Covid: Half of patients at some hospitals have virus
07/01/2021 | news | health | 2,650
More than half the patients at some hospitals have the virus, forcing other care to be cut back.
1
07/01/2021 13:46:17 338 79
bbc
And yet there are still people who think this isn't serious or worse, not real at all. False information is causing real harm now.
9
07/01/2021 13:51:59 44 162
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This is London, not the rest of the UK ?
188
07/01/2021 14:20:32 39 32
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To be fair there's not many that don't believe that covid is real, serious or deadly. But it isn't serious or deadly to the vast majority and much of the financial and societal damage could have been avoided by targeting the response instead of this one size fits all.
369
07/01/2021 14:45:21 3 5
bbc
Australian GPs urged to prescribe ivermectin triple therapy to fight COVID-19. Worth a shot ?
Twatz like you are the real harm Removed
07/01/2021 16:26:53 13 1
bbc
It has been all the way through. Witness the idiots who constantly quote high survival figures that conveniently ignore anyone over 70 or with underlying conditions (together about 25% of the UK population) and who talk as though everyone who doesn't actually die is bouncing with health and living just as before.
07/01/2021 16:45:29 2 8
bbc
I couldn't care less about what happens in London. Frankly, if you choose to live in such a dump then you don't deserve any healthcare whatsoever.
2
07/01/2021 13:47:02 140 2
bbc
Worrying times for those awaiting scans & diagnosis if delays are of any length of time.
64
07/01/2021 14:04:52 94 71
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Very worrying-so stay at home and do your part.
352
07/01/2021 14:42:33 10 3
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For two people I know it is already to late, and surprise surprise, the figures for unrelated deaths are not 'available' any more.
07/01/2021 18:06:58 4 1
bbc
My experience of this is my mother discovering she had cervical cancer. A few months ago she found out, and now she has had scans & operation and been given the all clear just over a few months. I was shocked, I was expecting it to be a very very lengthy treatment, especially with all the stuff you hear in the news.

Guess it depends on what you've actually got & where (including residence areas)
08/01/2021 22:24:26 0 0
bbc
Some might do well to go private if they can afford it..
3
07/01/2021 13:49:42 443 36
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The first lockdown was meant to be a last resort measure while we worked to “get the house in order” with healthcare capacity. The Nightingales were setup, but at the same time little appeared to be done about getting more staff in place.

Given how the NHS struggles every winter, getting as much done about capacity as possible in time for this winter should have been a no brainer.
I'm just here to remind everyone that Boris Johnson once said Donald Trump deserved the nobel peace prize.

Sorry to be off topic but there's no HYS on the terrorist attack that occurred yesterday.

And btw, let's expand our NHS.
Removed
171
07/01/2021 14:19:04 71 45
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The Nightingales were just a Government propaganda vehicle.
180
07/01/2021 14:19:31 37 31
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That's why the government has increased the number of nurses this year. Unfortunately nurses aren't immune from covid.
@BBC, why are you removing my comments? Why is there no HYS on the biggest attack on Western democracy since WW2?

Trump incited his supporters and used them as a weapon of terrorism. Our prime minister once claimed he deserved the Nobel peace prize. Why is Johnson not calling him out by name?
Removed
251
07/01/2021 14:31:14 27 36
bbc
Spot on. And now the precedent has been set that it is acceptable to lockdown to protect the NHS, rather than fund and resource it properly.

Unless we clearly say no, we can expect to see future politicians locking us down in future winters for the NHS' protection, long after Covid-19 itself has been defeated.
297
07/01/2021 14:36:38 25 13
bbc
The Government is fully accountable for not preparing for the winter peak. Every year we hit 95% capacity so it is no wonder when we hit a pandemic we have no capacity. They had 10 months to prepare for what would be an obvious winter spike. As you can see this was false economy as we are now bankrupt as a nation.
305
07/01/2021 14:35:08 13 3
bbc
they could have used them as vaccination centres
336
SP
07/01/2021 14:40:01 27 14
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Unfortunately, this government is not proactive on issues where cost is involved; it is reactive, and very late at that.
351
07/01/2021 14:42:25 30 2
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From all the stuff I've read and seen wasn't a huge problem that we just haven't got enough critical care nurses to deal with the amount if people needing specialist care and these highly trained/ experienced nurses can't just be trained up in 6 months
368
07/01/2021 14:45:19 2 4
bbc
"Should have been" being the operative phrase!
389
07/01/2021 14:42:35 22 2
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Did you think your comment through? Medical staff cannot be magicked into existence, there is no machine that you pull a lever on and out they pop. They have to be trained. Or poached from countries who pay them less, which is not very moral if you ask me. And yes, nurses should get bursaries like in the old days. But you can't instantly make medical staff appear.
404
07/01/2021 14:49:21 2 3
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My god! If only you were in charge.
447
07/01/2021 14:52:59 12 1
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The first lockdown was part of the original strategy to manage the virus in a series of waves with no wave big enough to swamp the NHS and repeat the scenes in Italy where people were being treated in corridors.
569
07/01/2021 15:03:37 8 1
bbc
Hospitals are alway under pressure every winter. This time it’s particularly acute.

Since the 1980’s all new hospitals have never been built big enough. By the time a new building goes up it is already inadequate for the numbers of local people, let alone future population growth.They are forever having an extensions added on restricted sites.
593
07/01/2021 15:06:04 11 3
bbc
The Covid level is down to human behaviour
637
07/01/2021 15:09:25 10 3
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Just out of interest, how do you think a resource model works where requirements vary between 80% in quiet times, 130% in seasonal variations and 200% in a pandemic?

Yes, these figures are guesses. but you get the point.

Do we have this whole bank of nurses and Dr's ordinarily sat twiddling thumbs? And what do we then do with them, once they are no longer required?
841
07/01/2021 15:27:57 8 2
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Training more staff takes years.
843
07/01/2021 15:28:05 7 3
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Although more staff are employed now against last year it takes time to bring on more staff.One way they have got more capacity although there are more patients is to increase capacity at normal hospitals hence why they have not yet brought in the nightingales.One thig not mentioned as we are saving more lives it must mean patients are in hospital longer which is increasing numbers
937
07/01/2021 15:36:08 7 3
bbc
I agree with the comment no brainer. It takes 3 years to train a nurse and then it can only train those who volunteer. Just stop and think about it where would you have got all the extra medical staff from. I am assuming that you have constructed your own toilet roll production line to guard against future shortages
07/01/2021 15:41:20 7 2
bbc
The problem is it takes 3 years to train a student nurse and 5 years to train a junior doctor THEN they take another 10 years getting really good at the job... you can't pull 1000s of full trained medical staff out of your backside and 30 years of govt cuts (Tory, Labour, Tory-Lib Dem, Tory) have gutted the army medical services too. Its all TA ie NHS staff so you can't use them either.
07/01/2021 15:46:59 2 3
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The armed forces can help, Army, Navy, Air force all have vast medical units
07/01/2021 16:31:08 0 4
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Forget what the government tells us, they're hopeless.

It's obvious anyone with brain cells that you mix indoors in the middle of an airborne pandemic, the NHS will get overwhelmed.
07/01/2021 16:33:32 3 2
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Another day, another ignorant comment on HYS. There is a chronic recruitment crisis in nursing, there are never less than 20,000 more nurses needed by the NHS and it's currently 40k +. Pray tell, in the world that you live in - what exactly should the government have done? The only think that is a no-brainer is the inside of your skull.
07/01/2021 16:41:03 2 1
bbc
How do you get more staff in place when they take several years to train? You can’t just ship them in from overseas when they are needed in their own countries.
07/01/2021 16:58:36 0 1
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Thank god for you spelling out the obvious
07/01/2021 17:06:16 2 3
bbc
There are thousands of recently retired docs and nurses who could have been retrained during the summer to help with staffing. Lack of foresight.
4
07/01/2021 13:49:53 84 16
bbc
This is why we need to get a grip as the secondary deaths due to missed ops, the knock on for cancelled physios (as I was informed today), economic hit and education lost will be the legacy of failed strategy now. Hit hard, hit fast and check Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam for what they are like now
95
07/01/2021 14:10:44 100 28
bbc
It's funny how the countries which have had the least deaths. Have also had the least lockdowns.

It's the timing of them that matters. We left it too late every single time!
99
07/01/2021 14:11:44 34 4
bbc
All three have one thing in common: they shut their borders *very* early. Our window of opportunity came and went by mid-February at the latest.

In 50 years time when children are learning about this in history, they won’t believe that in March 2020 the entire country was told to stay at home while the airports remained open for business, no quarantine or negative test required.
07/01/2021 16:08:18 5 3
bbc
Look closer to home, here in Guernsey we are free from any social restrictions as we locked down our boarders hard. In Jersey however they decided that tourism was more important and opened back up and they are now in a second lockdown.
07/01/2021 17:17:16 2 1
bbc
population density plays a part as well
07/01/2021 21:33:13 2 0
bbc
Err very wrong. They have had some of the most severe restrictions!
5
07/01/2021 13:50:07 34 33
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england's trump takes a lot of the blame.
11
mat
07/01/2021 13:52:49 9 14
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well deserved!
53
07/01/2021 14:02:50 5 2
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Rubbish,the problem has existed for decades.
55
xlr
07/01/2021 14:03:01 6 2
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I'm not a fan of Boris but simple incompetence (mostly due to his personality traits as trying to make do as he goes along) doesn't come close to Trump's malaevolent disregard for own citizens.

At one point you could almost swear Trump was intentionally trying to kill as many older Americans as possible, to free up jobs and take pressure off demands for an affordable healthcare system.
165
07/01/2021 14:18:20 0 2
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Trump > Bozo
209
07/01/2021 14:22:53 2 1
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Corbyn? Cult egotist who can't be wrong. Different politics, same human failings.
6
07/01/2021 13:50:32 45 3
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We need to leverage technology/ remote monitoring more and have a proper hospital @ home service nationally. Huge swaths of patients fill beds in hospitals that don’t need the acute/ specialist services there. This was a problem before the pandemic, and now when we need extra capacity it is becoming even more apparent.
13
pTc
07/01/2021 13:53:31 36 6
bbc
I was going to say the same thing. Most people could quite easily manage their own symptoms at home with online sessions with Drs and same day pharmacy services as needed.
17
07/01/2021 13:55:00 3 1
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Is that not what forced their hand to push people back out to care homes as quickly as possible initially, only exacerbating the problems many times over.
341
07/01/2021 14:40:25 7 1
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increase the population , you need more hospitals
7
07/01/2021 13:51:28 382 26
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Why did we build all these Nightingale hospitals if they were to only remain on standby, then be dismantled.

Shouldn't they have become covid centres while hospitals attempted to continue operating to help those in need with every other health problem.
15
07/01/2021 13:54:14 264 56
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For a photo op. They must have known from the start they could not staff them and so just created them, did the news story and then shut them a few weeks after opening them without use.
33
07/01/2021 13:58:49 32 5
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It was only *after* they built them and promoted them, that they realised they didn't have the staff to man them.
How could they not have known that before building them?
44
07/01/2021 14:00:50 38 2
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The NHS does not have an infinate supply of qualified staff. That is the problem.
77
07/01/2021 14:07:30 26 10
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That's far too sensible for the incompetent shower ruining the nation - that's not a typo by the way.
321
07/01/2021 14:38:13 13 8
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The UK gov is only good at making propaganda. Don't forget that we are led by Britain trump
361
07/01/2021 14:44:17 6 2
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There are not enough nhs staff to go round and you cant make people work in hospitals no matter how many vacancies there are.
366
07/01/2021 14:45:00 14 9
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So Bojo could bung his mates a few billion quid without any scrutiny using Covid as an excuse. They knew from the start they wouldn't be able to staff them. Crooks.
382
07/01/2021 14:46:55 5 3
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Worst case scenario, they become palliative care centres with staff making patients comfortable until they die.
526
Les
07/01/2021 14:59:18 13 7
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Tory austerity ensured there is insufficient staff to man them.
627
07/01/2021 15:09:01 4 3
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That is common sense, but then you voted for a dangerous clown
739
07/01/2021 15:19:11 7 2
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The Nightingales were 'window dressing' to show how effectively the Conservatives can run health care. The one thing they didn't think through was if you have staff vacancies at existing hospitals where, apart from raiding hospitals around the world, were you going to find trained medics to run them?

I've no doubt profitable construction contracts were handed out to build the Nightingales...
823
07/01/2021 15:26:19 5 2
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Simple: no staff. Got Johnson and his croniew off the hook for a few weeks though - it's all about political brownie points!
851
07/01/2021 15:28:35 0 2
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Going to be used as modern day mental hospitals soon
895
MT
07/01/2021 15:33:01 2 2
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Of course they should but not so many backhanders doing it the sensible way
07/01/2021 15:46:08 2 2
bbc
They were intended to be overflow for patients requiring hospitalisation but not intensive care, ie the moderately sick. The problem is A) staffing, B) predicting who'll be a bit ill with covid & C) dealing with people who may have covid but need treating for something else. If someone has a heart attack you don't wait 3 days to test them for covid before taking them to hospital do you?
07/01/2021 15:48:13 4 1
bbc
The problem is that the NHS is always running on inadequate staffing levels, and the Nightingale hospitals need to be staffed. While Medical Corps of the armed forces can contribute, they don't have the medical staff to fully operate these facilities. Perhaps Govt was simply hoping retired medics would fill in personnel gaps??
07/01/2021 15:48:38 1 4
bbc
might need to check facts first:
The Nightingale in London is reopening next week to take non Covid-19 patients to relieve the burden on other London hospitals. The Manchester Nightingale was reopened in October (Source BMJ)
07/01/2021 15:53:40 2 1
bbc
And who's going to staff them?
07/01/2021 15:57:08 3 1
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The medical needs of covid patients is often complex & unpredictable, so it is hard to meet their needs in a Nightingale.
07/01/2021 16:13:12 0 6
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It was just the way this government acts, do something (eventually) but dont think how the end product will work.
Labour would be worse than that, so we are in a bit of a pickle.
07/01/2021 16:21:36 3 2
bbc
We didn't build hospitals. We kitted out existing structures. The Army and other contractors upheld their commitment, so did those who were willing to provide care. The only commitment lacking is that of our current Government to do things in a timely manner.
07/01/2021 16:25:40 1 2
bbc
Because it's a scam.
07/01/2021 16:27:01 4 1
bbc
20 students at the college where I work have lost a parent to covid. One (previously healthy) 19 y/o student is currently being ventilated & things aren't looking good for them. My friend in London has lost 4 neighbours on his street last week. 1 previously healthy colleague now has type 2 diabetes where it attacked his pancreas, another, age 30, had blood clots on lungs from covid.
07/01/2021 17:22:42 2 2
bbc
They couldn't be Covid centres, they have no ICU or many other hospital facilities. Also no staff. Just rows of beds for the cameras.
8
07/01/2021 13:51:52 186 43
bbc
Closing schools, pubs, hairdressers, gyms etc reduces contact between people and limits opportunity for the virus to spread.

Masks reduce your likelihood of spreading it to others.

Good personal hygiene reduces your likelihood of catching it.

The fewer people that need hospital care to recover from Covid, the more hospital space is available to treat other ailments.

It's that simple.
30
07/01/2021 13:58:08 165 24
bbc
Sadly I still see lots of people who are too simple to understand something that simple.
70
07/01/2021 14:05:41 13 27
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Thanks for the patronising safety advice.

I mean, none of us knew this already, right ?

Sigh.
136
07/01/2021 14:15:35 6 12
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Why don't we use tax revenue from businesses to open up more hospital space, hire more staff and build capacity so they don't have to cancel cancer ops?
200
07/01/2021 14:21:23 12 4
bbc
Unfortunately, a large swathe of the population is even more simple.
213
07/01/2021 14:23:14 8 10
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we knew about the mask thing a year ago...testing at airports makes a difference too still not implemented in UK
345
07/01/2021 14:41:26 14 6
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Everything you say is completely true. And yet, amazingly, a third of your votes are down - says it all about HYS. Either a significant number of wind-up merchants or idiots.
392
07/01/2021 14:47:42 7 6
bbc
True but the type of mask available to public is of limited effectiveness even if used correctly
Add to that there is very little information on the originating source (they don't look back to identify where someone caught the virus very often) apart from family, hospital and supermarkets (all essential) means that the virus will continue to spread and not necessarily at a noticeably reduced rate
402
07/01/2021 14:48:43 13 2
bbc
The problem is that closing pubs, gyms, hairdressers etc doesn't reduce contact if people then find other ways to socialise, exercise, get their hair cut. Friends gather in one home to watch football. Friends get together to exercise (sometimes outside, sometimes using exercise equipment in a private house). Hairdressers turn 'mobile'. And supermarkets now full of kids.

So it isn't that simple.
450
07/01/2021 14:51:09 9 1
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Schools are not closed hundreds of primary school children are still attending as key workers need to work however schools now need to take pupils who do not have computers or wifi sone schools will be half full
456
07/01/2021 14:53:41 0 10
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What a genius......of God'd sake take control...then bog off
665
mc
07/01/2021 15:08:22 7 6
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and still more are dying from cancer and suicide and mental health than covid but are being denied help and treatment
867
07/01/2021 15:30:29 5 2
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Closing down limits contact, that includes workplaces, and schools, and all, all incoming passenger flights , including Irish ones.
GH
07/01/2021 16:23:58 4 2
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Why would people downvote this eminently sensible post?

Utter dimwits!
07/01/2021 16:27:15 5 6
bbc
No, it certainly isn't that simple. The lockdown regulations are riddled with exceptions and anomalies. Some of the rules lack common sense.

The November lockdown did not reduce case numbers, neither did the placing of most regions into the top tier.

I will continue to be careful, but I have lost faith in the lockdowns and I now resent the loss of freedom, for months to come.
07/01/2021 17:08:34 2 5
bbc
“Masks reduce your likelihood of spreading it to others.”

Only approved virus resistant masks stop the virus the cheapo ones sold to Joe public do nothing much hence the WHO advice not to wear them for the general public.
08/01/2021 13:03:27 0 0
bbc
sadly people are still denying that it exists, or is that bad, or that more people have died of something else in the past, the death numbers are false, that the vaccination is control, their freedom is curtailed, the NHS hospitals are empty. Common sense says that government wouldn't lock down if things were not that bad but hey! its untrue!! Their attitude & beliefs have no logic & risk lives
1
07/01/2021 13:46:17 338 79
bbc
And yet there are still people who think this isn't serious or worse, not real at all. False information is causing real harm now.
9
07/01/2021 13:51:59 44 162
bbc
This is London, not the rest of the UK ?
40
07/01/2021 13:59:54 28 5
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Yet
78
07/01/2021 14:07:46 53 15
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It is spreading very fast in many other areas so do as ordered STAY AT HOME.
219
07/01/2021 14:23:48 43 9
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London is 30% of uk population. It’s 2 x Scotland, Wales and NI combined. In % of the space. So yes it will always have more effect than anywhere else in uk for everything.

I don’t live in London, no axe to grind but can see reality.
247
07/01/2021 14:25:09 12 18
bbc
its spreads around cities with international airports first
267
07/01/2021 14:32:15 34 1
bbc
We're in Huntingdon and last week we double the infection with an extra 550 - and we are slightly above the national average for nubers per 100,000,

So no, not just London
580
07/01/2021 15:04:43 12 2
bbc
Don't worry this will soon spread to Lancashire if the local boarding school Stonyhurst is anything to go by. Against the law they are still getting their overseas students in and actively doing so as I type thus staying open. One rule for us and one for them
10
07/01/2021 13:52:12 206 21
bbc
The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?
The virus needs to be isolated, and that needs isolation hospitals and on-site staffing.

Otherwise, even with the best intentions there is inevitable spread to other patients and out into the wider community
26
07/01/2021 13:57:25 159 20
bbc
"isolation hospitals" is the right idea
But was that not the idea behind the Nightingales which they built at vast (public) cost and with a huge 'ta-da', *then* realised they hadn't the nurses to run them, and are now quietly dismantling?
32
07/01/2021 13:58:32 19 2
bbc
If you look at the geography of the UK and the locations of hospitals you will see why this has not been the case all along. Not everyone lives in an area with multiple hospitals in the area.
46
07/01/2021 14:01:18 25 1
bbc
There is a practical problem with that seemingly logical idea. Many people are aymptomatic and can come with a non-covid condition, bringing covid in with them. Most of the time you do not have time to test before you start treating the other condition - result a covid clear place is no longer clear and the whole place will need to be shut for a deep clean. Works only if you know Covid is there.
98
07/01/2021 14:11:21 6 4
bbc
"The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?"

You would of thought that this would have been achievable, and also that the nightingale hosps could have been used for routine if not used for C19. does seem that the people who sit behind desks didnt think it through. But then as a population people created this wave.
100
xlr
07/01/2021 14:11:52 12 3
bbc
We're past the point where CV-clean has any meaning. You can have very early covid infection, but come up negative in the test simply because the virus RNA is not yet in the mucous membranes or below the test limit of detection.
316
07/01/2021 14:36:52 5 11
bbc
The hospitals are clearly unhygienic
864
07/01/2021 15:29:47 5 1
bbc
My local hospital was 'CV -clean' until this week - now it's taking overspill from others including London (100 miles away). Overwhelmed!
912
MT
07/01/2021 15:34:26 3 7
bbc
Yes and a very easy solution to keep wards virus free isn't even being done in UK. UV-C lights shred ANY virus including Covid. Robotic UV-C lights are used throughout the world, but not apparently in the UK. You have more chance of finding a UV-C light in a urinal hand dryer than a hospital! SHAMEFUL
932
cp
07/01/2021 15:35:36 8 1
bbc
Possible in cities perhaps but not in parts of the country with one hospital serving a wide area.
07/01/2021 15:54:32 9 1
bbc
Whilst this seems to be a perfect principle, it can't really be done.

Imagine I have a car accident and would normally be sent to a trauma unit in hospital. But magically (tests aren't fast/you wouldn't always want to do them in transit) the ambulance found that I was infected.

Great, divert to a C-only hospital (who specialise in that) and I can't be treated.

It really is Catch-22.
07/01/2021 15:56:38 6 1
bbc
Because 1 in 50 people have covid. If you had a heart attack are you seriously suggesting you wait for a test to be carried out to decide which hospital the ambulance takes you to? If it was that easy it would have been done already....

it also doesn't help if the number of covid positive patients exceeds the bed capacity of the hospitals.... we saw that happen in Italy and Spain in March-April
07/01/2021 16:14:18 5 1
bbc
Because in rural areas, we only have the luxury of one hoslital, miles and miles away.. choice is not a luxury we have outside of cities...
07/01/2021 21:30:16 1 0
bbc
Because cv clean is impossible to achieve this cannot be done. Testing is not 100% foolproof and many people attending a&e will be completely asymptomatic or showing no early symptoms prior to illness
07/01/2021 21:49:05 1 1
bbc
You are brighter than those who have been ordained as fit to rule.
That is how poor a democracy we have in the UK.
Rees Mogg is not fit to polish my shoes.
08/01/2021 12:48:15 0 0
bbc
Staff or patients can bring it in from the community outside - the networks that people still permitted to have & the allowed mixing (supermarkets et al) can be sources of infection, particularly with the new mutation which is much more infectious. & the number keeps rising. Those requiring other treatment (eg cancer & heart) may need icu beds - but none available due to critical covid patients
Nix
08/01/2021 21:51:37 0 0
bbc
The NHS is actually trying to do this in trusts made up of multiple hospital sites but sadly its not as simple as you might hope. What do you do when someone is too sick to be transferred between hospitals after turning up at the wrong site? It happens regularly. Or when you don't know someone's covid status on admission when they come in without classic symptoms?
5
07/01/2021 13:50:07 34 33
bbc
england's trump takes a lot of the blame.
11
mat
07/01/2021 13:52:49 9 14
bbc
well deserved!
No HYS on USA incident so I’ll do it here:
All those who are resigning from Trumps team <20 days before they are out of a job are opportunist and looking at there next jobs without tarnish of being on ‘team trump’. If they really felt aggrieved they would have taken a role under him in the first place.

No one who has worked or trump is employable in my opinion.
Removed
25
07/01/2021 13:55:15 0 6
bbc
And how many people do you employ?
34
07/01/2021 13:58:54 2 1
bbc
Outrageous not to accept the result, after an election or referendum here the result surely would be accepted by all ???
Why isn’t Trump in custody? Removed
86
07/01/2021 14:08:58 2 1
bbc
Bit hard, some I am sure believed in Trump's 'ideals' but now feel he has lost the plot totally. No-one likes losing and they may feel he could have shown more statesmanship but by inciting mob action he has gone to far. Given the type of some of Trumps supporters deserting him even now could be a risk to their safety but there are limits for most people.
6
07/01/2021 13:50:32 45 3
bbc
We need to leverage technology/ remote monitoring more and have a proper hospital @ home service nationally. Huge swaths of patients fill beds in hospitals that don’t need the acute/ specialist services there. This was a problem before the pandemic, and now when we need extra capacity it is becoming even more apparent.
13
pTc
07/01/2021 13:53:31 36 6
bbc
I was going to say the same thing. Most people could quite easily manage their own symptoms at home with online sessions with Drs and same day pharmacy services as needed.
440
07/01/2021 14:52:19 0 5
bbc
Then don't!
14
07/01/2021 13:53:57 11 11
bbc
The lack of useful preparation by the DoH and NHS even after a year borders on criminal negligence. Useless Nightingale hospitals because no thought given to staffing. The panic action at the start meant no thought for non-covid patients resulting in a backlog putting even more strain on the system. A continual saga of panic and reactions with a total lack of considered planning and forethought.
61
07/01/2021 14:04:08 9 2
bbc
What we are seeing is yet another example of the NHS being not fit for purpose and being in desperate need of a root and branch review.
Millions and millions of pounds wasted and front line staff suffering. The sad thing is no government will face in to this, as it is seen as a vote loser
204
07/01/2021 14:21:57 0 1
bbc
EU really messed up the NHS
7
07/01/2021 13:51:28 382 26
bbc
Why did we build all these Nightingale hospitals if they were to only remain on standby, then be dismantled.

Shouldn't they have become covid centres while hospitals attempted to continue operating to help those in need with every other health problem.
15
07/01/2021 13:54:14 264 56
bbc
For a photo op. They must have known from the start they could not staff them and so just created them, did the news story and then shut them a few weeks after opening them without use.
36
07/01/2021 13:59:31 21 2
bbc
Exeter is in use for Covid patients and has been since November.
42
xlr
07/01/2021 14:00:16 31 13
bbc
Pretty much. Their function was always to comfort the public, not to provide actual use. Much like the race to buy ventilators.
342
07/01/2021 14:40:49 10 3
bbc
Why couldnt we have used the 10 Months to give emergency focused training for the extra nurses?
07/01/2021 16:27:21 3 2
bbc
Very true, they must have known staffing was not possible.
I reckon they tried to copy what China did, but there it was possible to seal off cities and provinces stopping all inter-province travel, which meant those other provinces could send teams of medical staff to deal with the hotspot of Wuhan and it's province Hubei.
07/01/2021 16:32:24 2 2
bbc
Forget what the government does, they're hopeless.

It's obvious to anyone with brain cells that you mix indoors in the middle of an airborne pandemic, the NHS will get overwhelmed.

It's up to us to stop mixing indoors unmasked.
07/01/2021 17:03:52 1 2
bbc
Plus at a cost of over £66 million each one. Disgraceful waste of money.
16
pTc
07/01/2021 13:54:51 14 15
bbc
95 percent of the NHS as been a COVID only service since last March. Hence the massive increase in community deaths since, again, March- because people are petrified of using the services.
20
07/01/2021 13:56:16 11 3
bbc
Based on what evidence?
21
07/01/2021 13:56:19 7 1
bbc
No, it hasn't.
203
07/01/2021 14:21:16 0 3
bbc
hospitals have been empty all across the country
08/01/2021 05:50:56 1 0
bbc
Source?
6
07/01/2021 13:50:32 45 3
bbc
We need to leverage technology/ remote monitoring more and have a proper hospital @ home service nationally. Huge swaths of patients fill beds in hospitals that don’t need the acute/ specialist services there. This was a problem before the pandemic, and now when we need extra capacity it is becoming even more apparent.
17
07/01/2021 13:55:00 3 1
bbc
Is that not what forced their hand to push people back out to care homes as quickly as possible initially, only exacerbating the problems many times over.
59
07/01/2021 14:03:33 9 1
bbc
It was never going to be realistic to keep covid out of care homes. It’s unfair to keep a resident in a hospital following a covid diagnosis; they may well have mild symptoms and it’s unacceptable to use a scarce hospital bed to “store” care home residents. Instead care homes should have been supported just as hospitals to maintain “green/ red” areas to protect other residents.
18
07/01/2021 13:52:11 11 19
bbc
And it's all "our fault" according to the government.

Sigh.

Remember when Bozo promised 12 weeks to beat the virus ?

Why does he always give false optimism ?

Sigh.
76
07/01/2021 14:07:25 6 3
bbc
so people ignoring guidance and doing as they please, Raves, house parties, going to see mates and ignore guidance is the govt fault is it? Yes it could be handled better, but if people act like selfish idiots then blame them !!!
92
07/01/2021 14:09:49 0 4
bbc
All Boris has done wrong is go on holiday at the start, miss 5 COBRA meetings, ignore advice to lockdown so his gfriend could have a baby shower, get the virus by shaking hands with patients, not condemn his cronies when they break rules, eat out scheme, universities free for all, constant u turns, constant waffle, made promises he can't keep but apart from that he's been useless.
491
07/01/2021 14:56:46 1 1
bbc
Karen?
19
DrR
07/01/2021 13:55:39 210 5
bbc
It's a bad time to be ill, thats for sure.
93
07/01/2021 14:10:09 184 12
bbc
Worst time possible to get cancer
16
pTc
07/01/2021 13:54:51 14 15
bbc
95 percent of the NHS as been a COVID only service since last March. Hence the massive increase in community deaths since, again, March- because people are petrified of using the services.
20
07/01/2021 13:56:16 11 3
bbc
Based on what evidence?
137
pTc
07/01/2021 14:15:41 1 2
bbc
This evidence. You will note this was published in may. https://www.bmj.com/content/369/bmj.m1931
16
pTc
07/01/2021 13:54:51 14 15
bbc
95 percent of the NHS as been a COVID only service since last March. Hence the massive increase in community deaths since, again, March- because people are petrified of using the services.
21
07/01/2021 13:56:19 7 1
bbc
No, it hasn't.
22
07/01/2021 13:56:29 195 40
bbc
My brother in law was trying to help a customer yesterday who refused to wear a mask and flatly denied covid was real with the manager refusing to confront him, all the time knowing one of their colleagues was fighting for his life in hospital. Money trumps common sense....I despair!
31
07/01/2021 13:58:32 132 57
bbc
If only people had the power or inclination to treat this as a crime - denying a virus, or intentionally spreading it is indirect attempt to harm
110
07/01/2021 14:13:06 21 5
bbc
I'm afraid that even with the best intentions you cannot help a fool. Best to ignore them completely although you can refuse to serve them. Probably best to just stand well away from them and have no physical contact at all.
148
07/01/2021 14:17:18 27 3
bbc
There's no treatment yet for stupid.
608
mc
07/01/2021 15:06:34 7 34
bbc
it is not illegal ro wear a mask in fact my gp says safer not too as the amount of germs on a mask causing more harm
875
07/01/2021 15:31:11 5 5
bbc
I see you mention 'trumps' - nutters this side of the pond too!
nax
07/01/2021 16:04:49 12 1
bbc
It's the customers who wear a mask as a chin warmer that get me
07/01/2021 16:06:17 17 3
bbc
As a manager in essential services I also suffer the same idiots without face coverings (usually weed heads etc). I still challenge every one although the govt guidelines forbid it and the Police these days are simply social services. Its every man for himself I am afraid. I will continue my quest to protect though!
07/01/2021 16:32:15 9 5
bbc
I know terrible, 50 people I know personally are all currently fighting for their lives all in intensive care with it, who knows if they’ll make it, all this while some are denying it, there’s so many stories like ours out there, this misinformation spreading is rife.
07/01/2021 21:51:17 3 1
bbc
The super markets are raking it in, but refuse to challenge anyone not wearing a mask in store.
They should be prosecuted for enabling the spread of the virus.
08/01/2021 18:21:08 0 0
bbc
Which industry?
23
07/01/2021 13:57:01 10 12
bbc
This is wrong on so many levels, ok covid is a serious threat and unfortunately it has caused deaths and anguish to so many, but the NHS is now being sacrificed on the covid alter to one would think, every other thing the NHS was set up to treat.
Why are the nightingales being underutilised ?
Serious questions need asked which MPs made a fortune setting them up, knowing there was no staffing.
57
07/01/2021 14:03:07 6 6
bbc
The people in hospital with covid are dying also, more acutely than cancer care. They aren't admitting people with the sniffles so your point about treating covid with superiority is ridiculous and highlights the complete willful ignorance of the population to this disease. The issue is years of underfunding. If it wasn't covid that broke the back, it would have been any virus.
84
07/01/2021 14:08:52 0 4
bbc
Nightingales were a propaganda exercise and never had, nor ever had a chance, of having, enough staff, to treat serious Covid cases. There was already an acute shortage of Intensive Care staff. Running the Health Service at maximum capacity is suicidal in this situation and the Govt were warned of this in 2016. The lack of spending in the last 10 years has truly come home to roost.
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
35
07/01/2021 13:59:14 27 16
bbc
because the only alternative we're offered is socialism!
43
DrR
07/01/2021 14:00:36 16 8
bbc
I am not sure any other party would have done any better. Stop knocking the government and help to get Covid under control.
50
07/01/2021 14:02:02 10 13
bbc
There is no logic.
Working Class Tory Voters Are a complete anomaly and seem to believe that they are in some special.
It is very sad.
52
07/01/2021 14:02:19 8 7
bbc
Because there's a lot lot more to life and what needs paying than the NHS. I've only ever had bad service from the NHS after paying into it since working age. I pay for private too, id rather not have to pay for bad service from our 'beloved nhs'
69
07/01/2021 14:05:28 6 10
bbc
Because they're selfish to the core
81
07/01/2021 14:07:47 9 7
bbc
......and you think we'd all be sipping cocktails and having a ball now if Corbyn had of won? Be careful what you wish for...besides numerous other Countries have faced the same dilemmas one way or another. If you think you could do a better job, become PM. It's easy to sit behind a keyboard & criticise.
105
07/01/2021 14:12:15 3 5
bbc
Jeeze! People thinking because of criticism of 10 years of the NHS having its budget, I'm all in favour of Corbyn. Weird logic.

The NHS is bad because the Tories cut and privatised many parts of it.

And ironically, private doctors _are_ NHS doctors too working on the side. Chicken and egg issues.

And the only alternative is not socialism.
184
07/01/2021 14:19:31 0 3
bbc
people like to vote in upperclass toffs in Britain
191
07/01/2021 14:20:45 3 2
bbc
Because they know that with Labour it is always much worse.
No HYS on USA incident so I’ll do it here:
All those who are resigning from Trumps team <20 days before they are out of a job are opportunist and looking at there next jobs without tarnish of being on ‘team trump’. If they really felt aggrieved they would have taken a role under him in the first place.

No one who has worked or trump is employable in my opinion.
Removed
25
07/01/2021 13:55:15 0 6
bbc
And how many people do you employ?
10
07/01/2021 13:52:12 206 21
bbc
The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?
The virus needs to be isolated, and that needs isolation hospitals and on-site staffing.

Otherwise, even with the best intentions there is inevitable spread to other patients and out into the wider community
26
07/01/2021 13:57:25 159 20
bbc
"isolation hospitals" is the right idea
But was that not the idea behind the Nightingales which they built at vast (public) cost and with a huge 'ta-da', *then* realised they hadn't the nurses to run them, and are now quietly dismantling?
67
07/01/2021 14:05:29 9 18
bbc
You do not need extra staff. The staff follow the patients, but on separate sites.

So say half the staff in the Nightingale doing CV only, while the other half are running a half-open hospital doing all the urgent non-CV work

The layout can also allow more patients / staff, not ideal but better than cross infection
347
07/01/2021 14:41:36 5 2
bbc
They were not meant as isolation more as overflow as routing hospitals filled, they just forgot you still need staff. Either that or none of their chums ran a medical staff empoyment agency.
926
07/01/2021 15:35:15 4 1
bbc
Used to have these, they were called TB asylums. Now they are all flats and retail parks.
The Epsom hospitals spring to mind, North Cheam, Sutton....
08/01/2021 03:18:07 0 0
bbc
More likely built for a worst case scenario where contagion (and R rates) went through the roof & the Nightingales would then become an isolation hospice. It takes so little wit to realise that extra clinical staff wouldn't be conjured up overnight & that splitting the existing staff between more locations would increase overheads & reduce effectiveness that even the worst politician would know,
27
07/01/2021 13:57:31 9 14
bbc
Very sad and all very preventable with a functioning government who understood the problem and were willing to take the right decisions at the right time

Those who said we should learn to live with the virus are getting what they wanted. Complete chaos and the worst of both worlds with a failing health care system and a failing economy.
51
07/01/2021 14:02:14 15 4
bbc
Would also help if we had a public who understood the seriousness of the pandemic and followed the guidelines instead of thinking I'll be ok if I get covid
28
07/01/2021 13:57:49 25 20
bbc
Now maybe some people will understand why we need the total lock-down.
257
07/01/2021 14:31:51 5 9
bbc
The success of the NHS is currently causing these levels of Covid patients in hospital's.
422
07/01/2021 14:50:10 2 2
bbc
We absolutely do need a total lockdown. I work on building sites and it astonishes me on a daily basis how some people have little regard for social distancing. Only yesterday I watched a Site Manager explain the contents of a small box to a plumber. They were so close they might as well have been kissing. A Site Manager for god's sake! When I called him on it his attitude was lethargic at best.
475
07/01/2021 14:55:49 3 2
bbc
The fecklessness, stupidity and lack of any care or compassion of (what is hopefully still) a minority is currently causing these levels of COVID patients in hospitals. (I'm sorry, but I couldn't bring myself to put an apostrophe in hospitals where Sir Keir... did)
29
07/01/2021 13:58:08 2 7
bbc
What you mean when Ivor Cummings, Levitt, and those guys at Unherd spent the whole of the summer convincing 40% of society that COVID didn't matter because it would be gone by the 25th of August they were wrong?
8
07/01/2021 13:51:52 186 43
bbc
Closing schools, pubs, hairdressers, gyms etc reduces contact between people and limits opportunity for the virus to spread.

Masks reduce your likelihood of spreading it to others.

Good personal hygiene reduces your likelihood of catching it.

The fewer people that need hospital care to recover from Covid, the more hospital space is available to treat other ailments.

It's that simple.
30
07/01/2021 13:58:08 165 24
bbc
Sadly I still see lots of people who are too simple to understand something that simple.
570
07/01/2021 15:03:49 5 10
bbc
Is this why since we all started wearing masks the cases have done nothing but increase......
07/01/2021 16:28:56 4 4
bbc
I have come across very few people behaving in a reckless or anti-social way., but we are all punished and deprived of the power to make common sense choices.
22
07/01/2021 13:56:29 195 40
bbc
My brother in law was trying to help a customer yesterday who refused to wear a mask and flatly denied covid was real with the manager refusing to confront him, all the time knowing one of their colleagues was fighting for his life in hospital. Money trumps common sense....I despair!
31
07/01/2021 13:58:32 132 57
bbc
If only people had the power or inclination to treat this as a crime - denying a virus, or intentionally spreading it is indirect attempt to harm
No thanks fascist. Removed
687
07/01/2021 15:13:25 20 10
bbc
Deniers and flouters should have their right to 100% NHS revoked. They should be asked to contribute or accept they will lose priority for oxygen in times of scarcity.
07/01/2021 17:11:05 4 3
bbc
I have been saying this all along. The fact they are going out knowing full well that passing it on could end up killing not just a vulnarable person but children and other adults, should mean they get higher sentences for premeditated harm not a paltry £200 fine? Is that all a persons life is worth in todays age?
07/01/2021 19:37:03 2 1
bbc
UK has become enough of a police state already.
However idiotic, people are entitled to their beliefs in a democracy.
Do your bit and take all precautions
but try and remain tolerant of others.
07/01/2021 23:40:17 1 2
bbc
What if the guy was one of the 'official figures' say 49 out of 50 who doesn't have it and/or has an exemption (mental or physical)? The over reaction to this virus is nothing more than a sick joke in my humble opinion. Cue 'tin foil, covidiot' posts from those who cannot accept any alternative views other than their own.
10
07/01/2021 13:52:12 206 21
bbc
The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?
The virus needs to be isolated, and that needs isolation hospitals and on-site staffing.

Otherwise, even with the best intentions there is inevitable spread to other patients and out into the wider community
32
07/01/2021 13:58:32 19 2
bbc
If you look at the geography of the UK and the locations of hospitals you will see why this has not been the case all along. Not everyone lives in an area with multiple hospitals in the area.
75
07/01/2021 14:07:24 7 11
bbc
Why does anyone need to be treated 'locally' ? It is not like visitors are allowed.

Everyone has a 'second nearest' hospital so as long as one is available for 'CV and one for 'other' it works
7
07/01/2021 13:51:28 382 26
bbc
Why did we build all these Nightingale hospitals if they were to only remain on standby, then be dismantled.

Shouldn't they have become covid centres while hospitals attempted to continue operating to help those in need with every other health problem.
33
07/01/2021 13:58:49 32 5
bbc
It was only *after* they built them and promoted them, that they realised they didn't have the staff to man them.
How could they not have known that before building them?
128
07/01/2021 14:14:44 16 3
bbc
Someone in the government must surely have asked how they were going to staff them. Or at least you would hope.
No HYS on USA incident so I’ll do it here:
All those who are resigning from Trumps team <20 days before they are out of a job are opportunist and looking at there next jobs without tarnish of being on ‘team trump’. If they really felt aggrieved they would have taken a role under him in the first place.

No one who has worked or trump is employable in my opinion.
Removed
34
07/01/2021 13:58:54 2 1
bbc
Outrageous not to accept the result, after an election or referendum here the result surely would be accepted by all ???
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
35
07/01/2021 13:59:14 27 16
bbc
because the only alternative we're offered is socialism!
120
xlr
07/01/2021 14:14:22 3 8
bbc
Are you sure socialism is worse?
15
07/01/2021 13:54:14 264 56
bbc
For a photo op. They must have known from the start they could not staff them and so just created them, did the news story and then shut them a few weeks after opening them without use.
36
07/01/2021 13:59:31 21 2
bbc
Exeter is in use for Covid patients and has been since November.
104
07/01/2021 14:12:13 9 4
bbc
And surprise surprise Devon has a lower case rate than most places.

NHS superspreader ?
113
07/01/2021 14:13:23 17 3
bbc
Its about the only one. The others mostly never had a single patient before being closed.
37
07/01/2021 13:59:35 13 5
bbc
Thinking forwards, we need to offer indemnity to staff for adverse events caused by inadequate staffing and lack of equipment.

Mid-Staffs and other failures have demonstrated that in any investigation the patient facing staff will always be penalised, no matter how impossible a situation they are placed in. With 1 nurse caring for 3 ICU patients harmful omissions and errors are inevitable.
177
07/01/2021 14:18:21 1 22
bbc
EU really messed up the NHS
38
07/01/2021 13:59:52 78 32
bbc
In 2016, in The Cygnus Exercise, the Tory Govt were warned that we were woefully unprepared for a pandemic but they did nothing about it because of cost. Just imagine if the Govt had invested a small fraction of the money it has spent during the pandemic in the NHS, especially Intensive Care facilities and staff, before the pandemic, how much money would have been saved during it.
58
07/01/2021 14:03:08 68 12
bbc
That's life. Governments spend on what people are shouting for at the time.
72
07/01/2021 14:06:41 7 11
bbc
For government, read NHS.
186
07/01/2021 14:20:16 8 2
bbc
So what? Governments have been told that the road system is under-maintained, that the power generation industry needs investment, etc. etc.. These studies don't buy votes. Governments prefer vote-winning giveaways.
205
07/01/2021 14:22:19 12 14
bbc
The NHS and PHE/S/W/NI also did nothing.
Planning costs nothing as they employ too many managers anyway

It is the responsibility of NHS and PHE/S/W/NI to make choices from the budget provided, not to hold out begging bowls every time. Leave the 'leisure & lifestyle treatments' to private payments.

The whole NHS system simply rewards failure with more money
397
Ann
07/01/2021 14:48:11 8 4
bbc
Yes it was when Jeremy hunt was in charge.
507
07/01/2021 14:58:29 14 5
bbc
And what would the electorate say if billions was spent on facilities which might never be needed? And on supplies which deteriorate if they are stored in a warehouse for years on end? And if we trained thousands of medical staff who then spent time twiddling their thumbs?

Being completely prepared for a year (at least) of pandemic would have starved other public services of finance.
07/01/2021 16:05:42 2 5
bbc
Just imagine if they'd invested £billions ready for a pandemic which didn't come? What would the moaners be saying now? All that PPE being thrown out after use-by-date, warehouses full of unused ventilators or whatever kit was needed for all possible pandemics! Big fuss if Council buys salt and it doesn't snow. Can't win.
07/01/2021 16:38:49 1 4
bbc
Lots of exercises like this, with extreme scenarios, are run by the military and emergency services. I took part in some Army ones. Ultimately, governments have to allocate their limited resources to what they are advised is most likely to happen.

Sometimes they call it wrong, but they are criticised if they spend a lot of money preparing for something which does not happen e.g nuclear bunkers.
07/01/2021 16:51:44 1 2
bbc
More money on intensive care wouldn't have helped in this instance. The oxygen lines used to supply hospital wards are a standard diameter throughout Europe and regardless the number of beds on the wards can only maintain flow to 6 ventilators. This has impacted upon capacity throughout Europe. No one foresaw an event where every bed on a ward would need oxygen.
"Hospitals at risk of becoming covid only site's"

But covid ISN'T real

And Trump WON the election

And liar Johnson's NOT a liar

And Patel is NOT a bully

And Hancock is NOT an idiot

And Track and trace IS working

And Tory PPE ISN'T just corruption

And Tories DIDN'T vote against feeding children

And our FPTP election system IS DEMOCRACY

Welcome to an ALTERNATIVE world

OF LIES
Removed
9
07/01/2021 13:51:59 44 162
bbc
This is London, not the rest of the UK ?
40
07/01/2021 13:59:54 28 5
bbc
Yet
41
07/01/2021 14:00:00 49 11
bbc
One of my local Drs (ex MP Paul Williams) tweeted this morning that he has been administering vaccines and some people have said that they: “won’t have the Pfizer one, they’ll wait until the British one comes out”.

See here: https://twitter.com/PaulWilliamsLAB/status/1347110494881116160?s=20
48
DrR
07/01/2021 14:01:27 115 26
bbc
Idiots.
60
07/01/2021 14:03:34 23 9
bbc
Can't help the stupid. Anyway are they really a loss to the gene pool if they don't get the vaccine.
62
07/01/2021 14:04:09 10 27
bbc
What they are actually saying is they don't trust this government not to leave them both high and dry with them falling to look after the vaccine temperature or re administer on time

The Oxford prick does away with the government incompetence
192
07/01/2021 14:20:54 15 6
bbc
That is their choice. They must go to the back of the queue though.
320
07/01/2021 14:37:33 6 27
bbc
Good to support British business. Why support EU pharma
412
07/01/2021 14:49:51 9 3
bbc
Very kind of them to offer to go to the Back of the queue.
453
07/01/2021 14:53:19 1 6
bbc
Nice to see our overworked vaccinators have time to mouth off on Twitter. The way people have been talking, I thought that they had been working non stop for a week now.
818
07/01/2021 15:26:10 1 6
bbc
And, no doubt, they'll have to wait for a white nurse to administer it.
957
MT
07/01/2021 15:37:13 3 4
bbc
What do you mean comes out? Ashok Sharma promised we would have 30,000,000 Oxford vaccines BY SEPTEMBER 2020! Another failure.
07/01/2021 19:07:01 1 0
bbc
The Pfizer one is much much more expensive. So you could say that people preferring to wait for the Oxford one are helping save us money!!!
07/01/2021 19:27:33 0 0
bbc
Having looked at the trial results, if I were offered the Oxford vaccine tomorrow, or the BioNTech a month later, I'd wait for the BioNTech vaccine.
07/01/2021 21:35:30 2 0
bbc
Tell him to give me and the mrs a call.
15
07/01/2021 13:54:14 264 56
bbc
For a photo op. They must have known from the start they could not staff them and so just created them, did the news story and then shut them a few weeks after opening them without use.
42
xlr
07/01/2021 14:00:16 31 13
bbc
Pretty much. Their function was always to comfort the public, not to provide actual use. Much like the race to buy ventilators.
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
43
DrR
07/01/2021 14:00:36 16 8
bbc
I am not sure any other party would have done any better. Stop knocking the government and help to get Covid under control.
127
07/01/2021 14:14:42 0 3
bbc
I am helping get COVID under control by staying apart from folks and keeping healthy.

The majority of folks have done what they are told. It's the government messing up things with schools, eat out to help out, and opening up too quickly after lockdowns. These have caused all the issues not individuals.
7
07/01/2021 13:51:28 382 26
bbc
Why did we build all these Nightingale hospitals if they were to only remain on standby, then be dismantled.

Shouldn't they have become covid centres while hospitals attempted to continue operating to help those in need with every other health problem.
44
07/01/2021 14:00:50 38 2
bbc
The NHS does not have an infinate supply of qualified staff. That is the problem.
121
07/01/2021 14:14:25 19 12
bbc
There's a lot of 'tested CV positive' staff sitting at home self isolating.

It would be safe for them to be at work in a CV-only facility - as there is nobody to infect in it
494
07/01/2021 14:57:02 10 7
bbc
Maybe if they paid nurses better they would retain more staff. Other professionals who do 40 hours a week of hard graft, on their feet all day, nights and shift work, get more than 25-30k. And that's not including all the extra hours they work that they don't get paid for
833
07/01/2021 15:27:13 1 2
bbc
I think you maeant 'adequate' supply of staff.
07/01/2021 17:12:56 2 2
bbc
The NHS does not have nearly enough staff for normal times. Just look at the number of vacancies.
45
07/01/2021 14:01:02 90 16
bbc
I assumed that nightingale hospitals would be staffed by Army nurses and doctors. Why not?? And the balance with retirees or some of the hundreds of thousands who left nursing over the past decade for a better paid/easier job??
175
07/01/2021 14:17:42 22 8
bbc
thought they would use it to vaccinate people
189
07/01/2021 14:20:39 14 4
bbc
The RAMC are trained with trauma in mind, and away from the field they hand them to the NHS - so they would need training and supervision by NHS employed medics. Plus there are only about 300 serving members of all grades.
Getting retirees back into service has a lot of bureaucracy involved to meet the demands of the DoH and NHS. It is not the done thing to reduce papaerwork.
224
07/01/2021 14:24:51 18 2
bbc
Theres not that many full time army nurses and doctors. Most are just normal nurses and doctors with a connection to the army through the TA.
287
07/01/2021 14:34:26 17 1
bbc
Its the general shortage of Doctors & Nurses and in terms of the Nightingales specialist staff and equipment thats the issue.

Army & Air Force Nurses & Doctors already work in the NHS, so the situation will not change.
449
07/01/2021 14:50:56 14 2
bbc
I find your comment on people who have left nursing in poor taste. My sister, aged in her late 50s, and therefore vulnerable to the disease, went back into front-line ICU nursing at her local hospital during the first lockdown. She was absolutely exhausted and has only just recovered her health. Now she starts again next week in the same hospital. She will save many lives. Will you?
601
07/01/2021 15:05:41 5 1
bbc
We don’t have army doctors & nurses there pooled from the NHS.

The RAMC is populated with army medics & drivers & with the highest respect they would only be of any use as ambulance back up.

Military hospitals were shut down years ago as defence cost saving measures.
643
Suz
07/01/2021 15:10:08 8 1
bbc
Because the armed services have been decimated personnel wise and those medical personnel that are still serving mostly work in the NHS anyway, or are continuing to look after serving personnel.
959
07/01/2021 15:37:22 1 1
bbc
Assumptions are rarely true! Probably a mountain of paper for them to complete before they're allowed to work anyway. And you must think the Army is rather bigger than it really is.
07/01/2021 16:55:52 1 1
bbc
There are no military hospitals. Combat medics could be used, but the majority of army doctors and nurses for emergences are reservists and already working in NHS.
SK
07/01/2021 17:06:08 0 1
bbc
In the absence of conflicts most military staff are at work in NHS hospitals, hence not available for Nightingales.
The better thing to do would be to use the Nightingales as cottage hospitals for those awaiting social services or discharge arrangements or rehabilitating, so they could be managed with a skeleton staff leaving the NHS hospitals and staff to manage the sickest.
07/01/2021 19:18:28 0 0
bbc
Most army nurses and doctors are reservists from the NHS. Those that aren't are actually needed by the army.
SJ
08/01/2021 00:23:40 0 0
bbc
You assumed there was a plan. From the same people who (did not) have a plan for brexit.
10
07/01/2021 13:52:12 206 21
bbc
The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?
The virus needs to be isolated, and that needs isolation hospitals and on-site staffing.

Otherwise, even with the best intentions there is inevitable spread to other patients and out into the wider community
46
07/01/2021 14:01:18 25 1
bbc
There is a practical problem with that seemingly logical idea. Many people are aymptomatic and can come with a non-covid condition, bringing covid in with them. Most of the time you do not have time to test before you start treating the other condition - result a covid clear place is no longer clear and the whole place will need to be shut for a deep clean. Works only if you know Covid is there.
89
07/01/2021 14:09:33 7 5
bbc
Test on entry ?

Current tests are able to give accurate 'not negative' results in 20 minutes, so still in the ambulance.
A few false positives indeed, but they are no worse off than now
47
07/01/2021 14:01:23 15 13
bbc
Of course there is no photo opportunity in this one for Johnson, so his bloated rear end is nowhere to be seen.
Maybe he could drive a forklift through a south facing wall of bricks on the top of Beachy Head. That would make a good one.
132
07/01/2021 14:15:12 5 3
bbc
A waste of a perfectly good forklift!
41
07/01/2021 14:00:00 49 11
bbc
One of my local Drs (ex MP Paul Williams) tweeted this morning that he has been administering vaccines and some people have said that they: “won’t have the Pfizer one, they’ll wait until the British one comes out”.

See here: https://twitter.com/PaulWilliamsLAB/status/1347110494881116160?s=20
48
DrR
07/01/2021 14:01:27 115 26
bbc
Idiots.
No HYS on USA incident so I’ll do it here:
All those who are resigning from Trumps team <20 days before they are out of a job are opportunist and looking at there next jobs without tarnish of being on ‘team trump’. If they really felt aggrieved they would have taken a role under him in the first place.

No one who has worked or trump is employable in my opinion.
Removed
Why isn’t Trump in custody? Removed
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
50
07/01/2021 14:02:02 10 13
bbc
There is no logic.
Working Class Tory Voters Are a complete anomaly and seem to believe that they are in some special.
It is very sad.
74
07/01/2021 14:06:44 4 3
bbc
The second hand BMW generation.
27
07/01/2021 13:57:31 9 14
bbc
Very sad and all very preventable with a functioning government who understood the problem and were willing to take the right decisions at the right time

Those who said we should learn to live with the virus are getting what they wanted. Complete chaos and the worst of both worlds with a failing health care system and a failing economy.
51
07/01/2021 14:02:14 15 4
bbc
Would also help if we had a public who understood the seriousness of the pandemic and followed the guidelines instead of thinking I'll be ok if I get covid
101
07/01/2021 14:11:58 0 5
bbc
How are the public supposed to understand if the Government refuses to publish guidance in clear English.

Uses phrases that are unclear and open to interpretation.

Announces measure A then sets up the regulations as measure A+ or A-.

U-turns on an hourly basis.

Constantly floats ideas in the media to test reaction to potential future policy.
178
07/01/2021 14:19:03 0 3
bbc
what advice, you can fly into the country no tests
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
52
07/01/2021 14:02:19 8 7
bbc
Because there's a lot lot more to life and what needs paying than the NHS. I've only ever had bad service from the NHS after paying into it since working age. I pay for private too, id rather not have to pay for bad service from our 'beloved nhs'
5
07/01/2021 13:50:07 34 33
bbc
england's trump takes a lot of the blame.
53
07/01/2021 14:02:50 5 2
bbc
Rubbish,the problem has existed for decades.
54
07/01/2021 14:02:56 25 19
bbc
Hasn't Tory Austerity served us well!!!

I wonder if private hospitals are still taking ppl in that pay,not heard anything about them.....
73
07/01/2021 14:07:00 6 8
bbc
They are and business is booming. A good friend of mine has finally gone private after much arm twisting by family??
421
PJ
07/01/2021 14:50:06 1 4
bbc
I've taken out private insurance for my family for the first time. I don't trust that the NHS will ever be 'there for us' in the future. Oh, unless we get covid of course.
5
07/01/2021 13:50:07 34 33
bbc
england's trump takes a lot of the blame.
55
xlr
07/01/2021 14:03:01 6 2
bbc
I'm not a fan of Boris but simple incompetence (mostly due to his personality traits as trying to make do as he goes along) doesn't come close to Trump's malaevolent disregard for own citizens.

At one point you could almost swear Trump was intentionally trying to kill as many older Americans as possible, to free up jobs and take pressure off demands for an affordable healthcare system.
56
07/01/2021 14:03:02 192 51
bbc
They have had nigh on 12 months to get prepared for this but seem to have done little other than give overblown statements of intent.
139
07/01/2021 14:15:47 69 140
bbc
But of course you have played your role in all this,havn't you?
427
07/01/2021 14:50:48 6 24
bbc
Of course with you in charge everything would have been fine!
470
07/01/2021 14:55:17 9 18
bbc
Yes they have had time to prepare and have already managed to do better than most other countries in the world. What was that figure, more vaccinations so far in the UK than the rest of the EU combined?.. Sounds shameful.
07/01/2021 15:47:50 8 2
bbc
Sadly the public didn't co-operate: few of us wear masks covering mouth and nose without fiddling with them and thus defeating the object, people don't keep their distance in public areas like shops, people have been mixing with too many others. Now people are dying, thanks not to the NHS or the Govt, but to the blithering idiots who think only their social life matters.
07/01/2021 15:54:03 7 2
bbc
They have had much longer than 12 months. In 2016 the Cygnus exercise showed how unprepared the NHS were. The Tory government decided not to spend the money required to implement the recommendations (preferring to waste it on Brexit presumably) and refuse, still, to release details of the report.
07/01/2021 18:26:58 3 2
bbc
Every Government since the 1960s pandemic have had the opportunity to develop a national contingency plan but have failed dismally.
23
07/01/2021 13:57:01 10 12
bbc
This is wrong on so many levels, ok covid is a serious threat and unfortunately it has caused deaths and anguish to so many, but the NHS is now being sacrificed on the covid alter to one would think, every other thing the NHS was set up to treat.
Why are the nightingales being underutilised ?
Serious questions need asked which MPs made a fortune setting them up, knowing there was no staffing.
57
07/01/2021 14:03:07 6 6
bbc
The people in hospital with covid are dying also, more acutely than cancer care. They aren't admitting people with the sniffles so your point about treating covid with superiority is ridiculous and highlights the complete willful ignorance of the population to this disease. The issue is years of underfunding. If it wasn't covid that broke the back, it would have been any virus.
185
07/01/2021 14:20:13 3 1
bbc
The NHS is still funded at a higher percentage of GDP than at any time prior to 2010.
38
07/01/2021 13:59:52 78 32
bbc
In 2016, in The Cygnus Exercise, the Tory Govt were warned that we were woefully unprepared for a pandemic but they did nothing about it because of cost. Just imagine if the Govt had invested a small fraction of the money it has spent during the pandemic in the NHS, especially Intensive Care facilities and staff, before the pandemic, how much money would have been saved during it.
58
07/01/2021 14:03:08 68 12
bbc
That's life. Governments spend on what people are shouting for at the time.
115
xlr
07/01/2021 14:13:31 12 9
bbc
Hence why populism is rubbish and populist governments are doomed to fail.
130
07/01/2021 14:14:54 10 6
bbc
If only that were true. Thy spend on what suits them, for as long as they can get away with it, at the time. And as we have a government which is ideologically opposed to public services we are now where we are. You (we) get the government you (we) deserve.
238
07/01/2021 14:28:43 14 2
bbc
Governments spend money on things which will win them votes in areas likely to swing an election. Their goal is not to run the country well, or to represent anyone, but to get reelected. That's their main goal, everything else (good or bad) is just a side effect of trying to be reelected.
835
07/01/2021 15:27:27 2 2
bbc
And that, in 2016, was Brexit and only Brexit.
983
07/01/2021 15:40:21 5 3
bbc
Now that’s simply NOT the case. People want tax dodging, tax avoidance, scammers, etc., clamping down on and with a right wing Tory government it’s never going to happen.
17
07/01/2021 13:55:00 3 1
bbc
Is that not what forced their hand to push people back out to care homes as quickly as possible initially, only exacerbating the problems many times over.
59
07/01/2021 14:03:33 9 1
bbc
It was never going to be realistic to keep covid out of care homes. It’s unfair to keep a resident in a hospital following a covid diagnosis; they may well have mild symptoms and it’s unacceptable to use a scarce hospital bed to “store” care home residents. Instead care homes should have been supported just as hospitals to maintain “green/ red” areas to protect other residents.
41
07/01/2021 14:00:00 49 11
bbc
One of my local Drs (ex MP Paul Williams) tweeted this morning that he has been administering vaccines and some people have said that they: “won’t have the Pfizer one, they’ll wait until the British one comes out”.

See here: https://twitter.com/PaulWilliamsLAB/status/1347110494881116160?s=20
60
07/01/2021 14:03:34 23 9
bbc
Can't help the stupid. Anyway are they really a loss to the gene pool if they don't get the vaccine.
116
07/01/2021 14:13:34 9 3
bbc
If they're entitled to a vaccine then they've already reproduced mate.
14
07/01/2021 13:53:57 11 11
bbc
The lack of useful preparation by the DoH and NHS even after a year borders on criminal negligence. Useless Nightingale hospitals because no thought given to staffing. The panic action at the start meant no thought for non-covid patients resulting in a backlog putting even more strain on the system. A continual saga of panic and reactions with a total lack of considered planning and forethought.
61
07/01/2021 14:04:08 9 2
bbc
What we are seeing is yet another example of the NHS being not fit for purpose and being in desperate need of a root and branch review.
Millions and millions of pounds wasted and front line staff suffering. The sad thing is no government will face in to this, as it is seen as a vote loser
284
07/01/2021 14:34:03 0 2
bbc
Basically true, all down, in my opinion, to the demand for excessive paperwork mus of whic serves no practical use. Keeping track is essential and many NHS administrators work very hard and usefully but the higher it goes up the chain the more people there are whose sole job is to re-hash figures to give to someone to file and not be acted upon.
41
07/01/2021 14:00:00 49 11
bbc
One of my local Drs (ex MP Paul Williams) tweeted this morning that he has been administering vaccines and some people have said that they: “won’t have the Pfizer one, they’ll wait until the British one comes out”.

See here: https://twitter.com/PaulWilliamsLAB/status/1347110494881116160?s=20
62
07/01/2021 14:04:09 10 27
bbc
What they are actually saying is they don't trust this government not to leave them both high and dry with them falling to look after the vaccine temperature or re administer on time

The Oxford prick does away with the government incompetence
94
07/01/2021 14:10:10 13 3
bbc
So the government are running around checking temperatures now?
We must have the hardest working ministers in the world.
384
07/01/2021 14:47:11 6 3
bbc
Ah, you know exactly what other people are thinking ?

you probably also think you can say exactly why people voted for Brexit too ?!

Yep, you have spouted your ignorant and ill-informed made-up nonsense on that previously too.
445
07/01/2021 14:52:53 18 3
bbc
I must add .My wife works at a covid hospital.She cant have the Pfizer as shes has a penicillin allergy.This is why she will have the oxford vaccine.There's reasons why some people cant have Pfizer.So dont assume that all people are dumb.
08/01/2021 04:08:13 0 0
bbc
"The Oxford prick does away with the government incompetence"

Although many claim that is the source of government incompetence.
63
07/01/2021 14:04:40 5 6
bbc
50 new hospitals

50,000 new nurses

Get Covid Done

If only it were that easy......
91
07/01/2021 14:09:43 5 4
bbc
It is that easy if you are a liar like Johnson is

He never follows through

The media never holds him to account
112
07/01/2021 14:13:15 1 2
bbc
People playing their part and not whinging would help vastly!
162
07/01/2021 14:16:56 1 1
bbc
visa for NHS staff is hard to get
2
07/01/2021 13:47:02 140 2
bbc
Worrying times for those awaiting scans & diagnosis if delays are of any length of time.
64
07/01/2021 14:04:52 94 71
bbc
Very worrying-so stay at home and do your part.
202
07/01/2021 14:21:42 18 6
bbc
Treat people with respect
319
07/01/2021 14:38:01 23 14
bbc
...and the unnecessarily patronising post of the year goes to...
534
07/01/2021 15:00:20 7 4
bbc
I would except my firm has stayed open at full capacity like many others because they can't afford any more lockdowns
796
07/01/2021 15:24:53 9 3
bbc
You can stay at home as much as you like and do your part - still long waits for scans and cancer diagnosis.
07/01/2021 15:42:06 4 11
bbc
Stay at home and die quietly. What a society.
07/01/2021 17:00:13 2 4
bbc
You mean, presumably, stay at home and die if you have worrying symptoms of illness other than covid?
Removed
66
bbc
Removed
26
07/01/2021 13:57:25 159 20
bbc
"isolation hospitals" is the right idea
But was that not the idea behind the Nightingales which they built at vast (public) cost and with a huge 'ta-da', *then* realised they hadn't the nurses to run them, and are now quietly dismantling?
67
07/01/2021 14:05:29 9 18
bbc
You do not need extra staff. The staff follow the patients, but on separate sites.

So say half the staff in the Nightingale doing CV only, while the other half are running a half-open hospital doing all the urgent non-CV work

The layout can also allow more patients / staff, not ideal but better than cross infection
332
07/01/2021 14:39:41 14 1
bbc
Do need extra staff - you cannot treat normal NHS patient intake PLUS the Covid intake with the same number of staff.
992
07/01/2021 15:41:06 10 2
bbc
"You do not need extra staff. The staff follow the patients, but on separate sites."

If you have a full hospital and a full Nightingale, then you need all the usual hospital staff (not really enough in the first place) plus extra to cover Nightingale. YOU DO NEED EXTRA STAFF.
07/01/2021 21:57:45 2 0
bbc
You display a remarkable ignorance in NHS staffing levels. We are 40,000 nurses short.
68
07/01/2021 14:05:45 91 13
bbc
As the cost of this lockdown is over £10bn a week , so the entire cost of the NHS for a year will be incurred in less than 3 months, all resources possible should go into vaccinations

So, Boris, use the pharmacies to administer jabs, use the army, use DPD to for logistical support

But don’t waste the precious weeks of this £60bn lockdown
79
07/01/2021 14:08:03 71 9
bbc
You can't distribute and use what you do not have
97
07/01/2021 14:11:11 4 6
bbc
Do both AND STAY AT HOME ETC.Especially you.
109
07/01/2021 14:12:53 9 3
bbc
Haven't yet got enough vaccine yet and probably still don't have a plan as to when they should start relaxing restrictions eg how many vaccinated, how long after etc.
-70oC logistical support is very limited - most frozen stuff is transported at -20oC - so I doubt DPD will be able to help very much.
160
07/01/2021 14:16:33 4 9
bbc
thought it caused mild symptoms in people
929
07/01/2021 15:35:31 9 3
bbc
They are not wasting precious weeks as you can see we are well ahead of nearly every country in the word in getting vaccines into arms
07/01/2021 16:54:41 0 1
bbc
Mac, as this site has made clear the limiting factor is the testing of each batch of the vaccine before it is put into people. So use all those people, but to address the limiting step, open up University Laboratories and suspend PHD research in Biology and Chemistry and get these highly capable scientists trained in batch testing (which could have been done in Dec once the vaccine was announced).
07/01/2021 18:05:11 0 1
bbc
DPD managed to lose 2/6 parcels of mine...not sure using them for vaccine transport is the best idea
08/01/2021 13:05:49 0 0
bbc
they already are they announced this yesterday
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
69
07/01/2021 14:05:28 6 10
bbc
Because they're selfish to the core
8
07/01/2021 13:51:52 186 43
bbc
Closing schools, pubs, hairdressers, gyms etc reduces contact between people and limits opportunity for the virus to spread.

Masks reduce your likelihood of spreading it to others.

Good personal hygiene reduces your likelihood of catching it.

The fewer people that need hospital care to recover from Covid, the more hospital space is available to treat other ailments.

It's that simple.
70
07/01/2021 14:05:41 13 27
bbc
Thanks for the patronising safety advice.

I mean, none of us knew this already, right ?

Sigh.
102
07/01/2021 14:12:05 17 7
bbc
Karen?
521
07/01/2021 14:59:07 7 6
bbc
Well, I'm in the South East and I see a large number of people, getting close < 2m to other people, the majority of whom are not wearing masks. The new variant is highly transmissible and this virus is predominantly spread by droplets being breathed out. Masks will dramatically reduce the droplets an individual breathes out being breathed in by any close contacts. Wear masks, save lives.
07/01/2021 17:08:14 4 2
bbc
Clearly not given the number of people not following the safety advice. Unfortunately we cannot ensure that they are the ones that die.
71
07/01/2021 14:06:36 11 18
bbc
For years the NHS has trotted out the same old mantra every winter. Perhaps in future years they won't - bit like crying wolf. Oh no, of course they will - suits their understaffed/underpaid/undervalued demands to squeeze more out of us all.
82
07/01/2021 14:08:14 10 4
bbc
cretinous statement
118
07/01/2021 14:14:15 1 3
bbc
Was going to respond to this, but "cretinous statement" covers things adequately.
122
07/01/2021 14:08:23 1 2
bbc
Lets hope you require the NHS soon.
150
07/01/2021 14:17:30 1 3
bbc
The whole CV saga has been NHS blackmailing the nation

Just plan to do less work in January and do it in July instead.
169
07/01/2021 14:18:42 0 2
bbc
You should read your rubbish back and repent..
182
07/01/2021 14:19:43 1 2
bbc
Have you been in a hospital in the winter time in the last five years?
248
07/01/2021 14:25:20 2 1
bbc
You should feel lucky that we have an NHS in this country. Imagine how bad it would be if we had an insurance based healthcare system, like the US
38
07/01/2021 13:59:52 78 32
bbc
In 2016, in The Cygnus Exercise, the Tory Govt were warned that we were woefully unprepared for a pandemic but they did nothing about it because of cost. Just imagine if the Govt had invested a small fraction of the money it has spent during the pandemic in the NHS, especially Intensive Care facilities and staff, before the pandemic, how much money would have been saved during it.
72
07/01/2021 14:06:41 7 11
bbc
For government, read NHS.
331
07/01/2021 14:39:25 9 5
bbc
Well, the person responsible for shelving it was Jeremy Hunt. Last time I looked: a Conservative politician.
54
07/01/2021 14:02:56 25 19
bbc
Hasn't Tory Austerity served us well!!!

I wonder if private hospitals are still taking ppl in that pay,not heard anything about them.....
73
07/01/2021 14:07:00 6 8
bbc
They are and business is booming. A good friend of mine has finally gone private after much arm twisting by family??
50
07/01/2021 14:02:02 10 13
bbc
There is no logic.
Working Class Tory Voters Are a complete anomaly and seem to believe that they are in some special.
It is very sad.
74
07/01/2021 14:06:44 4 3
bbc
The second hand BMW generation.
32
07/01/2021 13:58:32 19 2
bbc
If you look at the geography of the UK and the locations of hospitals you will see why this has not been the case all along. Not everyone lives in an area with multiple hospitals in the area.
75
07/01/2021 14:07:24 7 11
bbc
Why does anyone need to be treated 'locally' ? It is not like visitors are allowed.

Everyone has a 'second nearest' hospital so as long as one is available for 'CV and one for 'other' it works
07/01/2021 15:52:51 9 1
bbc
Depends what you mean by locally. RCH in Truro is about an hour from the next nearest location and with instant transport not yet avialable transporting patients, potentailly very sick and ventilated those idstances is a non starter. Belevie it or not considerable thought has one into the covid response by those who know how to plan services and very little is as simple as many think.
07/01/2021 16:15:00 4 1
bbc
Stop talking rubbish. Not everyone has the luxury of a choice of nearby hospitals..
07/01/2021 21:26:14 2 0
bbc
How near do you want? How do you get there?
What if both the nearest are already full?
What if a disproportionate percentage of staff at one or the other have to isolate?
Easier said than done.
18
07/01/2021 13:52:11 11 19
bbc
And it's all "our fault" according to the government.

Sigh.

Remember when Bozo promised 12 weeks to beat the virus ?

Why does he always give false optimism ?

Sigh.
76
07/01/2021 14:07:25 6 3
bbc
so people ignoring guidance and doing as they please, Raves, house parties, going to see mates and ignore guidance is the govt fault is it? Yes it could be handled better, but if people act like selfish idiots then blame them !!!
7
07/01/2021 13:51:28 382 26
bbc
Why did we build all these Nightingale hospitals if they were to only remain on standby, then be dismantled.

Shouldn't they have become covid centres while hospitals attempted to continue operating to help those in need with every other health problem.
77
07/01/2021 14:07:30 26 10
bbc
That's far too sensible for the incompetent shower ruining the nation - that's not a typo by the way.
349
07/01/2021 14:41:57 8 5
bbc
Then they should have been trained. 10 months was a long time. Perhaps not enough for fully qualified, but enough for basic 1st line care.
9
07/01/2021 13:51:59 44 162
bbc
This is London, not the rest of the UK ?
78
07/01/2021 14:07:46 53 15
bbc
It is spreading very fast in many other areas so do as ordered STAY AT HOME.
149
07/01/2021 14:17:25 27 82
bbc
I will never do as ordered! I will follow any sensible advice though.
333
07/01/2021 14:39:46 18 11
bbc
People are not staying home, they are out for coffee's, the roads are as busy as ever, he should have shut everything down, airports, ports etc and only had essential services operating and thats it. Otherwise nothing will change
562
mc
07/01/2021 15:02:22 2 23
bbc
where is proof only propaganda and false accounting
07/01/2021 17:25:41 2 3
bbc
Except for going shopping, to the doctors, dentist, vet, pharmacy, for child and elderly care, or exercise. Oh and Barnard Castle for an eye test.
68
07/01/2021 14:05:45 91 13
bbc
As the cost of this lockdown is over £10bn a week , so the entire cost of the NHS for a year will be incurred in less than 3 months, all resources possible should go into vaccinations

So, Boris, use the pharmacies to administer jabs, use the army, use DPD to for logistical support

But don’t waste the precious weeks of this £60bn lockdown
79
07/01/2021 14:08:03 71 9
bbc
You can't distribute and use what you do not have
883
07/01/2021 15:32:00 3 8
bbc
Don't blame the manufacturers, look at the order process and what was agreed versus the deliveries. Hancock is to easy to blame AstraZeneca or Pfizer.

Testing takes to 3 weeks to demonstrate product quality and sterility, if an adulterated product was released 1000s more could die. Manufacture and testing takes as long as it does, once delivered to the gvernment that is where the problem starts
07/01/2021 15:42:21 2 3
bbc
But no one seems to know what we do not have (really)!
This man is responsible, but read up on him and cry!
Nadhim Zahawi: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nadhim_Zahawi
80
07/01/2021 14:08:04 4 2
bbc
Imagine having your cancer surgery cancelled or other life saving treatment...

This Country has for ten/twenty had its NHS overwhelmed in Winter that's without a pandemic, nice to hear some senior voices making feelings public @ long last.
24
07/01/2021 13:57:03 19 22
bbc
10 years of Tory austerity and the need for 43,000 nurses has led to these problems.

Why do people vote Tory!!
81
07/01/2021 14:07:47 9 7
bbc
......and you think we'd all be sipping cocktails and having a ball now if Corbyn had of won? Be careful what you wish for...besides numerous other Countries have faced the same dilemmas one way or another. If you think you could do a better job, become PM. It's easy to sit behind a keyboard & criticise.
71
07/01/2021 14:06:36 11 18
bbc
For years the NHS has trotted out the same old mantra every winter. Perhaps in future years they won't - bit like crying wolf. Oh no, of course they will - suits their understaffed/underpaid/undervalued demands to squeeze more out of us all.
82
07/01/2021 14:08:14 10 4
bbc
cretinous statement
3
07/01/2021 13:49:42 443 36
bbc
The first lockdown was meant to be a last resort measure while we worked to “get the house in order” with healthcare capacity. The Nightingales were setup, but at the same time little appeared to be done about getting more staff in place.

Given how the NHS struggles every winter, getting as much done about capacity as possible in time for this winter should have been a no brainer.
83
bbc
I'm just here to remind everyone that Boris Johnson once said Donald Trump deserved the nobel peace prize.

Sorry to be off topic but there's no HYS on the terrorist attack that occurred yesterday.

And btw, let's expand our NHS.
Removed
96
07/01/2021 14:11:10 1 3
bbc
Stay on target
If Trump supporters who stormed the Capitol Building are terrorists, what are BLM who stormed multiple police precincts, courthouses and government buildings? Removed
Remember when the Tories insisted that he receive a "royal welcome". We spent £10's of millions of tax payer money to lavish this scumbag! Removed
23
07/01/2021 13:57:01 10 12
bbc
This is wrong on so many levels, ok covid is a serious threat and unfortunately it has caused deaths and anguish to so many, but the NHS is now being sacrificed on the covid alter to one would think, every other thing the NHS was set up to treat.
Why are the nightingales being underutilised ?
Serious questions need asked which MPs made a fortune setting them up, knowing there was no staffing.
84
07/01/2021 14:08:52 0 4
bbc
Nightingales were a propaganda exercise and never had, nor ever had a chance, of having, enough staff, to treat serious Covid cases. There was already an acute shortage of Intensive Care staff. Running the Health Service at maximum capacity is suicidal in this situation and the Govt were warned of this in 2016. The lack of spending in the last 10 years has truly come home to roost.
164
07/01/2021 14:18:18 1 1
bbc
Not entirely, they are the last resort... a step up from leaving sick people lying in corridors. I believe they were used for propaganda, but that doesn't mean their purpose was designed for propaganda purposes. You can't blame the government for putting plans in place for the worst case scenario, in fact we should have been blaming them if they hadn't made the plans.
85
07/01/2021 14:08:58 53 41
bbc
I cannot believe any stats and figures given to us anymore. How much of this whole issue is down to the sensationalising of the media?
212
07/01/2021 14:22:55 32 20
bbc
Seriously? You still dont believe whats going on?
231
07/01/2021 14:27:09 3 7
bbc
Less than due to gullible prats who believe every conspiracy theory going.
517
07/01/2021 14:58:52 7 5
bbc
If anything, the media is largely *underreporting* the problem. We really are in a very serious jam.

I think a better question would be to ask why you don't trust what you are reading. Trump's media tactics have been very corrosive of public trust, and ultimately of democracy itself.
No HYS on USA incident so I’ll do it here:
All those who are resigning from Trumps team <20 days before they are out of a job are opportunist and looking at there next jobs without tarnish of being on ‘team trump’. If they really felt aggrieved they would have taken a role under him in the first place.

No one who has worked or trump is employable in my opinion.
Removed
86
07/01/2021 14:08:58 2 1
bbc
Bit hard, some I am sure believed in Trump's 'ideals' but now feel he has lost the plot totally. No-one likes losing and they may feel he could have shown more statesmanship but by inciting mob action he has gone to far. Given the type of some of Trumps supporters deserting him even now could be a risk to their safety but there are limits for most people.
87
07/01/2021 14:09:07 77 6
bbc
We are supposed to be going out tonight to clap for our hero's , don't know about that think we all (THAT'S EVERYONE) need to follow the guidelines to help them would be more appreciated
140
07/01/2021 14:15:50 34 12
bbc
Clap for superspreaders more like
198
07/01/2021 14:20:56 19 5
bbc
I won't be clapping, not that I don't admire the NHS and its workforce, but because its bloody pointless and a little bit sad. To do some real good we need rid of the things in number 10.
457
PJ
07/01/2021 14:53:58 4 2
bbc
Supposed to? Is this another ridiculous covid regulation?
595
07/01/2021 15:06:16 9 1
bbc
I wont be clapping, load of nonsense
716
mc
07/01/2021 15:15:42 11 3
bbc
the only one who clapped in my area were the ones breaking the rules anyway
07/01/2021 15:45:41 10 2
bbc
Why would anyone respond to some virtue signalling private citizen seeking another publicity rush by engaging in a pointless and potentially dangerous activity. 'Heroes' just want you to stay at home and stay safe. DON'T DO IT!
07/01/2021 17:26:03 0 1
bbc
I won't be going out side, bad enough I have to go to work in the office all of next week (except Thursday when I might be having a blood test for an unrelated but potentially deadly disease)
SJ
08/01/2021 00:24:59 0 0
bbc
Boris Johnson deserves the clap.
88
07/01/2021 14:09:16 12 9
bbc
It's been amazing how easy it's been to brainwash and control a large percentage of the population without any photographic evidence. At least people can stand outside at 8pm and clap again. That will help them think they are helping.
111
07/01/2021 14:13:06 8 1
bbc
Forget the clap JUST FOLLOWING THE GUIDELINES would probably be more appreciated and more help to them
157
07/01/2021 14:15:25 5 3
bbc
I won't be clapping, not that I don't admire the NHS and its workforce, but because its bloody pointless and a little bit sad. To do some real good we need rid of the things in number 10.
46
07/01/2021 14:01:18 25 1
bbc
There is a practical problem with that seemingly logical idea. Many people are aymptomatic and can come with a non-covid condition, bringing covid in with them. Most of the time you do not have time to test before you start treating the other condition - result a covid clear place is no longer clear and the whole place will need to be shut for a deep clean. Works only if you know Covid is there.
89
07/01/2021 14:09:33 7 5
bbc
Test on entry ?

Current tests are able to give accurate 'not negative' results in 20 minutes, so still in the ambulance.
A few false positives indeed, but they are no worse off than now
317
07/01/2021 14:37:52 8 1
bbc
50-75% accuracy depending on who is doing the testing and many cases cannot wait 20 miniutes before treatment with the potential of a further wait if they need transferring to the 'correct' type of hospital.
441
07/01/2021 14:52:29 5 2
bbc
What? So you want them to stop the ambulance and swab a heart attack victims throat for a lateral flow test and then wait for the result before deciding which hospital to go to?
07/01/2021 15:57:47 1 1
bbc
Laminar flow is 75% acccurate when done by trained lab staff. When untrained staff do it its 50% accurate. You might as well toss a coin.
07/01/2021 21:27:25 2 0
bbc
20 minute wait in the ambulance is no problem at all - if the ambulance has to wait 2 or 3 hours to deliver the new patient as all the beds are full.
90
07/01/2021 14:09:43 24 2
bbc
20% in May caught it whilst in hospital. What is the percentage now?
217
07/01/2021 14:23:36 33 15
bbc
Closer to 35%, or if you take people who are "suspected of catching it in hospital 42%. The NHS are not in anyway heroes in this, between a third and half of all infections are due to diabolical infection control, let see how many are out hugging an high fiving again when the clap for our "heroes" starts again tonight.
63
07/01/2021 14:04:40 5 6
bbc
50 new hospitals

50,000 new nurses

Get Covid Done

If only it were that easy......
91
07/01/2021 14:09:43 5 4
bbc
It is that easy if you are a liar like Johnson is

He never follows through

The media never holds him to account
18
07/01/2021 13:52:11 11 19
bbc
And it's all "our fault" according to the government.

Sigh.

Remember when Bozo promised 12 weeks to beat the virus ?

Why does he always give false optimism ?

Sigh.
92
07/01/2021 14:09:49 0 4
bbc
All Boris has done wrong is go on holiday at the start, miss 5 COBRA meetings, ignore advice to lockdown so his gfriend could have a baby shower, get the virus by shaking hands with patients, not condemn his cronies when they break rules, eat out scheme, universities free for all, constant u turns, constant waffle, made promises he can't keep but apart from that he's been useless.
19
DrR
07/01/2021 13:55:39 210 5
bbc
It's a bad time to be ill, thats for sure.
93
07/01/2021 14:10:09 184 12
bbc
Worst time possible to get cancer
133
07/01/2021 14:15:19 11 25
bbc
As opposed to the best time...
324
07/01/2021 14:38:41 32 11
bbc
Cancer kills 150K EVERY year, twice as much as Covid. It gets 150M a year for research from the UK government. UK has spent 450 BILLION on Covid. Seems Cancer victims are valued much less than Covid victims.
08/01/2021 11:52:04 0 1
bbc
There's a good time to get cancer?
62
07/01/2021 14:04:09 10 27
bbc
What they are actually saying is they don't trust this government not to leave them both high and dry with them falling to look after the vaccine temperature or re administer on time

The Oxford prick does away with the government incompetence
94
07/01/2021 14:10:10 13 3
bbc
So the government are running around checking temperatures now?
We must have the hardest working ministers in the world.
430
07/01/2021 14:49:14 3 4
bbc
You don't read the news do you? If you did, you would realise that the poster was talking about the Pfizer vaccine, which needs to be stored at ridiculously low temperatures, making it much harder to roll out to the whole population because special equipment is needed. Unlike the Oxford vaccine which can be kept in a normal fridge.
4
07/01/2021 13:49:53 84 16
bbc
This is why we need to get a grip as the secondary deaths due to missed ops, the knock on for cancelled physios (as I was informed today), economic hit and education lost will be the legacy of failed strategy now. Hit hard, hit fast and check Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam for what they are like now
95
07/01/2021 14:10:44 100 28
bbc
It's funny how the countries which have had the least deaths. Have also had the least lockdowns.

It's the timing of them that matters. We left it too late every single time!
293
07/01/2021 14:36:01 8 5
bbc
That’s not a direct reason. Lockdown means you have failed as by definition it’s out of control and you can’t contain it. It’s gone wrong long before a lockdown! Lockdown doesn’t cause the deaths but stops it getting worse
335
07/01/2021 14:39:37 4 2
bbc
they test at airports and borders especially NZ
718
07/01/2021 15:16:27 8 4
bbc
What about individual behaviour? The lockdowns happen because individuals are not taking responsibility for the spread of the virus
07/01/2021 16:03:59 4 2
bbc
Maybe too many people in this country are too selfish
07/01/2021 16:32:01 2 2
bbc
Some of the countries have very different societies with authoritarian governments. They impose measures which would be unacceptable in a democracy.
I'm just here to remind everyone that Boris Johnson once said Donald Trump deserved the nobel peace prize.

Sorry to be off topic but there's no HYS on the terrorist attack that occurred yesterday.

And btw, let's expand our NHS.
Removed
96
07/01/2021 14:11:10 1 3
bbc
Stay on target
68
07/01/2021 14:05:45 91 13
bbc
As the cost of this lockdown is over £10bn a week , so the entire cost of the NHS for a year will be incurred in less than 3 months, all resources possible should go into vaccinations

So, Boris, use the pharmacies to administer jabs, use the army, use DPD to for logistical support

But don’t waste the precious weeks of this £60bn lockdown
97
07/01/2021 14:11:11 4 6
bbc
Do both AND STAY AT HOME ETC.Especially you.
10
07/01/2021 13:52:12 206 21
bbc
The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?
The virus needs to be isolated, and that needs isolation hospitals and on-site staffing.

Otherwise, even with the best intentions there is inevitable spread to other patients and out into the wider community
98
07/01/2021 14:11:21 6 4
bbc
"The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?"

You would of thought that this would have been achievable, and also that the nightingale hosps could have been used for routine if not used for C19. does seem that the people who sit behind desks didnt think it through. But then as a population people created this wave.
4
07/01/2021 13:49:53 84 16
bbc
This is why we need to get a grip as the secondary deaths due to missed ops, the knock on for cancelled physios (as I was informed today), economic hit and education lost will be the legacy of failed strategy now. Hit hard, hit fast and check Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam for what they are like now
99
07/01/2021 14:11:44 34 4
bbc
All three have one thing in common: they shut their borders *very* early. Our window of opportunity came and went by mid-February at the latest.

In 50 years time when children are learning about this in history, they won’t believe that in March 2020 the entire country was told to stay at home while the airports remained open for business, no quarantine or negative test required.
312
07/01/2021 14:35:45 4 4
bbc
Being an island might help?
478
07/01/2021 14:55:12 8 10
bbc
I hope the days of cheap mass air travel are over now. It was never a good thing. Flying abroad should be an occasional and special experience, not a way of commuting, going to routine business meetings or weekending at the holiday home.
10
07/01/2021 13:52:12 206 21
bbc
The sooner all hospitals become either 'CV-clean' or 'CV-Only' the better. Why has this not been the case all along ?
The virus needs to be isolated, and that needs isolation hospitals and on-site staffing.

Otherwise, even with the best intentions there is inevitable spread to other patients and out into the wider community
100
xlr
07/01/2021 14:11:52 12 3
bbc
We're past the point where CV-clean has any meaning. You can have very early covid infection, but come up negative in the test simply because the virus RNA is not yet in the mucous membranes or below the test limit of detection.