Covid: 'I’m one of those people who’s been left out'
11/01/2021 | news | business | 265
An industry group wants more state help for people like Jon Wilding, whose business is hit by the pandemic.
1
11/01/2021 12:41:11 8 11
bbc
What was that Boris said about business again?

and we wonder why small businesses are in crisis
19
11/01/2021 13:16:16 2 5
bbc
And yet, the chances are they voted him and his incompetent shower into office.
2
11/01/2021 12:43:44 61 11
bbc
Why should politicians living on a perpetual gravy train be bothered about the fate or future of small businesses?

Never having worked for a living in the private sector, they don't understand the principles of management or accounting, but still get their salaries paid every month on the dot.

If their performances were assessed as regularly as those in the private sector, they'd be sacked.
22
BD
11/01/2021 13:16:52 31 10
bbc
Could you fact check your comment on politicians 'never having worked for a living in the private sector'. I would be surprised if this statement applied to 100% of our politicians.
105
11/01/2021 15:49:41 6 4
bbc
Their performances are assessed, every five years, and if they're not up to expectations their constituents sack them.
208
11/01/2021 19:08:01 1 1
bbc
David Davis is a self made man from industry, started from very humble beginnings. Which is why I liked him, but he is probably too straight to be a politician! Not so used to dealing with politicians and bureaucrats who always have a multitude of hidden agendas.
3
Ian
11/01/2021 12:45:25 4 5
bbc
That's what happens when the focus becomes too narrow. Protect life but not livelihoods. Inflation is set to soar (commodity prices are rocketing) whilst unemployment will too. Throw in huge tax increases and we're set for a total meltdown. As inflation rockets we can expect interest rates up too - crippling homeowners and businesses & govts who have borrowed too much to get by. Disaster awaits!
4
11/01/2021 12:46:49 32 12
bbc
I just closed my business. After 10 years and having generated thousands and thousands in tax for HMRC it's all over. TBH it's a combination of IR35, Brexit and Covid. No help from the government. Now all that tax from all these closed companies has dried up.
13
11/01/2021 12:55:08 18 3
bbc
If you were working in/out IR35, then were you generating less tax than being a direct employee?

You will likely pay more tax , if you are employed direct again.

I do agree, IR35 will force many small business to close (and their employees become directly employed thru PAYE again). Assuming of course, the "parent" company still needs the work done
5
11/01/2021 12:48:11 29 5
bbc
Meaningless stat. based on 1,400 firms.
What sector.
How old
etc.
There are so many variations making it meaningless if in a tough sector, young, nearly retired no indication what so ever that it should be used as a measure across all firms.

Scaremongering for more "Free Money"
229
11/01/2021 22:37:32 4 1
bbc
Quite. What %age of FSB members would go bust in a typical year?
6
11/01/2021 12:49:00 6 5
bbc
Still, if it saves just one life, eh?
7
11/01/2021 12:50:05 14 9
bbc
I know several self employed people who haven't received a penny throughout this whole pandemic.....mainly because they were newly self employed / freelance; or have a split income (employed / self employed).

I have seen several Tory ministers quizzed on this on national media....talk about pinning jelly to a wall. Far easier than getting them to directly respond to the questions.
32
11/01/2021 13:30:32 6 5
bbc
Our leadership have decided that the NHS needs protecting and everything else is collateral damage. Whatever your views are on lockdowns the cost of them are are starting to show and will be with us for years and decades to come. Our lack of leadership is just as concerning as COVID. The piper will come calling soon.
8
11/01/2021 12:50:25 3 18
bbc
This was going to happen after Brexit anyway.
9
11/01/2021 12:53:12 14 5
bbc
IR35 has screwed more 'small businesses' than any pandemic.

A good 50% of contractors I know in the IT and Telco world who work through LTD companies have gone pop as a result.
17
11/01/2021 13:03:02 6 2
bbc
"Unfortunately" I know about IR35 too.

But, if the parent company still needs the work to be done, then your friends can become direct employees.

Not that I support HMRC BAD application of IR35!
35
OwO
11/01/2021 13:32:06 10 3
bbc
All IR35 did was let people pay less tax than they should have, effectively robbing the public purse. Now you want the public to pay for them? Laughable.
10
11/01/2021 12:54:29 4 6
bbc
We need to help businesses as much as we do individuals, unfortunately everyone in society who isn’t in the top 1% assumes you’ve all been avoiding paying tax as your main occupation and treating society as if it doesn’t matter, as a consequence there is limited public appetite for sympathy here, rightly or wrongly.
14
11/01/2021 13:02:29 7 0
bbc
I suspect that few small-business owners are in the top 1%
11
11/01/2021 12:54:51 4 9
bbc
While the pandemic will, no doubt, add to the total of firms closing down, Brexit (i.e. the friction added trade with the EU) was always going to cause some firms to go bust - there's not necessarily a domestic market of sufficient size for some products (as some fishermen are already finding out).
12
11/01/2021 12:47:29 9 7
bbc
Running any business carries risk.

If the market disappears, as it has done due to Covid, then the business may no longer be viable

The government have mitigated much of the risks to date, but they don't/can't/shouldn't own the business risk using taxpayers money

When life returns to normal and the market returns, then it is likely businesses will spring up again.

Economics of demand = supply
4
11/01/2021 12:46:49 32 12
bbc
I just closed my business. After 10 years and having generated thousands and thousands in tax for HMRC it's all over. TBH it's a combination of IR35, Brexit and Covid. No help from the government. Now all that tax from all these closed companies has dried up.
13
11/01/2021 12:55:08 18 3
bbc
If you were working in/out IR35, then were you generating less tax than being a direct employee?

You will likely pay more tax , if you are employed direct again.

I do agree, IR35 will force many small business to close (and their employees become directly employed thru PAYE again). Assuming of course, the "parent" company still needs the work done
49
11/01/2021 13:54:30 11 2
bbc
Scrapping IR35 was made due to pressure from the big four consultancies who want contractors done away with as it is competition for them. This will leave the big four free to offer more of their services without hindrance. Once the consultancies embed, you cannot get them out. This is where most of the government are placing their contracts and it’s costing a fortune.
174
11/01/2021 17:50:07 1 1
bbc
thanks to companies not wanting contractors due to IR35 and the number of people looking for work it is a buyers market so rates have dropped - personally by about 40% so not hard to work out what that does to the tax revenue from me
175
11/01/2021 17:52:48 3 2
bbc
IR35 is the most short-sighted, biting nose off to spite face, legislation I have ever seen. It'll cost revenue, not generate more. Many of those jobs will shift offshore. A good deal for Sunak's in-laws. Not so good for UK PLC.
231
11/01/2021 22:41:25 2 0
bbc
I am accountant & a clientwas on 85K PAYE, paying about 22% in tax & NI. He set up his own PSC, generating 500K+ in revenues, paid 70K+ in corp tax & passed on VAT collected which was also around that mark. After taking salary, he paid tax on dividends. Excluding VAT, he paid on average over 100K in corp and dividend tax. There won't be a PAYE job that will generate same tax so whose loss is it?
232
11/01/2021 22:43:49 2 1
bbc
IR35 and Dividends are legal, HMRC don’t have a problem with people minimising the tax they pay. These schemes are set up to encourage enterprise. I see many people here complaint the by paying dividends we are dodging tax. But have you offered to increase your PAYE payments, no, you only pay what you have to. In many cases previous government have encouraged setting up LTD businesses!
10
11/01/2021 12:54:29 4 6
bbc
We need to help businesses as much as we do individuals, unfortunately everyone in society who isn’t in the top 1% assumes you’ve all been avoiding paying tax as your main occupation and treating society as if it doesn’t matter, as a consequence there is limited public appetite for sympathy here, rightly or wrongly.
14
11/01/2021 13:02:29 7 0
bbc
I suspect that few small-business owners are in the top 1%
15
11/01/2021 13:02:35 4 1
bbc
Quelle Surprise - Not! This is a terrible situation for many. Particularly those recently SE who can't get a grant etc but may have signed up to rental agreements etc.
Unfortunately this is the effect of Covid19 and many have know they can not survive for long under situations where the country has needed to go into lockdown.
I hope some try again when its over and wish them luck.
16
11/01/2021 13:09:08 3 7
bbc
I think the states managed the Economic side of this pandemic better (trying my best not to give Trump credit) They will come out the other side in a much better way. They did not offer furlough scheme just improved unemployment and gave cash to everyone. This let bad firm collapse and free up people to start the New Economy.
9
11/01/2021 12:53:12 14 5
bbc
IR35 has screwed more 'small businesses' than any pandemic.

A good 50% of contractors I know in the IT and Telco world who work through LTD companies have gone pop as a result.
17
11/01/2021 13:03:02 6 2
bbc
"Unfortunately" I know about IR35 too.

But, if the parent company still needs the work to be done, then your friends can become direct employees.

Not that I support HMRC BAD application of IR35!
126
11/01/2021 16:23:47 0 0
bbc
Not if the parent company are managing a downsize in workforce. I know many subcontractors who had their contracts ended at a huge loss of knowledge to their teams. Those same teams are now struggling with no knowledge transfer whilst the roles through subcontract companies adverts are unfilled.
239
11/01/2021 23:05:06 1 0
bbc
Problem is that firms intent is to employ contractors essentially on employee wages and zero hours T&C.
18
11/01/2021 13:10:42 6 6
bbc
It's very easy support many small British small business these days with using the internet and searching for them and British manufactured made products

It's pure laziness to use a globalist online retailer and buy globalist produced junk that contributes to mass movement goods around are planet and global warming on a industrial scale

It's this globalisation that caused virus spread like fire
1
11/01/2021 12:41:11 8 11
bbc
What was that Boris said about business again?

and we wonder why small businesses are in crisis
19
11/01/2021 13:16:16 2 5
bbc
And yet, the chances are they voted him and his incompetent shower into office.
23
11/01/2021 13:20:37 3 5
bbc
Yup, and are the same people probably blame labour for their woes or say but sure Labour would be worse. There's no helping some people
20
11/01/2021 13:16:17 10 11
bbc
My business, which supplies the NHS, has deliveries stuck in Germany due to Brexit. We use a large, well organised haulage company with an international reputation. We, and they, have gone through the new paperwork and completed it satisfactorily as far as we know but the whole thing is an absolute mess. Gove spouts about minor disruption .. this isn't 'minor' it's the usual mess from this crowd.
24
11/01/2021 13:20:44 8 10
bbc
Sounds about right, they could not run the proverbial bath, but many gullible folk still sucked in by the words.
27
11/01/2021 13:22:29 1 3
bbc
And Northern Ireland is much worse than the rest of the UK due to the scandalous Withdrawal Agreement.
They wish to be in same the position as the rest of the UK, but Ireland/EU (& Boris) has put a border in the sea blocking the biggest market (UK = GB/NI trade)
21
11/01/2021 13:16:50 19 4
bbc
"The FSB based its prediction on a survey of 1,400 small firms, 5% of which said they expected to close this year."
So NO new businesses will open this year ???
30
11/01/2021 13:28:53 15 10
bbc
While I’m sure SOME new businesses may open this year , it will be a very brave (bordering on foolish) move to do so.
Given the combination of lack of government support to people lacking 3 years of tax records (new businesses) and the plethora of unknowns about brexit regulations.

Imho very few new businesses will open in the next 2 years. It’s risky in good times, we’re not in good times.
2
11/01/2021 12:43:44 61 11
bbc
Why should politicians living on a perpetual gravy train be bothered about the fate or future of small businesses?

Never having worked for a living in the private sector, they don't understand the principles of management or accounting, but still get their salaries paid every month on the dot.

If their performances were assessed as regularly as those in the private sector, they'd be sacked.
22
BD
11/01/2021 13:16:52 31 10
bbc
Could you fact check your comment on politicians 'never having worked for a living in the private sector'. I would be surprised if this statement applied to 100% of our politicians.
34
11/01/2021 13:31:20 15 2
bbc
BD - Unfortunately an increasing number of our politicians have only ever worked in the Westminster bubble. They start as special advisers, Councillors or working at a think tank and fight an unwinnable seat before finally being approved to run in a safe seat as one becomes available.

Real life work experience is a rare and soon to be non-existent commodity in political life.
142
11/01/2021 16:42:20 4 2
bbc
His point is I believe, that the vast majority of our MPs haven't a clue how the real world - outside the Westminster bubble - works. Have no idea what it takes to run a small business with all the extra bureaucracy which they - our MPs - have voted into operation..
209
11/01/2021 19:08:40 1 2
bbc
Probably applies to 100% of Labour politicians though.
19
11/01/2021 13:16:16 2 5
bbc
And yet, the chances are they voted him and his incompetent shower into office.
23
11/01/2021 13:20:37 3 5
bbc
Yup, and are the same people probably blame labour for their woes or say but sure Labour would be worse. There's no helping some people
20
11/01/2021 13:16:17 10 11
bbc
My business, which supplies the NHS, has deliveries stuck in Germany due to Brexit. We use a large, well organised haulage company with an international reputation. We, and they, have gone through the new paperwork and completed it satisfactorily as far as we know but the whole thing is an absolute mess. Gove spouts about minor disruption .. this isn't 'minor' it's the usual mess from this crowd.
24
11/01/2021 13:20:44 8 10
bbc
Sounds about right, they could not run the proverbial bath, but many gullible folk still sucked in by the words.
25
11/01/2021 13:23:17 21 5
bbc
This is going to sound harsh, but what we will see is pure darwinism - the survival of the fittest.

No business has the right to survive and no country can protect every job.

The big hope is for a post Covid bounce back.
42
11/01/2021 13:39:00 16 3
bbc
Surely pure darwinism would be to let the virus run a natural course with no lockdown. No one can live forever and the country can save every life.
201
11/01/2021 18:46:32 0 0
bbc
It’s a virus, they don’t go away so how do you ever expect to get to post covid?
26
11/01/2021 13:24:01 15 8
bbc
This isn't even news

It's a fantasy prediction from a self-interested trade body

No one is suggesting there isn't a problem but this kind of extrapolation isn't a headline

There are 2 obvious questions

How representative is the sample?

How many businesses close in a normal year - the article is silent - it's public information?

The BBC is awash with vested interest soundbite comment
51
11/01/2021 14:01:36 5 8
bbc
If you have such a problem with the BBC and the research and articles that it employs, why do you bother coming on to its website. The DE and DM would be happy to keep you all to themselves.
20
11/01/2021 13:16:17 10 11
bbc
My business, which supplies the NHS, has deliveries stuck in Germany due to Brexit. We use a large, well organised haulage company with an international reputation. We, and they, have gone through the new paperwork and completed it satisfactorily as far as we know but the whole thing is an absolute mess. Gove spouts about minor disruption .. this isn't 'minor' it's the usual mess from this crowd.
27
11/01/2021 13:22:29 1 3
bbc
And Northern Ireland is much worse than the rest of the UK due to the scandalous Withdrawal Agreement.
They wish to be in same the position as the rest of the UK, but Ireland/EU (& Boris) has put a border in the sea blocking the biggest market (UK = GB/NI trade)
28
11/01/2021 13:26:34 1 6
bbc
This is not a surprise as the Government deliberately excludes 2.9m from meaningful financial support for 10 months. Covid will provide cover for the destruction of SME sector until families beg for help. You will then be offered Debt relief, for a share of your assets (commercial or residential) which starts state ownership.
You will live on UBI and be happy.

29
11/01/2021 13:27:48 12 11
bbc
Every small business owner I know (& since I started mine 16 yrs ago I've met a lot) would've been ineligible for the Govt's help at some point (as I would for the first 2 yrs of my business) if COVID had struck at a different time.

To miss these people out at the start was an oversight, to continue to exclude these entrepreneurs 9 months later proves the Tories hate small business owners.
38
11/01/2021 13:36:10 10 9
bbc
Small business owners don't make the same levels of donations that big multi national conpanies do!??
43
11/01/2021 13:40:13 4 2
bbc
you can have furlough on your PAYE ( you chose to make it low not govt) and you can have a £50K which you pay nothing for a year and low interest repayment up to 10 years. That is better than any loan ever, stop moaning
21
11/01/2021 13:16:50 19 4
bbc
"The FSB based its prediction on a survey of 1,400 small firms, 5% of which said they expected to close this year."
So NO new businesses will open this year ???
30
11/01/2021 13:28:53 15 10
bbc
While I’m sure SOME new businesses may open this year , it will be a very brave (bordering on foolish) move to do so.
Given the combination of lack of government support to people lacking 3 years of tax records (new businesses) and the plethora of unknowns about brexit regulations.

Imho very few new businesses will open in the next 2 years. It’s risky in good times, we’re not in good times.
31
11/01/2021 13:29:26 76 21
bbc
LattesandPilates
13:26
"This is not a surprise as the Government deliberately excludes 2.9m from meaningful financial support for 10 months"

You mean those who paid themselves a salary UNDER the National Insurance threshold and then toke dividends to avoid high rate PAYE. To have the advantages of being in the club, you must pay the subs...
36
11/01/2021 13:34:34 20 40
bbc
Oh the irony of you saying that if you want benefits of membership, you have to to the fees!

2nd, what these people have done is not against the law! You should do some research before posting!??
37
11/01/2021 13:34:37 10 7
bbc
Ouch...That's a very wide sweeping statement covering 2.9 m people.
I'm not sure if you are really that ignorant or just trying to be controversial?
40
11/01/2021 13:38:08 14 3
bbc
Dividends can only be paid on profits (taxed once, Corporation Tax at 19%) the higher rate of dividend tax is 37.5% a whole 7.5% lower the higher rate of income tax.

Plus the additional profitable turnover will have generated VAT which someone will end up paying (20% of turnover).

I would need to earn £600k in PAYE to generate the same tax my company and I pay and if I did someone else wouldn't.
41
11/01/2021 13:38:35 22 2
bbc
spot on, I am an IT contractor who pays myself minimum wager and rest in Divs. This is my choice as its most tax efficient way, and legal. To do this you probably need to have over £100K income otherwise you would be sole trade. If you cannot have a pot of contingency money as a £100K plus ltd company director you should not be in that business. I made sure I had emergency pot, stop moaning
110
11/01/2021 15:55:22 7 4
bbc
To be honest, the benefits of company v soletrader are fairly marginal these days, certainly less than they were before dividends were taxed. Owner managers should therefore have access to the same benefits soletraders have had over the last 9 months.
I would rather HMRC concentrate on those who have claimed when they didn't need the cash, or worse, continued to trade as before.
203
11/01/2021 19:51:58 2 2
bbc
Try looking up corporation tax and dividend tax and come back to us.
264
12/01/2021 19:07:43 0 0
bbc
No comments here from a real small business owner I see .. just a few unconsidered opinions and an IT contractor who uses a ltd company to collect his day-rate. The reality is that these SB owners risk *everything* to build *something* to provide the stable employment you smugly collect. You wont know you missed them 'till they're gone ... because you will be too :(
7
11/01/2021 12:50:05 14 9
bbc
I know several self employed people who haven't received a penny throughout this whole pandemic.....mainly because they were newly self employed / freelance; or have a split income (employed / self employed).

I have seen several Tory ministers quizzed on this on national media....talk about pinning jelly to a wall. Far easier than getting them to directly respond to the questions.
32
11/01/2021 13:30:32 6 5
bbc
Our leadership have decided that the NHS needs protecting and everything else is collateral damage. Whatever your views are on lockdowns the cost of them are are starting to show and will be with us for years and decades to come. Our lack of leadership is just as concerning as COVID. The piper will come calling soon.
33
11/01/2021 13:30:38 13 12
bbc
My small business, selling PPE to the NHS, will have to close down later this year if the pandemic comes to an end. No more government contracts to keep it going.

Still, I've made a donation to the Tory party and my other new company, "Levelling Up (North) Ltd", is starting to get some promising-looking contracts.
44
11/01/2021 13:42:46 6 1
bbc
Richard I hope your suppliers of the varsarien FFP2 and FFP3 anti bacterial and anti viral masks that are reusable for up to a month if stored correctly rather than those single use disposable surgical masks that are becoming the new plastic bag blight on the oceans and landscape?
87
11/01/2021 15:11:37 2 0
bbc
Exactly! Businesses only exist if their is a market for their goods and services. if the market dries up as in a pandemic , then the business goes. That's the reality of business.
22
BD
11/01/2021 13:16:52 31 10
bbc
Could you fact check your comment on politicians 'never having worked for a living in the private sector'. I would be surprised if this statement applied to 100% of our politicians.
34
11/01/2021 13:31:20 15 2
bbc
BD - Unfortunately an increasing number of our politicians have only ever worked in the Westminster bubble. They start as special advisers, Councillors or working at a think tank and fight an unwinnable seat before finally being approved to run in a safe seat as one becomes available.

Real life work experience is a rare and soon to be non-existent commodity in political life.
9
11/01/2021 12:53:12 14 5
bbc
IR35 has screwed more 'small businesses' than any pandemic.

A good 50% of contractors I know in the IT and Telco world who work through LTD companies have gone pop as a result.
35
OwO
11/01/2021 13:32:06 10 3
bbc
All IR35 did was let people pay less tax than they should have, effectively robbing the public purse. Now you want the public to pay for them? Laughable.
48
11/01/2021 13:48:14 0 3
bbc
I don't want the public to pay for anybody.

But cheers dits for being so presumptuous.
50
11/01/2021 13:59:23 3 2
bbc
That is a myth. Anybody who is running a limited company would beg to differ with you. Corporation tax, Vat, dividends payments, salary etc are all subject to tax.
31
11/01/2021 13:29:26 76 21
bbc
LattesandPilates
13:26
"This is not a surprise as the Government deliberately excludes 2.9m from meaningful financial support for 10 months"

You mean those who paid themselves a salary UNDER the National Insurance threshold and then toke dividends to avoid high rate PAYE. To have the advantages of being in the club, you must pay the subs...
36
11/01/2021 13:34:34 20 40
bbc
Oh the irony of you saying that if you want benefits of membership, you have to to the fees!

2nd, what these people have done is not against the law! You should do some research before posting!??
172
11/01/2021 17:46:12 1 0
bbc
thanks to the pandemic and IR35 I will be contributing about 30% less to HMRC in the next financial year - well that is until they put up taxes to pay for this mess.
Yes more NI but less paye and corporation tax (well none of the latter) - companies are taking advantage to offer FTC instead of out and out contracts on lower rates
226
11/01/2021 22:12:48 1 1
bbc
Company directors make business decisions on how they pay themselves. I am not responsible for their decisions. So if they pay themselves dividends why should I then support them? I work full time as PAYE and I am expected to have sympathy! Get a loan or close the business.
241
12/01/2021 00:41:54 0 1
bbc
“What these people have done is not against the law”

Sounds suspiciously like the last refuge of a scoundrel.

I am not an expert and every case has it’s merits, but why should the government pay people more than they pay themselves. The government have a duty to not waste taxpayers’ money.
258
12/01/2021 11:38:54 0 1
bbc
It might be legal but it has bitten them on the b*m for being so clever - just like all these high earners who 'borrowed' money from overseas trusts instead of being paid and are now whinging at tax bills that ordinary employees have always been paying
265
roy
12/01/2021 21:03:11 0 0
bbc
you pay yourself in dividends to avoid paying the same rate of national insurance that paye employees pay.that is what pays for unemployment benefits,you cannot expected to have your cake and eat it as sombody said.
31
11/01/2021 13:29:26 76 21
bbc
LattesandPilates
13:26
"This is not a surprise as the Government deliberately excludes 2.9m from meaningful financial support for 10 months"

You mean those who paid themselves a salary UNDER the National Insurance threshold and then toke dividends to avoid high rate PAYE. To have the advantages of being in the club, you must pay the subs...
37
11/01/2021 13:34:37 10 7
bbc
Ouch...That's a very wide sweeping statement covering 2.9 m people.
I'm not sure if you are really that ignorant or just trying to be controversial?
45
11/01/2021 13:46:09 7 8
bbc
Whoaml's a Govt deflectionist!??
29
11/01/2021 13:27:48 12 11
bbc
Every small business owner I know (& since I started mine 16 yrs ago I've met a lot) would've been ineligible for the Govt's help at some point (as I would for the first 2 yrs of my business) if COVID had struck at a different time.

To miss these people out at the start was an oversight, to continue to exclude these entrepreneurs 9 months later proves the Tories hate small business owners.
38
11/01/2021 13:36:10 10 9
bbc
Small business owners don't make the same levels of donations that big multi national conpanies do!??
39
11/01/2021 13:34:35 31 7
bbc
Alternative headline, based on the data in the story:

"95% of business expect to survive"
62
11/01/2021 14:30:03 10 10
bbc
95% is way lower than the number of people who survive COVID. Where do you get your income from I guess it’s not from a business that the government has forced to close.
31
11/01/2021 13:29:26 76 21
bbc
LattesandPilates
13:26
"This is not a surprise as the Government deliberately excludes 2.9m from meaningful financial support for 10 months"

You mean those who paid themselves a salary UNDER the National Insurance threshold and then toke dividends to avoid high rate PAYE. To have the advantages of being in the club, you must pay the subs...
40
11/01/2021 13:38:08 14 3
bbc
Dividends can only be paid on profits (taxed once, Corporation Tax at 19%) the higher rate of dividend tax is 37.5% a whole 7.5% lower the higher rate of income tax.

Plus the additional profitable turnover will have generated VAT which someone will end up paying (20% of turnover).

I would need to earn £600k in PAYE to generate the same tax my company and I pay and if I did someone else wouldn't.
31
11/01/2021 13:29:26 76 21
bbc
LattesandPilates
13:26
"This is not a surprise as the Government deliberately excludes 2.9m from meaningful financial support for 10 months"

You mean those who paid themselves a salary UNDER the National Insurance threshold and then toke dividends to avoid high rate PAYE. To have the advantages of being in the club, you must pay the subs...
41
11/01/2021 13:38:35 22 2
bbc
spot on, I am an IT contractor who pays myself minimum wager and rest in Divs. This is my choice as its most tax efficient way, and legal. To do this you probably need to have over £100K income otherwise you would be sole trade. If you cannot have a pot of contingency money as a £100K plus ltd company director you should not be in that business. I made sure I had emergency pot, stop moaning
149
11/01/2021 16:56:32 4 3
bbc
I don't believe you. HMRC guidance specifically says that if you pay yourself an excessive proportion in dividends - and if it exceeds your wages, it is excessive - you can and will have your dividends treated as subject to NI and PAYE.
191
11/01/2021 19:08:46 4 2
bbc
SPOT ON!! I used to be a contractor and made best use of the available tax regulations to minimise my tac liabilities - thus saving considerable amounts of money. People who do this are NOT entitled, nor should they need, a hand out from the government. Totally out of order to consider applying for, or wanting any kind of hand out.
227
11/01/2021 22:14:13 0 0
bbc
Thank you Tony for your wise words. I wish you all the best in business and good fortune for the future.
25
11/01/2021 13:23:17 21 5
bbc
This is going to sound harsh, but what we will see is pure darwinism - the survival of the fittest.

No business has the right to survive and no country can protect every job.

The big hope is for a post Covid bounce back.
42
11/01/2021 13:39:00 16 3
bbc
Surely pure darwinism would be to let the virus run a natural course with no lockdown. No one can live forever and the country can save every life.
202
11/01/2021 18:47:23 1 0
bbc
Best comment on here. The Swiss have said that the population need to get used to the fact people don’t live forever and treating those near the end of live because they have covid is cruel
29
11/01/2021 13:27:48 12 11
bbc
Every small business owner I know (& since I started mine 16 yrs ago I've met a lot) would've been ineligible for the Govt's help at some point (as I would for the first 2 yrs of my business) if COVID had struck at a different time.

To miss these people out at the start was an oversight, to continue to exclude these entrepreneurs 9 months later proves the Tories hate small business owners.
43
11/01/2021 13:40:13 4 2
bbc
you can have furlough on your PAYE ( you chose to make it low not govt) and you can have a £50K which you pay nothing for a year and low interest repayment up to 10 years. That is better than any loan ever, stop moaning
76
11/01/2021 14:59:16 2 3
bbc
Hi Tony,

I didn't put anyone on Furlough and I'm fine, as I said it was me once but my company has grown significantly since 2004 and has the reserves to survive so I'm not moaning. I'm pointing out that every small business owner I know was once in the position of the 3M people the Govt has excluded, this is a choice the Govt has made and people should remember that next time they come to vote.
33
11/01/2021 13:30:38 13 12
bbc
My small business, selling PPE to the NHS, will have to close down later this year if the pandemic comes to an end. No more government contracts to keep it going.

Still, I've made a donation to the Tory party and my other new company, "Levelling Up (North) Ltd", is starting to get some promising-looking contracts.
44
11/01/2021 13:42:46 6 1
bbc
Richard I hope your suppliers of the varsarien FFP2 and FFP3 anti bacterial and anti viral masks that are reusable for up to a month if stored correctly rather than those single use disposable surgical masks that are becoming the new plastic bag blight on the oceans and landscape?
37
11/01/2021 13:34:37 10 7
bbc
Ouch...That's a very wide sweeping statement covering 2.9 m people.
I'm not sure if you are really that ignorant or just trying to be controversial?
45
11/01/2021 13:46:09 7 8
bbc
Whoaml's a Govt deflectionist!??
47
11/01/2021 13:47:37 5 6
bbc
yes, that's very obvious, but still fun to flush 'em out !
46
11/01/2021 13:46:30 15 14
bbc
Small business will bounce back, stronger than before now we are out of the EU.
The complete shambles the eu have made of the vaccine roll out must be enough evidence for anyone that when it comes to the really big stuff you need to have complete control over your own affairs.
52
11/01/2021 14:01:46 4 10
bbc
.... and when they find out that their products are more expensive than imported goods?
53
11/01/2021 14:01:54 2 8
bbc
Yes because our vaccine rollout has been so successful! ??
59
11/01/2021 14:16:49 3 5
bbc
we just might want to consider why our death rates are higher that in comparable European countries. Lets see how the vaccine roll out looks in 6 weeks time before passing judgement
45
11/01/2021 13:46:09 7 8
bbc
Whoaml's a Govt deflectionist!??
47
11/01/2021 13:47:37 5 6
bbc
yes, that's very obvious, but still fun to flush 'em out !
35
OwO
11/01/2021 13:32:06 10 3
bbc
All IR35 did was let people pay less tax than they should have, effectively robbing the public purse. Now you want the public to pay for them? Laughable.
48
11/01/2021 13:48:14 0 3
bbc
I don't want the public to pay for anybody.

But cheers dits for being so presumptuous.
13
11/01/2021 12:55:08 18 3
bbc
If you were working in/out IR35, then were you generating less tax than being a direct employee?

You will likely pay more tax , if you are employed direct again.

I do agree, IR35 will force many small business to close (and their employees become directly employed thru PAYE again). Assuming of course, the "parent" company still needs the work done
49
11/01/2021 13:54:30 11 2
bbc
Scrapping IR35 was made due to pressure from the big four consultancies who want contractors done away with as it is competition for them. This will leave the big four free to offer more of their services without hindrance. Once the consultancies embed, you cannot get them out. This is where most of the government are placing their contracts and it’s costing a fortune.
54
11/01/2021 14:02:56 9 0
bbc
Professional engineering services are not supplied via "the big 4".

IR35 is not only accountancy/auditing.
35
OwO
11/01/2021 13:32:06 10 3
bbc
All IR35 did was let people pay less tax than they should have, effectively robbing the public purse. Now you want the public to pay for them? Laughable.
50
11/01/2021 13:59:23 3 2
bbc
That is a myth. Anybody who is running a limited company would beg to differ with you. Corporation tax, Vat, dividends payments, salary etc are all subject to tax.
152
Bob
11/01/2021 17:02:02 1 0
bbc
No one said pay NO tax. Paying LESS tax is different to paying NO tax.

If it wasn't tax efficient people wouldn't do it and companies helping people take advantage of it wouldn't have clients.
26
11/01/2021 13:24:01 15 8
bbc
This isn't even news

It's a fantasy prediction from a self-interested trade body

No one is suggesting there isn't a problem but this kind of extrapolation isn't a headline

There are 2 obvious questions

How representative is the sample?

How many businesses close in a normal year - the article is silent - it's public information?

The BBC is awash with vested interest soundbite comment
51
11/01/2021 14:01:36 5 8
bbc
If you have such a problem with the BBC and the research and articles that it employs, why do you bother coming on to its website. The DE and DM would be happy to keep you all to themselves.
46
11/01/2021 13:46:30 15 14
bbc
Small business will bounce back, stronger than before now we are out of the EU.
The complete shambles the eu have made of the vaccine roll out must be enough evidence for anyone that when it comes to the really big stuff you need to have complete control over your own affairs.
52
11/01/2021 14:01:46 4 10
bbc
.... and when they find out that their products are more expensive than imported goods?
46
11/01/2021 13:46:30 15 14
bbc
Small business will bounce back, stronger than before now we are out of the EU.
The complete shambles the eu have made of the vaccine roll out must be enough evidence for anyone that when it comes to the really big stuff you need to have complete control over your own affairs.
53
11/01/2021 14:01:54 2 8
bbc
Yes because our vaccine rollout has been so successful! ??
55
11/01/2021 14:07:14 5 2
bbc
only a donkey praises its own tail
58
11/01/2021 14:04:26 8 2
bbc
Its been amazingly successful and getting better.
What makes you think differently
49
11/01/2021 13:54:30 11 2
bbc
Scrapping IR35 was made due to pressure from the big four consultancies who want contractors done away with as it is competition for them. This will leave the big four free to offer more of their services without hindrance. Once the consultancies embed, you cannot get them out. This is where most of the government are placing their contracts and it’s costing a fortune.
54
11/01/2021 14:02:56 9 0
bbc
Professional engineering services are not supplied via "the big 4".

IR35 is not only accountancy/auditing.
53
11/01/2021 14:01:54 2 8
bbc
Yes because our vaccine rollout has been so successful! ??
55
11/01/2021 14:07:14 5 2
bbc
only a donkey praises its own tail
56
11/01/2021 14:08:58 12 6
bbc
Sad as it is for business's that go under, it's the nature of the beast
The pandemic has done untold damage to economies around the world & business's everywhere will go under

That said, as long as the pandemic is eventually brought under control, new business's will be created, maybe some by the same people whose business collapsed due to covid
Many of these entrepreneurs are determined folk
65
MVS
11/01/2021 14:36:55 8 1
bbc
We are indeed!
57
11/01/2021 14:11:30 40 9
bbc
That’s the problem with the government giving out free money, people start to expect it and complain non stop and want more free money. So many ungrateful people
194
11/01/2021 19:20:59 5 2
bbc
On top of all that, we are now having to suffer more BBC nepotism this evening. Barney Walsh (son of Bradley) will be on the One Show, tonight.
Forget talent. It is WHO you know, not what you know, when it comes to jobs with the BBC,
53
11/01/2021 14:01:54 2 8
bbc
Yes because our vaccine rollout has been so successful! ??
58
11/01/2021 14:04:26 8 2
bbc
Its been amazingly successful and getting better.
What makes you think differently
46
11/01/2021 13:46:30 15 14
bbc
Small business will bounce back, stronger than before now we are out of the EU.
The complete shambles the eu have made of the vaccine roll out must be enough evidence for anyone that when it comes to the really big stuff you need to have complete control over your own affairs.
59
11/01/2021 14:16:49 3 5
bbc
we just might want to consider why our death rates are higher that in comparable European countries. Lets see how the vaccine roll out looks in 6 weeks time before passing judgement
61
11/01/2021 14:23:32 5 1
bbc
No we can pass judgement now, an unmitigated disaster across the EU with not enough vaccine ordered and the roll out stalled by Commission led bureaucracy.
France have administered so few they don't even register on the World tables.
122
11/01/2021 16:15:46 1 0
bbc
Deaths per million (per Worldometers) for European countries:

Belgium 1,728
Slovenia 1,454
Bosnia Herzogovena 1,324
Italy 1,311
UK 1,196
Bulgaria 1,174
Hungary 1,122
Spain 1,109
Croatia 1,106
France 1,037

Or, when using "comparable", do you simply mean "those with a lower figure than the UK" ?
60
11/01/2021 14:22:11 5 7
bbc
At a time of pandemic it is unwise to put in place barriers to trading with our largest trading partner. It is apparent that despite the political rhetoric to the contrary there is now a customs border in the Irish sea and bureaucratic impediments to trade in place at Dover...
59
11/01/2021 14:16:49 3 5
bbc
we just might want to consider why our death rates are higher that in comparable European countries. Lets see how the vaccine roll out looks in 6 weeks time before passing judgement
61
11/01/2021 14:23:32 5 1
bbc
No we can pass judgement now, an unmitigated disaster across the EU with not enough vaccine ordered and the roll out stalled by Commission led bureaucracy.
France have administered so few they don't even register on the World tables.
39
11/01/2021 13:34:35 31 7
bbc
Alternative headline, based on the data in the story:

"95% of business expect to survive"
62
11/01/2021 14:30:03 10 10
bbc
95% is way lower than the number of people who survive COVID. Where do you get your income from I guess it’s not from a business that the government has forced to close.
114
11/01/2021 15:56:19 5 3
bbc
"the government has forced to close." No, it's covid that has removed business from these companies, not the govt. When the govt first started supporting business, it didn't take long for the scammers to use the system to their advantage, secure in the knowledge that any delay in paying out would have led to screams of abuse from the opposition benches. There has to be a line drawn in support.
137
11/01/2021 16:35:37 2 3
bbc
Can you explain the relevance of a comment about where my income comes from to my original suggestion that there's a perfectly valid alternative headline?
63
11/01/2021 14:33:03 4 2
bbc
We are always told to save for a rainy day, but this is hundreds of rainy days and so difficult for many .Thankfully the government has helped many but there is still a lot, due to the nature of employment who have qualified for very little or nothing. It is certainly an ill parted world, but how long when this is all over will it take the treasury to recoup it all.
64
MVS
11/01/2021 14:36:06 5 4
bbc
We reap what we sow.
We went into lockdown in March last year and have largely remained economically inactive ever since.
Of course many, many small businesses will close as a result.
Dare I say that there was an alternative strategy that would have involved very heavy restrictions and isolation of vulnerable people whilst the young and fit went back to work last June!
73
11/01/2021 14:57:46 3 2
bbc
Perhaps isolation of vulnerable people might have worked in most cases though, unfortunately, not everywhere.

How would you deal with large multi-generational families? People living in large apartment/council blocks? How would you decide who is vulnerable?

How would you enforce no-contact - even now there are plenty of Muppets breaking the rules; imagine free-for-all!...
74
11/01/2021 14:58:29 1 1
bbc
Many young folk have also suffered dreadfully to this virus,its not only the elderly.
125
11/01/2021 16:22:33 1 1
bbc
So what was this strategy ?

How would you care for, and shield, the 12 million or so over 65;
or identify those of all ages with asthma, diabetes, obesity, or other at risk ailments ?

When young and fit become ill with covid they require hospital treatment to recover. If hospitals saturated then it's a problem for all.

It would be near impossible to provide support required for such a project.
56
11/01/2021 14:08:58 12 6
bbc
Sad as it is for business's that go under, it's the nature of the beast
The pandemic has done untold damage to economies around the world & business's everywhere will go under

That said, as long as the pandemic is eventually brought under control, new business's will be created, maybe some by the same people whose business collapsed due to covid
Many of these entrepreneurs are determined folk
65
MVS
11/01/2021 14:36:55 8 1
bbc
We are indeed!
66
11/01/2021 14:37:50 10 12
bbc
COVID and Brexit - toxic combination for small firms. COVID will go away eventually - Brexit will take much longer to go away sadly.
80
11/01/2021 15:00:03 7 2
bbc
It's not going away, we have left you might have missed it.
67
RRP
11/01/2021 14:40:06 42 11
bbc
For 10 months Sturgeon has wreaked havoc on the Scottish private sector economy. Her only interest is benefit claimants and those in the public sector, who make up her core voter base.
It is been left for WM to bail out struggling Scottish businesses.
78
11/01/2021 15:02:52 5 11
bbc
Are you prepared to go and help the NHS . Free for all would cripple the NHS and cause terrible suffering to many.
207
11/01/2021 19:12:36 1 0
bbc
Not to mention poor outcomes in Scotland on health, education and policing. SNP are way out of their depth.
68
11/01/2021 14:49:59 5 3
bbc
This is why a Citizen Income is a good idea. Then businesses that cannot trade during the pandemic can just go on hiatus, reopening when matters improve... and the people who work in them will have received a basic income to keep them going.
92
11/01/2021 15:18:42 0 1
bbc
Yes but, no state income should remotely be anywhere near enough to live on, by most people’s expectations. It should just replace all and every tax allowance and benefits.
106
11/01/2021 15:50:38 1 1
bbc
Basic Living Income or what Universal Income should be turned into for **everyone** including for the homeless, oaps, & the ReesMoggs.

Some businesses have more than wages to pay, so UBI would be welcome.
Would mean that bosses would have to be more considerate to the staff, & staff would have to be more considerate to the bosses.

Would quickly kill off the zombie companies, be a good thing
69
11/01/2021 14:52:51 11 4
bbc
Still waiting on the SNP false promise money?
70
11/01/2021 14:54:20 15 0
bbc
More to come I,m afraid, the dole queue will be massive.
77
11/01/2021 14:59:18 4 15
bbc
Yep, as usual with Party of the Rich governments...
The SNP are hoarding money for their Indy campaign.

It's certainly not going to small businesses as Westminster wanted it to.

Shame on them.

Vote them OUT in May.
Removed
75
11/01/2021 14:58:45 5 26
bbc
You obviously have a proof of that, right?

Easily remedied via the proper channels...
168
11/01/2021 17:37:53 0 3
bbc
United Ireland and Independent Scotland E U Nations will be out of this obscene stramash we in England are stuck with it
72
11/01/2021 14:57:35 10 1
bbc
Worldwide phenomenon I'm afraid, nature abhors a vacuum and something will fill the void left.
64
MVS
11/01/2021 14:36:06 5 4
bbc
We reap what we sow.
We went into lockdown in March last year and have largely remained economically inactive ever since.
Of course many, many small businesses will close as a result.
Dare I say that there was an alternative strategy that would have involved very heavy restrictions and isolation of vulnerable people whilst the young and fit went back to work last June!
73
11/01/2021 14:57:46 3 2
bbc
Perhaps isolation of vulnerable people might have worked in most cases though, unfortunately, not everywhere.

How would you deal with large multi-generational families? People living in large apartment/council blocks? How would you decide who is vulnerable?

How would you enforce no-contact - even now there are plenty of Muppets breaking the rules; imagine free-for-all!...
64
MVS
11/01/2021 14:36:06 5 4
bbc
We reap what we sow.
We went into lockdown in March last year and have largely remained economically inactive ever since.
Of course many, many small businesses will close as a result.
Dare I say that there was an alternative strategy that would have involved very heavy restrictions and isolation of vulnerable people whilst the young and fit went back to work last June!
74
11/01/2021 14:58:29 1 1
bbc
Many young folk have also suffered dreadfully to this virus,its not only the elderly.
The SNP are hoarding money for their Indy campaign.

It's certainly not going to small businesses as Westminster wanted it to.

Shame on them.

Vote them OUT in May.
Removed
75
11/01/2021 14:58:45 5 26
bbc
You obviously have a proof of that, right?

Easily remedied via the proper channels...
43
11/01/2021 13:40:13 4 2
bbc
you can have furlough on your PAYE ( you chose to make it low not govt) and you can have a £50K which you pay nothing for a year and low interest repayment up to 10 years. That is better than any loan ever, stop moaning
76
11/01/2021 14:59:16 2 3
bbc
Hi Tony,

I didn't put anyone on Furlough and I'm fine, as I said it was me once but my company has grown significantly since 2004 and has the reserves to survive so I'm not moaning. I'm pointing out that every small business owner I know was once in the position of the 3M people the Govt has excluded, this is a choice the Govt has made and people should remember that next time they come to vote.
70
11/01/2021 14:54:20 15 0
bbc
More to come I,m afraid, the dole queue will be massive.
77
11/01/2021 14:59:18 4 15
bbc
Yep, as usual with Party of the Rich governments...
67
RRP
11/01/2021 14:40:06 42 11
bbc
For 10 months Sturgeon has wreaked havoc on the Scottish private sector economy. Her only interest is benefit claimants and those in the public sector, who make up her core voter base.
It is been left for WM to bail out struggling Scottish businesses.
78
11/01/2021 15:02:52 5 11
bbc
Are you prepared to go and help the NHS . Free for all would cripple the NHS and cause terrible suffering to many.
127
ab
11/01/2021 16:24:07 1 1
bbc
A bust economy will floor the NHS. Where do you think the money for it comes from?
199
11/01/2021 18:43:35 0 0
bbc
So what if the NHS is crippled, they are not treating people with cancer, heart disease etc anymore. They only treat covid so the rest of the NHS who are being paid to do nothing could do covid people while those of us who have cared for our health for all of our lives, you know been responsible and not a burden to the NHS, can have our lives back
75
11/01/2021 14:58:45 5 26
bbc
You obviously have a proof of that, right?

Easily remedied via the proper channels...
94
11/01/2021 15:23:52 3 8
bbc
I see no proof other than comment by a Conservative MSP putting his political spin on things. Good to see the conservatives supporting devolution.

Presumably it wasn't a relatives company that provided the report ?

With the financial year not yet ended I would hope that the government have funds to tide them through.
66
11/01/2021 14:37:50 10 12
bbc
COVID and Brexit - toxic combination for small firms. COVID will go away eventually - Brexit will take much longer to go away sadly.
80
11/01/2021 15:00:03 7 2
bbc
It's not going away, we have left you might have missed it.
93
11/01/2021 15:21:16 2 5
bbc
What has been done can, to an extent, be undone - when a majority of the population vote to rejoin.
81
11/01/2021 15:05:07 13 5
bbc
"we risk losing hundreds of thousands of great, ultimately viable small businesses this year, at huge cost to local communities and individual livelihoods."

They may have been viable before the pandemic, but they aren't now. A business is only as viable as the prevailing market and competition allow. Businesses come and go. Why prop up businesses that are doomed? Encourage new ones.
75
11/01/2021 14:58:45 5 26
bbc
You obviously have a proof of that, right?

Easily remedied via the proper channels...
121
11/01/2021 16:15:15 1 2
bbc
So the statement: "They show that councils have distributed millions of pounds to local traders and charities in a bid to keep the Scottish economy functioning" is a proof that SNP are hoarding money for their Indy campaign?

Really? Do you guys even read the links that you provide?....
83
11/01/2021 15:06:10 5 2
bbc
Could this be adding to the issues...

More secrets to come?

https://theferret.scot/coronavirus-cash-cover-up-freedom-of-information/
84
11/01/2021 15:07:29 3 2
bbc
State-sponsored shut-down of private business.

Most business owners would never have chosen to shut down. Freedom of choice is not in operation in this country.

I hope this is a big signal to those who still think we don't have a bloated and over-controlling state. Socialism with Tories in charge and 20-year-old Communists coming out of our own universities should be ringing alarm bells.
97
11/01/2021 15:29:43 3 0
bbc
Is that you Donald ?
189
11/01/2021 18:41:53 0 1
bbc
Let them stay open then, but at the same time, shoulder the blame for the increased death rates. Or is it only one sided like most far left ideas?
85
11/01/2021 15:07:33 25 4
bbc
WM has sent vast sums of honest UK tax payers cash to assist small businesses in Scotland. Whingeon is hoarding it of course and reluctant to pass it on under some illusion of fantasy. Time WM sent in a forensic accountant to investigate. Oh Eck!
86
11/01/2021 15:09:36 39 5
bbc
John swinney showed yesterday why Scotlands business and people are not getting the Gov they want

Middle of a pandemic

Thousands dead and more dying

Businneses struggling / closing

many unemployed

vaccine roll out questions

Care home deaths

SNHS under pressure

Most of us restricted to barracks

And He is telling us Independence is a priority for Covid recovery

TELLS US ALL WE NEED TO KNOW
150
11/01/2021 16:58:48 18 5
bbc
If independent Scotland would not have received the amount of vaccines provided by being part of successful UK
33
11/01/2021 13:30:38 13 12
bbc
My small business, selling PPE to the NHS, will have to close down later this year if the pandemic comes to an end. No more government contracts to keep it going.

Still, I've made a donation to the Tory party and my other new company, "Levelling Up (North) Ltd", is starting to get some promising-looking contracts.
87
11/01/2021 15:11:37 2 0
bbc
Exactly! Businesses only exist if their is a market for their goods and services. if the market dries up as in a pandemic , then the business goes. That's the reality of business.
88
11/01/2021 15:14:51 4 1
bbc
Only 5%? So not any big problem I would have been unsurprised had they said that in any ordinary year. Just as many are likely to pop up every year taking a chance they have a business. Especially daft eating based supposed businesses. Money should not be thrown at current businesses to hold on to their place against new upstarts.
75
11/01/2021 14:58:45 5 26
bbc
You obviously have a proof of that, right?

Easily remedied via the proper channels...
89
11/01/2021 15:16:23 10 2
bbc
Widely reported. You should try to keep up....
90
11/01/2021 15:17:11 18 3
bbc
Whingeon's certainly taking liberties failing to roll out WM £billions designated for small Scottish businesses. Must think we all came up the Clyde on a banana boat. Talking of which! any word on the beached £300m ferries. Oh Eck!
197
11/01/2021 19:29:45 0 7
bbc
The problem with many Scots, is they are spineless. Not their fault - it is just that the Scots have been bullied, gaslighted, abused and coerced by Westminster for nearly 400 years and Scotland's confidence as a nation has been destroyed; much the same way as an abused partner's in any other abusive relationship.
This is why Scotland will never leave their abuser, the UK, and become independent.
91
11/01/2021 15:18:23 22 6
bbc
Freeman. the msp who tried to stop FOI requests is only doing what her communist masters are telling her, She is a long term communist activist , Who in the commie party was the top Scottish organiser, who is very well known in communist circles of being still a strong communist. , oh then after 30 years changed to the SNP aye right , i bet her communist helpers are still laughing
68
11/01/2021 14:49:59 5 3
bbc
This is why a Citizen Income is a good idea. Then businesses that cannot trade during the pandemic can just go on hiatus, reopening when matters improve... and the people who work in them will have received a basic income to keep them going.
92
11/01/2021 15:18:42 0 1
bbc
Yes but, no state income should remotely be anywhere near enough to live on, by most people’s expectations. It should just replace all and every tax allowance and benefits.
107
11/01/2021 15:51:44 1 0
bbc
Why not?

If it was to provide excess to everyone then I would agree.
Placed at a level where if someone wants anything more than a frugal basic life then they would work for it. If someone wants a 60" tv & binge watch then they would have to work to get that. Holiday in the sun, work for it.

Study, work for it. etc Want BigMacs every 5 minutes, work for it.

And no endless child benefits
80
11/01/2021 15:00:03 7 2
bbc
It's not going away, we have left you might have missed it.
93
11/01/2021 15:21:16 2 5
bbc
What has been done can, to an extent, be undone - when a majority of the population vote to rejoin.
104
11/01/2021 15:38:41 2 1
bbc
Not going to happen.....is their a state in the EU called Cuckoo Land you could apply for entry to.
94
11/01/2021 15:23:52 3 8
bbc
I see no proof other than comment by a Conservative MSP putting his political spin on things. Good to see the conservatives supporting devolution.

Presumably it wasn't a relatives company that provided the report ?

With the financial year not yet ended I would hope that the government have funds to tide them through.
117
11/01/2021 16:07:42 5 1
bbc
"I see no ships...."
95
11/01/2021 15:25:02 18 3
bbc
SNP not handing out the money they promised from the £11b UK support

BUt yesterday they are shouting for Brexit funds of £billions to offset the costs

Who checks where the money goes?

Appears a 'stash' is being created by the SNP at people and Business's expense

WHERE IS THE MONEY???
141
11/01/2021 16:41:19 4 9
bbc
the tories witheld every penny
96
11/01/2021 15:28:10 4 2
bbc
Businesses paying the price of the Scottish Gov support failings

Many dont know who to support as they are dissapointed in Tories or labour in Scotland

Will there be another choice soon

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-55617824

Another party to support?

Only saying...not recommending
144
11/01/2021 16:44:09 1 1
bbc
nobody will vote for english labour or tories in scotland as they voted together on brexit at scotlands expense and it is showing already at the tills and lack of many foodstuffs in the shops . business funding is being witheld by the tory government
84
11/01/2021 15:07:29 3 2
bbc
State-sponsored shut-down of private business.

Most business owners would never have chosen to shut down. Freedom of choice is not in operation in this country.

I hope this is a big signal to those who still think we don't have a bloated and over-controlling state. Socialism with Tories in charge and 20-year-old Communists coming out of our own universities should be ringing alarm bells.
97
11/01/2021 15:29:43 3 0
bbc
Is that you Donald ?
98
11/01/2021 15:30:37 6 2
bbc
"... record number...".

SME's fail EVERY year. Some fail 'cos they underestimated operating costs in their business plan. Some didn't research their market. Others fail 'cos they preferred dividends to holding cash reserves & some 'take the money & bust'. There are myriad reasons for SME failure, so nuanced 'record number' doesn't offer readers the full picture without descriptive categorisation?
99
11/01/2021 15:33:09 7 3
bbc
Vaccine roll out

Business support / small business failings

but at the 12.15 brief whats in Nicola's opening remarks......Celtics visit to Dubai?

I would ask why the questioning is so poor, so repetitive and not 'on point'

Although touched on - Should someone not be stating why should anyone believe NS and the SNP - Serious Allegations she mislead parliament.

Should we listen??
139
11/01/2021 16:40:25 3 1
bbc
nobody in scotland listens to sectarian voting tories with no seats after may
The SNP are not interested in business.

They just want to recreate the old East Germany in the North.

State control of everything.

Money given to approved businesses, mainly run by ex SNP advisors, MSP etc

Lots of hand outs . Bribes to voters.

Cowards unable to introduced new taxes but they have the devolved power.

Just want to blame Westminster for everything.

Vote them OUT in May.
Removed
102
11/01/2021 15:37:27 4 2
bbc
How can people not see this...its so obvious
131
11/01/2021 16:30:14 0 0
bbc
snp have a massive majority and will win every seat in may , especially after english labour voted with the tories on brexit , at scotlands fishermen and farmers expense . SNP AWAYS DO WHATS BEST FOR SCOTTISH BUSINESS