Teachers' grades to replace A-levels and GCSEs in England
06/01/2021 | news | education | 1,305
Gavin Williamson will "trust in teachers rather than algorithms" in awarding this year's results.
1
06/01/2021 15:02:35 15 13
bbc
Another day another embarrassing u turn. Don’t expect Williamson to resign in disgrace. None of these have the self respect to go
29
06/01/2021 15:14:43 7 1
bbc
Why is any change in policy due to changing circumstances called a u turn?
31
06/01/2021 15:15:16 2 1
bbc
Not a u turn ,just a decision made according to a new situation. However, why are I turn wrong if they are made for the right reasons? What would you do?
460
06/01/2021 16:43:37 1 0
bbc
Was it a U-turn when Sir Keir Hindsight completely changed his Brexit policy, or is it 'different' for 'socialists'?
2
06/01/2021 15:03:45 11 17
bbc
Thanks for destroying my childs education and mental and social health Mr Williamson. I truly hate you with all the energy i can muster.
12
06/01/2021 15:07:37 5 6
bbc
If the schools were kept open then there wouldn't be an issue. Exams are easily doable in a socially distanced fashion.

Schools remaining open are the only way to give children the best education and to help their mental and social health.
Removed
144
06/01/2021 15:33:40 2 1
bbc
Moan at Labour and the unions who have called long and loud!
162
CJR
06/01/2021 15:36:16 3 0
bbc
It’s called a pandemic, that started in China, I would vent your anger there
3
06/01/2021 15:03:50 14 9
bbc
Better to replace exams altogether. All they tell you is how much information someone can memorise. ( For a short time).
4
PS
06/01/2021 15:03:52 58 17
bbc
Oh Dear a decision that will be bound to create a flood of criticism because a decision has been made they do not agree with. Yawn!
722
06/01/2021 17:51:57 14 25
bbc
Government following the lead of NI, Scotland and Wales - AGAIN!
Everyone else could see it coming, bar the Westminster moron.
5
06/01/2021 15:04:09 17 10
bbc
Gavin Williamson makes Chris Grayling appear like a Greek shipping magnate.
22
06/01/2021 15:12:57 5 2
bbc
That's Onasis - not onanism.
6
06/01/2021 15:04:50 110 26
bbc
So long as it isn't a case of inflated grades again. Teachers wouldn't have known how important their predicted grades were going to be last year, but this year you hope they will be more realistic. Otherwise we will have more erosion in peoples trust in those grades and indeed the education system as a whole.
28
Leo
06/01/2021 15:14:34 69 15
bbc
It could easily be argued the adjusted grades of year-end exams doesn't truly reflect the ability of students, but only the desire of education authorities to produce a so-called "grading curve" which may or may not represent the actual ability of a particular year's body of students.
109
06/01/2021 15:29:51 6 3
bbc
How can we be 'realistic' when assessing something that hasn't happened? If every student in a class has shown at some point over their GCSE course they can achieve a grade 4, why in my right mind would I predict any of them a 2? To fit the expected spread? Which ones?

It's not a case of 'inflated grades' - it's a case of us being optimistic for students who have human inconsistencies...
184
06/01/2021 15:40:15 7 10
bbc
Regardless of grades, I would be reluctant to employ any school leaver from this year. They have essentially missed a full year of a most critical part of their education- and possibly their work ethic as well.
193
06/01/2021 15:34:41 4 1
bbc
Teacher's 'predicted' grades were only part of it. It was their individual ranking of each student that actually had the biggest impact, and the grades their centre got the year before.
248
06/01/2021 15:52:16 3 1
bbc
Unfortunately the current cohort of exam students missed half of last year as well so the evidence available for teachers to accurately grade will actually be less than last year!
473
06/01/2021 16:47:26 0 0
bbc
My predicted grades were always realistic, and they were usually right.
694
06/01/2021 17:43:01 2 0
bbc
Any teacher will be optimistic. It’s our trade. It’s up to OFQAL to pull the results into line with historical data.
787
ET
06/01/2021 18:13:56 1 0
bbc
“Erosion of trust”. I had a spell in the City running an IT department. I NEVER trusted a C in GCSE English. Very often the reading “test” issued as part of the interview process revealed a potential employee was going to struggle with the index page of a manual. PDF or real paper.

Maths GCSE. Pass raw score ~30%. Feel like relying on someone that gets 70% wrong?
901
06/01/2021 18:44:56 0 2
bbc
Why don’t to volunteer to do moderation of course work and then you could check the grades yourself

Teachers can well do without the extr UNPAID work
940
06/01/2021 18:56:04 1 0
bbc
I remember reading last year of the ridiculed algorithm grades actually taking precedent over teacher estimates when the former proved to be higher. I’d been led to believe the algorithm grades had all been dropped.
944
06/01/2021 18:56:55 3 0
bbc
Grades by teachers can never be impartial when their salary, reputation and funding are influence by the school ranking systems. These should be abolished first so that teachers are not under pressure to inflate grades.
06/01/2021 19:34:05 1 0
bbc
British education is rubbish
06/01/2021 22:06:46 1 0
bbc
Well said. Did we really see an 11% increaser in GCSE grades last year - based on teacher assessment? I do feel teachers need more education on assessing pupil performance based on reality.
7
06/01/2021 15:06:56 19 8
bbc
Guess the grade. That’s a lot of trust being placed on individual teachers.

What could go wrong?
336
06/01/2021 16:10:27 2 1
bbc
Worth having a look at statistics on reliability of marking when exams do happen. You might find this an eye-opener!
8
Leo
06/01/2021 15:07:01 8 6
bbc
No system of grading for students is perfect, but I do favour the approach of grading by work done during term than by end-of-term exams. While it will introduce an issue of teacher subjectivism (hopefully a minor issue) it does promote actually learning the course subject rather than simple memorisation of facets of the subject (or even memorising questions and answers) to pass an exam.
657
06/01/2021 17:32:01 0 0
bbc
Problem is access to the internet now when being assess with work done from home. I know a few teenagers are very good at googling. However, I also accept that there is no perfect solution and exams cannot be sat in this year, nor can assessments be done under exam conditions to ensure client knowledge rather than cutting and pasting!
9
Hex
06/01/2021 15:07:02 66 51
bbc
Problem is teachers always massively overestimate the results. Exam results are always below their predictions.
57
06/01/2021 15:20:03 52 19
bbc
This is a complex argument you're simplifying.

The fact is that we will predict something close to the best the students have shown us. If Bobby has shown me he can work at a grade 6 on a good day numerous times, I'm not going to predict him a 4, am I?

The 2nd factor is that students very rarely surpass their best in exams, but they often fall short of it...
309
06/01/2021 16:05:06 2 2
bbc
I don’t over-estimate results. Pls don’t assume none of us have the collective interest of the whole cohort, not just our students best interest at heart.
317
06/01/2021 16:05:51 3 3
bbc
Your use of always concerns me here. Am I led to believe that every estimate of a grade by a teacher is incorrect?
340
06/01/2021 16:11:14 3 0
bbc
I think there is an alement of "Easy life" with this also. If teachers give low / accurate grades, they may get a lot of stick from students and parents, ruining their lives etc.. By erring on the high side, the teachers / schools are less likely to get a hard time from those that are most likely to complain directly.
425
R1
06/01/2021 16:33:38 1 1
bbc
Teachers = key workers who are not pulling their weight. Now they are trapped into assessing marks. If they overestimate and it causes problems, no-one to blame but the teachers. Like it !!
573
06/01/2021 17:11:12 0 0
bbc
What we need is a formula to normalise them - lets call it an algorithm as people are frightened of formulae.
670
06/01/2021 17:36:27 0 0
bbc
Not so. Primary schools have had to submit teacher assessment results in advance of SATs results being released for years and in my school they have been 95%+ spot on every year. SATs have been misused and misrepresented for years. They should be there to confirm teachers' results not override them. A lot, including the government, don't see it that way.
720
06/01/2021 17:50:54 0 0
bbc
This is not the case, especially when the process includes external moderation.
724
06/01/2021 17:52:30 0 0
bbc
What a stupid thing to say.
06/01/2021 23:02:15 0 0
bbc
Wow Hex, your Trumpist use of unsubstantiated claims is amazing - two years ago I predicted my student GCSE grades and averaged 0.1 of a grade out. My A-Level predictions have odd outliers, but I have never 'massively overestimated' results, sometimes I underestimate. Do you have any evidence? I have loads, but what would you care, I mean what would teachers know?
10
06/01/2021 15:07:32 27 6
bbc
Won't matter. Nobody will believe them anyway.
11
06/01/2021 15:07:32 66 19
bbc
Thank goodness common sense has prevailed. Primary teachhers can get on with teaching rather than SATs preparation.
718
06/01/2021 17:50:32 12 33
bbc
Teacher assessed grades are far more reliable, than end of 2 year's work, final exams.
Exams merely set candidates up for failure and are not a true reflection of ability.
06/01/2021 20:12:18 1 3
bbc
Seriously is this trying to be Ironic? The last thing teachers seem to want to do at the minute is teach
06/01/2021 22:17:39 0 0
bbc
Spelling: Teachers.
2
06/01/2021 15:03:45 11 17
bbc
Thanks for destroying my childs education and mental and social health Mr Williamson. I truly hate you with all the energy i can muster.
12
06/01/2021 15:07:37 5 6
bbc
If the schools were kept open then there wouldn't be an issue. Exams are easily doable in a socially distanced fashion.

Schools remaining open are the only way to give children the best education and to help their mental and social health.
53
06/01/2021 15:18:34 0 5
bbc
Agree. Parents already under extreme pressure now have to be mental health counsellors for their kids and again. doing the NHS jobs for them.
79
06/01/2021 15:24:49 2 0
bbc
In which case, more importance should be given to those who have to teach. Teachers need to be vaccinated!
90
06/01/2021 15:27:04 2 0
bbc
Agreed. The most joyful sound I heard in the whole of last year was on the first day of Autumn Term, when I happened to walk past a school at break time. The children were obviously delighted to be back with their friends. And this morning I invigilated a Year 13 BTec exam - even young adults showed real joy at being back in school. Staying at home, in many cases alone all day, is detrimental.
13
06/01/2021 15:07:39 5 9
bbc
Congratulations England...only six months behind the est of the UK....
14
06/01/2021 15:08:10 1 17
bbc
And I'll bet the kids in the poorer Areas of the country will no any better, nor will they get to Oxbridge, or even to a university, nor will their be any better forms of employment no matter what the spin doctors say!! SHAME OF AN INCUMBENTGOVERNMENT THAT FAILS TO DELIVER WHAT IT STATES PUBLICALLY?
61
SFM
06/01/2021 15:20:39 0 0
bbc
Eh??
101
06/01/2021 15:28:12 0 0
bbc
If only you had spell checked and grammar checked your rant. It might have made a compelling argument
127
06/01/2021 15:32:07 1 0
bbc
Shame on the unions and Labour for crying to close schools - it was always going to disadvantage the disadvantaged and will put back the gains in recent years by many more!
15
06/01/2021 15:08:24 247 73
bbc
Lets hope the teachers giving out grades are very impartial and fair. When I was at school many years ago there was always the teachers pets and kids they didn't like. Hopefully this does not influence their decision making. But I doubt that very much. There will also be certain people who bump.grades up to make themselves look good and others who suffer due to others been fair.
151
Rob
06/01/2021 15:34:32 118 67
bbc
Do not worry this will not happen- grades still have to be justified with evidence and it is not just one person who what the grade is, dialogue takes place with a team. Lots of quality assurance!
163
06/01/2021 15:36:16 29 2
bbc
Personally I am more nervous about pushy parents getting their way. I saw it with predicted grades when I was young but it didn’t really matter as the exam showed the reality of the situation. These people will get away with it this year!
174
06/01/2021 15:30:29 14 4
bbc
Teachers should grade their pupils then the papers should be passed to a Teacher at another school to be looked at again. This at .least would stop any favouritism.A similar system with A levels. Its a pity that there isn't a way to stop universities cherry picking applicants
198
06/01/2021 15:43:50 22 15
bbc
Teacher assessments have always been scrutinised in their departments and I cross moderated with fellow heads of subjects in neighbouring schools. Teacher bias is minute, unlike when I was at school in the 60s
213
06/01/2021 15:46:10 11 4
bbc
In Further Education teachers have always marked work under strict guidelines. It works very well but a huge amount of work for the staff.
237
06/01/2021 15:50:11 18 4
bbc
Some won't be 'impartial and fair'. They have vested interests. The grades will rise, despite acknowledgement of lost education for this year's students.

Then, knowing some teachers will 'bump grades' will serve as an incentive for others to increase theirs so that their students aren't disadvantaged.

Lets hope that the moderation process is applied rigorously.
247
06/01/2021 15:52:05 16 3
bbc
Precisely, I was that lazy kid at school who did very little all year and then crammed for my exams. I ended up with a masters from a top university. Under this system the teachers would not have given me anything near the grades I achieved.
254
06/01/2021 15:53:06 20 1
bbc
Last time they did this (Last Year) top grades went through the roof. Must have been a very clever year group. Or perhaps teachers had slightly overstated the capabilities of their students? I can't agree with people who say the grades are scrutinised by departments so will be accurate, then top grades increase by 10%. I guarantee we end up with another "Genius" year group.
272
06/01/2021 15:57:11 0 1
bbc
Impossible for that to happen with the current system
286
06/01/2021 16:00:00 5 0
bbc
Grades should show what the student is suited for in the ‘next stage’. Would be ridiculous for to over-award GCSE grades and then find a student struggles with A levels they ought not to have taken. I hope all other teachers see it this way.
306
06/01/2021 16:04:06 2 2
bbc
Were you the one that teachers disliked?
362
06/01/2021 16:16:52 4 1
bbc
There were lots of children I liked or disliked as a teacher. However, that did not sway my view of their abilities, and never would.
I'm guessing you are looking for an excuse.
470
06/01/2021 16:46:00 0 0
bbc
The 'teacher's pet' situation was a long time ago. When I taught GCSE English, the coursework grading was done very carefully, using exam board grade criteria. It was then cross-checked by other members of the department, and subjected to external moderation. We paid great attention to the grade boundaries. You had no professional credibility if your grade assessments were too far out.
518
06/01/2021 16:26:41 0 0
bbc
It's a vain hope. One of my students, who teachers didn't like was given two E grade A-levels. Everyone else in her classes got higher grade assessments. On taking the exams she got a C and a D.

Don't believe the justification and quality assurance lies.
620
06/01/2021 17:13:20 0 0
bbc
To be honest i don't think they can swing the grades either way too much as under the current system they have been issuing actual & predicted grades since the kids started senior school so the benchmarks have been set really
649
06/01/2021 17:30:38 1 0
bbc
Im a teacher and I certainly have my favourites whom I will pass. Sadly, I will fail people like you.
652
06/01/2021 17:31:11 0 0
bbc
Let's just hope there will be objective grading/marking schemes that it will be mandatory for schools to follow in order to achieve cross-country consistency. Schools might receive this information from the government by the last week in July if they are lucky!
789
06/01/2021 18:14:51 0 0
bbc
And here within lies one of the greatest issues. Teachers are pilloried based on how you remember your school days. The profession is unrecognisable from 10 years ago, let alone longer. Yes, there are bad apples in every job but stop thinking schools still exist with these stereotypes.
861
06/01/2021 18:35:01 0 0
bbc
That's life. It is no different to work and the way people make themselves important. Only to fall apart, as these kids will do.
892
06/01/2021 18:41:38 0 0
bbc
I think you’ll find they’re carefully moderated.
16
06/01/2021 15:09:07 19 1
bbc
GCSE to A-Level is for young people, intellectually a big jump.....never mind without the loss of almost a years teaching. Feel sorry for the kids that will be struggling at A-level (and also degree level) on topics they have not covered at GCSE.
42
06/01/2021 15:16:32 7 13
bbc
Why would they do subjects at A level and degrees if they didn't do them at GCSE
461
R1
06/01/2021 16:43:53 3 2
bbc
Why does everything have to be spoon fed to the kids ? Just tell them to get on with it and self-teach. Tell them to show some initiative for once !
17
06/01/2021 15:09:18 431 84
bbc
Stick with the exams : Moan moan moan
Cancel exams, get alogorithm to grade : Moan moan moan
Cancel exams, get teachers to grade : Moan moan moan

It's just become an automatic reaction here now hasn't it?
27
06/01/2021 15:14:33 122 15
bbc
Exactly. There is no one size fits all. And if there is, it should fit me
156
06/01/2021 15:35:30 27 3
bbc
Well said, I was just going to post something similar but you have put it so nicely :-)
268
06/01/2021 15:56:19 24 33
bbc
I think the moaning is the result of a lack of proactive decision making by the Education department who should - like every responsible function - have resiliency planning as party of its strategic and transactional thinking. Instead we have last min decisions and moan moan moan. I worked in an organisation that planned for pandemics 5 years back (as well as natural disasters) and are doing ok.
356
06/01/2021 16:14:56 23 41
bbc
LOL

Tory Bot Propaganda Army hard at work blaming us for the Tory Government ineptness!
391
06/01/2021 16:24:19 13 4
bbc
Depends if you have kids in those year groups. Also, it's probably not the same people moaning each time.
411
06/01/2021 16:29:35 9 24
bbc
The only people moaning about this are those like you who don't like it when people complain when the government makes a mess of things.

No complaints from me that they have learned from last years debacle and decided to do what they were eventually forced to do last year.
475
06/01/2021 16:48:22 12 12
bbc
Do you understand the irony of your own post?
477
Trs
06/01/2021 16:48:30 10 17
bbc
Because the government can’t make a decision and stick to it. They change their minds like the wind. One day the exams are definitely on the next they are off. What do you expect?
479
06/01/2021 16:49:40 12 3
bbc
Brilliant. Absolutely right.
552
06/01/2021 17:07:02 0 4
bbc
But is any single individual moaning at all 3 of those options?
559
06/01/2021 17:08:29 5 0
bbc
Agreed!! Should be called HYM mot HYS!
580
06/01/2021 17:12:28 0 0
bbc
And you're surprised?
592
06/01/2021 17:13:18 1 0
bbc
Agreed. We need to foster optimism and resilience in everyone of all ages.
595
06/01/2021 17:13:56 0 8
bbc
Between brexit, covid, the financial crisis, the immigration scandals , seed scattering PM total failure of global institutions....
618
06/01/2021 17:19:41 2 11
bbc
like you automatic tory apologists.
641
06/01/2021 17:27:13 1 0
bbc
You’re right and it drives me mad!
685
IR
06/01/2021 17:40:27 2 5
bbc
My son is in 2nd year A levels and has been pulled from pillar to post, told conflicting information for months, and day to day is being messed around. Yes there is a pandemic, we all get that...but mostly this has been caused by a string of poor decisions, a thirst for big announcements that are ill-thought through, and then last minute u-turns when the 'stick to my decision' space runs out.
799
06/01/2021 18:17:52 2 2
bbc
‘He told MPs he would "trust in teachers rather than algorithms", a reference to the U-turn over last year's exams.’

An algorithm told him that was the optimum statement to make.

____________________________
825
06/01/2021 18:26:04 1 4
bbc
The comment of a person who cannot think of anything concrete to say.
850
RTH
06/01/2021 18:33:59 1 0
bbc
Yep - everyone's an expert.
917
06/01/2021 18:10:37 1 1
bbc
unless you are tho one having to take your exams or have a child taking the exam its not your place to comment. I was supposed to take my GCSE's this year and mocks when badly so I wasn't happy the exams were cancelled, but there are some children who didn't have proper teaching last year so are very far behind and so their exams would go badly. and the algorithm was never good as we learnt
06/01/2021 20:45:43 1 2
bbc
No, I think it was moaning about the piddling about and lack of decision making.
The chop and change every five minutes, the uncertainty and the poor decisions they finally came up with.

As a parent I want my kids to have consistency not being pushed around at the whim of BJ.
06/01/2021 21:03:38 2 0
bbc
Its the way the media work .... all over Christmas they are questioning why Boris hadn't locked down, but as soon as he does they are moaning about the impact - when will it end etc. The hail the vaccine, but as soon as Boris says they are targeting 13m by mid February they are looking at anyway they can see him fail - they will go for his throat if he only reaches 12.9m
06/01/2021 21:18:42 2 1
bbc
Exactly, I actually thought the proposal was fair.
- Base on mocs - "it's not fair I didn't bother" -
- Base on Algorithm - "it's not fair I am sure I would have done brilliant"
- Sit the exam - "it's not fair during lockdown I played 24/7 on the xbox".

Wait till these snowflakes get into the real world with performance management, annual reviews, performance improvement plans!
06/01/2021 21:21:48 2 1
bbc
Its the kids that have to sit the first exams (maybe in 2022, maybe 2023 who knows) I feel sorry for.

They'll have a ~25% grade deflation as the grades last year and likely this year were SO over inflated.
18
06/01/2021 15:10:06 29 10
bbc
So in years to come, when people look back, they'll be this blip for a couple of years where 'results' are far superior to any other year
302
06/01/2021 16:03:43 37 4
bbc
If that's the worst that happens for 2 year's worth of GCSE and A level students who have had to put up with lockdowns, tiers, fear of or actually losing family members to Covid, family financial issues, and all the rest, I'd say that was a good outcome.
19
06/01/2021 15:10:47 6 11
bbc
These grades will be grossly unfair , teachers may be able to teach but they are too close to grade students
35
06/01/2021 15:16:19 5 1
bbc
This is the most illogical argument. Because teachers teach the students, knowing them best, they are least able to judge how much and how well they have learned?

Huh - to think that by observing you actually know less.
96
06/01/2021 15:27:48 2 1
bbc
Teachers are professional
20
06/01/2021 15:11:16 166 43
bbc
So another year of record exam results, because teachers can be trusted.

In the 2019 GE campaign, the then shadow Education Minister Angela Rayner, campaigned for the abolition of predicted grades as they were unfair and discriminatory, especially against poorer and ethnic minority students.

Now they claim they are the fairest system, and teachers know best.

How times change.
113
06/01/2021 15:30:21 137 62
bbc
Here here - Labour hypocrisy and cheap political point scoring. They have undermined every single response to COVID. Labour Wales has been a top roaring success though - oh, it hadn’t, a population the size of a medium county and they have been in near constant lockdown for the duration!
305
06/01/2021 16:03:58 7 9
bbc
What’s the actual answer to this conundrum then? Given the circumstances, I think teachers probably do know best.
409
06/01/2021 16:29:23 9 5
bbc
Carefull, you don't what Rayner to talk over you and tell you very condescendingly you dont know what your talking about whilst looking smug
489
06/01/2021 16:51:36 6 2
bbc
You are right. Interference by politicians resulted in the abolition of coursework and complete reliance on final exams. If there was still a coursework element, it would have been really useful, both last year and this, for the teachers who have to produce the grades. I taught both these systems in GCSE English.
508
06/01/2021 16:57:24 2 2
bbc
Not sure there was a pandemic forcing the issue in 2019 was there? Fact is, there is no alternative. What we should be cross about is the fact that this government had no Plan B in place to publish straight away and now students and their teachers still don't know exactly what the processes will be. That's just negligent.
750
06/01/2021 18:02:40 0 0
bbc
Maybe it's because the software used last time to calculate the grades was grossly unfair, not fit for purpose and had to be ditched.
770
MH
06/01/2021 18:09:43 0 0
bbc
It definetely is discriminatory against private \ home schooled candidates with disabilities who lost out both last year and now this year. Whilst the rest of the country got 10% higher grades, this unfortunate group of students have again not been supported.
775
ET
06/01/2021 18:10:27 0 0
bbc
Well, logic says she was talking (ahem) nonsense. All the data suggests predictions are accurate within 10-20%. Exam boards used to collect correlative data on schools predictions vs actual results.
However, the opportunity for outstanding performance (bad for pupils) is removed if the exam is taken away. As is of course, abject failure (good for pupils).
897
06/01/2021 18:42:54 1 1
bbc
What a nasty person you are. The papers and course work are moderated carefully.
Jd
06/01/2021 20:58:45 0 0
bbc
5-15% jump higher in results last year based on the previous year... but behind the headline those grades were actually inline with the predicted grades from SATS testing in year 6 and the fft20 data which all schools rely on. please read past the headlines and trust teachers. the data works, she know little.
21
06/01/2021 15:11:39 47 21
bbc
Teachers have to predict grades based on a students ability, current coursework and mocks every year so I am sure this will be competently carried out as long as government don't interfere and mess things up.

This should have been done last year rather than rely on some half backed algorithm.
40
06/01/2021 15:16:30 19 4
bbc
It was done that way last year - eventually. Exams represent individual achievement. An algorithm (even a fully backed one) will be based on statistics which is about groups not individuals.
202
06/01/2021 15:36:16 3 2
bbc
Yes but teachers' predicted are consistently over optimistic compared to actual grades achieved. Which isn't surprising, but does/ will lead to grade inflation without other moderating measures.
251
06/01/2021 15:50:21 3 0
bbc
It is done every year and always has been. Problem is they have always been inflated compared to actual grades achieved. That is the statement from UCAS!!!
310
06/01/2021 16:05:08 3 3
bbc
You clearly don't understand how different people prepare - relying upon mocks (coursework is all but dead now anyway) is farcical - it's like saying charity shield winner determines who wins Premier League - mocks are simply spot check in time not proper assessment - this is a disastrous situation and 2021 and 2020 will be "the years where results meant nothing" - that's unfair on kids
440
06/01/2021 16:38:59 2 2
bbc
It was don't you remember algorithms were kicked out and and teacher assessments and guess what grades went up 10% which didn't need an algorithm to work that one out.
5
06/01/2021 15:04:09 17 10
bbc
Gavin Williamson makes Chris Grayling appear like a Greek shipping magnate.
22
06/01/2021 15:12:57 5 2
bbc
That's Onasis - not onanism.
71
06/01/2021 15:23:19 0 0
bbc
brilliant comment
23
06/01/2021 15:13:02 12 8
bbc
Schools could have been setting graded course work for assessment, but of course the pig headed Government insisted that exams would go ahead.

Late decision making yet again from the Government and no contingency planning.
54
SFM
06/01/2021 15:18:36 3 2
bbc
I think the decision has been made in light of the new strain and current lock down. new strain only discovered just before christmas so actually i think it's quick decision making, not slow.
However let's not let reality get in the way of a bit of boris bashing
802
06/01/2021 17:55:26 0 0
bbc
You are 100% correct. It is an absolute disgrace that there is no contingency plan in place. It is a huge failing on behalf of the government. They have now cancelled the exams & don't actually seem to be able to provide a clear plan as to how they are going to replace them until Feb. In the private sector this would be totally unacceptable: The need to cancel the exams can not be a huge shock.
24
sm
06/01/2021 15:13:21 37 2
bbc
As an exams officer in a school, I am happy that a decision has been made sooner than last time. It's not an ideal situation by far, but I can't worry about what ifs now. It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards.
I just hope Ofqual and DfE now work swiftly with the exam boards to work out the process for the teacher assessments!
49
06/01/2021 15:18:03 9 0
bbc
It'll be nice if they consider 'crammers'! Otherwise i'd be staring at 2 E's and a U!!!
52
06/01/2021 15:18:17 1 2
bbc
"It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards." I thought you said you were an exams officer in a school?
59
sm
06/01/2021 15:20:34 5 1
bbc
Loving all the typical teacher haters. Do you even have any idea how hard school staff (this includes cleaners, administrators & exam officers like me) are working hard to support students? This government keeps changing their mind and dumping stuff on schools to deal with last minute!

This isn't ideal by far but MOST schools will be fair on their grades because we care about the students future!
986
06/01/2021 19:09:23 0 0
bbc
Come May just re-instate the exams with no notice.
Then we will really find out which students have been taught subjects and which ones are simply memory machines.

Simples
25
06/01/2021 15:14:13 7 13
bbc
Inevtitably exam marks will go up because teachers will want to be seen to have done a great job.
It's basically a wheeze to grade your own performance for teachers.
26
06/01/2021 15:14:21 97 6
bbc
Please do not leave out private candidates this time. They have worked hard and deserve to be treated with respect and not abandoned again.
110
ml
06/01/2021 15:16:53 28 17
bbc
My daughter decided to take a year out post last summer, self study at home and was hoping to sit the exams in the summer to improve her CAG grade. This has left her feeling depressed.
533
06/01/2021 16:30:21 2 1
bbc
I saw my nephew screwed by this last summer. I now have a student who, thanks to last year's lousy "teaching" was working hard to get good retake grades. She was hoping to get into medical school.

Downing Street really doesn't give a toss about these students: and there are a lot of them.
06/01/2021 22:14:27 0 1
bbc
Private candidates can't be evaluated by schools. They had the opportunity to sit an exam in the autumn when they were evaluated in the usual way.
17
06/01/2021 15:09:18 431 84
bbc
Stick with the exams : Moan moan moan
Cancel exams, get alogorithm to grade : Moan moan moan
Cancel exams, get teachers to grade : Moan moan moan

It's just become an automatic reaction here now hasn't it?
27
06/01/2021 15:14:33 122 15
bbc
Exactly. There is no one size fits all. And if there is, it should fit me
6
06/01/2021 15:04:50 110 26
bbc
So long as it isn't a case of inflated grades again. Teachers wouldn't have known how important their predicted grades were going to be last year, but this year you hope they will be more realistic. Otherwise we will have more erosion in peoples trust in those grades and indeed the education system as a whole.
28
Leo
06/01/2021 15:14:34 69 15
bbc
It could easily be argued the adjusted grades of year-end exams doesn't truly reflect the ability of students, but only the desire of education authorities to produce a so-called "grading curve" which may or may not represent the actual ability of a particular year's body of students.
119
06/01/2021 15:31:17 9 1
bbc
Absolutely, I agree that the may be a difference between the normal curve and between what students are predicted. I just think that while a small difference may be explained and accepted, as large a difference as 2020 simply isn't.
123
06/01/2021 15:31:54 4 3
bbc
Possibly but not by anyone who actually knows anything
06/01/2021 22:08:03 0 1
bbc
Stupid comment. You need to state a factual imperative rather than a subjective notion.
06/01/2021 22:38:56 0 0
bbc
you don't know how it works; we look at past performance measures of students to determine how many of each grade should be available; the grading curve changes every year to fit the students. When you're dealing with tens of thousands of students any slight fluctuations are minimal and it works very well.
1
06/01/2021 15:02:35 15 13
bbc
Another day another embarrassing u turn. Don’t expect Williamson to resign in disgrace. None of these have the self respect to go
29
06/01/2021 15:14:43 7 1
bbc
Why is any change in policy due to changing circumstances called a u turn?
264
06/01/2021 15:54:56 1 1
bbc
It hasn’t. It’s the same as last lockdown where he went for his pro eton algorithm. Now we trust the teachers this time.
30
06/01/2021 15:15:04 5 5
bbc
Wait, it will not be long before Gavin Williamson makes another U turn...
Total disaster this idiot is...
1
06/01/2021 15:02:35 15 13
bbc
Another day another embarrassing u turn. Don’t expect Williamson to resign in disgrace. None of these have the self respect to go
31
06/01/2021 15:15:16 2 1
bbc
Not a u turn ,just a decision made according to a new situation. However, why are I turn wrong if they are made for the right reasons? What would you do?
32
06/01/2021 15:15:29 2 5
bbc
Really wary for my youngest after what happened to my eldest with his A-Levels TY. His Maths teacher clearly didn't like him (which is fair enough). But there is no right of appeal effectively.
48
06/01/2021 15:18:01 3 1
bbc
At least he now knows he's got 6 months to brown-nose the teacher who'll be giving him his grades. Better tell him to get on with it!
33
06/01/2021 15:04:20 7 13
bbc
Another year where everyone will get an A*.
124
CJR
06/01/2021 15:32:00 0 0
bbc
Yep but most will be undeserving of the grades
196
06/01/2021 15:42:32 0 0
bbc
This simply did not happen last year - the full range of grades were awarded. There was (inevitably) grade inflation but don't do a disservice to the students who achieved and deserved top grades.
292
06/01/2021 16:02:05 0 0
bbc
Another ? Everyone ?
34
06/01/2021 15:15:50 4 4
bbc
The teachers grades will be moderated; that presumably be the role of OFQUAL and the exam boards. But, I hate to cut short the anti teacher bile that exists here. So sorry.

After all we know that OFQUAL will be fair and even handed after all they produced the "algorithm" which helped students only from the "best" schools. OFQUAL are appointed by the Government so fairness is of the essence.
19
06/01/2021 15:10:47 6 11
bbc
These grades will be grossly unfair , teachers may be able to teach but they are too close to grade students
35
06/01/2021 15:16:19 5 1
bbc
This is the most illogical argument. Because teachers teach the students, knowing them best, they are least able to judge how much and how well they have learned?

Huh - to think that by observing you actually know less.
80
06/01/2021 15:24:56 0 2
bbc
Teachers have their "favourites" and the ones they dislike. Teachers will mark up their favourites and mark down those they dislike or those where the parents have complained about them.
Teaching - the only profession where you are immune from criticism as all parents are too scared less the teachers mark down their children and adversely affect their futures
I complained once, never again
36
06/01/2021 15:16:21 4 0
bbc
What about the current Year 10 students who have also had and continue to have a lot of disruption and have missed a lot of direct face to face teaching ..shouldn't the DFE and the fireplace salesman be putting in place a system of assessed coursework , etc to replace exams next year as well?
89
06/01/2021 15:26:58 0 0
bbc
Why don’t we just scrap the whole education system instead - save a lot of anxiety, and everyone would have the same ‘fairness’ - or would they?
372
06/01/2021 16:19:50 0 0
bbc
Yes perhaps...... but then there’s a whole tonne of reasons why coursework largely gotten rid of, mainly focussing on the theme of unreliability..... of grades.
528
06/01/2021 17:01:33 0 0
bbc
Of course he should be directing a Plan B for Year 10 students. Some compromise of course work & exams or other evidence to back the CAGs.
You'd like to think he'd been working on such a contingency since his bog-awful performance last summer but of course he hasn't because he's incompetent.
2
06/01/2021 15:03:45 11 17
bbc
Thanks for destroying my childs education and mental and social health Mr Williamson. I truly hate you with all the energy i can muster.
37
bbc
Removed
38
mc
06/01/2021 15:06:03 3 14
bbc
no point in going back to school then as teachers will pass everybody to avoid rows and get bigger school grant but will never get jobs as no manager would employ them
105
06/01/2021 15:29:32 2 0
bbc
Your post is obviously there to make teachers angry. Did you have a bad experience at school? What turned you into a teacher hater? I pity your ignorance.
173
06/01/2021 15:30:17 0 0
bbc
Not how school finances work.
39
06/01/2021 15:16:30 47 9
bbc
This is the one instance since the pandemic started that the government has made a decision without either waiting until the last minute and/or flip-flopping around between yea and nay until nobody knows for sure what they're supposed to do when the time comes.
Don't anybody complain!
Please.
50
06/01/2021 15:18:04 25 38
bbc
They knew about the new variant about 6 weeks ago.
323
06/01/2021 16:06:59 6 5
bbc
Actually there’s been a whole range of contingencies that could have been worked out by now. Then, today we get the big unveiling. What has Gavin been doing all year????
995
06/01/2021 19:15:04 2 1
bbc
Well, I don't think so. Any halfway competent Secretary of Education would have been consulting with teachers, unions, school heads, exam boards, universities, employers and all other stakeholders from September/October (as soon as schools and universities were back) to begin to plan for 2021.

21
06/01/2021 15:11:39 47 21
bbc
Teachers have to predict grades based on a students ability, current coursework and mocks every year so I am sure this will be competently carried out as long as government don't interfere and mess things up.

This should have been done last year rather than rely on some half backed algorithm.
40
06/01/2021 15:16:30 19 4
bbc
It was done that way last year - eventually. Exams represent individual achievement. An algorithm (even a fully backed one) will be based on statistics which is about groups not individuals.
06/01/2021 19:51:59 0 0
bbc
Centre Assessed Grades still had an element of algorithm in that they looked at the track record of the school or college too. Some kids thrive on exams, some don't, fact.
41
06/01/2021 15:16:32 4 2
bbc
Capt Khaos and gang

Nothing on Btecs which are being taken now, so different student will get Certs other are being left in limbo.

But June exams are Teacher grades, this cannot be right, and not fair on Btec students
16
06/01/2021 15:09:07 19 1
bbc
GCSE to A-Level is for young people, intellectually a big jump.....never mind without the loss of almost a years teaching. Feel sorry for the kids that will be struggling at A-level (and also degree level) on topics they have not covered at GCSE.
42
06/01/2021 15:16:32 7 13
bbc
Why would they do subjects at A level and degrees if they didn't do them at GCSE
355
06/01/2021 16:14:54 3 0
bbc
None of my psychology students do it at gcse..... it’s the lack transferable skills and approach to study that has proved a problem for my year 12, without that gcse rite of passage.
493
06/01/2021 16:53:43 3 0
bbc
Because there are lots of schools which can only offer certain subjects at A level - either because a GCSE actually doesn't exist in that subject, or the school can't staff it in any case.
863
06/01/2021 18:35:56 1 0
bbc
That should be topics not subjects. Read the post you're commenting on.
43
06/01/2021 15:16:38 13 12
bbc
Why is a former fireplace salesman in charge of our children's education? As with so many in this way below par govt, loyalty to Brexit trumped any semblance of competence.
They have, let me remind you, managed the double whammy of one of the highest covid death rates while trashing the economy: the worst of both worlds. What will it take for my fellow Englishmen to stop voting for these idiots?
185
06/01/2021 15:33:17 3 0
bbc
"Why is a former fireplace salesman in charge of our children's education?"

Because, if you still don't realise it, intelligence and integrity are not needed to be a minister, in fact a distinct lack of them is probably an advantage, as you are then more likely to be a consummate brown-noser.
44
06/01/2021 15:17:05 15 9
bbc
This whole issue is overblown - It is NOT the end of the world / destroying youngsters lives etcetera.

Simply keep all those affected (and who want to moan about the situation...) in school for a further year, when what they missed will be recovered.

As for the dramatic, irrecoverable damage of having to be off school - they're off for 4-6 weeks every summer every single year!

Just stop moaning
68
06/01/2021 15:22:14 8 5
bbc
Do you have children? If you do, you should not! By the time the current lockdown finishes, children will have been out of school for almost a year. In most cases, the damage to their education and mental health is irreparable. Numbers of mental health issues in children increased by 50% and so did suicides. Last year, parents would be fined for taking kids out of school, now we don't care.
108
06/01/2021 15:29:41 1 1
bbc
So how do you create an ‘extra’ year? Classes of 60 in year 11? Keep students in EYFS in pre-school for an extra year. Impossible to do.
And there’s a huge difference between having a summer holiday for a few weeks with family/friends vs having to stay at home during a pandemic. The huge scale of mental health issues/self-harm that arose from the lockdown v1 shows that this is destroying lives.
170
06/01/2021 15:30:01 1 0
bbc
Perhaps you would like to explain how OK this is to students who thanks to last year's very poor "teaching" and/or unfair grading, were going to sit A-levels this summer to get the grades they needed for their chosen university. They are no longer at school, so exams are their only recourse.
392
06/01/2021 16:24:21 0 0
bbc
Yes and let’s forget those that take their cheeky may / September holiday. How much education do they miss over 13 years...... 6 months!!
45
06/01/2021 15:06:37 7 4
bbc
This worked so well last year, with the number of A grades awarded way over the top.

Then I think of one of my students who was the only one in her classes predicted E grades. On actually taking the exams she got a C and a D. Of course this had nothing to do with the teachers disliking her.

This was GROSSLY UNFAIR last year and it will be just as unfair in 2021.
46
PC
06/01/2021 15:07:38 6 1
bbc
A robust system now needs to be developed between teachers, Ofqual and DfE for arriving at the most accurate grades possible. Needs to be based on work done in class, plus school assessments e.g. tests, time controlled assignments and teacher estimates. All parties need to be able to have confidence in the grades arrived at by the schools.
371
06/01/2021 16:18:51 2 0
bbc
Many schools worked tirelessly to develop robust systems internally last year to predict realistic grades. Then got lambasted by parents (typically middle class) who thought little Johnny was under-graded, and are still now going through FOI requests, dealing with threatened legal action.
438
06/01/2021 16:37:00 0 0
bbc
You have just described an algorithm
47
06/01/2021 15:17:30 50 17
bbc
I feel so sorry for young generation. Those of us who are older can sit and worry about our health, but our lives are more behind us than ahead - just a fact.

They are having their chances ruined, sport axed, exercise and friends axed, an assessment system that will award "top grades to all" undermines value of qualifications - exams discriminate - it's their job to show who can and who can't.
72
06/01/2021 15:23:27 55 8
bbc
I think the current situation will inspire many young people. They will look at our current crop of senior politicians and say 'I can do better than that'.

And as teenagers they probably already can.
145
06/01/2021 15:33:57 5 7
bbc
NO, NO and yet again NO!
It makes me very angry that people assume that teachers will just give inflated grades to "make themselves look good"! We know that what students need and expect is to be treated fairly.
Teachers care about their students, it is the government / OFSTED that care about results more. League tables should never have happened outside of sport - education is not a competition.
464
06/01/2021 16:44:41 3 0
bbc
Completely agree. I hope the older generation will appreciate what the young have sacrificed here, which will affect them the rest of their lives.
779
06/01/2021 17:46:19 0 1
bbc
If you don't want to be a bother to your relatives or to the state, I would not take that attitude.I would fight to engage in society however many years you have left.The young have suffered but older people have suffered too with less time to make up for it and few speaking up for them.
Exams prove nothing about a person except that they can pass them.They will soon be redundant.
06/01/2021 22:11:33 0 0
bbc
Totally agree, they are most impacted whilst they also have the lowest risk.
32
06/01/2021 15:15:29 2 5
bbc
Really wary for my youngest after what happened to my eldest with his A-Levels TY. His Maths teacher clearly didn't like him (which is fair enough). But there is no right of appeal effectively.
48
06/01/2021 15:18:01 3 1
bbc
At least he now knows he's got 6 months to brown-nose the teacher who'll be giving him his grades. Better tell him to get on with it!
87
06/01/2021 15:26:28 0 0
bbc
He doesn't kiss any ones ar5e!
24
sm
06/01/2021 15:13:21 37 2
bbc
As an exams officer in a school, I am happy that a decision has been made sooner than last time. It's not an ideal situation by far, but I can't worry about what ifs now. It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards.
I just hope Ofqual and DfE now work swiftly with the exam boards to work out the process for the teacher assessments!
49
06/01/2021 15:18:03 9 0
bbc
It'll be nice if they consider 'crammers'! Otherwise i'd be staring at 2 E's and a U!!!
75
sm
06/01/2021 15:24:27 0 0
bbc
I'm sure your school will show you that they consider a lot of factors: your work in class, your mock grades, your overall progress, etc. That is some of the factors considered last year and that might be included in this years process as well... once DfE and Ofqual release it.
346
06/01/2021 16:12:06 2 1
bbc
Arguably cramming doesn’t represent deep learning... cram one day, forget the next? Maybe grades for crammed not valid anyway?
06/01/2021 22:30:30 0 0
bbc
Should have started sooner! No excuse, loser!
39
06/01/2021 15:16:30 47 9
bbc
This is the one instance since the pandemic started that the government has made a decision without either waiting until the last minute and/or flip-flopping around between yea and nay until nobody knows for sure what they're supposed to do when the time comes.
Don't anybody complain!
Please.
50
06/01/2021 15:18:04 25 38
bbc
They knew about the new variant about 6 weeks ago.
99
SFM
06/01/2021 15:27:53 18 3
bbc
they might have known about it but had to study it to see the effects - i.e. increased transmissibility, etc.
115
CJR
06/01/2021 15:30:31 17 1
bbc
But they did not bank on the stupidity of joe public, that’s is we’re the problem is.
299
06/01/2021 16:03:24 8 1
bbc
What, and you think they should've switched to predicted grades the second they found out???
881
06/01/2021 18:39:39 1 2
bbc
And it had been detected on October in the sewage plants.... But, yes, 'December'... ??
06/01/2021 19:58:41 3 0
bbc
People have known about the basics (face, hands and space) for months but still not comply so how is that the government's fault. Maybe it is an educational issue.
06/01/2021 20:37:12 1 0
bbc
The government can only make decisions based on ‘expert’ opinions. If the experts change their minds the government has to follow suit. Yes, they knew about the variant but, like the original virus, no one could predict how virulent it would be!! So I agree, stop moaning...particularly the media!!
51
06/01/2021 15:18:14 6 6
bbc
We need to remove bias. Some kids are not liked by teachers.

SO... How about schools mark each others work. That way, as in a normal exam, the marker does not know the pupil. A simple yet effective way of delivering consistent results.
60
06/01/2021 15:20:37 5 2
bbc
So one school can undermine another?
73
06/01/2021 15:23:48 2 1
bbc
Reasonable idea - teaching unions would go absolutely apesh1t though!
84
06/01/2021 15:25:32 0 1
bbc
League tables and performance measures pitch schools and pupils against each other. I cant think of a more divisive way of screwing over another local school in the hunt for greater kudos from the local community
195
06/01/2021 15:34:43 0 0
bbc
Teachers don't want the work! They've been paid very handsomely for doing very little last year and got a wage rise! I'm encouraging my child to become a teacher - protected planning and prep time, guaranteed salary, really hard to be sacked...Job For Life!
443
06/01/2021 16:39:39 0 0
bbc
GCSE and A-level exams are marked by third party professional markers who don't know the student, this can be replicated to a degree by having these markers review the basis of assessment for students. School sends in the supporting evidence for the student and this is reviewed by the marker, they determine if the grade is reasonable or needs to be adjusted.
24
sm
06/01/2021 15:13:21 37 2
bbc
As an exams officer in a school, I am happy that a decision has been made sooner than last time. It's not an ideal situation by far, but I can't worry about what ifs now. It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards.
I just hope Ofqual and DfE now work swiftly with the exam boards to work out the process for the teacher assessments!
52
06/01/2021 15:18:17 1 2
bbc
"It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards." I thought you said you were an exams officer in a school?
69
sm
06/01/2021 15:22:40 0 0
bbc
Yes, I am? What is your point sorry?
485
06/01/2021 16:51:00 0 0
bbc
Before writing in this way, are you sure that you have any idea of what an exminations officer in a school actually does?
12
06/01/2021 15:07:37 5 6
bbc
If the schools were kept open then there wouldn't be an issue. Exams are easily doable in a socially distanced fashion.

Schools remaining open are the only way to give children the best education and to help their mental and social health.
53
06/01/2021 15:18:34 0 5
bbc
Agree. Parents already under extreme pressure now have to be mental health counsellors for their kids and again. doing the NHS jobs for them.
23
06/01/2021 15:13:02 12 8
bbc
Schools could have been setting graded course work for assessment, but of course the pig headed Government insisted that exams would go ahead.

Late decision making yet again from the Government and no contingency planning.
54
SFM
06/01/2021 15:18:36 3 2
bbc
I think the decision has been made in light of the new strain and current lock down. new strain only discovered just before christmas so actually i think it's quick decision making, not slow.
However let's not let reality get in the way of a bit of boris bashing
827
06/01/2021 17:59:02 0 0
bbc
It is not about Boris Bashing, it is incompetence not to have a contingency plan that they can immediately put in place in light of the situation last year. It is lazy, someone should have risk assessed the situation and done the work in a timely fashion, rather than leaving everyone not knowing what they need to deliver in the next few months. The situation lacks leadership.
55
06/01/2021 15:19:03 3 3
bbc
Simple answer to teacher assessment is for another school in the county/area to assess the assessment, that way you would get a fairer result and no bias.
638
06/01/2021 17:27:03 0 0
bbc
That's what we used to have in this country - it was called external moderation, invloved other teachers from other schools agreeing on common standards and all supervised by a rigorous independent oversight from the exam boards. I assume it's largely been done away with after the Tories went over to almost entirely final exams system of assessment of students' work.
56
06/01/2021 15:19:42 6 15
bbc
A* for all at A-Level and Grade 9 for all at GCSE so the teachers can show how wonderful they are at teaching.
Not realising that grading exams in this way means they are actually failing their pupils, will mean employers can't rely on exam results so will fall back on hiring those they know (nepotism) - thus disadvantaging the already disadvantaged even more.
Way to go teachers!
76
06/01/2021 15:24:31 2 1
bbc
Teachers don't assess their pupils in this way. Literally no comment has ever been written on a forum based on less understanding of the issue than this. Way to go Geordieboy
129
06/01/2021 15:24:11 0 0
bbc
What have the teachers done to warrant this situation? It's the Ed Sec that's chosen this course of action. He cocked it up last year and has had loads of time to get it right for this year but has consistently failed to do anything about it.
130
06/01/2021 15:24:20 0 0
bbc
Personally I think we should all be given PhDs, just for the hell of it. And while we are at it perhaps we can all have a VC and a Nobel Prize as well! This would be inline with the current way of grading pupils.
9
Hex
06/01/2021 15:07:02 66 51
bbc
Problem is teachers always massively overestimate the results. Exam results are always below their predictions.
57
06/01/2021 15:20:03 52 19
bbc
This is a complex argument you're simplifying.

The fact is that we will predict something close to the best the students have shown us. If Bobby has shown me he can work at a grade 6 on a good day numerous times, I'm not going to predict him a 4, am I?

The 2nd factor is that students very rarely surpass their best in exams, but they often fall short of it...
83
06/01/2021 15:25:30 14 4
bbc
That's not something we can control or predict, but it IS something the gov't algorithm considered.

The problem was that algorithms don't know WHICH kids would fall short, so it just penalised them at random to force the results to fit the usual curve, which is horribly unfair & not something teachers will do.

It's an impossible task. Maybe exams are the issue. Maybe Bobby deserved a 6 all along
186
06/01/2021 15:33:27 8 5
bbc
Exams replicate the real world where we often have to make a decision on the hoof and under pressure, using the knowledge and experience that we have gained. Course work is done at leisure.
191
06/01/2021 15:42:12 11 4
bbc
Teachers have shown they tend to award unrealistically high grades - and it's interesting to read the thinking behind it.

Awarding a grade based on the best a student could possibly do is clearly not what is intended - and it's very unfair on students whose teachers try to work out the most realistic grade to give them.

High marks make teachers look good - bit of a fox / henhouse situation.
330
06/01/2021 16:08:51 1 2
bbc
Maybe the whole concept of academic grading is broken anyway. Teaching to the exam for students to forget the following day is pointless.
407
06/01/2021 16:29:01 1 0
bbc
You are in an impossible position to ‘predict’ the outcome of an exam, any more than a govt can predict COVID cases in 6mths. What you have described is an expectation (quite reasonably) of what could happen given x,y,z. The prediction requires calculating (an algorithm) the likelihood of x,y,z happening (in which case I assume by now you write from your super yacht sipping cocktails)
970
GEH
06/01/2021 19:03:03 1 0
bbc
So you are saying over prediction is baked in!
993
06/01/2021 19:13:50 1 0
bbc
OK now makes sense why this prediction must always be wrong.

If Bobby is a 6 half the time, and a 4 the rest surely he really is a 5 on average ?
He will certainly be a 5 when someone comes to employ him full time.
06/01/2021 22:18:49 0 0
bbc
In this case assessments are pointless as they are not accurate when measured.
58
06/01/2021 15:20:27 5 3
bbc
Let's just hope the Education Secretary's plan is far more 'robust' than the omnishambles he endorsed last time around.
24
sm
06/01/2021 15:13:21 37 2
bbc
As an exams officer in a school, I am happy that a decision has been made sooner than last time. It's not an ideal situation by far, but I can't worry about what ifs now. It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards.
I just hope Ofqual and DfE now work swiftly with the exam boards to work out the process for the teacher assessments!
59
sm
06/01/2021 15:20:34 5 1
bbc
Loving all the typical teacher haters. Do you even have any idea how hard school staff (this includes cleaners, administrators & exam officers like me) are working hard to support students? This government keeps changing their mind and dumping stuff on schools to deal with last minute!

This isn't ideal by far but MOST schools will be fair on their grades because we care about the students future!
51
06/01/2021 15:18:14 6 6
bbc
We need to remove bias. Some kids are not liked by teachers.

SO... How about schools mark each others work. That way, as in a normal exam, the marker does not know the pupil. A simple yet effective way of delivering consistent results.
60
06/01/2021 15:20:37 5 2
bbc
So one school can undermine another?
14
06/01/2021 15:08:10 1 17
bbc
And I'll bet the kids in the poorer Areas of the country will no any better, nor will they get to Oxbridge, or even to a university, nor will their be any better forms of employment no matter what the spin doctors say!! SHAME OF AN INCUMBENTGOVERNMENT THAT FAILS TO DELIVER WHAT IT STATES PUBLICALLY?
61
SFM
06/01/2021 15:20:39 0 0
bbc
Eh??
62
06/01/2021 15:21:04 11 7
bbc
Good to see Labour cracking on with that "Spirit of March".. One day into Lockdown 3 and they are playing politics already. They just cant help themselves. How in heavens name do they think they are either holding anyone to account or presenting a credible alternative come the next election. Will they never learn from their mistakes? Such a shame as a lifelong Labour voter.
301
Ed
06/01/2021 16:03:40 1 0
bbc
What does "playing politics" mean? They're a political party, that's their job.
63
06/01/2021 15:21:12 10 10
bbc
I trust the teachers, it takes a lot of faith to be one, espechially in the past one year
I'm just waiting for anotehr mess comming out of No 10
64
06/01/2021 15:21:17 5 5
bbc
Hold your horses !!
Mr Williamson will be due a U-turn on Saturday if he follows other decisions made previously.
65
06/01/2021 15:21:51 9 7
bbc
Williamson's breathtaking arrogance and stupidity is beyond belief. He is in charge of our children's future and is is utterly incapable.

Endless U-turns and backtracking without any apology or any sign of humility or ability to learn from his mistakes expose this chancer for what he really is, a bozo sycophant interested in himself and to hell with those he is tasked with serving.
66
06/01/2021 15:21:59 2 5
bbc
If every lesson in every subject for every year of schooling were available on Youtube or some similar medium with every pupil given access at home I suspect the quality of our education system would improve dramatically! Pupils and savvy parents who would have real knowledge of progress and evidence to support requests for explanatory tutoring as required. This is the opportunity to implement!
147
06/01/2021 15:34:05 1 1
bbc
So your basically advocating permanent homeschooling. Good luck with that then.
418
06/01/2021 16:32:33 0 0
bbc
My kids loved Horrible Histories, but both hated history at school. HH made learning fun and made the subject memorable - note sure it would have got them a GCSE though without the teacher's input.
67
06/01/2021 15:22:11 19 7
bbc
Labour so hypocritical - closing schools has more ramifications than keeping them open. ‘Close schools’ was the cry: result - disadvantaged children more disadvantaged (access to online lessons, school meals, place to study, etc), lower levels of quality education, increased mental health issues, another bumper results year with children without the education to back it up, parents can’t work, etc
121
06/01/2021 15:31:41 7 6
bbc
A** grades across the board, free laptops, free broadband, guaranteed uni acceptance later, parents on free wages (furlough), mortgage holidays, loan repayment deferrals and no-interest-loans. Its been awful.
294
Ed
06/01/2021 16:02:39 1 2
bbc
How is this labour being hypocritical? The Tories are the one who closed the schools. The scientists also said close the schools.

It's not hypocritical of Labour to also support closing schools. it's hypocritical of YOU to criticise labour for a decision also backed by the Tories.
303
06/01/2021 16:00:30 2 1
bbc
To be fair to Tory Starmer he only called for schools to close 50 minutes after Robert Peston reported the government were closing them.
44
06/01/2021 15:17:05 15 9
bbc
This whole issue is overblown - It is NOT the end of the world / destroying youngsters lives etcetera.

Simply keep all those affected (and who want to moan about the situation...) in school for a further year, when what they missed will be recovered.

As for the dramatic, irrecoverable damage of having to be off school - they're off for 4-6 weeks every summer every single year!

Just stop moaning
68
06/01/2021 15:22:14 8 5
bbc
Do you have children? If you do, you should not! By the time the current lockdown finishes, children will have been out of school for almost a year. In most cases, the damage to their education and mental health is irreparable. Numbers of mental health issues in children increased by 50% and so did suicides. Last year, parents would be fined for taking kids out of school, now we don't care.
06/01/2021 21:31:02 0 0
bbc
For goodness sake. Stop tarring so many with your broad brush strokes. It is irrelevant if people have/do not have children (by the the way a kid is a young goat). Damage is limited to the ability of parents. All children should be able to read and write to a basic standard when they first attend school. BECAUSE, their parents chose to add to the gene pool and should make very effort to add to it.
52
06/01/2021 15:18:17 1 2
bbc
"It's my job to focus on supporting the students in the best way possible from now onwards." I thought you said you were an exams officer in a school?
69
sm
06/01/2021 15:22:40 0 0
bbc
Yes, I am? What is your point sorry?
514
06/01/2021 16:58:45 1 1
bbc
No need to apologise. My point is what is known as a cheap-shot.

Personally I call myself a 'teacher' and if the context requires mention that I've been given extra responsibility for exams. Leading with 'exams officer' suggests that you do not think of teaching as your primary role. Of course, in large education establishments 'exam officers' may not actually be teachers. So possibly furloughed.
70
06/01/2021 15:22:51 67 28
bbc
Gavin

1/10

See me
77
06/01/2021 15:24:35 38 13
bbc
One? You are generous!
100
06/01/2021 15:28:08 8 1
bbc
Grade inflation!
Also 1/10 for the ability to speak properly - he needs a phonics lesson to help him say the word "the" correctly. Gavin, it doesn't begin with a "v", try putting your tongue between your teeth to make a "th" sound, you're a role model to young people (Not.) Removed
538
06/01/2021 16:35:42 0 0
bbc
For six of the (very) best.
728
06/01/2021 17:54:10 0 0
bbc
1/10 ...

I believe that 1/10 now equates to a grade 'A' !
22
06/01/2021 15:12:57 5 2
bbc
That's Onasis - not onanism.
71
06/01/2021 15:23:19 0 0
bbc
brilliant comment
47
06/01/2021 15:17:30 50 17
bbc
I feel so sorry for young generation. Those of us who are older can sit and worry about our health, but our lives are more behind us than ahead - just a fact.

They are having their chances ruined, sport axed, exercise and friends axed, an assessment system that will award "top grades to all" undermines value of qualifications - exams discriminate - it's their job to show who can and who can't.
72
06/01/2021 15:23:27 55 8
bbc
I think the current situation will inspire many young people. They will look at our current crop of senior politicians and say 'I can do better than that'.

And as teenagers they probably already can.
154
06/01/2021 15:27:24 3 0
bbc
That is pretty much all politicians in all parties! Very few heavyweights about any more.
357
06/01/2021 16:16:07 0 0
bbc
and my cat
433
R1
06/01/2021 16:35:43 2 1
bbc
Well, they might be able to do better than Labour or the SNP but that's it.
435
06/01/2021 16:36:31 1 0
bbc
Each young generation can claim that, it was no different in the past. True comment but applicable through a number of the recent generations
51
06/01/2021 15:18:14 6 6
bbc
We need to remove bias. Some kids are not liked by teachers.

SO... How about schools mark each others work. That way, as in a normal exam, the marker does not know the pupil. A simple yet effective way of delivering consistent results.
73
06/01/2021 15:23:48 2 1
bbc
Reasonable idea - teaching unions would go absolutely apesh1t though!
167
06/01/2021 15:28:48 1 0
bbc
Aside from the impracticality of the idea (the whole point of relying on teacher assessment is that there is insufficient robust data to do this centrally without knowing the students involved and how they have developed in class), the amount of time that would take would merely reduce still further the amount of in-school teaching time provided to students.
74
06/01/2021 15:24:10 1 1
bbc
I'm invigilating level 3 BTec assessments from tomorrow (14 hours in 2 hour blocks) . The environment is not very friendly in general with the isolation measures in place and I feel sorry for the students this that are taking them at this time. I wish my institution would decided to cancel them (they can) but at this time they have not. Seems unfair that everything else is cancelled and not BTec
85
06/01/2021 15:25:38 0 0
bbc
The kids are ready for their Btec exams as they are happening this week.
148
06/01/2021 15:34:14 0 0
bbc
My institution has said it is a students choice as to whether they sit the assessment or not. Half and half as to sitting them or not!
176
06/01/2021 15:31:40 0 0
bbc
On the contrary. BTec will remain respected, whilst GCSEs and A levels will be frowned on by employers.;
49
06/01/2021 15:18:03 9 0
bbc
It'll be nice if they consider 'crammers'! Otherwise i'd be staring at 2 E's and a U!!!
75
sm
06/01/2021 15:24:27 0 0
bbc
I'm sure your school will show you that they consider a lot of factors: your work in class, your mock grades, your overall progress, etc. That is some of the factors considered last year and that might be included in this years process as well... once DfE and Ofqual release it.
56
06/01/2021 15:19:42 6 15
bbc
A* for all at A-Level and Grade 9 for all at GCSE so the teachers can show how wonderful they are at teaching.
Not realising that grading exams in this way means they are actually failing their pupils, will mean employers can't rely on exam results so will fall back on hiring those they know (nepotism) - thus disadvantaging the already disadvantaged even more.
Way to go teachers!
76
06/01/2021 15:24:31 2 1
bbc
Teachers don't assess their pupils in this way. Literally no comment has ever been written on a forum based on less understanding of the issue than this. Way to go Geordieboy
70
06/01/2021 15:22:51 67 28
bbc
Gavin

1/10

See me
77
06/01/2021 15:24:35 38 13
bbc
One? You are generous!
150
06/01/2021 15:34:28 2 0
bbc
All must have prizes!
567
06/01/2021 17:09:37 0 0
bbc
1/10 is to encourage the pupil who is obviously struggling. Must have missed many lessons or lacks ability.
78
06/01/2021 15:24:41 7 11
bbc
Teachers proved they couldn't be trusted last summer, when they over graded pupils.

Now they get to do it again.

I feel sorry for universities, who will end up the students not up to the course.
194
06/01/2021 15:34:43 0 0
bbc
And you think the government really cares about this in the slightest?
12
06/01/2021 15:07:37 5 6
bbc
If the schools were kept open then there wouldn't be an issue. Exams are easily doable in a socially distanced fashion.

Schools remaining open are the only way to give children the best education and to help their mental and social health.
79
06/01/2021 15:24:49 2 0
bbc
In which case, more importance should be given to those who have to teach. Teachers need to be vaccinated!
35
06/01/2021 15:16:19 5 1
bbc
This is the most illogical argument. Because teachers teach the students, knowing them best, they are least able to judge how much and how well they have learned?

Huh - to think that by observing you actually know less.
80
06/01/2021 15:24:56 0 2
bbc
Teachers have their "favourites" and the ones they dislike. Teachers will mark up their favourites and mark down those they dislike or those where the parents have complained about them.
Teaching - the only profession where you are immune from criticism as all parents are too scared less the teachers mark down their children and adversely affect their futures
I complained once, never again
81
06/01/2021 15:11:52 2 6
bbc
By June/July, almost everyone who is in the least vulnerable will have been vaccinated. So there is absolutely no excuse for cancelling exams. It's true that they will have had a year of "teaching" that really sucks, but as exams are "marked to a curve" this will automatically be adjusted for.

Another shameful betrayal of young people, and another year whose exam grades won't be taken seriously.
177
Joe
06/01/2021 15:32:20 2 0
bbc
This only works if all students have had the same opportunity to learn the course, but we know that coronavirus has not effected everyone equally, with students from poorer and more disadvantaged backgrounds being impacted to a greater extent. The "marking on a curve" system will only amplify these disparities which were completely out of control of the students affected.
82
ml
06/01/2021 15:12:39 4 1
bbc
Where does this leave Private Students? Those who have been studying at home and therefore no support from any education establishment?
94
06/01/2021 15:27:41 4 1
bbc
Everyone in the country will now get top grades so I see no reason why these pupils shouldn't get them too.
57
06/01/2021 15:20:03 52 19
bbc
This is a complex argument you're simplifying.

The fact is that we will predict something close to the best the students have shown us. If Bobby has shown me he can work at a grade 6 on a good day numerous times, I'm not going to predict him a 4, am I?

The 2nd factor is that students very rarely surpass their best in exams, but they often fall short of it...
83
06/01/2021 15:25:30 14 4
bbc
That's not something we can control or predict, but it IS something the gov't algorithm considered.

The problem was that algorithms don't know WHICH kids would fall short, so it just penalised them at random to force the results to fit the usual curve, which is horribly unfair & not something teachers will do.

It's an impossible task. Maybe exams are the issue. Maybe Bobby deserved a 6 all along
183
06/01/2021 15:40:07 5 4
bbc
At least the results show that missing lots of school actually improved grades overall.
51
06/01/2021 15:18:14 6 6
bbc
We need to remove bias. Some kids are not liked by teachers.

SO... How about schools mark each others work. That way, as in a normal exam, the marker does not know the pupil. A simple yet effective way of delivering consistent results.
84
06/01/2021 15:25:32 0 1
bbc
League tables and performance measures pitch schools and pupils against each other. I cant think of a more divisive way of screwing over another local school in the hunt for greater kudos from the local community
74
06/01/2021 15:24:10 1 1
bbc
I'm invigilating level 3 BTec assessments from tomorrow (14 hours in 2 hour blocks) . The environment is not very friendly in general with the isolation measures in place and I feel sorry for the students this that are taking them at this time. I wish my institution would decided to cancel them (they can) but at this time they have not. Seems unfair that everything else is cancelled and not BTec
85
06/01/2021 15:25:38 0 0
bbc
The kids are ready for their Btec exams as they are happening this week.
86
06/01/2021 15:13:49 3 3
bbc
If only we had subject coursework still, and didn’t rely purely on exam test! Alas the teaching unions did away with it - too much work for teachers. I hope pupils don’t get short-changed by the teachers because of their reluctance to (course)work.
97
06/01/2021 15:27:51 2 1
bbc
It was got rid of because it was too easy to cheat.
103
06/01/2021 15:28:52 1 0
bbc
Coursework was done away with by Mr Gove. But, do not let this comment spoil your anti teacher bile.
160
06/01/2021 15:36:12 1 0
bbc
Department for Education is a union? Wow, I had no idea, 'Gove'!
220
06/01/2021 15:41:09 0 0
bbc
The unions called for coursework to be binned/have not called for coursework to be brought back since it was. Yes it is a ministerial decision that goves without saying.

Modular exams, if introduced, would be binned by the unions as it puts serial exam pressure on the pupil.
568
06/01/2021 17:09:39 1 0
bbc
Please check your facts. It was the then Education Secretary, Michael Gove who did away with all coursework in GCSEs and moved to exam only assessment model. Teacher unions opposed this as they knew from experience that a 50% coursework 50% exam model is far more accurate at showing what a student knows and understands. Nothing to do with too much work for teachers.
48
06/01/2021 15:18:01 3 1
bbc
At least he now knows he's got 6 months to brown-nose the teacher who'll be giving him his grades. Better tell him to get on with it!
87
06/01/2021 15:26:28 0 0
bbc
He doesn't kiss any ones ar5e!
88
06/01/2021 15:26:57 2 5
bbc
It just beggars belief just how incompetent Boris's minions are. But that's the problem with only selecting Brexit supports who are dumber than yourself as cabinet ministers. Good help us.
36
06/01/2021 15:16:21 4 0
bbc
What about the current Year 10 students who have also had and continue to have a lot of disruption and have missed a lot of direct face to face teaching ..shouldn't the DFE and the fireplace salesman be putting in place a system of assessed coursework , etc to replace exams next year as well?
89
06/01/2021 15:26:58 0 0
bbc
Why don’t we just scrap the whole education system instead - save a lot of anxiety, and everyone would have the same ‘fairness’ - or would they?
321
06/01/2021 16:06:32 0 0
bbc
There are lots of university courses that are assessed entirely on graded coursework , assignments,dissertations, presentations , etc .. now some may argue about the the merits of that verses exams but I'm sure it wouldn't be beyond the wit of DFT and education boards to develop these types of assessment for next year just in case the mass vaccinations don't deliver the forecast results
12
06/01/2021 15:07:37 5 6
bbc
If the schools were kept open then there wouldn't be an issue. Exams are easily doable in a socially distanced fashion.

Schools remaining open are the only way to give children the best education and to help their mental and social health.
90
06/01/2021 15:27:04 2 0
bbc
Agreed. The most joyful sound I heard in the whole of last year was on the first day of Autumn Term, when I happened to walk past a school at break time. The children were obviously delighted to be back with their friends. And this morning I invigilated a Year 13 BTec exam - even young adults showed real joy at being back in school. Staying at home, in many cases alone all day, is detrimental.
91
06/01/2021 15:27:06 8 5
bbc
Rubbish comments on here

Teachers are the best placed to give assessments

If you think the teacher hates your child then why are you keeping your child there ?

No teacher is going to bugger this up they will be fair
111
06/01/2021 15:30:10 6 7
bbc
Bulls**t. I complained once about a teacher and all my child's marks after that were reduced by at least one grade from pre-complaint.
"Those who can't do, teach. Those who can't teach, teach the teachers" still holds true by and large (although there are exceptions)
187
06/01/2021 15:40:48 0 1
bbc
It isn't about teachers hating pupils - it's about having a (possibly subconscious) bias.

I do a lot of work in schools , and I know several teacher who are NOT going to be fair - one said "X did fairly well on assignment, but her attitude is disgusting, so I dropped her 2 grades"

Teachers work hard and are to be respected, but they're human and have human failings.
205
mc
06/01/2021 15:37:28 0 0
bbc
you want a bet ever heard the phrase "teachers pet", it is there for a reason
92
06/01/2021 15:27:18 3 5
bbc
Teachers moaning. Its part of their make up
107
06/01/2021 15:29:34 3 1
bbc
But is such an easy job why don't you try it.
93
CJR
06/01/2021 15:27:19 22 12
bbc
Unfortunately these and last year’s exams will not be worth the paper they are written on.
120
06/01/2021 15:31:30 24 6
bbc
Only if YOU decide to look at the year and penalise the student

Is that what you will do ?
212
Rob
06/01/2021 15:46:06 2 2
bbc
Mmmmm . . . really?. Just you holding that view I think.
712
06/01/2021 17:27:49 0 0
bbc
Agree
06/01/2021 19:19:30 0 0
bbc
Or simply deduct 1 grade for 2020 and 2021 - pretty much what the govt algorithm was going to do until the whingefest about not getting the greades teacher promised.

Maybe the certificates need a health warning on them?
WARNING - Teacher estimated grades 0 deduct one for reality
06/01/2021 21:26:14 0 0
bbc
Quite agree. Teachers fear failing their appraisal and will always look to get a better result.
82
ml
06/01/2021 15:12:39 4 1
bbc
Where does this leave Private Students? Those who have been studying at home and therefore no support from any education establishment?
94
06/01/2021 15:27:41 4 1
bbc
Everyone in the country will now get top grades so I see no reason why these pupils shouldn't get them too.
95
06/01/2021 15:17:19 5 1
bbc
So, exam results become ever more meaningless. I know a lot of companies set their own exams now, as part of the recruitment process, because they no longer trust the system. Even over on the Guardian the general opinion is that only exams sat under proper conditions can be said to give a truly unbiased grade.
556
06/01/2021 17:07:30 0 0
bbc
There's nothing new in the idea of companies setting their own versions of entry exams - they have been doing it for years and so has the Civil Service - to assess whether the applicants were suited to the particular needs of that company. But that is not what GCSEs and A levels are designed to do - how could they, to meet all the needs of all the different sorts of companies, jobs etc?
19
06/01/2021 15:10:47 6 11
bbc
These grades will be grossly unfair , teachers may be able to teach but they are too close to grade students
96
06/01/2021 15:27:48 2 1
bbc
Teachers are professional
86
06/01/2021 15:13:49 3 3
bbc
If only we had subject coursework still, and didn’t rely purely on exam test! Alas the teaching unions did away with it - too much work for teachers. I hope pupils don’t get short-changed by the teachers because of their reluctance to (course)work.
97
06/01/2021 15:27:51 2 1
bbc
It was got rid of because it was too easy to cheat.
590
06/01/2021 17:13:12 1 0
bbc
The coursework model did allow students to re-submit essays, projects etc for re-marking after feedback from teachers on where this needed improving to attain a higher grade. There were strict rules on how many times a piece of work could be re-submitted and what teachers could say or write in their feedback.
98
06/01/2021 15:27:52 0 0
bbc
I’m just thankful I’m not in education anymore. I didn’t learn anything useful until I was 15/16 anyway and I finished college at 24
50
06/01/2021 15:18:04 25 38
bbc
They knew about the new variant about 6 weeks ago.
99
SFM
06/01/2021 15:27:53 18 3
bbc
they might have known about it but had to study it to see the effects - i.e. increased transmissibility, etc.
70
06/01/2021 15:22:51 67 28
bbc
Gavin

1/10

See me
100
06/01/2021 15:28:08 8 1
bbc
Grade inflation!