Soaring house prices in 2020 likely to slow this year, says Halifax
08/01/2021 | news | business | 998
The lender says it expects "downward pressure on house prices" in 2021 following annual rise of 6% last year.
1
08/01/2021 10:28:27 3 1
bbc
Whatever happened to Mystic Meg?
13
08/01/2021 10:55:35 5 0
bbc
She became Mr Blobby
2
08/01/2021 10:33:39 43 8
bbc
The policy of QE by the BoE is driving asset values through the roof.
All this is to protect the investment class against the reality that homes are only worth what the younger generation can afford to pay for them.
Housing bubble will burst, when the cheap paper from the central bank is forced to stop due to inflation risks !
364
DC
08/01/2021 13:05:45 31 0
bbc
I've read a lot of these posts and this one has the soberest analysis and most likely outcome. Once inflation really kicks in fiscal policy will be sudden and ruthless in its u-turn and many a mortgage payer will see the ground disappear from under them. This is the fourth major recession i've lived through and every time witnessed the shock of so many when the obvious finally, inevitably happens.
649
08/01/2021 15:16:33 3 0
bbc
... and expensive mortgages start locking young people into more years of renting.
3
08/01/2021 10:35:47 10 11
bbc
House prices will only fall when government stops printing money. Government will only stop printing money when global confidence in the pound collapses and we have to go to the World bank for a bail out. Expect this will happen about late 2022. House prices will than have a monster correction (30 to 50%) drop.
4
08/01/2021 10:38:47 41 15
bbc
The same Nationwide that predicted a 15 % drop , following Carneys usual nonsense at the Bank of England that prices would drop 30 % following the Brexit vote ? a pointless non article rising unemployment will kill off any growth
14
08/01/2021 10:57:11 26 11
bbc
Your comment doesn't take into the 0.25% rate cut after the vote and the £60 billion of QE the BOE initially used to mitigate the result of the vote.
311
08/01/2021 12:50:18 2 0
bbc
I think basically whats been happening there been a pandemic so government been paying certain businesses and peoples wages once that stop we will find out what really is going to happen to housing market
656
08/01/2021 15:17:46 0 1
bbc
It wil be a gradual decline of London property which used to be on par with much of the country.
5
08/01/2021 10:41:21 11 5
bbc
They said the same thing last year, the increase in house prices were initially a surprise to all.

As long as the population is still rising and money is still circulating, prices will hold steady or continue to rise.

Those who are worst affected by this crisis, namely hospitality workers, don't tend to be homeowners
18
08/01/2021 10:59:33 12 4
bbc
The population rising is not the problem - it's the lack of affordable homes which are not being built. Combined with QE, interest rates of 0.1% and a stamp duty holiday.
6
08/01/2021 10:45:01 10 10
bbc
A house price crash would be the best late Christmas present that young people could hope for. Since the price of a house is now calculated by working out how many individual rooms it could rent out on an HMO basis, the first step needs to be a rent cap. Once the rent cap is in place it's time to crack out the CGT and wealth taxes (rent cap prevents the costs being passed on).
683
08/01/2021 15:32:21 0 0
bbc
Rent caps sound good in theory, but in practice pushes out the good landlords that can no longer make money from renting and leaves in the dodgy ones that ignore the rules and use intimidation tactics / legal technicalities on anyone challenging them
What we need is vastly more good quality housing to take the pressures off the market
7
08/01/2021 10:45:06 5 6
bbc
Crashing in 2021 !!!!!!!!!!
8
08/01/2021 10:46:08 68 6
bbc
Price rises at that level given the outlook for economy only shows the lunacy that is British House Prices.

The market has been broken for a long time but run by the Banks, Property Developers & Landlords and massively helped along by the BOE interest rates QE etc. and no policy other than keep them going from governments of the last 20 odd years.

It will only stop when sanity returns, no sign.
29
SH
08/01/2021 11:06:31 37 14
bbc
It's a market economy and prices are set by estate agents, if they sell a house in a street for a certain price then the next one that comes on the market they set the price a little higher. If another buyer turns up the next one gets prices higher still etc. etc. yet people trust the valuations because that's what someone else was "willing" to pay
There's no control or cap on the value of a house
114
08/01/2021 11:42:17 16 1
bbc
And let's not forget "Help To Buy", where the government subsidises house purchases with taxpayer money, to bid up prices yet further
928
09/01/2021 02:21:15 0 0
bbc
If the BOE puts up interest rates - how do you think the Govt are going to be able to pay the iterest on all the debt they have. THey'll have to increase TAX and reduce Social Services Govt employee wages. It's all lose lose.
963
09/01/2021 13:37:06 0 0
bbc
Pete theres no bubbble. Chart at the start of all this "article" read correctly right across (only thing that really counts ) show AVE> rises of just 3% per annum. Hardly a "bubble"..especially with a gov. and central bank actually aiming for similar levels of inflation as a deliberate and probably sensible policy! Those talking of "bubbles" are actually inventing one that doesnt actually exist.
9
Tim
08/01/2021 10:51:55 125 12
bbc
Stamp duty holiday has fuelled this latest rise. Soon we will return to the high-stamp duty which means a non-mobile UK work force, and reduced incentive to buy a wreck and do it up.
22
SH
08/01/2021 11:01:18 130 1
bbc
That and zero % interest rates on savings. For those people with money in the bank property is currently guaranteeing a return on investment so is it any wonder that house prices have jumped up despite the fact we're still in a pandemic with the impact that is having on jobs and income.
414
08/01/2021 13:24:19 6 7
bbc
Meh, you reckon? Stamp duty is peanuts compared to the cost of buying a home. This is like saying you won't go shopping because you refuse to pay 20p for a carrier bag
472
08/01/2021 13:53:00 3 13
bbc
I am a BTL landlord and I have not benefited from the stamp duty holiday, we still have to Pay 3% more than people who are buying to live in! There is no stamp duty holiday for that 3%!
528
08/01/2021 14:15:20 3 2
bbc
Do away with stamp duty
582
08/01/2021 14:43:00 5 1
bbc
The incentive to renovate houses went long ago. If you buy a second home you pay stamp duty plus 3%, then you pay income tax at 40% (as opposed to previously capital gains at 28%) on any profit. If you want to rent it then you can't offset your mortgage payments against the rent, so you break even and then get a massive tax bill. So wrecks will remain wrecks and renters are stuffed.
10
08/01/2021 10:52:06 105 11
bbc
What do you expect when you have a monetary committee that ignores its own targets when the wrong side. A Governor who spent years telling us that interest rates and BOE policies had no impact on House Prices until he had an epiphany just as he was leaving. He expected people to believe him aswell.

House & Rent costs at these levels are very bad for the economy and any sensible fiscal policy
11
08/01/2021 10:54:41 32 7
bbc
Completely agree Pete ;)
830
08/01/2021 16:57:25 1 1
bbc
We continue to set ourselves up with a stagnant, inefficient rentier economy, and the people in government don't care. It doesn't affect them.
960
09/01/2021 13:28:37 1 0
bbc
Like many other posters you have a false view of both rents and prices in the UK.
Rents are really no different to other countries .Read the above chart on house prices correctly..ave gain in prices pr annum across the full time axis...is just 3% P/A No more. Vast majority of economists consider such levels of inflation to be desirable Pete.
10
08/01/2021 10:52:06 105 11
bbc
What do you expect when you have a monetary committee that ignores its own targets when the wrong side. A Governor who spent years telling us that interest rates and BOE policies had no impact on House Prices until he had an epiphany just as he was leaving. He expected people to believe him aswell.

House & Rent costs at these levels are very bad for the economy and any sensible fiscal policy
11
08/01/2021 10:54:41 32 7
bbc
Completely agree Pete ;)
12
08/01/2021 10:55:35 340 41
bbc
limit purchases for buy to let, remove hoarding and slow release of land by builders in favour of future long term price, curb net migration, TRUE affordable homes for low income, stop false economies by part rent/own schemes that are just engineered for a developer to sell a £250k home to a £40k pa income family, stop building on greenbelt through greasing the palms of local councils etc etc
81
08/01/2021 11:33:04 87 17
bbc
Nail hit on head!
189
08/01/2021 12:06:10 25 10
bbc
Hoarding nonsense. Builders are rampantly grasping every little green space they can and slapping up rubbish as fast as possible. Utterly corrupt. The government overrules local denials on behalf of mates. Changes the made up rules ever more to the greedy land seller's and developer's advantage.

Ban all green Field build. Everywhere. Redevelopment only, improve the stock.
I may come across as a Tory or Brexit Britnat little Englander for this one [which I am far from being] , but uncontrolled immigration is the major factor here , the UK gov need to investigate the match immigrant salaries with housing in the area where they are going to live/work , if no match can be truly made, then they cannot come in ! same if they have kids , if no school place then no entry . Removed
410
08/01/2021 13:22:06 11 1
bbc
Couldn't agree more. We need affordable well built homes or if there needs to be rents then have affordable rental properties with decent rent controls.
Also make new builds better quality everyone I know who has new builds have had moderate to severe issues yes my 100 year old house has damp and odd issues but it's sturdy
416
08/01/2021 13:25:34 9 6
bbc
These are not Conservative friendly policies - they prioritise people over money.

It irks me to no end that public consensus seems to be for all these socially-minded, progressive policies... and then the public vote Tory again and again.

It doesn't make sense. There's no evidence they'll start building affordable homes, stop enocuraging foreign investors, stop favouring landlords etc.
428
08/01/2021 13:20:56 10 12
bbc
What defines an affordable home? Affordable to who? And why would a developer sell them at a rate lower than they could?

Land hoarding is a fair point that could be regulated. The real issue is that we need to build on land that everyone objects to being built on (just by referring to it as "green belt"). Increasing supply to meet demand is the only way prices will come down.
If the idiot Brown hadn't wrecked every other form of investment in the UK, buy to let would be something most of us had never heard of. However, it does suit Labour's long term objection to home ownership for the masses.
500
08/01/2021 14:05:42 6 3
bbc
Since the 1980s the housing stock has risen from 16 million homes to > 22 million, however we have changed the way we live, in the 1950s only 10% of homes had a single adult occupier, now it is around 35%. We have to accept that we have changed the way we live and build more homes. In my town people are protesting against a new large development, despite a shortage of homes for the young.
529
08/01/2021 14:16:03 8 4
bbc
oh yes, the old land banking rubbish that we always hear about and that has been completely debunked. I have worked for house builders for 30 years and I have never encountered this idea of holding an asset and releasing it slowly, it make no economic sense. Return on Capital Employed is a key measure for the industry and slow build rates just cripples us. But no one will care, reality isn't news.
540
08/01/2021 14:24:34 13 3
bbc
Buy to Let is not the problem. Buy to leave empty is. Buy as a holiday home is. A property that is let out is available, it is used, it provides the flexiblility that many people need until they become settled in one area. It provides accommodation for tranient workers, often working away from home. Holiday homes and Buy to Leave Empty purchases take properties out of circulation.
595
08/01/2021 14:51:16 6 0
bbc
stop talking sense the Neo Libs will have the police round to warn you ....
615
08/01/2021 15:03:43 11 2
bbc
The below could also be added:

Limit deposits to minimum 25%.
Get rid of htb schemes
Increase interest rates
Limit lending to x4 income.

Guarentee prices will come back to realistic levels.
632
08/01/2021 15:09:50 0 5
bbc
Commie
682
08/01/2021 15:32:16 0 1
bbc
Have you read the wrong article, this one predicts house prices to fall, therefore by default, more affordable.
697
08/01/2021 15:41:58 1 2
bbc
All I'm thinking about is myself and making as much dosh as possible, because I'm better than everyone else in the entire world ... said just about everyone human being, ever.

Until that kind of thinking changes, nothing else is going to change. Sad but true
771
08/01/2021 16:10:34 0 1
bbc
Regulation in Brexit Britain?

Sorry to inform you that the reality will be very much the opposite.
812
08/01/2021 16:40:29 1 3
bbc
Migration has no demonstrable effect of the kind you imply. Did you vote Leave?
873
08/01/2021 18:04:27 1 0
bbc
Encourage people to stop having more than 2 children(single mother with 8 children in yesterday's news....).
The UK is overpopulated, houses are tiny & expensive, with modern construction unlikely to stand more than 40 years.
I own a house which is almost identical in size to my sister's house in London, but mine has a much larger garden.
Her house £1.6 million
My house in Cumbria £185-200,000
949
09/01/2021 12:53:53 1 0
bbc
Buy to let homes are a small fraction of the market and only a very massive increase in the buying of same could have any influence on wider market.. heavy tax burdens upon it already render that highly unlikely. As for comments on land..it pays nothing..until developed upon and sold. Builders cant afford to sit on vast swathes of it for years and not producing . You do not know your subject sir.
950
Mo
09/01/2021 12:56:46 0 0
bbc
Rent control. High rents drive up property values for investors, making them unaffordable to buy for most people.
989
09/01/2021 19:47:07 0 0
bbc
tax landlords out of existence and prices will become more realistic, house pimping has grown so much that its feeding the wealth divide.
1
08/01/2021 10:28:27 3 1
bbc
Whatever happened to Mystic Meg?
13
08/01/2021 10:55:35 5 0
bbc
She became Mr Blobby
23
08/01/2021 11:01:27 1 0
bbc
Oh no.... now she's in a minefield of his/her rights
4
08/01/2021 10:38:47 41 15
bbc
The same Nationwide that predicted a 15 % drop , following Carneys usual nonsense at the Bank of England that prices would drop 30 % following the Brexit vote ? a pointless non article rising unemployment will kill off any growth
14
08/01/2021 10:57:11 26 11
bbc
Your comment doesn't take into the 0.25% rate cut after the vote and the £60 billion of QE the BOE initially used to mitigate the result of the vote.
15
08/01/2021 10:57:20 189 32
bbc
We have a planning system that has actively prevented house building for decades and continues to make obtaining planning permission all but impossible except for corporate house builders with low ethics, deep pockets and highly paid lawyers.

Thus, there is a major imbalance in the UK's house market with demand far outstripping supply leading to inevitable price rises and exclusion fort many.
34
Bob
08/01/2021 11:09:57 58 14
bbc
Which may explain such rampant rises at a time when obtaining a mortgage has become harder for most.

Sales volumes are a fraction of their normal levels. We've had countless tales of city exoduses.

I suspect these sky-high rises are just representative of a dead market on life-support thanks to those seeking larger, and more expensive properties and with such low supply, they'll pony up for it.
47
GW
08/01/2021 11:22:49 6 2
bbc
Rubbish planning never stopped development. Developers can appeal local decision and when they win it cannot be overturned.
128
08/01/2021 11:46:21 8 6
bbc
I'm yet to be convinced of the myth we are crying out for housing. I've seen hundreds of vast new build sites appearing on the outskirts of villages, towns and cities on my travels the past few years. We're building at an alarming rate. The problem is we're not building the correct type of housing to meet the demand, i.e. affordable and specialist (disabled access etc.).
170
08/01/2021 12:01:28 11 4
bbc
Utter rubbish. Planning is out of control and rampantly destroying the food growing and wildlife land so mates of the political class get million appropriated from public created planning gain. It is how the UK does corruption. Were it Amazon rainforest there would be an outcry. But our greedy are let get away with it by the lies of housing having to be on their fields not redevelopment in towns.
232
08/01/2021 12:22:43 4 0
bbc
Seriously ? Open season for planning in East Anglia !
247
08/01/2021 12:24:39 8 1
bbc
It was years ago that I read that major housebuilder Crest Nicholson spent more money on getting planning permission for schemes than they did on bricks.
286
08/01/2021 12:40:29 6 4
bbc
You are wrong. In fact there are lots of planning permissions granted but greedy house builders do t build to keep prices high. Please check your facts before posting.
296
08/01/2021 12:44:05 7 1
bbc
Yes hard to get planning for small developments, but big boys allowed hundreds of big unaffordable houses and to concrete over green barrier the lungs of the country.
299
08/01/2021 12:44:44 6 4
bbc
Whilst i agree we have an outdated planning system, most smaller developments are refused because of complaints from local residents and highways agency, no one wants 500 houses erecting in the field behind their home as it reduces value, and road networks can not support extra traffic. But if your socialism makes you blind to local residents feelings, by all means call on the fight.
306
08/01/2021 12:46:32 5 1
bbc
at last someone pointed this out going on for years
309
08/01/2021 12:48:42 0 1
bbc
And your answer to this is???
344
08/01/2021 13:00:33 3 0
bbc
Part of the problem is the way sites are developed based on thin margins that mean corners are cut, affordable housing removed and quality reduced along with land banking to ensure house prices rise in areas as per developers model. Allow councils to build homes, they will be duty bound to ensure suitable schools and roads are provided and if the homes are council ones it wont affect house prices.
360
08/01/2021 13:04:16 3 8
bbc
Nonsense, planning has never been easier to obtain for big or small developments. If you want to look for culprits in any housing shortage faced by this country try looking at the ever increasing number of houses being taken out of the supply chain to house the ever growing student population. Perhaps if we had less young people doing gender studies we'd be able to house the rest of us :)
375
08/01/2021 13:08:57 4 3
bbc
There are over 250,000 vacant properties in England. Building on green belt will reduce the amount of food we can produce, building on brown belt needs to be the way we go.
427
08/01/2021 13:29:13 3 1
bbc
Totally right
453
08/01/2021 13:41:28 4 3
bbc
If we didn’t have 100 000 of people coming to the UK every year then it wouldn’t have been a problem. Along with that foreign investment into property should be illegal.
571
08/01/2021 14:39:57 2 1
bbc
The planning system is a minefield that prevents housebuilding. It should make self-build far easier. But the rules are the same for big developers, despite the nonsense you hear. People object to any new houses, and they often don't know why they are objecting, its just what we do. The housing shortage is the publics fault. Object, object, object, then complain about shortages and high prices.
759
08/01/2021 16:06:14 2 1
bbc
What absolute tosh! Where I live, it's essentially a building site. The residents are continously object to the planning, but Waverley council seem to overturn our objections. Go into Guildford, it's the same story - Residents object, but the building goes on. Furthermore, we were told that a 4 bedroomed house takes 8 weeks to build and costs £80-90K, then sold for a whopping £600K!
781
08/01/2021 16:15:14 0 0
bbc
'Demand outstripping supply'...this is one of the great housing myths perpetuated by producer interests. 'Demand' in this case has meant easy money supply for decades... not households!
972
09/01/2021 16:33:46 0 1
bbc
Complete nonsense - it is a combination of ultra-low rates and gimmicks like the SD holiday. Next time you play Monopoly, put all the fines etc. in the middle and the next on free parking gets the cash. No change in supply or demand, but see what happens to prices.
976
09/01/2021 17:02:10 0 1
bbc
As the new Govt discovered soon after 2010, having bent all the rules to favour developers and development, the houses weren't built because developers want to drip feed the market to maintain high prices.
It's not usually planning holding back development, it's the developers who get the planning permission and then sit on it.
16
08/01/2021 10:58:32 41 6
bbc
Who knows where the housing market will be in a year or 5 years time but suspect for most the acquisition of a usable asset which over time will increase represent a decent investment compared to the alternatives.

Bank interest at zero.
Volatile Stock markets see sawing.
Bond market - paying for the privilege.
25
08/01/2021 11:04:01 29 50
bbc
If your primary residence is an investment it should be taxed like any other investment, i.e. no more primary residence relief on CGT. The taxpayer should not be subsidising your property investments, right? That would be socialism.
17
08/01/2021 10:58:41 4 1
bbc
Didn't they say something similar last year?

Economic predictions are invariably wrong.
20
08/01/2021 11:00:49 8 1
bbc
Yes, before massive QE, interest rate drop and stamp duty holiday. You can't blame them for getting a prediction wrong when most factors that affect house prices were changed.
5
08/01/2021 10:41:21 11 5
bbc
They said the same thing last year, the increase in house prices were initially a surprise to all.

As long as the population is still rising and money is still circulating, prices will hold steady or continue to rise.

Those who are worst affected by this crisis, namely hospitality workers, don't tend to be homeowners
18
08/01/2021 10:59:33 12 4
bbc
The population rising is not the problem - it's the lack of affordable homes which are not being built. Combined with QE, interest rates of 0.1% and a stamp duty holiday.
418
08/01/2021 13:26:22 1 0
bbc
How about we magic up some more builders then...

We're building as fast as we can, we simply don't have the capacity to build for an additional 300,000 people every single year, and because we haven't ever had that capacity, the backlog is in the millions.

Yes, it's supply and demand, but it's simplistic to say we're just not building enough when we CAN control the other factor more easily.
19
08/01/2021 11:00:42 6 2
bbc
Soaring, BS Bingo Journo word. Just need carnage now for a full house.
69
08/01/2021 11:29:24 0 0
bbc
And chaos!
17
08/01/2021 10:58:41 4 1
bbc
Didn't they say something similar last year?

Economic predictions are invariably wrong.
20
08/01/2021 11:00:49 8 1
bbc
Yes, before massive QE, interest rate drop and stamp duty holiday. You can't blame them for getting a prediction wrong when most factors that affect house prices were changed.
36
08/01/2021 11:12:43 0 2
bbc
When you make a prediction you need to take into account the possibility of such things which were eminently predictable considering the situation we found ourselves in.
21
08/01/2021 11:01:05 140 117
bbc
But weren’t house prices supposed to crash after Brexit. More project fear found to be lies
28
08/01/2021 11:06:17 111 37
bbc
I know many people who voted to remain due to the 'threat' by Cameron and Osbourne 2 weeks before the referendum that just on a vote to leave there would be an emergency budget, tax rises, interest rate rises and massive house price falls. None of which happened (which most of us knew would be the case) and interest rates actually came down the very next day after the vote.
30
08/01/2021 11:07:14 22 34
bbc
Well said! I always mentained that project fear was opinions dressed up as facts.
50
08/01/2021 11:24:13 36 5
bbc
Were it not for the stamp duty holiday they would not have risen. So government intervention caused the rise. And it is a blip.
93
08/01/2021 11:35:01 19 8
bbc
Drop in house prices were a prediction made 5 years ago.

The current situation follows Covid 19 & cuts on duties which are two big driving factors in people moving. These weren't known about 5 years ago and, had they been, they predictions may have been different.

You're criticism in unfounded seeing as the people you're criticising didn't have the info we have now
137
08/01/2021 11:42:32 16 24
bbc
The liberal elite love house price rises, as many of them are BTL landlords. It is why they were anti Brexit, afraid that their investments would go down and the rest us would be able to afford our own houses!
146
08/01/2021 11:51:02 16 13
bbc
They have crashed, did you not see the £ plunge against others currencies... the rest of the world just got a lot richer compared to us...
157
08/01/2021 11:54:15 5 1
bbc
There is a theory that house prices mirror tock market price trends after 12 months. They should be down quite dramatically in 6 months,
168
08/01/2021 12:00:04 4 8
bbc
Ramifications of Brexit are yet to be felt
196
08/01/2021 12:09:14 6 3
bbc
1) The only time I saw that mentioned was advocating Brexit - trying to appeal to the generation who are priced out of the market (literally the only possible benefit as far as I'm concerned)
2) We're only a week in in more than name only
3) The government has propped up house prices over the Covid crisis by pausing stamp duty

But don't let me stop you trying to score political points
337
Pip
08/01/2021 12:58:57 4 0
bbc
House prices won't ever crash, they may slow down, but never for long. Bricks and Mortar, you can't beat it.

Stop second home buying and properties bought by Russian and Chinese billionaires, as empty investments, may bring prices down a little.........?
352
08/01/2021 13:01:54 1 0
bbc
Anyone who says they know that the price of anything will rise, or fall, is either telling BS or just dumb. Remember though we only actually left EU rules last week. Up until now it’s been BAU.
380
08/01/2021 13:12:05 1 3
bbc
Not what my estate agent told us , wife has a couple of rentals and we were going to flog them off, agents told her to wait as prices will increase significantly after Brexit .
641
08/01/2021 15:14:14 0 0
bbc
London will but the decline will be gradual.
821
08/01/2021 16:48:38 0 0
bbc
I thought lower house prices was a selling point of brexit? Mistakenly put out by the wrong side. Certainly If I didn't own a house at the time because I couldn't afford one it would be an incentive to vote out.
9
Tim
08/01/2021 10:51:55 125 12
bbc
Stamp duty holiday has fuelled this latest rise. Soon we will return to the high-stamp duty which means a non-mobile UK work force, and reduced incentive to buy a wreck and do it up.
22
SH
08/01/2021 11:01:18 130 1
bbc
That and zero % interest rates on savings. For those people with money in the bank property is currently guaranteeing a return on investment so is it any wonder that house prices have jumped up despite the fact we're still in a pandemic with the impact that is having on jobs and income.
974
09/01/2021 16:37:42 1 0
bbc
With the exception of unemployment which is still lower than a few years ago and some reduction is some of the workforce incomes,the bulk of earners in this country are in fact better off this year .For instance the furlough scheme although reduces gross incomes by 20% net incomes due to tax deductions and also the many savings of being at home mean most are better off
13
08/01/2021 10:55:35 5 0
bbc
She became Mr Blobby
23
08/01/2021 11:01:27 1 0
bbc
Oh no.... now she's in a minefield of his/her rights
24
08/01/2021 10:55:20 17 17
bbc
Hopefully the days of flooding the country with immigrants are behind us which should take the heat out of the market.
31
08/01/2021 11:07:43 5 8
bbc
Wake up the housing crises is about supply and demand,
build more homes to bring the price down
110
08/01/2021 11:40:56 0 0
bbc
Flooding the country with cheap mortgages is the cause. If people can borrow at 0.25% (I've seen mortgages that low) rather than 5%, of course they can bid up house prices to insane levels.
16
08/01/2021 10:58:32 41 6
bbc
Who knows where the housing market will be in a year or 5 years time but suspect for most the acquisition of a usable asset which over time will increase represent a decent investment compared to the alternatives.

Bank interest at zero.
Volatile Stock markets see sawing.
Bond market - paying for the privilege.
25
08/01/2021 11:04:01 29 50
bbc
If your primary residence is an investment it should be taxed like any other investment, i.e. no more primary residence relief on CGT. The taxpayer should not be subsidising your property investments, right? That would be socialism.
86
08/01/2021 11:34:17 15 10
bbc
So, in your view, nobody should ever be allowed to make a profit on anything without giving the government 40% of any gain ?

Presumably the government will reimburse any failed businesses then ?

Sounds like we take all the risk and the government takes the rewards.
103
08/01/2021 11:37:44 13 4
bbc
Well actually mate most people's primary residence is their home! So you feel we should be taxed for the basic need of a roof over our heads? Presumably you think we should bring back vat on ordinary food and other basic essentials? Or perhaps you are being ironic? It's difficult to tell!
166
08/01/2021 11:58:27 10 3
bbc
Whether it is taxed or not (this will be the Govt to decide) it still remains a significantly more attractive investment than the alternatives.

I for one dont see any case for taxing someones home anymore than taxing your savings - the money you pay for the property has already been taxed in the first place & you then pay council tax & tax on utilities to use it.
523
08/01/2021 14:13:50 5 1
bbc
Council tax is based on house prices so in a way they are taxed.
610
08/01/2021 15:02:52 4 1
bbc
Its OK if you work for the public sector and have a guaranteed defined benefit pension. The majority of people working in the private sector do not have the luxury of defined benefit pensions and use their home as a saving for their pension when they downsize and they have paid for the mortgage out of taxed income - so it would be grossly unfair to abolish the primary residence relief of CGT
736
08/01/2021 15:57:15 6 0
bbc
How do you propose to calculate the amount of money spent on a house, during the period of occupation. Mortgage Interest, rates, decoration, repairs, even time spent gardening, are all necessary. Should an owner keep records of expenditure and calculate the value of diy?
The taxpayer contributes nothing.
818
08/01/2021 16:44:51 4 0
bbc
your primary residence is not an investment it is a home. To tax people based on house price inflation is to trap them in their first home. Because they can't sell it and move to an equivalent house without paying inflation tax. A tax on something they have no control over.
Downsizing will become a thing of the past and all large homes will be occupied by people whose children have left. insane
26
08/01/2021 11:05:04 200 18
bbc
While Bitcoin hits $40,000 backed by ???

I would rather have the mud baked bricks...… world has flipped its button.
40
08/01/2021 11:18:53 34 104
bbc
Watch you don't fall off that wall Humpty Dumpty.
64
08/01/2021 11:28:33 20 1
bbc
95% of bitcoin is owned by 2% of account holders, Why would anyone get involved in this is beyond me.
67
08/01/2021 11:28:52 13 2
bbc
Who in their right mind throws $40K at this "investment" scam? No sympathy for those that are going to lose a fortune trying to get rich quick.
as someone who managed to accumulate a few bitcoin over the years when they were selling for three figure prices, I'll happily have both. Removed
80
08/01/2021 11:32:05 9 0
bbc
Yeah bit coin is based on block chain management and data mining... i dont trust it at all but to be fair I simply just don't understand it. I wish I had invested in it years ago though....
132
08/01/2021 11:47:19 4 5
bbc
Investing in property is safe, but not very profitable. If 6% growth in one year is a record, the average is less. There are also maintenance costs in owning property. If you invested in Tesla shares 2 months ago, you would have almost doubled your money by now. In a year, you should expect at least 300% growth. Unlike Bitcoin, Tesla has valuable assets and IP to back up its value.
138
01
08/01/2021 11:44:11 16 3
bbc
Bitcoin is backed by demand and speculation, just like house prices.
144
08/01/2021 11:50:43 7 1
bbc
What's fiat currency backed by? It's just an assurance from the government and they can manipulate it's value. Volatility is the issue with bitcoin but with 6/7 of the possible supply now mined and adoption increasing (Paypal for example) I think it will become considerably less volatile in years to come

For what it's worth 40k will likely be cheap in a few years
182
08/01/2021 12:03:56 4 1
bbc
The button had already been flipped prior. BitCoin isn't majorly different from the speculation inherent in the rest of our financial system, including housing.

People have made serious profit from BitCoin. It's not a joke. It's as much of a gamble as investing in anything else.
184
08/01/2021 12:04:03 1 3
bbc
Why are we only allowed to comment on two news stories? Why don't they let us make our feelings known about the fact that the Gov have only just got around to screening those who fly into this country whether they are Covid carriers or not??? Or does that not fit in with the la la land that the Tories want to pretend exists?
215
08/01/2021 12:11:51 7 0
bbc
And the US dollar still has a value backed by $20.3 Trillion of debt ...
224
08/01/2021 12:20:05 4 2
bbc
Bitcoin is backed by energy, same as every asset ever, the energy of thousands of computers creating a network that cannot be manipulated and has a finite supply, keep kidding yourself on. Bitcoin will rise to a million dollars and usurp gold as an inflation hedge and SOV. Bitcoin currently has 120m users doubling every year, there are less bitcoins than there are millionaires. cheers all.
276
meh
08/01/2021 12:38:14 0 4
bbc
At least i know humpty has got a single digit IQ!

I would have happily bought bitcoin years ago IF it could be held in an ISA. But the fact you cant and you have to pay CGT on profits was an instant nono. Whats the point in me risking my capital, possbly turn in a 100k profit and then watch hmrc take a 20k cut (or 40k if rumours are true)

Ill take my chances on tesla TAX FREE :)))
419
08/01/2021 13:26:38 5 0
bbc
And I suppose the 100s of big investment banks/hedge funds who have publicly backed Bitcoin are all wrong then
517
08/01/2021 14:12:32 3 0
bbc
Well if you know what bitcoin is offering as compare to greedy banks, you will get your answer why it is so expansive. If you dont know, its fine. No one forching anyone to buy bitcoin
576
08/01/2021 14:41:23 1 0
bbc
Even if you had Bitcoins you'll still have to find somewhere to live
27
08/01/2021 11:06:00 2 9
bbc
The Stamp Duty holiday should be extended, or at the very least the future rates should be lower than pre-COVID. We need to let the housing market work so people can move house.
32
08/01/2021 11:08:58 10 2
bbc
Won't happen. Stamp duty is one of the biggest money makers for government. The recent stamp duty holiday was never about getting people to move house it was about giving highly leveraged investors one last chance to escape the property market. If you didn't escape in 2020 you're going to be on the hook when the 2021 budget comes out.
21
08/01/2021 11:01:05 140 117
bbc
But weren’t house prices supposed to crash after Brexit. More project fear found to be lies
28
08/01/2021 11:06:17 111 37
bbc
I know many people who voted to remain due to the 'threat' by Cameron and Osbourne 2 weeks before the referendum that just on a vote to leave there would be an emergency budget, tax rises, interest rate rises and massive house price falls. None of which happened (which most of us knew would be the case) and interest rates actually came down the very next day after the vote.
We only left just over a week ago! Moronic comment. Removed
58
08/01/2021 11:26:35 35 3
bbc
House price falls are what most people want.

And a decent amount of interest on their savings.
437
08/01/2021 13:27:20 4 0
bbc
It's strange how people often know many others who agree with them.

I know thousands who would agree with me on that.
646
08/01/2021 15:15:10 0 0
bbc
The interest fall was a bad thing.
666
08/01/2021 15:21:59 0 1
bbc
I was one of those people. I voted Remain, reluctantly, because I listened to George Osborne's warnings about a big economic hit. I should have had the courage of my convictions and voted Leave.
8
08/01/2021 10:46:08 68 6
bbc
Price rises at that level given the outlook for economy only shows the lunacy that is British House Prices.

The market has been broken for a long time but run by the Banks, Property Developers & Landlords and massively helped along by the BOE interest rates QE etc. and no policy other than keep them going from governments of the last 20 odd years.

It will only stop when sanity returns, no sign.
29
SH
08/01/2021 11:06:31 37 14
bbc
It's a market economy and prices are set by estate agents, if they sell a house in a street for a certain price then the next one that comes on the market they set the price a little higher. If another buyer turns up the next one gets prices higher still etc. etc. yet people trust the valuations because that's what someone else was "willing" to pay
There's no control or cap on the value of a house
257
08/01/2021 12:29:47 13 3
bbc
Prices are set by the market, not estate agents. I have seen several properties put on recently at steep prices which have been taken off after a few weeks as they got no viewings due to being overpriced. Property is worth what someone is willing to pay and that is affected by many factors, but not agents. After all, they are acting for sellers who always want the best price.
303
08/01/2021 12:45:56 3 3
bbc
Its not though is it.
HTB £30,000,000,000 + to buy "affordable £600,000 houses".
Allowing developers to dictate housing policy
Policies that don't deliver what the country needs.

If market why £1,000,000,000,000 + QE
Why 0% interest rates
Why mortgage holiday
etc etc. etc.

If it was market none of that would be happening. Its only a market economy when it suits.
354
08/01/2021 13:02:43 5 1
bbc
It's not left to the market though, help to buy and all sorts of other schemes, and veryt poor build rates for affordable houses pushing more people into private rent, hence more people buy to let! A vicious circle - one time when house prices too high they did not sell, sellers dropped prices and so on, the market regulated itself on price/demasnd. Too much government interference now.
370
08/01/2021 13:07:09 11 8
bbc
Never read so much rubbish. House prices are set by the market, bit estate estate agents. If an estate agent says a 2 bed terraced in Salford is worth £600k, will it sell?
Of course not, people pay what they can afford for the house they want in the area they want. No one is forced to buy a particular house.
635
08/01/2021 15:11:13 0 0
bbc
Why should there be. If everyone was not obsessed with property the market might skew towards buyers.
21
08/01/2021 11:01:05 140 117
bbc
But weren’t house prices supposed to crash after Brexit. More project fear found to be lies
30
08/01/2021 11:07:14 22 34
bbc
Well said! I always mentained that project fear was opinions dressed up as facts.
24
08/01/2021 10:55:20 17 17
bbc
Hopefully the days of flooding the country with immigrants are behind us which should take the heat out of the market.
31
08/01/2021 11:07:43 5 8
bbc
Wake up the housing crises is about supply and demand,
build more homes to bring the price down
505
08/01/2021 14:05:46 1 0
bbc
How many homes do you propose we build? If nett annual migration is around 350,000 a year then we need 800,000 new homes every year to cool the market. That's cloud cookoo land.
27
08/01/2021 11:06:00 2 9
bbc
The Stamp Duty holiday should be extended, or at the very least the future rates should be lower than pre-COVID. We need to let the housing market work so people can move house.
32
08/01/2021 11:08:58 10 2
bbc
Won't happen. Stamp duty is one of the biggest money makers for government. The recent stamp duty holiday was never about getting people to move house it was about giving highly leveraged investors one last chance to escape the property market. If you didn't escape in 2020 you're going to be on the hook when the 2021 budget comes out.
33
08/01/2021 11:09:39 9 9
bbc
Need more help for young people and dont build more Rabbit hutches, these do nothing to help with mental health
41
GW
08/01/2021 11:19:29 4 14
bbc
Some one down voted you unbelievable shows Tory Cons for what they are selfish
15
08/01/2021 10:57:20 189 32
bbc
We have a planning system that has actively prevented house building for decades and continues to make obtaining planning permission all but impossible except for corporate house builders with low ethics, deep pockets and highly paid lawyers.

Thus, there is a major imbalance in the UK's house market with demand far outstripping supply leading to inevitable price rises and exclusion fort many.
34
Bob
08/01/2021 11:09:57 58 14
bbc
Which may explain such rampant rises at a time when obtaining a mortgage has become harder for most.

Sales volumes are a fraction of their normal levels. We've had countless tales of city exoduses.

I suspect these sky-high rises are just representative of a dead market on life-support thanks to those seeking larger, and more expensive properties and with such low supply, they'll pony up for it.
953
09/01/2021 13:03:30 1 0
bbc
A sustained fall in prices...Bob..good luck with that . Bank of England and the Gov. sensibly have a stated aim of achieving 2% inflation or thereabouts As wages and materials rise ...expecting houses not to is a bit silly. As for "rampant " prices look at the graph...the average per ann over the whole graph is around 3% SO this is all really hype...around recent removal of "stamp" tax.
35
08/01/2021 11:11:05 112 58
bbc
I would hardly describe a 6% or so rise as 'soaring', when the long term average increase in house prices is around 5%, it's typical lazy journalism as we are getting use to from the BBC and others to generate 'clicks' for their sites and papers. Most 'experts' were expecting a fall last year but were completely wrong.
45
08/01/2021 11:22:33 127 26
bbc
Completely concur about the lazy journalism that abounds on the BBC and elsewhere. Everything has to be littered with emotive words and statistics without providing context to get a balanced piece.
133
08/01/2021 11:47:51 5 11
bbc
Ur duh Ignorance personied with a touch of arrogance. You should feel proud.
179
08/01/2021 12:03:21 14 2
bbc
6% of 200,000 is 12,000, that's a big rise given unemployment is rising rapidly and 200,000 is a small property in a lot of places. Young people have been struggling to get on the Ladder and an extra £1200 to achieve a 10% deposit is large considering that would cover solicitors fees for properties at this price. What may not be large to you can be crippling to others.
279
08/01/2021 12:39:25 3 3
bbc
I'd agree 6% is hardly soaring but it is better than most banks offer. But sustainable? Hardly. With job cuts etc wages will not be rising. A fall is coming.

Still, i'm currently up nearly 90%. Gold. As with any investment buy low sell high. Unlike houses, gold can be sold instantly. Selling a house you have to wait ...... and pray
322
08/01/2021 12:52:00 2 2
bbc
Where do you live? In our area prices leap by 10-20% every year, if not more.
811
08/01/2021 16:40:10 1 0
bbc
Exactly
845
Suz
08/01/2021 17:20:47 1 0
bbc
It is when interest rates for savings are at 0%
20
08/01/2021 11:00:49 8 1
bbc
Yes, before massive QE, interest rate drop and stamp duty holiday. You can't blame them for getting a prediction wrong when most factors that affect house prices were changed.
36
08/01/2021 11:12:43 0 2
bbc
When you make a prediction you need to take into account the possibility of such things which were eminently predictable considering the situation we found ourselves in.
43
GW
08/01/2021 11:20:54 1 0
bbc
Who expected Covid certainly not the tories
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
38
08/01/2021 11:18:14 40 77
bbc
ok boomer
46
08/01/2021 11:22:35 21 8
bbc
Not forgetting 15% interest rates at the time.
52
08/01/2021 11:25:03 28 4
bbc
As a young person who has bought a house in the last 3 months - you still need a 10% deposit.

Everyone knows renting is more expensive the issue is the cost of property is higher than lenders will lend so you need a higher deposit to cover the gap.

Saving a 30% deposit on a £200k house is a lot of money for younger people just starting out. It's not all going on flash cars and lip fillers ?????
53
08/01/2021 11:25:09 8 8
bbc
Renting in the private sector is of similar cost to paying a mortgage. Don’t forget you have to pay for maintenance. And if you’ve an imbecile renting from you the costs can spiral. Hence no DSS please. And those who move into council houses (owned by large private companies) quite often incur huge costs as they have the backing of the taxpayer (council benefits) the people paying their rent.
55
08/01/2021 11:25:53 13 35
bbc
The problem is that youngsters want everything now and they all want brand new!
56
Bob
08/01/2021 11:26:13 21 5
bbc
You had to save 10% deposit? You realise the average FTB deposit for 2019 was £50k on an average house price of £217k, so 23%?
57
GW
08/01/2021 11:26:30 26 5
bbc
Yeh but u got mortgage tax relief free university and actually got a grant to live on whilst at uni
71
max
08/01/2021 11:29:32 41 3
bbc
The difference is that when “us oldies” bought our home in 1997 we paid about twice our annual salary for it. Today, houses in our street sell for four to five times that and wages haven’t kept up. So, yes, we do worry about our now adult children being able to afford to buy in the future. Even a 10% deposit is out of reach for many young people these days.
106
08/01/2021 11:39:12 9 1
bbc
I do appreciate is has always required a struggle to pay for houses but comparisons to the past need to factor in the disproportionate price rises that make what was once hard now impossible for many. E.g.
"Applying the same rate of inflation to food prices (as housing)...a four-pint bottle of milk would cost £10" https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21365920
203
08/01/2021 12:10:54 7 2
bbc
Or the government could bring back Council Housing.
278
08/01/2021 12:35:43 3 7
bbc
And the youngsters don't remember when there was no double glazing or central heating, when bathrooms were often at the back of the house and unheated, when television was black and white and had to be tuned in with a dial, 3 channels, none during the night. Many people didn't even have a land phone line! Many didn't have a car in the household.
305
08/01/2021 12:46:23 8 3
bbc
Nonsense. I've £60k+ in savings, a very well paid job and no debt other than student loans. All I can afford by myself here with the mortages available are studio flats in a crappy area.
You might say "jUSt mOvE thEN" but that misses the point. Why should I move 100 miles away from my job, friends and family because of the ponzi scheme cooked up by estate agents, landlords, investors and bankers
362
08/01/2021 13:04:48 1 2
bbc
I had a 95% mortgage in the 1980s as a first time buyer. It wasn't a problem at all.
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
38
08/01/2021 11:18:14 40 77
bbc
ok boomer
178
08/01/2021 12:03:06 8 0
bbc
I am 43 my father been in property all his life, been very successful and he used to buy houses for £3750 4-5 bed detached the same house now in the area is starts from £800,000 + this in 55-60 years, so you say save a deposit, I would rather save what you had too than what you have to today when wages have not matched the house prices
39
GW
08/01/2021 11:18:16 9 12
bbc
Whole economy built on sand housing market subsidised by Con Govt with stamp duty suspended so rich can get rid of houses
63
08/01/2021 11:28:06 4 0
bbc
They can’t win can they? The other side to that is a lot of people were able to buy a property for the first time.
That wouldn’t suit your rant though would it?
72
08/01/2021 11:29:42 3 0
bbc
What happened back in 2016 when all you experts predicted a massive economic crash due to Brexit?
It never happened
26
08/01/2021 11:05:04 200 18
bbc
While Bitcoin hits $40,000 backed by ???

I would rather have the mud baked bricks...… world has flipped its button.
40
08/01/2021 11:18:53 34 104
bbc
Watch you don't fall off that wall Humpty Dumpty.
97
08/01/2021 11:36:51 4 0
bbc
Enjoy your 21st Century..... :-)
458
08/01/2021 13:44:36 5 0
bbc
A final thought, no doubt 30 years ago you guys would have all been the saying the exact same thing about the internet. So where are we 30 years later? 3 of the 5 biggest companies in the world exist solely on the net, Facebook, Amazon, Google, the other 2 provide the hardware for the other 3, Apple and Microsoft. We are in a digital world, Bitcoin is the next digital progression.
33
08/01/2021 11:09:39 9 9
bbc
Need more help for young people and dont build more Rabbit hutches, these do nothing to help with mental health
41
GW
08/01/2021 11:19:29 4 14
bbc
Some one down voted you unbelievable shows Tory Cons for what they are selfish
42
08/01/2021 11:20:46 2 7
bbc
Just watch over the next 3 years house prices correcting to 2008/09 levels and the value of Bitcoin exceed the average at present house price.
65
CJR
08/01/2021 11:28:35 2 0
bbc
Please post your evidence
94
08/01/2021 11:35:13 0 0
bbc
over 50% of housing stock has no mortgage... and over 30% of buys are with Cash (no mortgage) - i dont believe a 30% drop is in site or even possible... maybe a 2-5% bump this year (Due to leaving CU and SM and end of SDH). But house price increase is always a good investment... if you have missed it.. sorry, stick to crypto
36
08/01/2021 11:12:43 0 2
bbc
When you make a prediction you need to take into account the possibility of such things which were eminently predictable considering the situation we found ourselves in.
43
GW
08/01/2021 11:20:54 1 0
bbc
Who expected Covid certainly not the tories
44
08/01/2021 11:21:49 76 5
bbc
The Bank of England’s QE Policy goes a long way to explaining the house price levels: no-one (whether foreign buyers or pension funds) wants to buy bonds knowing they’ll lose money on it right now, so the only thing QE does is boost asset prices. The bubble will have to burst at some point.
329
08/01/2021 12:56:30 40 6
bbc
Indeed, and when the bubble bursts it will be a big bang, long overdue.
359
08/01/2021 13:03:28 2 0
bbc
It does boost asset prices, but generally stocks and shares. It’s not the cause of house price inflation. Which, in reality is only marginally above average at 6%. Trend for past 10 yrs is below long term average.
396
08/01/2021 13:15:58 0 1
bbc
Parklife
717
08/01/2021 15:50:34 2 0
bbc
....or just insert more QE. We have kicked the debt can so far down the road we can no longer see it.... that printing press is just too damned handy....
962
09/01/2021 13:32:19 1 0
bbc
What bubble.??.read the graph with the initiating news article above..read it correctly right across the time axis. Only extended time is worth looking at and its saying 3% per annum gain on AVERAGE..across exteneded time.You have bought into the hype like most other posters here. The bubble is in your minds because it isnt there in the chart!
35
08/01/2021 11:11:05 112 58
bbc
I would hardly describe a 6% or so rise as 'soaring', when the long term average increase in house prices is around 5%, it's typical lazy journalism as we are getting use to from the BBC and others to generate 'clicks' for their sites and papers. Most 'experts' were expecting a fall last year but were completely wrong.
45
08/01/2021 11:22:33 127 26
bbc
Completely concur about the lazy journalism that abounds on the BBC and elsewhere. Everything has to be littered with emotive words and statistics without providing context to get a balanced piece.
61
08/01/2021 11:27:18 11 6
bbc
It's because the writers of these articles aren't proper journalists. They are admin staff tasked with writing an article.
127
08/01/2021 11:46:19 6 12
bbc
And your rhetoric is lazy as well. NOTHING ORIGINAL!
935
09/01/2021 09:01:49 0 1
bbc
They’ve quoted Lloyds who have said prices have “soared”.
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
46
08/01/2021 11:22:35 21 8
bbc
Not forgetting 15% interest rates at the time.
77
Bob
08/01/2021 11:31:23 17 1
bbc
Whilst true that interest rates were much higher, and also more likely to face swings meaning less stability and security in what you pay monthly, it is also true that for first time buyers the ratio of salary to house value continues to be at record levels, and is also mirrored in that the proportion of salary spent on housing per month is also much higher than back then.
393
08/01/2021 13:15:15 1 6
bbc
Agree and we were more driven in owning our our house than having a lavish lifestyle, it's different priorities back then to now.
15
08/01/2021 10:57:20 189 32
bbc
We have a planning system that has actively prevented house building for decades and continues to make obtaining planning permission all but impossible except for corporate house builders with low ethics, deep pockets and highly paid lawyers.

Thus, there is a major imbalance in the UK's house market with demand far outstripping supply leading to inevitable price rises and exclusion fort many.
47
GW
08/01/2021 11:22:49 6 2
bbc
Rubbish planning never stopped development. Developers can appeal local decision and when they win it cannot be overturned.
948
09/01/2021 12:51:23 1 0
bbc
Members of the public are excluded by the technical and legal aspects.
It's interesting you speak of developers; they are not the public at large.
28
08/01/2021 11:06:17 111 37
bbc
I know many people who voted to remain due to the 'threat' by Cameron and Osbourne 2 weeks before the referendum that just on a vote to leave there would be an emergency budget, tax rises, interest rate rises and massive house price falls. None of which happened (which most of us knew would be the case) and interest rates actually came down the very next day after the vote.
We only left just over a week ago! Moronic comment. Removed
82
08/01/2021 11:33:18 25 6
bbc
We left a year ago mate, we had a year to stick to the same rules because we had no idea what rules would be agreed for after due to the sheer incompetence of our government
Read the comment properly and you will notice that it referred to the vote going to leave not the actual leaving.

Please engage brain before throwing moronic insults.
Removed
248
08/01/2021 12:25:30 0 0
bbc
no your wrong, we left a year and 1 week ago, get your facts right
310
08/01/2021 12:49:19 4 4
bbc
And yet the sun still rose, electricity came out the sockets, water out the taps and best of you can still buy toilet paper. Time to move on, grow up, accept the will of the people and complain about something else you can actual change, like perhaps child poverty. £1 from every remoaner for every negative comment and food banks would be full.
49
08/01/2021 11:23:13 49 8
bbc
With the current employment and economic status, soaring house price is the wrong direction to go.
390
08/01/2021 13:14:49 15 20
bbc
They’re not soaring. It’s 6%, so slightly higher than trend.
21
08/01/2021 11:01:05 140 117
bbc
But weren’t house prices supposed to crash after Brexit. More project fear found to be lies
50
08/01/2021 11:24:13 36 5
bbc
Were it not for the stamp duty holiday they would not have risen. So government intervention caused the rise. And it is a blip.
51
08/01/2021 11:24:42 0 0
bbc
All assets will reprice against a rapidly increasing money supply. Local supply/demand variations also apply to housing
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
52
08/01/2021 11:25:03 28 4
bbc
As a young person who has bought a house in the last 3 months - you still need a 10% deposit.

Everyone knows renting is more expensive the issue is the cost of property is higher than lenders will lend so you need a higher deposit to cover the gap.

Saving a 30% deposit on a £200k house is a lot of money for younger people just starting out. It's not all going on flash cars and lip fillers ?????
255
08/01/2021 12:29:28 4 8
bbc
How many young first time buyers buy £200k houses? With the possible exception of the south east, a sensible first time buyers property will be available within 20 mins of ideal location for around £160k needing a £16k deposit (supported by government schemes) and a combined income of circa £35k. Barrier to entry is because people now seem to settle down later not house prices.
408
08/01/2021 13:21:17 0 5
bbc
Why do you need a 30% deposit? Why do you need a 200k house?
Buy a £160k house and stick with the 5-10% first time buyer mortgage.
Simple!
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
53
08/01/2021 11:25:09 8 8
bbc
Renting in the private sector is of similar cost to paying a mortgage. Don’t forget you have to pay for maintenance. And if you’ve an imbecile renting from you the costs can spiral. Hence no DSS please. And those who move into council houses (owned by large private companies) quite often incur huge costs as they have the backing of the taxpayer (council benefits) the people paying their rent.
54
08/01/2021 11:25:35 15 4
bbc
We live on an island with limited space and an ever increasing population. Time the "experts" started doing the maths because each time they say prices will fall they rise still further. Looks like my teenage daughter will have to wait for me to pop my clogs if she wants a house....
131
08/01/2021 11:47:08 10 1
bbc
Yes the pond is getting more crowded every day. Disease controls population in nature, there is more to come.
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
55
08/01/2021 11:25:53 13 35
bbc
The problem is that youngsters want everything now and they all want brand new!
89
CJR
08/01/2021 11:34:42 1 8
bbc
Spot on
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
56
Bob
08/01/2021 11:26:13 21 5
bbc
You had to save 10% deposit? You realise the average FTB deposit for 2019 was £50k on an average house price of £217k, so 23%?
420
08/01/2021 13:26:43 0 3
bbc
That’s rubbish, FTB average deposit was 15% in 2019 (95% mortgages are available though) and data is skewed by London property prices. National average house price might be 240k, but there are plenty of first time buyer properties for around £100-125k outside SE. With 95% mortgages available, is it that hard to find £7k for a £150k house?
Just be flexible on location.
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
57
GW
08/01/2021 11:26:30 26 5
bbc
Yeh but u got mortgage tax relief free university and actually got a grant to live on whilst at uni
99
CJR
08/01/2021 11:37:15 12 21
bbc
Yep but not everyone went to university, most left school and started working, hum can you see the link? Working brings in money for the deposit, wasting time and money on some obscure degree does not.
160
08/01/2021 11:54:53 8 6
bbc
If University is such a burden then dont go... Get a trade apprenticeship, work hard at it. Some employers will subsidise you to get qualifications whilst you are working. If not then work your way up the ladder. You will still end up with a good salary, be earning earlier and without incurring such debt. Too many youngsters think that UNI is the only correct way to progress a career
290
08/01/2021 12:38:11 2 1
bbc
Not automatically, grants were means tested and often miserly. And with interest rates well over 10%, that tax relief came in handy. A lot of people still lost their homes and all the savings they had put into them.
28
08/01/2021 11:06:17 111 37
bbc
I know many people who voted to remain due to the 'threat' by Cameron and Osbourne 2 weeks before the referendum that just on a vote to leave there would be an emergency budget, tax rises, interest rate rises and massive house price falls. None of which happened (which most of us knew would be the case) and interest rates actually came down the very next day after the vote.
58
08/01/2021 11:26:35 35 3
bbc
House price falls are what most people want.

And a decent amount of interest on their savings.
446
08/01/2021 13:30:57 0 0
bbc
I don't. I want high house prices and low interest rates. I don't pay interest on anything but higher interest rates depress the equity markets.
929
09/01/2021 02:29:56 0 0
bbc
Most people have far too much borrowed against their house. Any significant house price drop is going to leave loads of people in -ve equity and at risk of losing their house if they cannot keep up mortgage payments. So many people rely on every increasing house prices.
59
08/01/2021 11:26:52 44 6
bbc
We've been saying prices can't go on rising at these levels for years, but they have. Now our whole finincial system is dependent on the "fake" equity in our homes.
824
08/01/2021 16:52:44 5 2
bbc
The Great House Price Con.
60
08/01/2021 11:27:18 2 4
bbc
I would not trust any statistics that came from the Halifax. So many in that organisation completely out of their depth. Just like our Government to be honest!
45
08/01/2021 11:22:33 127 26
bbc
Completely concur about the lazy journalism that abounds on the BBC and elsewhere. Everything has to be littered with emotive words and statistics without providing context to get a balanced piece.
61
08/01/2021 11:27:18 11 6
bbc
It's because the writers of these articles aren't proper journalists. They are admin staff tasked with writing an article.
162
08/01/2021 11:57:02 7 5
bbc
But surely they've all got a BA in Media Studies?
62
08/01/2021 11:27:21 5 3
bbc
Supply and demand - it is simple economics

However money is going to be tight for 20 years now or we will collapse in a Greek style heap and perhaps worse

Nobody is thinking about this - C19 will be killing 10's of millions going forward by the poverty we've caused by our response.
153
08/01/2021 11:52:45 0 3
bbc
Your 6th word sums up your post.
39
GW
08/01/2021 11:18:16 9 12
bbc
Whole economy built on sand housing market subsidised by Con Govt with stamp duty suspended so rich can get rid of houses
63
08/01/2021 11:28:06 4 0
bbc
They can’t win can they? The other side to that is a lot of people were able to buy a property for the first time.
That wouldn’t suit your rant though would it?
26
08/01/2021 11:05:04 200 18
bbc
While Bitcoin hits $40,000 backed by ???

I would rather have the mud baked bricks...… world has flipped its button.
64
08/01/2021 11:28:33 20 1
bbc
95% of bitcoin is owned by 2% of account holders, Why would anyone get involved in this is beyond me.
42
08/01/2021 11:20:46 2 7
bbc
Just watch over the next 3 years house prices correcting to 2008/09 levels and the value of Bitcoin exceed the average at present house price.
65
CJR
08/01/2021 11:28:35 2 0
bbc
Please post your evidence
66
08/01/2021 11:28:42 91 22
bbc
Control our current population and you wont need to build new houses, we can't have infinite growth, the worlds resource are suffering as it.
Move to China - they love this way of thinking... or Nazi Germany. Removed
119
08/01/2021 11:44:09 9 1
bbc
Include food and energy needed, perfect storm. Especially with push to all electric with no power stations.
485
08/01/2021 13:56:26 3 16
bbc
Are you advocating forced sterilisation? Or forced abortions?
623
08/01/2021 15:06:39 2 5
bbc
Not true.
Number of homes has risen faster than population for decades.

We need new houses because more people own two or more, more live alone, more couples in 3, 4 or 5 beds, more empty investment/speculation properties, not enough homes where jobs are, not enough for affordable rents, too many old cold & need replacing...
695
08/01/2021 15:41:37 3 8
bbc
How? Euthanasia, or compulsory contraception, with severe punishment for any transgressions?
As this isn't a dictatorship, I don't think it's possible, (unfortunately).
767
you
08/01/2021 16:09:15 3 5
bbc
totally agree lots of scroungers find their way here to be kept by the state while
English people sleep rough
829
08/01/2021 16:56:57 1 0
bbc
Contraception is what is needed. The withdrawal agreement doesn't work. Brexit is a good example.
894
08/01/2021 19:02:24 2 0
bbc
The UK has a negative birth rate as do many western countries. Overpopulation is a world problem. Over consumption and greed is our problem
26
08/01/2021 11:05:04 200 18
bbc
While Bitcoin hits $40,000 backed by ???

I would rather have the mud baked bricks...… world has flipped its button.
67
08/01/2021 11:28:52 13 2
bbc
Who in their right mind throws $40K at this "investment" scam? No sympathy for those that are going to lose a fortune trying to get rich quick.
74
08/01/2021 11:30:24 17 0
bbc
You don't need to spend $40K to acquire, you can buy fractions of one. FWIW I haven't and won't.
Answer. You buy in years ago when it (in my case $500 in 2016) was much cheaper, then you part sell at steps on the way up. I'm already in six figure profit. People like you were saying this stuff when bitcoin was $100, $1000, $10,000 and even if it falls by a significant margin in any short term, it doesn't matter. Not too late though, it'll be heading to $100,000 in the short to medium term. Removed
68
08/01/2021 11:29:20 1 3
bbc
Soaring house prices in 2020 likely to slow this year, says Halifax....Halifax and the other so-called market geniuses said the same about 2018 and 2019 and the market absolutely rocketed. Then add the Stamp Duty relief and sellers and agents just loaded the price. Young people have no hope of getting on the hosing ladder.
105
Bob
08/01/2021 11:38:38 2 0
bbc
Prices did no such thing.

Jan 2018 - £224,544
Jan 2019 - £228,314
1.67% increase.

Jan 2019 - £228,314
Jan 2020 - £232,111
1.66% increase.

Oh boy, look at those rocketing numbers.

Some regions like the East and London were flat or negative.
19
08/01/2021 11:00:42 6 2
bbc
Soaring, BS Bingo Journo word. Just need carnage now for a full house.
69
08/01/2021 11:29:24 0 0
bbc
And chaos!
70
08/01/2021 11:29:27 3 6
bbc
I seem to recall many leavers stating categorically that Brexit would lead to lower house prices and higher wages so let’s be patient, shall we?
101
08/01/2021 11:37:21 2 2
bbc
I never heard that one. Silly comment.
37
08/01/2021 11:16:21 66 55
bbc
Some comments on here about affordability for younger people conveniently forget us oldies had to have a 10% deposit and had to save with a lender for some while before they would grant a mortgage. Renting is far more expensive than buying in most areas people just need to sacrifice some things to save the deposit just like we had to and choose areas that are 'affordable' rather than 'desirable'
71
max
08/01/2021 11:29:32 41 3
bbc
The difference is that when “us oldies” bought our home in 1997 we paid about twice our annual salary for it. Today, houses in our street sell for four to five times that and wages haven’t kept up. So, yes, we do worry about our now adult children being able to afford to buy in the future. Even a 10% deposit is out of reach for many young people these days.
39
GW
08/01/2021 11:18:16 9 12
bbc
Whole economy built on sand housing market subsidised by Con Govt with stamp duty suspended so rich can get rid of houses
72
08/01/2021 11:29:42 3 0
bbc
What happened back in 2016 when all you experts predicted a massive economic crash due to Brexit?
It never happened
73
08/01/2021 11:29:47 21 10
bbc
I can’t really take seriously any BBC headline that doesn’t include “Crisis”, “Catastrophe” or “Disaster”.
149
08/01/2021 11:52:00 10 11
bbc
Go elsewhere then.
Try another NATIONAL BROADCASTER HYS/Website.
Ohhh ..........
67
08/01/2021 11:28:52 13 2
bbc
Who in their right mind throws $40K at this "investment" scam? No sympathy for those that are going to lose a fortune trying to get rich quick.
74
08/01/2021 11:30:24 17 0
bbc
You don't need to spend $40K to acquire, you can buy fractions of one. FWIW I haven't and won't.
Britons and their obsession with house buying. Popcorn, anyone?
BBC has become like Daily " how much is his house worth" Mail nowadays.
Rather than contributing to the fair rent campaign they add to the rat race of property buying. At the same time depriving youngsters from owning one.
135
08/01/2021 11:41:45 47 19
bbc
As someone diagnosed with a illness which will one day reduce my quality of life im obsessed with paying of my mortgage so that after working from the age of 16 i can rest knowing when the money stops coming in i wont be left with a huge financial monthly burden.
How does that deprive you from owning a house?
Work 2 jobs and try scrimping and saving yourself and you may reap the rewards.
173
08/01/2021 12:02:22 6 7
bbc
"depriving youngsters from owning one"
only by the over-paid socialist elite BBC staff who are paid way more than they are worth to put out biased socialist b/s yet don't see the irony that they are the problem, and put themselves far above the plebs that they think they represent
611
08/01/2021 15:03:17 3 7
bbc
At the same time depriving youngsters from owning one.

Sorry, no. I realised a long time ago that the only way to buy a house was to get a better job. There are 2 ways of thinking on this issue.

1- moan and have tantrums that you're underpaid, and bemoan others who have more than you or

2- Pick a degree that enables you to earn lots of money afterwards and get enough bank to buy.

I chose 2
76
08/01/2021 11:30:56 133 2
bbc
It would be better if the UK saw soaring production and innovation in 2021.
112
08/01/2021 11:41:27 122 20
bbc
Apprenticeship not degree. Perhaps uni chaos will encourage students to get off the Blair blunder.
129
08/01/2021 11:46:42 11 25
bbc
Agreed. Internal consumer markets aren't going to get us far. Problem is our youngsters aren't up to the future challenge.
918
08/01/2021 23:19:53 0 0
bbc
Unlikely when most are under the police state laws or hiding behind the couch!
973
09/01/2021 16:34:36 0 0
bbc
But if you reward people for sitting in a pile of bricks more that for skills, working etc., what will they do?
46
08/01/2021 11:22:35 21 8
bbc
Not forgetting 15% interest rates at the time.
77
Bob
08/01/2021 11:31:23 17 1
bbc
Whilst true that interest rates were much higher, and also more likely to face swings meaning less stability and security in what you pay monthly, it is also true that for first time buyers the ratio of salary to house value continues to be at record levels, and is also mirrored in that the proportion of salary spent on housing per month is also much higher than back then.
455
08/01/2021 13:42:31 1 2
bbc
Again, more rubbish.
General long term average ratio income : mortgage payments is around 25-30% of gross salary.
If we take ave monthly gross income per head of £1900 & average house price of 240k, mortgage of around £1000 PM. That’s around 26% of salary on mortgage payments for a 2 person household.
And you could make it more affordable by going for. 30year mortgage. If you’re 25, then why not?
26
08/01/2021 11:05:04 200 18
bbc
While Bitcoin hits $40,000 backed by ???

I would rather have the mud baked bricks...… world has flipped its button.
as someone who managed to accumulate a few bitcoin over the years when they were selling for three figure prices, I'll happily have both. Removed
66
08/01/2021 11:28:42 91 22
bbc
Control our current population and you wont need to build new houses, we can't have infinite growth, the worlds resource are suffering as it.
79
bbc
Move to China - they love this way of thinking... or Nazi Germany. Removed
“Move to China - they love this way of thinking... or Nazi Germany.”

—-

Except that in this country it would be a voluntary conscientious decision not to put a burden on the planet, based on educated reasoning.
Removed
26
08/01/2021 11:05:04 200 18
bbc
While Bitcoin hits $40,000 backed by ???

I would rather have the mud baked bricks...… world has flipped its button.
80
08/01/2021 11:32:05 9 0
bbc
Yeah bit coin is based on block chain management and data mining... i dont trust it at all but to be fair I simply just don't understand it. I wish I had invested in it years ago though....
95
08/01/2021 11:36:03 15 0
bbc
I was in on the Tulip Bulbs way back in the day...
12
08/01/2021 10:55:35 340 41
bbc
limit purchases for buy to let, remove hoarding and slow release of land by builders in favour of future long term price, curb net migration, TRUE affordable homes for low income, stop false economies by part rent/own schemes that are just engineered for a developer to sell a £250k home to a £40k pa income family, stop building on greenbelt through greasing the palms of local councils etc etc
81
08/01/2021 11:33:04 87 17
bbc
Nail hit on head!
605
08/01/2021 14:59:31 3 0
bbc
but how do we organise to stop the Neo lIbs killing our kids futures ? We need to organise ..
We only left just over a week ago! Moronic comment. Removed
82
08/01/2021 11:33:18 25 6
bbc
We left a year ago mate, we had a year to stick to the same rules because we had no idea what rules would be agreed for after due to the sheer incompetence of our government
83
08/01/2021 11:33:27 11 0
bbc
Hmmm. Well I do believe the housing market was predicted to "crash" when the covid crisis started. I do wonder sometimes why the BBC considers repeating somebody's opinions about what might happen can be considered "news" - worthy of the "front page" of the website no less!!
84
08/01/2021 11:33:43 4 3
bbc
Real interest rates are negative. The cost of servicing a mortgage is a tiny fraction of what it used to be, so of course prices will rise. Any impact from immigration, available housing supply is negligible in comparison.

Let's suppose interest rates were back at a "normal" 5% overnight, do people still think house prices will keep rising?

Come on losers, get downvoting my comment...
98
08/01/2021 11:36:52 0 0
bbc
Back at normal 5%? Hardly, Interest rates have not been above 5% for the last 10 years. it's highly unlikely it will be there again for another 5 years or so.
282
08/01/2021 12:36:54 0 0
bbc
At last a comment from someone who understands the real reason for continued house price growth. Almost all of this is down to historically low borrowing costs. This will not change in the short to medium term as governments will be unable to service their massive post covid debts. There was significant tightening of lending following the last crisis, but lenders are now offering very low rates.
85
08/01/2021 11:33:52 2 0
bbc
About ready for another drop.
25
08/01/2021 11:04:01 29 50
bbc
If your primary residence is an investment it should be taxed like any other investment, i.e. no more primary residence relief on CGT. The taxpayer should not be subsidising your property investments, right? That would be socialism.
86
08/01/2021 11:34:17 15 10
bbc
So, in your view, nobody should ever be allowed to make a profit on anything without giving the government 40% of any gain ?

Presumably the government will reimburse any failed businesses then ?

Sounds like we take all the risk and the government takes the rewards.
Welcome to the world of big boy investors. If you're not a big enough boy to pay taxes on capital appreciation of your assets then you're not a big enough boy to sit at the big boys table. Businesses are taxed differently to assets by the way so I don't see why you made that argument (well I do, it's because you're thick). Removed
87
08/01/2021 11:24:49 2 1
bbc
The people behind all the politicians will not cease until we are all on our knees begging for mercy.
What a world we live in.
I want off.
88
08/01/2021 11:25:50 4 3
bbc
Who cares about house prices? The vast majority of people aren't looking to buy or sell....
55
08/01/2021 11:25:53 13 35
bbc
The problem is that youngsters want everything now and they all want brand new!
89
CJR
08/01/2021 11:34:42 1 8
bbc
Spot on
90
08/01/2021 11:34:42 2 2
bbc
Seems obvious that house prices will rise in these uncertain times. Where else are people gonna invest their money?
House prices will plummet with the impending depression. Also the BBC loving reporting on Trump and his "mindless" supporters. The BBC has hated Trump from day one. Removed
Looking at the live stream at the time, it's possible some of them were not trump supporters. I noticed some were wearing masks. Removed
142
08/01/2021 11:50:28 1 0
bbc
What a ridiculous meaningless post? What are you on about?
92
08/01/2021 11:34:53 61 12
bbc
Stamp duty holiday has largely benefited buy-to-let landlords and wealthier homeowners as the banks have pulled most of their mortgage offers for first-time buyers or made their lending more stringent. Average salary in the UK is £31,461 Average home price is £253K. You do the maths on how big the average first-time buyer's deposit needs to be. It's just unattainable for most, particularly singles
263
08/01/2021 12:32:06 26 31
bbc
Agree its unobtainable for singles but that is the barrier, not house prices. These days people settle down later. And please stop suggesting first time buyers should be buying average priced houses - its ludicrous.
465
08/01/2021 13:48:32 6 3
bbc
But the average is skewed by london. Plus most people by with a partner.
484
08/01/2021 13:55:33 3 6
bbc
Landlords still pay 3% additional stamp duty, this has not been suspended.

I have been buying property, but have not benefited from the stamp duty holiday, but 1 penny.
21
08/01/2021 11:01:05 140 117
bbc
But weren’t house prices supposed to crash after Brexit. More project fear found to be lies
93
08/01/2021 11:35:01 19 8
bbc
Drop in house prices were a prediction made 5 years ago.

The current situation follows Covid 19 & cuts on duties which are two big driving factors in people moving. These weren't known about 5 years ago and, had they been, they predictions may have been different.

You're criticism in unfounded seeing as the people you're criticising didn't have the info we have now
42
08/01/2021 11:20:46 2 7
bbc
Just watch over the next 3 years house prices correcting to 2008/09 levels and the value of Bitcoin exceed the average at present house price.
94
08/01/2021 11:35:13 0 0
bbc
over 50% of housing stock has no mortgage... and over 30% of buys are with Cash (no mortgage) - i dont believe a 30% drop is in site or even possible... maybe a 2-5% bump this year (Due to leaving CU and SM and end of SDH). But house price increase is always a good investment... if you have missed it.. sorry, stick to crypto
80
08/01/2021 11:32:05 9 0
bbc
Yeah bit coin is based on block chain management and data mining... i dont trust it at all but to be fair I simply just don't understand it. I wish I had invested in it years ago though....
95
08/01/2021 11:36:03 15 0
bbc
I was in on the Tulip Bulbs way back in the day...
96
08/01/2021 11:27:38 10 1
bbc
The government inflating prices in the housing market won't end well.
40
08/01/2021 11:18:53 34 104
bbc
Watch you don't fall off that wall Humpty Dumpty.
97
08/01/2021 11:36:51 4 0
bbc
Enjoy your 21st Century..... :-)
84
08/01/2021 11:33:43 4 3
bbc
Real interest rates are negative. The cost of servicing a mortgage is a tiny fraction of what it used to be, so of course prices will rise. Any impact from immigration, available housing supply is negligible in comparison.

Let's suppose interest rates were back at a "normal" 5% overnight, do people still think house prices will keep rising?

Come on losers, get downvoting my comment...
98
08/01/2021 11:36:52 0 0
bbc
Back at normal 5%? Hardly, Interest rates have not been above 5% for the last 10 years. it's highly unlikely it will be there again for another 5 years or so.
221
08/01/2021 12:18:20 0 0
bbc
I entirely agree. I mean "normal" as in what used to be considered textbook normal, until the Bank of England decided to destroy monetary policy
57
GW
08/01/2021 11:26:30 26 5
bbc
Yeh but u got mortgage tax relief free university and actually got a grant to live on whilst at uni
99
CJR
08/01/2021 11:37:15 12 21
bbc
Yep but not everyone went to university, most left school and started working, hum can you see the link? Working brings in money for the deposit, wasting time and money on some obscure degree does not.
67
08/01/2021 11:28:52 13 2
bbc
Who in their right mind throws $40K at this "investment" scam? No sympathy for those that are going to lose a fortune trying to get rich quick.
Answer. You buy in years ago when it (in my case $500 in 2016) was much cheaper, then you part sell at steps on the way up. I'm already in six figure profit. People like you were saying this stuff when bitcoin was $100, $1000, $10,000 and even if it falls by a significant margin in any short term, it doesn't matter. Not too late though, it'll be heading to $100,000 in the short to medium term. Removed
239
08/01/2021 12:24:27 5 0
bbc
Ha ha poor folks don't appreciate how much their pounds and dollars are juat bits if paper. Worthless paper when the QE chickens come home to roost.
246
08/01/2021 12:27:08 4 0
bbc
You don't have "six figure profit" until you sell.
323
08/01/2021 12:55:52 3 2
bbc
Says who? It’s basically pyramid selling, so if you get in early you’re quids in. People buying now are screwed. When the music stops (which it will), watch that pyramid collapse as there’s nothing backing it up.