazon?
442
12/01/2021 13:13:03 1 0
bbc
Been retired for some 6 years, spent my professional career in property. In previous hard times, prime retail areas held their own or increased in value, secondary shops you prayed your tenant held on. Tertiary shops having had a variety of tenants, you know the ones, finally closed and remain vacant.
By the way retail rents are decided by supply and demand, not greedy retail landlords.
11
12/01/2021 10:29:12 51 11
bbc
This has to be good for the environment.

The amount of disposable tat that litters the homes of all of us is shameful and a betrayal of future generations.

Let us try to take the positives out of lockdown. Lower emissions. Working from home. Fewer planes in the sky. Noise pollution down. Reconnecting with family.
261
12/01/2021 11:30:39 8 11
bbc
I hate working from home
12
12/01/2021 10:29:17 149 16
bbc
Hang on......so you're telling me that when the shops are shut they sell less stuff?!? Groundbreaking!!
331
12/01/2021 12:10:17 48 1
bbc
Us common folk needed this article to confirm such obviously ground breaking news... >.>
564
12/01/2021 14:00:41 0 0
bbc
They won't if they transfer the stock online to sell back to warehouses
571
12/01/2021 14:05:22 1 1
bbc
It's news and is reported everywhere, even in your favourite rags. It would be odd not to report and record the facts, wouldn't it?
13
12/01/2021 10:30:02 9 7
bbc
Thanks China.
14
12/01/2021 10:30:04 67 8
bbc
Independent local businesses need to be supported through the recovery. Lockdowns have driven a lot of business to Amazon and the supermarkets - the government needs to find a way to help create vibrant local economies across the country.
320
ET
12/01/2021 12:05:07 28 6
bbc
Why? Why aren’t those wanting to sell goods responsible for finding a way to do it?
No government gave Bezos start up advice.
351
12/01/2021 12:20:33 2 1
bbc
Whilst that all sounds good, in reality "vibrant local economies" do not work in this day and age unless you have tourism in that particular area.
Amazon's hub a distribute method is much more environmental and economic which is what the Government is pushing for at present.
394
12/01/2021 11:56:49 1 2
bbc
I agree.

F-Amazon
476
12/01/2021 13:26:22 1 1
bbc
Free parking would be a good start
499
12/01/2021 13:33:58 0 0
bbc
Farm foods won't go online so people go elsewhere
548
12/01/2021 13:41:39 0 0
bbc
welcome to capitalism...
15
12/01/2021 10:30:12 3 3
bbc
So much for our economy then
52
12/01/2021 10:41:23 1 4
bbc
The UK has a pretty robust economy. It'll get better.
16
jon
12/01/2021 10:30:16 88 4
bbc
No surprise. People are not going to splash the cash while the fear of redundancy remains after furlough ends in April.
146
12/01/2021 11:05:33 12 7
bbc
To me that is counter intuitive. It’s clear that many people are doing what you say. My approach would is to put something away for the lean times ahead.
495
12/01/2021 13:33:08 0 0
bbc
and Christmas debt as well as the aviation and entertainment industry who largely haven't worked simce last March!
17
12/01/2021 10:30:34 161 12
bbc
So we are buying less things we don't really need.
Good for the environment
Good for people
But bad for a banking system that measures success by the growth in how much people borrow to spend on things they don't need
49
12/01/2021 10:41:10 53 51
bbc
Fewer?
161
12/01/2021 11:08:23 11 6
bbc
Bezos' best day in 2020 saw his wealth increase $13bn.

People aren't buying less, they're buying the same differently.

Retail stores are closed ergo sales have fallen.

Groceries are up 5% while retail is down 5% suggesting people are spending the same, elsewhere.
346
12/01/2021 12:17:33 6 1
bbc
yep
the cycle of debt and consumption needs breaking
not because money needs protecting or there's something morally bad about excess
but because there's an absolute in terms of how much planet allocation we got
484
12/01/2021 13:29:47 2 0
bbc
It's about time, shame this didn't start in 2008
18
12/01/2021 10:30:53 10 10
bbc
Todays crisis story from BBC News.

Shops are closed but BBC can reveal that unbelievably sales are down. Clearly this is down to Brexit or the Tory Govt or more likely both but certainly has nothing to do with the fact that shops are closed.
27
12/01/2021 10:34:50 5 2
bbc
You are the one bringing Brexit and the Government into it. I don't see either mentioned in the article.
63
12/01/2021 10:46:30 0 1
bbc
Great extrapolation. Nonsensical but well done.
19
12/01/2021 10:31:11 8 5
bbc
Really! Who would have guessed it. An overall 0.3% fall in the year of the pandemic and closed shops for weeks and weeks. Great Journalism
57
12/01/2021 10:43:04 0 2
bbc
This relates to the speed (or lack of) that the economy is likely to recover!??
1
12/01/2021 10:24:47 238 31
bbc
Perhaps this will be the turning point in which we realise we need to learn to live with less stuff.

Constantly buying, then throwing away stuff, and buying even more, especially things we don’t necessarily need, is damaging to the environment, given Earth doesn’t have infinite resources, especially if this is replicated for its 7.8 billion population.
20
12/01/2021 10:31:46 131 30
bbc
Sadly I doubt this will happen. People in this country will always want a car with a badge, clothes with a label etc to try and be Posh and Becks and to keep up with the neighbours. Maxing out credit cards to keep up. Me me me culture here in UK...
135
12/01/2021 11:03:11 17 1
bbc
I agree those attitudes exist and can definitely see where you're coming from, but I think maybe we do need to start challenging those attitudes to help combat the consumerism behaviour, driven by constant advertising and certain media outlet agendas for example.

People are not born with this behaviour in mind, we need to ensure education is effective in making a good society.
192
12/01/2021 11:23:34 5 2
bbc
same everywhere, inequality needs to be addressed as the rich expect the poor to supply frontline services whilst the rich dodge tax.
343
12/01/2021 12:15:19 3 1
bbc
Happily Stu I can count myself out of that one! I have never cared about a posh car, posh clothes, celebrity endorsements etc, nor keeping up with the neighbours. More than happy to drive a 10-year old car - much better for the environment & wallet than buying a new one, and wear clothes until they fall apart. I appreciate there are (mystifyingly to me at least) people like this though
350
12/01/2021 12:20:06 0 2
bbc
I think brand culture is a global phenomena and not everyone here follows it, or perhaps you are the only exception?
462
12/01/2021 13:22:58 0 0
bbc
One day the next generation will change
470
12/01/2021 13:25:13 0 1
bbc
Me, me, me culture ?

Is that the same as "listen to 'me' and my views on HYS" ?

I'm right, you're wrong. I know best because all the others are stupid.

And you accuse others of altruism !!!
482
12/01/2021 13:27:13 0 1
bbc
Who are you to lecture on what people should and should not buy?
21
12/01/2021 10:32:29 29 4
bbc
It's unnecessarily bleak and a bit inaccurate to report the state of sales from "physical non-food stores" only. People are buying plenty of things online, including that would give a more accurate picture of the state of retail, surely?
102
12/01/2021 10:34:00 13 9
bbc
Buying things online doesn't often go to British businesses or the UK economy
333
ET
12/01/2021 12:11:00 0 1
bbc
But you would need to exclude, for example, my pharmaceutical supplies from Cyprus.
22
12/01/2021 10:33:22 65 17
bbc
So an overall drop of 0.3% in a year dominated by Covid and lockdowns! Online retail significantly up, I’ve just switched over to Sky News, much more positivity in the economic reporting there today.
62
12/01/2021 10:45:16 15 11
bbc
Funny that they reported to same thing.
266
12/01/2021 11:45:56 2 2
bbc
Please explain how BBC is so different to sky:

Sky "Retailers suffered worst year on record in 2020"
BBC "Retail sales in 2020 'worst for 25 years' "

Sky "Total sales fell by 0.3% on 2019 - the biggest year-on-year change since 1995."
BBC "an overall fall of 0.3%, the worst annual change since 1995."

Sky "Non-food sales dropped by 5%"
BBC "food sales rose 5.4%, non-food fell about 5%"
401
12/01/2021 12:46:24 1 1
bbc
There's very little to be positive about economy wise.
23
NRB
12/01/2021 10:33:48 1 5
bbc
Do not worry - we have a mass migration of people back from Europe - once their consumption is returned to the high street we can see a swing in the right direction they will need to start new homes from scratch and will be looking for a massive amount of cheap affordable housing
46
12/01/2021 10:40:34 3 1
bbc
Non of which the Govt is building!??
97
12/01/2021 10:55:29 0 1
bbc
Are you sober? Are you english? If the latter and not the former, please could you learn your own language. Just as a matter of courtesy.
1
12/01/2021 10:24:47 238 31
bbc
Perhaps this will be the turning point in which we realise we need to learn to live with less stuff.

Constantly buying, then throwing away stuff, and buying even more, especially things we don’t necessarily need, is damaging to the environment, given Earth doesn’t have infinite resources, especially if this is replicated for its 7.8 billion population.
24
12/01/2021 10:33:50 42 6
bbc
Indeed

I'm no Hippy Happy Clapper Mother Earth type but sometimes it does feel like Covid coming into existence was the Planet's way of dealing with overpopulation, CO2 emissions and wasteful behaviour by the Human Race
116
12/01/2021 10:59:16 15 13
bbc
COVID will be like a minor itch compared open fractures all over your body if global warming really kicks in.

In a perfect world this would indeed be a wake up call for humanity.

This isn’t a perfect world though and will soon be forgotten.
217
12/01/2021 11:30:10 1 2
bbc
You are right. Covid is nature's way of reducing the population. Nature is cruel yes, but it has an ultimate purpose. It's very likely this virus will have long gone way before most people have the jab.
262
12/01/2021 11:44:27 1 2
bbc
Or the Chinese trying for further world domination. Let's see hiw the Western Givernment's deal with that one. Probably do naff all as per usual.
435
12/01/2021 13:09:02 1 0
bbc
CO2 emissions actually rose considerably this year
599
12/01/2021 15:21:04 0 0
bbc
You could look at virus's as the planets immune system, trying to rid itself of billions of humans as our current population number is not sustainable. Even global warming cold be considered as the start of the planets 'fever' to get rid of us. The planet will win out, whether many humans will be around to see that who knows.
10
12/01/2021 10:29:09 38 2
bbc
The High Street and retail in shops has been in decline for years with the rise in online purchasing, competitive nature of Supermarkets, high rents by retail landlords and high car parking prices set by Councils

Covid has accelerated this trend for the past 10 months and it's hard to see high street retail returning in popularity making job losses in this sector almost certain to continue
25
12/01/2021 10:34:15 20 4
bbc
I think the nature of high streets will continue to change - more cafes, services and small shops replacing department stores. But there's likely to be a big difference between high streets in large city centres and those in struggling towns. This disparity will continue to grow.
330
ET
12/01/2021 12:10:08 0 2
bbc
What did I miss? When was there not a big gap between town and city high streets?
Some discerning towns, now looking very wise, refused the Golden Arches and all the other high margin low quality retail “giants” while encouraging small, local businesses.
So long as they’re supported they’ll be fine and better off than my local city. HoF, M&S, BHS + all the others, gone, premises empty.
26
12/01/2021 10:34:39 9 16
bbc
How are things going to improve when there are shortages of certain items and an increase in non-tariff trade barriers?

The best way out of the crisis is to rejoin the SM & CU.
40
12/01/2021 10:37:49 1 4
bbc
Ask Sir Kier if you want to rejoin.
56
12/01/2021 10:42:41 1 4
bbc
Guess what isn't going to happen? One of the relevant political parties doesn't want it, the other is now openly realist enough to reject it as electoral suicide. That leaves "Joining the EU" as the preserve of lunatic fringe groups like the Lib Dems and the SNP.
286
12/01/2021 11:51:17 1 1
bbc
A crisis for me is when they confiscate your sandwiches because you haven’t paid a membership fee.
18
12/01/2021 10:30:53 10 10
bbc
Todays crisis story from BBC News.

Shops are closed but BBC can reveal that unbelievably sales are down. Clearly this is down to Brexit or the Tory Govt or more likely both but certainly has nothing to do with the fact that shops are closed.
27
12/01/2021 10:34:50 5 2
bbc
You are the one bringing Brexit and the Government into it. I don't see either mentioned in the article.
For those with an IQ below 10, this article is a revelation and informative meanwhile the rest of us saw this coming a mile off. Removed
41
12/01/2021 10:37:58 8 6
bbc
I must be a bit dim not knowing the precise figures being reported.
29
12/01/2021 10:35:22 15 7
bbc
Who would have thought eh? Shut the shops, people can't buy as much stuff. Remarkable.
42
12/01/2021 10:38:09 2 2
bbc
According to ONS figures (quoted on BBC), retail sales grew last year.
30
12/01/2021 10:35:49 6 13
bbc
I'm glad those awful nail bars are now closed, it takes a certain class of woman to think they look attractive...pretty sure they are contributing factor of transmission. Has there been any research on how long viruses live on them..?
38
12/01/2021 10:37:25 3 3
bbc
According to ONS figures, retail sales grew in 2020.
31
12/01/2021 10:35:56 12 4
bbc
With more firms closing, job losses rising, employees on furlough, 3m self employed not eligible for Govt support, those with jobs concerned over long term future, rising food price, the 2020 uncertaintyover Brexit & the incompetence of Govt, this headline & story is hardly the surprise of the year!??
552
12/01/2021 13:52:47 0 0
bbc
yet they could all restudy retrain and work elsewhere where jobs are needed
32
12/01/2021 10:36:10 44 9
bbc
Feels a bit mis-leading, you cant report on 'retail' sales without including Amazon, thats just ridiculous and of course non-essential retail will be down, they've been shut for 4 months, which bright spark figured that out!

Seems like another 'meddling with the news' BBC story, something that is becoming more and more frequent, probably by the woke brexit teams seeking out other opportunities.
338
ET
12/01/2021 12:12:58 5 0
bbc
Not that simple I’m afraid. It’s often cheaper to buy real books from .com and import them, than from .co.uk; then have them delivered from Seattle rather than UK, say.
Madness.
33
12/01/2021 10:36:17 10 9
bbc
talk about starting the obvious - quick get laura K asking a question about it when the next downing street briefing is on , or maybe capt Hindsight can tell us he knew this would happen 6 mths ago
34
12/01/2021 10:36:32 3 21
bbc
ALL THIS COVID IS TO ME IS A CONTROL MECHANISM. We have what I think is a highly controversial vaccine that I "REFUSE" to take, not interested. We have $38tn stolen from the markets and us since 2008 crash, by you guessed it, the top 2%. WHERE is our money gone you stole from us?, what are you upto UK GOVERNMENT?, running into space with your top 2% and all our money is not going to save you.
47
12/01/2021 10:40:46 9 3
bbc
Didn't know Q anon had a British chapter
51
12/01/2021 10:41:22 4 2
bbc
Your writing appears as incoherent as I imagine your thoughts to be.
55
12/01/2021 10:42:34 6 3
bbc
A control mechanism? Don't forget your tinfoil lined mask when you do shopping.
65
12/01/2021 10:47:11 2 1
bbc
English grammar at it's best.
120
12/01/2021 10:41:08 1 1
bbc
Pathetic.....grow up you muppet!
35
MVP
12/01/2021 10:36:32 11 8
bbc
Given there was a global pandemic, a reduction of just 0.3% is an astonishingly good result.
43
12/01/2021 10:39:07 6 5
bbc
Tell that to the 180,000 who lost their jobs, that it was "an astonishingly good result!"??
36
12/01/2021 10:36:59 8 5
bbc
This story seems to contradict ONS data, regularly published on the BBC, that has shown retail sales in 2020 above the previous year up to November, with December showing strong numbers as well.

On the 18th December, the BBC wrote "Despite the monthly fall, overall sales remain above their pre-pandemic levels."

Has anything changed since them, or is this selective reporting?
48
Bob
12/01/2021 10:41:05 5 2
bbc
One is from a respected statistics body the other is from a retail consortium whose members would rather their shops were open.
50
12/01/2021 10:41:21 1 3
bbc
the report is what the British Retail Consortium say about retail sales. Do you not believe them? Given that they are the experts of retailing it's better to believe them. Or do you not trust expertise?
124
12/01/2021 10:43:02 0 1
bbc
Thanks for FACT CHECKING the BBC who even fail to report that UK became 5th biggest economy in 2020 over taken France India thanks online business and services made and created in the UK. At least they reported on Warhammer sale being up 90%.
6
12/01/2021 10:27:42 30 11
bbc
which is very good news, yes? less material, less resources, the environment may thank us. well done BBC for the good news.
37
12/01/2021 10:37:04 0 3
bbc
Fridays for Future has now been downgraded to Friday mornings for future.
254
12/01/2021 11:42:14 0 1
bbc
Further downgraded to 'Ten minutes on some future Friday'.
30
12/01/2021 10:35:49 6 13
bbc
I'm glad those awful nail bars are now closed, it takes a certain class of woman to think they look attractive...pretty sure they are contributing factor of transmission. Has there been any research on how long viruses live on them..?
38
12/01/2021 10:37:25 3 3
bbc
According to ONS figures, retail sales grew in 2020.
39
12/01/2021 10:37:27 5 4
bbc
Change trade to an industry that's doing well like food or fishing. Set up a tackle shop. Club together with other failed tradespeople and create a small lake so people can fish.
26
12/01/2021 10:34:39 9 16
bbc
How are things going to improve when there are shortages of certain items and an increase in non-tariff trade barriers?

The best way out of the crisis is to rejoin the SM & CU.
40
12/01/2021 10:37:49 1 4
bbc
Ask Sir Kier if you want to rejoin.
59
12/01/2021 10:44:28 1 1
bbc
Keir.
For those with an IQ below 10, this article is a revelation and informative meanwhile the rest of us saw this coming a mile off. Removed
41
12/01/2021 10:37:58 8 6
bbc
I must be a bit dim not knowing the precise figures being reported.
64
12/01/2021 10:46:39 2 4
bbc
Perhaps you should shorten that sentence ?
285
12/01/2021 11:51:16 0 0
bbc
I wouldn't say you're a bit dim at all! Anyone who thinks that this news is surprising anyone is the dim one. Not all news has to be groundbreaking. Obviously a sensible person, like yourself, would like to know the extent of the damage to retail. Brass Eye is clearly the dimmest of us all :)
29
12/01/2021 10:35:22 15 7
bbc
Who would have thought eh? Shut the shops, people can't buy as much stuff. Remarkable.
42
12/01/2021 10:38:09 2 2
bbc
According to ONS figures (quoted on BBC), retail sales grew last year.
35
MVP
12/01/2021 10:36:32 11 8
bbc
Given there was a global pandemic, a reduction of just 0.3% is an astonishingly good result.
43
12/01/2021 10:39:07 6 5
bbc
Tell that to the 180,000 who lost their jobs, that it was "an astonishingly good result!"??
44
12/01/2021 10:40:03 9 9
bbc
Who on earth writes these self-evident and depressing reports for the Beeb? More to the point, why on earth are they paid to!
541
12/01/2021 13:51:47 0 0
bbc
Surely CymroBlair is an oxymoron?
45
12/01/2021 10:40:13 6 12
bbc
Does the BBC live in the real world ?????
61
12/01/2021 10:45:12 6 7
bbc
Yes! Next question???
89
12/01/2021 10:53:53 1 1
bbc
Yes. I'm guessing that your invented name proves that you aren't. You are delusional - so you probably voted 'brexsit'. Don't deny it. Please go and look up Donald Trump on social media - you know you want to, 'major' (seriously?)
23
NRB
12/01/2021 10:33:48 1 5
bbc
Do not worry - we have a mass migration of people back from Europe - once their consumption is returned to the high street we can see a swing in the right direction they will need to start new homes from scratch and will be looking for a massive amount of cheap affordable housing
46
12/01/2021 10:40:34 3 1
bbc
Non of which the Govt is building!??
78
12/01/2021 10:50:58 1 1
bbc
Didn't know that the government built houses.
34
12/01/2021 10:36:32 3 21
bbc
ALL THIS COVID IS TO ME IS A CONTROL MECHANISM. We have what I think is a highly controversial vaccine that I "REFUSE" to take, not interested. We have $38tn stolen from the markets and us since 2008 crash, by you guessed it, the top 2%. WHERE is our money gone you stole from us?, what are you upto UK GOVERNMENT?, running into space with your top 2% and all our money is not going to save you.
47
12/01/2021 10:40:46 9 3
bbc
Didn't know Q anon had a British chapter
36
12/01/2021 10:36:59 8 5
bbc
This story seems to contradict ONS data, regularly published on the BBC, that has shown retail sales in 2020 above the previous year up to November, with December showing strong numbers as well.

On the 18th December, the BBC wrote "Despite the monthly fall, overall sales remain above their pre-pandemic levels."

Has anything changed since them, or is this selective reporting?
48
Bob
12/01/2021 10:41:05 5 2
bbc
One is from a respected statistics body the other is from a retail consortium whose members would rather their shops were open.
17
12/01/2021 10:30:34 161 12
bbc
So we are buying less things we don't really need.
Good for the environment
Good for people
But bad for a banking system that measures success by the growth in how much people borrow to spend on things they don't need
49
12/01/2021 10:41:10 53 51
bbc
Fewer?
272
12/01/2021 11:47:30 14 16
bbc
So the smug, ' grammatically correct ' Feeling proud police are on here.
390
12/01/2021 12:41:45 11 2
bbc
Fewer of these posts.
36
12/01/2021 10:36:59 8 5
bbc
This story seems to contradict ONS data, regularly published on the BBC, that has shown retail sales in 2020 above the previous year up to November, with December showing strong numbers as well.

On the 18th December, the BBC wrote "Despite the monthly fall, overall sales remain above their pre-pandemic levels."

Has anything changed since them, or is this selective reporting?
50
12/01/2021 10:41:21 1 3
bbc
the report is what the British Retail Consortium say about retail sales. Do you not believe them? Given that they are the experts of retailing it's better to believe them. Or do you not trust expertise?
34
12/01/2021 10:36:32 3 21
bbc
ALL THIS COVID IS TO ME IS A CONTROL MECHANISM. We have what I think is a highly controversial vaccine that I "REFUSE" to take, not interested. We have $38tn stolen from the markets and us since 2008 crash, by you guessed it, the top 2%. WHERE is our money gone you stole from us?, what are you upto UK GOVERNMENT?, running into space with your top 2% and all our money is not going to save you.
51
12/01/2021 10:41:22 4 2
bbc
Your writing appears as incoherent as I imagine your thoughts to be.
15
12/01/2021 10:30:12 3 3
bbc
So much for our economy then
52
12/01/2021 10:41:23 1 4
bbc
The UK has a pretty robust economy. It'll get better.
53
12/01/2021 10:24:38 9 17
bbc
Brexit is also to blame. Lets not blame covid for everthing.
69
12/01/2021 10:48:29 1 5
bbc
Or hide behind Covid to try and deny the negative aspects of Brexit like your downvoters are doing.
81
12/01/2021 10:51:13 2 2
bbc
Covid will pass - you're stuck with 'brexsit' for ever. You can thank fartrage for that (he don't care he's got a radio show, advertising revenue and D. Trump to pay his alimony) Not england's finest hour.
54
12/01/2021 10:41:44 141 10
bbc
Hopefully we might see an end to the buying of cheap, poor value clothes, made in sweat shops around the world, which are promoted by talentless wannabe's who are paid to wear these clothes on tv game shows.

In the shops one day, worn once, and in the bin the day after. An appalling waste of natural resources.
80
12/01/2021 10:51:11 40 7
bbc
If only, but unfortunately this is the kind of product that is sold online to target the younger generation.
195
12/01/2021 11:24:19 8 1
bbc
I agree that the throwaway culture is a waste of global resource but wait for the howls from the Church of England et al when we stop buying from 'poor' countries like Bangladesh whose economic output depends on our throwaway culture. The whole global economic model needs to change & that is no easy fix & I don't have a solution. Buying British will be seen as xenophobic & racist
237
12/01/2021 11:37:13 3 1
bbc
Sweat shops in Leicester.
294
12/01/2021 11:54:48 2 1
bbc
The problem is: how do you know that your more expensive shirt is not also made in a sweat shop?
34
12/01/2021 10:36:32 3 21
bbc
ALL THIS COVID IS TO ME IS A CONTROL MECHANISM. We have what I think is a highly controversial vaccine that I "REFUSE" to take, not interested. We have $38tn stolen from the markets and us since 2008 crash, by you guessed it, the top 2%. WHERE is our money gone you stole from us?, what are you upto UK GOVERNMENT?, running into space with your top 2% and all our money is not going to save you.
55
12/01/2021 10:42:34 6 3
bbc
A control mechanism? Don't forget your tinfoil lined mask when you do shopping.
26
12/01/2021 10:34:39 9 16
bbc
How are things going to improve when there are shortages of certain items and an increase in non-tariff trade barriers?

The best way out of the crisis is to rejoin the SM & CU.
56
12/01/2021 10:42:41 1 4
bbc
Guess what isn't going to happen? One of the relevant political parties doesn't want it, the other is now openly realist enough to reject it as electoral suicide. That leaves "Joining the EU" as the preserve of lunatic fringe groups like the Lib Dems and the SNP.
19
12/01/2021 10:31:11 8 5
bbc
Really! Who would have guessed it. An overall 0.3% fall in the year of the pandemic and closed shops for weeks and weeks. Great Journalism
57
12/01/2021 10:43:04 0 2
bbc
This relates to the speed (or lack of) that the economy is likely to recover!??
58
MH
12/01/2021 10:44:01 11 7
bbc
I can imagine the BBC's Editor in Chief ordering his staff to find every new negative angle on the impacts of this virus.
85
12/01/2021 10:51:26 3 5
bbc
As opposed to the positive angles?! Journalists are like house surveyors - it's their job to find potential problems and draw attention to them; the good news we can see for ourselves, if and when it happens. When the BBC starts blindly jollying people along would be the time to be concerned, as there's no way of distinguishing that from propaganda.
40
12/01/2021 10:37:49 1 4
bbc
Ask Sir Kier if you want to rejoin.
59
12/01/2021 10:44:28 1 1
bbc
Keir.
60
12/01/2021 10:44:32 9 12
bbc
Let’s stop this nonsense about customers allegedly not wearing masks.

Customers are extremely compliant.

Of far greater concern are the shop staff who feel they have carte blanche to do whatever they like.

If you’re going to pick on someone, BBC, at least choose the right group.
79
12/01/2021 10:51:01 1 4
bbc
Totally agree I had a shop worker lick her fingers then touch my products..Disgusting
45
12/01/2021 10:40:13 6 12
bbc
Does the BBC live in the real world ?????
61
12/01/2021 10:45:12 6 7
bbc
Yes! Next question???
22
12/01/2021 10:33:22 65 17
bbc
So an overall drop of 0.3% in a year dominated by Covid and lockdowns! Online retail significantly up, I’ve just switched over to Sky News, much more positivity in the economic reporting there today.
62
12/01/2021 10:45:16 15 11
bbc
Funny that they reported to same thing.
213
12/01/2021 11:28:38 5 2
bbc
But they didn’t run with this negative and misleading headline. High Street retailers have had their worst year not all Retail sales , the BBC seems more like a tabloid when it does this.
18
12/01/2021 10:30:53 10 10
bbc
Todays crisis story from BBC News.

Shops are closed but BBC can reveal that unbelievably sales are down. Clearly this is down to Brexit or the Tory Govt or more likely both but certainly has nothing to do with the fact that shops are closed.
63
12/01/2021 10:46:30 0 1
bbc
Great extrapolation. Nonsensical but well done.
41
12/01/2021 10:37:58 8 6
bbc
I must be a bit dim not knowing the precise figures being reported.
64
12/01/2021 10:46:39 2 4
bbc
Perhaps you should shorten that sentence ?
34
12/01/2021 10:36:32 3 21
bbc
ALL THIS COVID IS TO ME IS A CONTROL MECHANISM. We have what I think is a highly controversial vaccine that I "REFUSE" to take, not interested. We have $38tn stolen from the markets and us since 2008 crash, by you guessed it, the top 2%. WHERE is our money gone you stole from us?, what are you upto UK GOVERNMENT?, running into space with your top 2% and all our money is not going to save you.
65
12/01/2021 10:47:11 2 1
bbc
English grammar at it's best.
66
bbc
Shame on the BBC for the sensationalist headline "Worst excess deaths in the UK since WW2" . Only hidden at the bottom is the balancing comment "It is likely to return death rates in the UK to levels last seen in the mid-2000s." Removed
204
12/01/2021 11:26:52 0 1
bbc
Why is this sensationalist? Please explain clearly and concisely.
67
12/01/2021 10:47:50 3 3
bbc
Well duh, all part of the plan to sack people and get new staff on lesser pay and conditions innit. Of course Amazon and ASDA didn’t even wait for Covid to facilitate the change, but the public will only accept so much and that line has been passed
68
12/01/2021 10:48:02 9 3
bbc
"Online non-food sales jumped by 44.8% in December"

So a miss leading headline with overall sales down by only 0.3%.
104
12/01/2021 10:56:46 3 1
bbc
And the BBC will quote ONS figures in a couple of weeks, which up to November showed a year on year increase in retail sales, and probably will for December as well.
53
12/01/2021 10:24:38 9 17
bbc
Brexit is also to blame. Lets not blame covid for everthing.
69
12/01/2021 10:48:29 1 5
bbc
Or hide behind Covid to try and deny the negative aspects of Brexit like your downvoters are doing.
1
12/01/2021 10:24:47 238 31
bbc
Perhaps this will be the turning point in which we realise we need to learn to live with less stuff.

Constantly buying, then throwing away stuff, and buying even more, especially things we don’t necessarily need, is damaging to the environment, given Earth doesn’t have infinite resources, especially if this is replicated for its 7.8 billion population.
70
12/01/2021 10:48:38 11 22
bbc
We will need the consumerism to pay of the 500 Billion debt.
131
12/01/2021 11:01:52 0 7
bbc
Maybe, maybe note. With the financial crisis 10 years ago and now those the rules of money are no longer compatible with reality.

Either we change the rules of money to match money

Or

We change reality to live by the current rules of reality.

I prefer option 1
145
12/01/2021 11:05:31 1 1
bbc
Its more like 2200 billion for the government alone. Consumer debt is probably twice that.
164
12/01/2021 11:10:08 5 3
bbc
Better still the wholesale progressive taxation of the excesses of consumerism including all forms of debt & borrowing natural resources would be the way to curb excess consumption & a debt fuelled world.
201
12/01/2021 11:26:00 5 1
bbc
how are we going to pay off the debt...with money from people who are in debt?
445
12/01/2021 13:14:47 0 0
bbc
using stuff up does not pay off debts
465
12/01/2021 13:23:56 0 0
bbc
The debt on what?
Covid or the results of consumerism? (climate change, waste and environmental impact)
71
12/01/2021 10:48:44 9 6
bbc
This is news? - Why not tell us about some of the success stories in the face of adversity... That would be news worth reading.
84
12/01/2021 10:51:26 5 6
bbc
Not everyone is a happy clapper like you though and there’s little to be happy about at the moment
108
12/01/2021 10:57:05 0 1
bbc
Because Brits resent the success of others at the best of times - even more so when others can't achieve it. Be honest: if you read a piece about some bloke who launched, say, a mail order business based on whatever people buy a lot of during lockdown and who was now getting quite rich, you'd actually accuse him of exploiting the situation and want to punch him.
72
12/01/2021 10:48:59 112 13
bbc
Not surprising really!

What's the next headline? Holidays in 2020 were at a 50 year low?
300
12/01/2021 11:55:36 42 3
bbc
Do keep up, that was yesterday:
"Heathrow passengers numbers down by nearly 60m".
I kid you not!
539
12/01/2021 13:39:41 1 0
bbc
As it is on the business pages and that would be business news possibly.
73
12/01/2021 10:49:01 4 10
bbc
The global economy will recover from COVID, the UK economy also has the added disappointment of Brexit to burden it for many years to come sadly. The financial services brain drain to Ireland, France and Germany is accelerating.
94
12/01/2021 10:55:09 1 3
bbc
Absolute twaddle.

The financial services brain drain you speak of is a myth, with most major banks and investment companies increasing their staff numbers in the UK since 2016.
98
12/01/2021 10:55:35 1 2
bbc
For goodness sake get over Brexit once and for all. It is done, it is over, it is what it is. You need serious help if you are going to keep whinging for years to come.
74
12/01/2021 10:49:10 81 4
bbc
or... best ever sales figures for a pandemic?
75
12/01/2021 10:49:48 47 4
bbc
Really so you close all the shops and are then surprised when retail figures are bad.. I am surprised they were not worse..
544
12/01/2021 13:46:29 3 3
bbc
No one is surprised these are the business pages and this is business news. Are words really that difficult for you to process?
76
RM
12/01/2021 10:50:28 5 12
bbc
Retail sales in 2020 'worst for 25 years
-
And they called it project fear. It's reality now for many.
91
12/01/2021 10:54:37 4 2
bbc
What?!? Project fear was to do with Brexit, retail sales are down due to Covid not Brexit. We only really left last week?
100
12/01/2021 10:56:07 1 2
bbc
I don't remember Remain claiming that voting to Leave would result in a pandemic.

I do remember that they said there would be a plague of locusts, but not a pandemic.
138
12/01/2021 11:03:26 1 2
bbc
Blimey, so Brexit caused Covid-19 then did it.
153
12/01/2021 10:53:35 1 2
bbc
This isn't about Brexit you absolute weapon, it's about coronavirus. Stop finding every opportunity to whine.
8
12/01/2021 10:28:28 13 10
bbc
To me it was not Brexit or Covid that has decimated the UK economy, it was the London Government who has decimated our economy, just remember that. Out of all of the countries in Europe as an example, it has been farcical what the London Government has done since Covid. Then we have the removal of freedom of speech online and other oppressive things being introduced by top 1% and Goverments, why?
77
12/01/2021 10:50:35 2 5
bbc
London Government? Don't know what that means but, furlough kind of ruins your argument if your talking about economics. Uk Gov was first to approve vaccines and one of the first to produce one, the vaccine that holds all the cards around the world due to its transportability. This Gov secured enough vaccines, while the EU didn't. UK has vaccinated more people than every European country.
46
12/01/2021 10:40:34 3 1
bbc
Non of which the Govt is building!??
78
12/01/2021 10:50:58 1 1
bbc
Didn't know that the government built houses.
60
12/01/2021 10:44:32 9 12
bbc
Let’s stop this nonsense about customers allegedly not wearing masks.

Customers are extremely compliant.

Of far greater concern are the shop staff who feel they have carte blanche to do whatever they like.

If you’re going to pick on someone, BBC, at least choose the right group.
79
12/01/2021 10:51:01 1 4
bbc
Totally agree I had a shop worker lick her fingers then touch my products..Disgusting
54
12/01/2021 10:41:44 141 10
bbc
Hopefully we might see an end to the buying of cheap, poor value clothes, made in sweat shops around the world, which are promoted by talentless wannabe's who are paid to wear these clothes on tv game shows.

In the shops one day, worn once, and in the bin the day after. An appalling waste of natural resources.
80
12/01/2021 10:51:11 40 7
bbc
If only, but unfortunately this is the kind of product that is sold online to target the younger generation.
486
12/01/2021 13:31:12 1 1
bbc
Yet those same young women complain about the climate! it's hypocritical
53
12/01/2021 10:24:38 9 17
bbc
Brexit is also to blame. Lets not blame covid for everthing.
81
12/01/2021 10:51:13 2 2
bbc
Covid will pass - you're stuck with 'brexsit' for ever. You can thank fartrage for that (he don't care he's got a radio show, advertising revenue and D. Trump to pay his alimony) Not england's finest hour.
5
12/01/2021 10:27:33 39 13
bbc
How much did it cost to produce a report stating the obvious?
82
12/01/2021 10:51:17 9 4
bbc
about £150 p/p.
1
12/01/2021 10:24:47 238 31
bbc
Perhaps this will be the turning point in which we realise we need to learn to live with less stuff.

Constantly buying, then throwing away stuff, and buying even more, especially things we don’t necessarily need, is damaging to the environment, given Earth doesn’t have infinite resources, especially if this is replicated for its 7.8 billion population.
83
12/01/2021 10:51:23 25 3
bbc
Perhaps, although I suspect as soon as all the shops are open again the treasury will be desperate for us to get spending again on stuff we don't really need.
203
12/01/2021 11:26:35 1 1
bbc
"suspect" is far too weak a word
464
12/01/2021 13:23:44 0 0
bbc
Yet there's new ways to buy ethical things and banks to take back to recycle and reuse and charity shops will need a the dead people's stuff
71
12/01/2021 10:48:44 9 6
bbc
This is news? - Why not tell us about some of the success stories in the face of adversity... That would be news worth reading.
84
12/01/2021 10:51:26 5 6
bbc
Not everyone is a happy clapper like you though and there’s little to be happy about at the moment
58
MH
12/01/2021 10:44:01 11 7
bbc
I can imagine the BBC's Editor in Chief ordering his staff to find every new negative angle on the impacts of this virus.
85
12/01/2021 10:51:26 3 5
bbc
As opposed to the positive angles?! Journalists are like house surveyors - it's their job to find potential problems and draw attention to them; the good news we can see for ourselves, if and when it happens. When the BBC starts blindly jollying people along would be the time to be concerned, as there's no way of distinguishing that from propaganda.
245
12/01/2021 11:39:18 2 1
bbc
I thought as a publicly funded organisation the BBCs job is to report the news as it happens, in an informed, balanced and truthful way, without bias. Not negatively or positively. This article has a misleading headline.
86
ken
12/01/2021 10:52:29 4 2
bbc
Not a rocket science headline
87
12/01/2021 10:52:30 7 7
bbc
Wow is it a really slow news day or what. Impressive state the bleeding obvious article there, but we know the BBC loves a miserable story.
Wierdly the local highstreet in my town has never had so many shops/takeaways opening on it their booming.
88
12/01/2021 10:53:25 5 1
bbc
It’s not surprising and it’s not going to change much. There will be a recovery of sorts when Covid is over but the move to on line retail is the death knell for many high streets and there will be fewer high street retailers in the future. We will see massive redevelopment of poorer high street retail to other uses ( probably leisure and residential) in the next 25 years
45
12/01/2021 10:40:13 6 12
bbc
Does the BBC live in the real world ?????
89
12/01/2021 10:53:53 1 1
bbc
Yes. I'm guessing that your invented name proves that you aren't. You are delusional - so you probably voted 'brexsit'. Don't deny it. Please go and look up Donald Trump on social media - you know you want to, 'major' (seriously?)
90
12/01/2021 10:54:36 4 1
bbc
Think positive, it's likely the best ever sales figures when shops have been totally closed for months and people are housebound or banned from buying 'non-essential items.'

Quelle surprise people aren't buying clothes, why bother when you rarely go anywhere? Unless like me you've been snapping up absolute bargains on ebay in prep for our release date in March/April/2024.
76
RM
12/01/2021 10:50:28 5 12
bbc
Retail sales in 2020 'worst for 25 years
-
And they called it project fear. It's reality now for many.
91
12/01/2021 10:54:37 4 2
bbc
What?!? Project fear was to do with Brexit, retail sales are down due to Covid not Brexit. We only really left last week?
92
12/01/2021 10:54:41 2 1
bbc
At the moment, people may be utilising their money more and just not buying some of the rubbish in the shops especially the clothes. Some of it is tat.
93
12/01/2021 10:55:08 3 2
bbc
What a surprise.

BBC - how about some positive news, of some businesses who are adapting to make things work for them during this crisis. Or is good news banned by the editors now?
113
12/01/2021 10:58:36 1 1
bbc
Send us all your 'good' news Nigel - I would LOVE to hear it.
73
12/01/2021 10:49:01 4 10
bbc
The global economy will recover from COVID, the UK economy also has the added disappointment of Brexit to burden it for many years to come sadly. The financial services brain drain to Ireland, France and Germany is accelerating.
94
12/01/2021 10:55:09 1 3
bbc
Absolute twaddle.

The financial services brain drain you speak of is a myth, with most major banks and investment companies increasing their staff numbers in the UK since 2016.
95
12/01/2021 10:31:16 2 2
bbc
I would never of guessed .... so whats brought this on
96
12/01/2021 10:32:59 2 3
bbc
People that are saying that this is good news obviously are not working in retail or financially dependant on someone working in retail. They also don't know how important retail is to local communities.

All this shows that there should be no delay in getting back to normal after the vulnerable are vaccinated and there is no immediate risk of the NHS being overwhelmed.
126
12/01/2021 11:00:51 2 1
bbc
It’s not good news but I cannot see the long term trend changing much. Neither Covid, nor Brexit are the main drivers of this. It’s on- line retail taking ever more share at the expense of shops. Shop jobs will move to on line retail, warehouses and distribution.
23
NRB
12/01/2021 10:33:48 1 5
bbc
Do not worry - we have a mass migration of people back from Europe - once their consumption is returned to the high street we can see a swing in the right direction they will need to start new homes from scratch and will be looking for a massive amount of cheap affordable housing
97
12/01/2021 10:55:29 0 1
bbc
Are you sober? Are you english? If the latter and not the former, please could you learn your own language. Just as a matter of courtesy.
73
12/01/2021 10:49:01 4 10
bbc
The global economy will recover from COVID, the UK economy also has the added disappointment of Brexit to burden it for many years to come sadly. The financial services brain drain to Ireland, France and Germany is accelerating.
98
12/01/2021 10:55:35 1 2
bbc
For goodness sake get over Brexit once and for all. It is done, it is over, it is what it is. You need serious help if you are going to keep whinging for years to come.
99
12/01/2021 10:55:38 1 1
bbc
Not surprising since the Welsh government even ban the sale of "non essential" items in supermarkets.
76
RM
12/01/2021 10:50:28 5 12
bbc
Retail sales in 2020 'worst for 25 years
-
And they called it project fear. It's reality now for many.
100
12/01/2021 10:56:07 1 2
bbc
I don't remember Remain claiming that voting to Leave would result in a pandemic.

I do remember that they said there would be a plague of locusts, but not a pandemic.