Paperchase on the brink of administration
05/01/2021 | news | business | 513
The stationery chain which has 127 stores and around 1,500 employees says shop closures hit it hard.
1
05/01/2021 14:20:35 35 6
bbc
It is sad. The High Street will be completely different post-Covid with the regular names gone. Survival of the fittest perhaps. Sad nonetheless.
157
05/01/2021 15:40:46 30 0
bbc
If independent local shops took the place of the big chains, it would be good for the smaller high streets. But business rates would need to be reformed first.
467
06/01/2021 00:25:29 0 0
bbc
I don't miss them. I'd only miss charity shops,savers, B&M, Holland and Barrett,Yours Clothing M&S and health shops. I don't shop much else
2
05/01/2021 14:20:44 12 6
bbc
what an absolute shambles we are in
15
05/01/2021 14:29:18 12 33
bbc
vote clown get cicus
capiche????
3
05/01/2021 14:23:06 50 10
bbc
How can it be fair to these firms that supermarkets and garden centres are allowed to stay open and sell cards and stationary?
8
05/01/2021 14:25:35 41 9
bbc
"stationary"

Ouch
18
05/01/2021 14:29:53 4 4
bbc
Do you have a better solution?
137
05/01/2021 15:28:05 2 2
bbc
But can they move their stock?
155
05/01/2021 15:38:40 5 1
bbc
I agree up to a point, but in Wales they tried to make large stores cordon off the 'non-essential' goods, and there was a bad reaction from shoppers on social media.
461
06/01/2021 00:20:07 0 0
bbc
So should shops cover their shops and just sell food?
4
05/01/2021 14:23:10 39 7
bbc
I'm not surprised. I went there before Christmas and it was near impossible to find a diary. The shelves were rammed with all sorts of fun and novelty gifts. These were aimed at young people, none of whom shop on the high street anymore. There is a huge small business movement on Tiktok where people make and sell gifts just like Paperchase sell- i think this is the way forward. Not the high street
466
06/01/2021 00:24:31 0 0
bbc
Worst thing to get last year's was scribbled out cancelled everything and depressing to look at why would you want one with risk of cancellations this year and most don't need them I don't bother I prefer calendars
5
05/01/2021 14:24:37 0 14
bbc
Haven't people worked out what's really going on yet?
16
FF
05/01/2021 14:29:36 17 1
bbc
Please enlighten us oh wise one?
25
05/01/2021 14:36:26 6 0
bbc
No, but I hear the dolphins know all about it.
46
05/01/2021 14:45:41 3 0
bbc
It sounds like you haven’t...
6
05/01/2021 14:25:02 3 4
bbc
Online is sadly the way forward. Unless coffee shops start selling clothes etc
20
05/01/2021 14:31:07 5 0
bbc
erm.. but clothes shops are already selling coffee??
114
05/01/2021 15:13:29 0 0
bbc
Why not?
7
05/01/2021 14:25:22 4 7
bbc
Another company that has been in and out of administration as long as I can remember. Covid may be administering the coup de grace, as it has to so many of these moribund zombie shops.
3
05/01/2021 14:23:06 50 10
bbc
How can it be fair to these firms that supermarkets and garden centres are allowed to stay open and sell cards and stationary?
8
05/01/2021 14:25:35 41 9
bbc
"stationary"

Ouch
9
05/01/2021 14:26:00 5 4
bbc
At the end of the day - who wants a Mao card?
110
05/01/2021 15:12:53 2 1
bbc
Someone, somewhere obviously.
505
06/01/2021 01:17:44 0 0
bbc
Momentum! Jeremy Corbyn and his friends!
10
05/01/2021 14:26:30 23 10
bbc
This one is a bit of a surprise as, unlike the dead shells that have been folding after years of struggles, this brand appeared to be doing well
28
05/01/2021 14:38:06 26 7
bbc
This is a great brand with great products. I just hope they survive, even if it's just online.
49
05/01/2021 14:47:04 3 2
bbc
Not really. The main users of pen and paper in this age are school students, and even education post-primary is moving increasingly to digital.
62
05/01/2021 14:51:35 4 0
bbc
The article says Paperchase had entered a CVA agreement almost two years ago so I guess it couldn’t have been doing so well
274
05/01/2021 16:55:52 3 0
bbc
"appeared to be doing well"?
Please tell me that's a wind-up??

You obviously missed the prominent bit in the article about their CVA less than two years ago? That's not ever a sign of a successful business, in case that needs spelling out to financial novices.

In medical parlance Paperchase was "in the bed nearest the door" and that was clearly long before Covid was ever brought into existence.
11
05/01/2021 14:27:20 163 37
bbc
The end of the High Street was sounded a long time ago, Covid has simply sped up the process! The main reason a lot of these shops can't continue to exist is they were rated out of existence even before Covid began by greedy Councils. When the shops are gone they will start on home owners - from my experience, that has already begun.
Time we trimmed them and their over spending and waste down!
22
05/01/2021 14:35:06 55 69
bbc
... 'greedy Councils' ? Not in my area! Their income has already been cut by more than half and most of the employees are on the minimum wage or barely above.

The only way to make the books balance is introduce swingeing increases in council tax for ordinary households where many are already paying 12-15% of their net income on the Poll Tax 'lite'.
52
05/01/2021 14:48:35 29 21
bbc
Councils are crying out for money - central government funding has been cut to the bone. When you say "greedy councils", what you mean is "Tory austerity". The ring wing press love to blame the councils when actually it's the govt that have forced the councils to find alternative sources of income. Like parking charges, rates & "litter fines" . All of which affect poorer councils more.
146
05/01/2021 15:26:27 5 0
bbc
I couldn't agree more! The companies that are being truly affected are the ones that failed to develop an online presence. As the saying goes, "evolve to perish"
260
05/01/2021 16:47:09 5 5
bbc
Yes, because councils are run to make a profit.

My my, how you have been blinded by conservatism, just go a little to the left and join the rest of us in reality my friend
287
05/01/2021 17:05:48 11 1
bbc
Nottingham City Council are a case in point. It wasn't enough to have lost taxpayers money in the Icelandic banking crisis, they have squandered over 45 million on the failed Robin Hood Energy company. When it went broke the Council leader was deeply apologetic to the few hundred who lost their jobs. Not a word of apology to council taxpayers who's millions they lost.
306
05/01/2021 17:20:19 8 3
bbc
"Time we trimmed them and their over spending and waste down!"

Overspending and waste - what decade are you still stuck in? What do you suggest they stop paying for? Most local councils have cut their budgets to the bone. What's still left that they can they cut - street lighting, schools, libraries, roads, refuse collection? Give us all a good laugh and suggest where the axe should fall next.
308
05/01/2021 17:23:37 6 2
bbc
'Greedy' councils?
You obviously havent checked how much central government has shifted responsibility for services onto councils whilst slashing their central funding.
320
05/01/2021 17:46:34 3 1
bbc
You don't get it do you? A council doesn't benefit by whacking up the rates - thereby killing off business! That would be short term gain for long term pain.

The simple fact is that a lot of these high street chains just aren't needed. In the digital age stationery businesses are as wobbly as a 10 foot jelly in high winds!
337
05/01/2021 17:57:53 2 0
bbc
Clueless comment - rates set by Council's are not to blame for the move to online and retail park shopping. The trend to move away from the high street is driven by the consumer not the local council........
340
05/01/2021 18:02:07 5 1
bbc
I suspect you know little about council finances, which have been cut massively by the government in the last 10 years. It would take councils another decade to meet the waste of £billions by the government in the last year on PPE, test & trace, etc which hasn't worked, mostly given to cronies or contributors to party funds. Councils have been by far better on tracing than Serco
348
05/01/2021 18:11:55 2 0
bbc
It’s the or site landlords that are the problems and the Tory government for messing about with rates and intentionally depleting councils if their income.

If the councils have less income (defunded by the tories) they can see valuable land and property to Tory donors.
360
05/01/2021 18:25:15 2 0
bbc
Councils are over stretched financially as it is. Yes there is some waste and incompetence but not to the degree may believe. The biggest issue is that out-of-town centres are rated too low. Add in all the warehouses and distribution parks that even lower and you see the problem. This is what gives all the online giants so much of an advantage. It is not a level playing field.
374
05/01/2021 18:40:28 3 0
bbc
Shops became cash cows for both landlords and councils because they were easy money. Local monopolies once upon a time. Or travel miles to another town and hope for less rip off mark ups. It is going to cause problems for councils, landlords can go broke no one will care. Council wages will need cutting, jobs automating away etc. Spurious pc roles eliminated.
12
05/01/2021 14:27:57 93 18
bbc
Though the health challenge is sad, you've got to seriously start wondering at what point are we going to say the economic collapse from lockdowns isn't worth it. I'd rather be seeing more nightingale hospitals spring up, and pay people who are tested positive to actually stay at home. Then the rest of us can get on with keeping the lights on and keeping a job.
80
05/01/2021 15:01:13 33 12
bbc
It might work if we had available and accurate tests.
148
05/01/2021 15:34:42 10 6
bbc
How do you get the trained staff for the nightingale hospitals - existing staff stretched to limit in hospitals because of sickness, can't spread them out any further - and each take a few years to train plus government has sent a lot of european and world wide staff out of the country by new brexit rules.
170
05/01/2021 15:47:26 7 7
bbc
1 in 10 testing positive need hospitalisation. 1 in 4 of those going into hospital doesn't come out alive again. Opening a load of nightingales (if you could magic the staff to man them... you can't) doesn't change those figures. Personally I'd rather not be coughing my lungs up for a fortnight to keep paperchase in trade.... THAT isn't worth it.
331
05/01/2021 17:53:04 5 2
bbc
Too late for that.

The way to tackle a pandemic is test, trace and isolate. UK Gov blatantly failed on all three counts.

You are suggesting letting the virus "run wild" which would decimate the economy and the NHS.

The health challenge is not "sad" it is a national emergency and your dangerous talk will cost more lives. Blood on your hands.
342
05/01/2021 18:04:30 4 0
bbc
If we'd locked down sooner and fully, the virus wouldn't have spread so far or fast. The test & trace system is still inadequate. We don't have the staff for all the Nightingale hospitals. 800 people died in the last day. You only have one life. let's allow as many as possible to keep theirs. Mass vaccination is the only solution.
349
05/01/2021 18:12:34 0 0
bbc
If everyone has the curious how can anyone work?
450
06/01/2021 00:09:56 0 1
bbc
we needed NHS smart cards not apps so we could swipe in shops,businesses, services so we knew who was positive and made sure people with vaccinations could go out
13
05/01/2021 14:28:07 3 3
bbc
paperchase going under because the hound has been caught?????
14
05/01/2021 14:28:48 4 24
bbc
Well done, Nicola, Boris, Rishi and whoever else. Your ineptitude is causing economic death.
19
05/01/2021 14:30:16 0 8
bbc
they'll already get a knighthood

you don't really need to say thank you again
48
05/01/2021 14:46:26 2 0
bbc
and you would do what that Civil servants, Sage scientists, Public health england, CBI etc etc has not thought off? nothing.. your like Starmer, you shout from the sidelines but offer no structured solution which, in fact, makes you AND HIM part of the problem.. Bye.. have a great day..
100
05/01/2021 15:08:44 1 0
bbc
Leave out Nicola. She's got her priorities right. the others have not a clue.
2
05/01/2021 14:20:44 12 6
bbc
what an absolute shambles we are in
15
05/01/2021 14:29:18 12 33
bbc
vote clown get cicus
capiche????
66
05/01/2021 14:53:51 4 6
bbc
and you would do what? and make sure your answer is not one that has already been considered by SAGE, Public health england, civil servants, CBI. Otherwise your just like starmer, you shout about the issues but have nothing concrete to add. In other words those that shout and have no solution are, in fact, part of the problem. Your gripe is Torys full stop, not the virus.. Try the truth
5
05/01/2021 14:24:37 0 14
bbc
Haven't people worked out what's really going on yet?
16
FF
05/01/2021 14:29:36 17 1
bbc
Please enlighten us oh wise one?
17
05/01/2021 14:29:46 1 1
bbc
everything is fine.
3
05/01/2021 14:23:06 50 10
bbc
How can it be fair to these firms that supermarkets and garden centres are allowed to stay open and sell cards and stationary?
18
05/01/2021 14:29:53 4 4
bbc
Do you have a better solution?
24
05/01/2021 14:35:46 18 2
bbc
Yes, stationery.
407
05/01/2021 19:15:22 0 0
bbc
> Do you have a better solution?

Like forcing the supermarkets to not stock / not sell non-essential goods like gift cards while restrictions are in effect that prevent their smaller competitors from opening?
14
05/01/2021 14:28:48 4 24
bbc
Well done, Nicola, Boris, Rishi and whoever else. Your ineptitude is causing economic death.
19
05/01/2021 14:30:16 0 8
bbc
they'll already get a knighthood

you don't really need to say thank you again
6
05/01/2021 14:25:02 3 4
bbc
Online is sadly the way forward. Unless coffee shops start selling clothes etc
20
05/01/2021 14:31:07 5 0
bbc
erm.. but clothes shops are already selling coffee??
21
05/01/2021 14:31:36 22 1
bbc
Retail will be entirely different in the new normal. Business failures, sad as they are, are simply the transition.
471
06/01/2021 00:28:53 0 0
bbc
I totally agree and don't miss Debenhams where I am didn't like it
11
05/01/2021 14:27:20 163 37
bbc
The end of the High Street was sounded a long time ago, Covid has simply sped up the process! The main reason a lot of these shops can't continue to exist is they were rated out of existence even before Covid began by greedy Councils. When the shops are gone they will start on home owners - from my experience, that has already begun.
Time we trimmed them and their over spending and waste down!
22
05/01/2021 14:35:06 55 69
bbc
... 'greedy Councils' ? Not in my area! Their income has already been cut by more than half and most of the employees are on the minimum wage or barely above.

The only way to make the books balance is introduce swingeing increases in council tax for ordinary households where many are already paying 12-15% of their net income on the Poll Tax 'lite'.
51
05/01/2021 14:48:21 22 3
bbc
landlords??? they are absolutely cashing it in whilst the shops are shut. they still want their fill... thats were the issues is GREEDY LANDLORDS
55
05/01/2021 14:49:49 23 5
bbc
You work for a council - vested interest perhaps?

Rows of empty shops in my area, when they close signs go up saying forced out by Council tax rises. Pubs close & frequently the business rates are higher than the rental they pay the brewery. My Council moved from offices -now empty to newly built with shopping centre that floods. They built it next to a river that has flooded since I was a kid!
106
05/01/2021 15:11:58 19 8
bbc
You might to take a look at the council's ACTUAL spending before saying that spending has been cut by half. The figures usually quoted by Councils are after inflation- as they feel entitled to at least inflation plus increases every year.
Actual drop per person is around 10%
The Average salary for Council jobs is £47,500.
https://www.cwjobs.co.uk/salary-checker/average-council-salary
143
05/01/2021 15:32:05 17 5
bbc
Councils also have a number of staff on six-figure salaries, although they are always bleating that they do not have enough money.
150
jj
05/01/2021 15:36:17 24 3
bbc
That’s because a significant part of your council tax goes on paying the pension for their retired employees in the golden days of pensions.
251
05/01/2021 16:40:59 6 1
bbc
nice! Sounds like your local council is straight as a dice! With a fair and proper planning office! Tell us the name of your council please, as mine is bent as anything and our MP - Jenrick -has been caught fiddling himself recently
282
DSA
05/01/2021 17:01:38 7 3
bbc
The councils still employ thousands of safe overpaid beaurcratic Mickey Mouse jobs.

It wouldn't surprise me if most of them have well staffed congestion creation departments.
383
Dee
05/01/2021 18:53:00 1 0
bbc
It depends on where you live. I’m guessing you don’t live in London.
424
GS
05/01/2021 19:34:12 1 0
bbc
I'm waiting for refund on my council tax for services halted with the excuse of Covid. Today another local play area closed after 'careful consideration'...meaning, we can save money on maintenance and emptying waste bins, when the government wants them to stay open.
438
05/01/2021 23:58:23 0 0
bbc
council tax doesn't work we need Local income tax each year it will look at actual incomes and tax accordingly. The wealthy don't pay enough it isn't right
23
05/01/2021 14:35:07 10 19
bbc
The nation is once again divided.
There are those afraid of the virus despite the fact it has a mortality of 0.1% and overall it is the very old and vulnerable who are at risk.
There are those who see the treatment being worse than the disease.

We need to see the bigger picture.
Shield the high risk.
Rescue the economy.
30
05/01/2021 14:39:31 5 15
bbc
If those who are high-risk were to shield themselves (supported by the actions of their families) then we wouldn't need lockdowns. It seems however that they are either unable or unwilling to do so.
41
05/01/2021 14:44:21 10 0
bbc
you had any of your family die. Behind a screen, cant touch them, cant hold them.. I have.. work colleague watched his 21 year old son die.. cousin (24) has lost the use of one of his lungs.. You trivialise pathetically.. try compassion, WE ARE ALL ENTITILTED TO LIFE.. Money doesn't replace these things and businesses will pull through eventually.. death is permanent
198
05/01/2021 16:04:32 2 0
bbc
I think 0.00001% of scientists that deal with viruses and pandemics agree with "just shield the vulnerable". I trust the remaining 99.99999%, cheers.
18
05/01/2021 14:29:53 4 4
bbc
Do you have a better solution?
24
05/01/2021 14:35:46 18 2
bbc
Yes, stationery.
47
05/01/2021 14:46:02 1 7
bbc
there is such a thing as restraint of trade ,this Government is driving a coach and four through the Common Law
5
05/01/2021 14:24:37 0 14
bbc
Haven't people worked out what's really going on yet?
25
05/01/2021 14:36:26 6 0
bbc
No, but I hear the dolphins know all about it.
86
05/01/2021 15:03:15 3 0
bbc
"No, but I hear the dolphins know all about it"

Nah, they're just using us to get lots of fish, they'll do away with us once they evolve opposable thumbs ??
140
FF
05/01/2021 15:29:42 2 0
bbc
Those pesky dolphins. Always messing a boat! :)
26
05/01/2021 14:36:40 8 1
bbc
The High Street has either to reinvent itself or die. Unfortunately the dead hand of local govt inertia hinders innovation because of needlessly restrictive processes around change of use, treating parking as a cash cow instead of a service etc. "Emergency" interest rates have kept some retailers alive for years longer than normal which has crowded out replacement businesses. Outlook: not good.
31
05/01/2021 14:40:43 10 3
bbc
its all to do with greedy landlords who are not willing to compromise. In Hitchin where I live they are absolutely all about them selves.
39
05/01/2021 14:43:47 3 3
bbc
We cannot allow town centres to become dead zones of luxury housing. We need new, low-cost, starter premises to help rebuild commerce in our towns in a form that people want - immediate, available and reflecting the character of the local area.

I miss the bustle of my local high street and its market.
59
05/01/2021 14:51:11 3 2
bbc
It is hard to reinvent whwn traditional shops are hemmed in. Council car parking charges, high rent, taxes vs online retailers take their pick of tax laws, shipping locations etc. In lockdown supermarkets can clean up, the likes of 'the range' doing the same. Not a level playing field.
27
05/01/2021 14:37:22 37 3
bbc
Paperchase is about to fold.
34
05/01/2021 14:41:35 37 5
bbc
Would that make them Origamichase?
99
05/01/2021 15:08:23 6 1
bbc
You crease me up.
125
05/01/2021 15:19:46 1 5
bbc
Having a day off from trashing the UK, Strawcat?
465
06/01/2021 00:23:13 0 0
bbc
Angel in the Centrefold.
10
05/01/2021 14:26:30 23 10
bbc
This one is a bit of a surprise as, unlike the dead shells that have been folding after years of struggles, this brand appeared to be doing well
28
05/01/2021 14:38:06 26 7
bbc
This is a great brand with great products. I just hope they survive, even if it's just online.
45
05/01/2021 14:45:07 6 3
bbc
Great products? Unnecessary products. Products that are just sent to the landfill (wrapping paper) or sent for recycling a day after they are bought. Environmental nightmare.
29
05/01/2021 14:38:11 192 15
bbc
The supermarkets are making a killing selling non-essential items at the expense of those shops forced to close.
73
05/01/2021 14:57:07 77 53
bbc
The charity shops have been doing it for decades as well - low to zero rates, staff are mostly vunteers and they sell new products almost at cost - bit it's okay, it's all for charity, never mind the shop owners and their families.
88
05/01/2021 15:05:20 1 1
bbc
Be interesting to see if that happens this time round. I can't say that on my in person visits I noticed much difference in the trolley contents. Because of an accident I bought countless pairs of slippers, could not get shoes on, spent loads and no-one said anything. Pillows, towels and bedlinen too.
159
JB
05/01/2021 15:43:24 14 4
bbc
Supermarkets (being castigated for selling non-essential items during lockdown, at the expense of shops forced to close) have always sold a range of items other than food and cleaning essentials.
335
05/01/2021 17:54:26 1 2
bbc
Totally true - if the items are non-essential then the supermarkets should also be prevented from selling them.
23
05/01/2021 14:35:07 10 19
bbc
The nation is once again divided.
There are those afraid of the virus despite the fact it has a mortality of 0.1% and overall it is the very old and vulnerable who are at risk.
There are those who see the treatment being worse than the disease.

We need to see the bigger picture.
Shield the high risk.
Rescue the economy.
30
05/01/2021 14:39:31 5 15
bbc
If those who are high-risk were to shield themselves (supported by the actions of their families) then we wouldn't need lockdowns. It seems however that they are either unable or unwilling to do so.
43
05/01/2021 14:44:26 7 0
bbc
there are millions at high risk, add in their family, add in the workers that care for them and of course then the workers families and you end up with most of the population locking down anyway
77
05/01/2021 14:59:51 4 0
bbc
Everyone over 70 cannot be expected to stay in for the best part of a year. It is impossible to hava all food delivered (try it) and it takes a toll on mental health. Older people who are fit need to be able to go to the supermarket, they are put at risk by selfish people who will not keep their distance or wear masks, and expect to bring their kids. Just normal good manners is what is needed.
26
05/01/2021 14:36:40 8 1
bbc
The High Street has either to reinvent itself or die. Unfortunately the dead hand of local govt inertia hinders innovation because of needlessly restrictive processes around change of use, treating parking as a cash cow instead of a service etc. "Emergency" interest rates have kept some retailers alive for years longer than normal which has crowded out replacement businesses. Outlook: not good.
31
05/01/2021 14:40:43 10 3
bbc
its all to do with greedy landlords who are not willing to compromise. In Hitchin where I live they are absolutely all about them selves.
82
05/01/2021 15:01:27 0 1
bbc
6 families
122
05/01/2021 15:16:29 1 1
bbc
That nust have changed over the last few years. Iran a business in Hitchin in the 90's and the council were OK and the square was thriving.
32
MVP
05/01/2021 14:41:19 10 2
bbc
Bricks and mortar retail will never be the same again after this pandemic. Paperchase is just another example.

And the greedy landlords of our cities and shopping centres who have been creaming in obscene rents for decades will need to re-assess their positions going forward.

I cannot say I feel sorry for them.
44
05/01/2021 14:44:52 10 3
bbc
Remember that many of those 'greedy landlords' are pension funds - perhaps yours!
166
05/01/2021 15:41:18 2 0
bbc
Empty commercial premises represent a substantial tax write-off opportunity. Sometimes it's worth leaving them empty.
426
05/01/2021 19:40:34 0 0
bbc
Spot on. Lockdown legislation prevents retailers from fully opening and earning sufficient income to pay overheads that include rent, business rates and staff wages.

There has been no legislation to require landlords to experience the same loss of income by imposing a moratorium on (i) rent and (ii) business rates.

Property owners are politically protected and the last to feel the cold draught.
33
05/01/2021 14:41:22 65 2
bbc
Paperchase was the go to place for an great card or two or some eccentric wrapping paper but it was always niche. Design leaders but became so expensive and distracted by their own style they did not keep up with changes in the market. Failed to move with the times. Blame hedge fund managers who are out for profit and not with the designers who often sell their work so cheaply. Market is changing.
87
05/01/2021 15:03:19 20 3
bbc
Agree. I liked, still like the shop. Would be card buyers take note, Oxfam have a great selection for all occasions, and the blank card range is really good. In shops and on-line. Look at Woodland Trust too.
27
05/01/2021 14:37:22 37 3
bbc
Paperchase is about to fold.
34
05/01/2021 14:41:35 37 5
bbc
Would that make them Origamichase?
35
05/01/2021 14:42:06 204 14
bbc
Everyone bleating that covid killed this chain, should read the article a little more thoroughly.
"The company went through an insolvency process, known as a Company Voluntary Arrangement or CVA, almost two years ago to cut costs."

Seems their troubles predate Covid.....
118
ggg
05/01/2021 15:15:18 94 15
bbc
Seems like their troubles predate Covid, but Covid killed them off. Probably like many people killed by the virus.
151
05/01/2021 15:36:32 4 14
bbc
The issue isn't if they had a CVA before, it's if they otherwise would have been viable. Also covid hasn't killed any business, government has.
186
05/01/2021 15:54:59 9 1
bbc
Yeh, it went through CVA two years ago.....and survived! Any greet card shop that looses Christmas and now Valentines Day will be in the ‘****’! Give them just a little sympathy!
307
05/01/2021 17:22:22 3 0
bbc
Agree. Lovely products, but very expensive
328
05/01/2021 17:51:42 3 1
bbc
This is one of several high street chains that were in trouble before covid hit. The taxpayers have paid furlough cash to keep jobs that never were going to be saved. That money must be reclaimed from any businesses that can be proved as failing before January 2020. Add to the list of creditors.
341
05/01/2021 18:04:01 0 0
bbc
And no one blamed brexit either.
434
05/01/2021 23:53:18 0 0
bbc
People don't need snail mail anymore im shocked too many stores more than some companies have
36
05/01/2021 14:43:26 6 13
bbc
We cannot keep shutting businesses for months on end, the country will be bankrupt. There will be riots and anarchy on the streets soon. . The internet has made this pandemic much worse than 1918 when there were rules closing meetings ,theatres and the like but essentially life went on with care. Stagger opening hours and get the shops open again!
72
05/01/2021 14:56:06 1 2
bbc
I agree! Three cheers for your common sense!
81
05/01/2021 15:01:16 0 0
bbc
Stagger opening hours and get the shops open again! That is worth investigating. Surprised anarchy and riots not happened already.
93
05/01/2021 15:07:00 2 0
bbc
And how many died in the 1918 pandemic?

(Answer: Nearly a quarter of a million in the UK alone)
507
06/01/2021 01:26:14 0 0
bbc
and end up with shops busy because the others aren't open then the closed ones goes bust. very smart! No if people had NHs smart cards the virus could be better traced than those apps
37
05/01/2021 14:43:29 10 8
bbc
In the internet age it’s mad that people still buy and send cards that aren’t kept or cherished, they are just sent to the recycling plant or landfill. And on top that they cost a ridiculous amount of money per card.

Sure, some artists rely on cards as an income and produce some beautiful work. But let’s face it, most cards are trashy.
78
05/01/2021 15:00:02 4 0
bbc
I sent cards and letters to older friends who do not have the internet, and I usually have plenty of cards, writing paper and stamps etc. There are beautiful cards available, handmade using different materials. I know the sort of cards you mean, a lot of the cards I get (even Christmas cards) go straight in recycling. Some I treasure. And a love letter, well... it's good for handwriting too.
38
05/01/2021 14:43:45 17 1
bbc
I love paperchase for the stationery, but sadly it was a little too expensive.
26
05/01/2021 14:36:40 8 1
bbc
The High Street has either to reinvent itself or die. Unfortunately the dead hand of local govt inertia hinders innovation because of needlessly restrictive processes around change of use, treating parking as a cash cow instead of a service etc. "Emergency" interest rates have kept some retailers alive for years longer than normal which has crowded out replacement businesses. Outlook: not good.
39
05/01/2021 14:43:47 3 3
bbc
We cannot allow town centres to become dead zones of luxury housing. We need new, low-cost, starter premises to help rebuild commerce in our towns in a form that people want - immediate, available and reflecting the character of the local area.

I miss the bustle of my local high street and its market.
477
06/01/2021 00:36:09 1 0
bbc
yet where does social housing go? people homeless most of the housing is private rentals lots can't afford them. No knock the shops down and built social housing it also rarely floods in towns compared to the country
40
rmw
05/01/2021 14:44:07 59 14
bbc
Fair taxes for online please. Otherwise traditional shops can't compete. It's only fair.

So many positive social externalities from real shopping. Very say to see this happening.
56
05/01/2021 14:50:42 68 20
bbc
The current arrangements are fair. Technology moves on. Nobody kept gas street lamps or blacksmiths when technology changed their lives. Time to let go of the past and move forward, not look backwards all the time.
206
05/01/2021 16:07:21 2 3
bbc
Yeh, bring back the Luddites.
244
05/01/2021 16:32:10 3 0
bbc
We run an online shop and we pay more to google to be on their first page than we would to have a high street shop
325
05/01/2021 17:49:22 2 1
bbc
What a stupid comment. All of these high street chains have websites, and no one is forcing them to have a store in every small town.

It's economic natural selection. The strong survive and the stupid, slow and inefficient die off - leaving the population of the High Street leaner and stronger.
332
Dee
05/01/2021 17:53:48 1 0
bbc
As the actress Zsa Zsa Gabor once said “Being jealous of a beautiful woman will not make you more beautiful”. The online genie will not go back in its bottle & tech taxes will be passed on to the UK small businesses who pay fees to use tech platforms. Location/demographic/price/quality points, excellent customer service & an online presence will only save retail.
458
06/01/2021 00:17:31 0 0
bbc
They are coming the Eurozone is doing a digital tax structure so are we
23
05/01/2021 14:35:07 10 19
bbc
The nation is once again divided.
There are those afraid of the virus despite the fact it has a mortality of 0.1% and overall it is the very old and vulnerable who are at risk.
There are those who see the treatment being worse than the disease.

We need to see the bigger picture.
Shield the high risk.
Rescue the economy.
41
05/01/2021 14:44:21 10 0
bbc
you had any of your family die. Behind a screen, cant touch them, cant hold them.. I have.. work colleague watched his 21 year old son die.. cousin (24) has lost the use of one of his lungs.. You trivialise pathetically.. try compassion, WE ARE ALL ENTITILTED TO LIFE.. Money doesn't replace these things and businesses will pull through eventually.. death is permanent
42
Ian
05/01/2021 14:44:25 9 10
bbc
?????????? Love to all those affected ??????????

We must use this pandemic to rebuild a more compassionate world
64
05/01/2021 14:51:55 16 6
bbc
What?
Why don't you rush out and buy their stuff, that's what they need, not mindless fluff?
117
05/01/2021 15:14:57 1 0
bbc
Pretty sure it's hugging that causes this problem, not solve it...
30
05/01/2021 14:39:31 5 15
bbc
If those who are high-risk were to shield themselves (supported by the actions of their families) then we wouldn't need lockdowns. It seems however that they are either unable or unwilling to do so.
43
05/01/2021 14:44:26 7 0
bbc
there are millions at high risk, add in their family, add in the workers that care for them and of course then the workers families and you end up with most of the population locking down anyway
32
MVP
05/01/2021 14:41:19 10 2
bbc
Bricks and mortar retail will never be the same again after this pandemic. Paperchase is just another example.

And the greedy landlords of our cities and shopping centres who have been creaming in obscene rents for decades will need to re-assess their positions going forward.

I cannot say I feel sorry for them.
44
05/01/2021 14:44:52 10 3
bbc
Remember that many of those 'greedy landlords' are pension funds - perhaps yours!
63
05/01/2021 14:51:37 1 2
bbc
and that makes it right?
70
05/01/2021 14:55:35 0 2
bbc
I don't think they are.
And even if they are, that simply highlights the failings of pension schemes - thanks to inflation and longer life expectancies very few pay in enough to cover their own pension and rely on the young to top them up, it's called a Ponzi or pyramid scheme.
249
ET
05/01/2021 16:40:05 0 0
bbc
No. Mine’s a government Ponzi scheme.
28
05/01/2021 14:38:06 26 7
bbc
This is a great brand with great products. I just hope they survive, even if it's just online.
45
05/01/2021 14:45:07 6 3
bbc
Great products? Unnecessary products. Products that are just sent to the landfill (wrapping paper) or sent for recycling a day after they are bought. Environmental nightmare.
104
05/01/2021 15:10:33 2 1
bbc
You go in in there then? I wonder.
5
05/01/2021 14:24:37 0 14
bbc
Haven't people worked out what's really going on yet?
46
05/01/2021 14:45:41 3 0
bbc
It sounds like you haven’t...
24
05/01/2021 14:35:46 18 2
bbc
Yes, stationery.
47
05/01/2021 14:46:02 1 7
bbc
there is such a thing as restraint of trade ,this Government is driving a coach and four through the Common Law
183
05/01/2021 15:53:10 4 1
bbc
Yawn, that old chestnut. Blah blah Magna Carta etc etc
14
05/01/2021 14:28:48 4 24
bbc
Well done, Nicola, Boris, Rishi and whoever else. Your ineptitude is causing economic death.
48
05/01/2021 14:46:26 2 0
bbc
and you would do what that Civil servants, Sage scientists, Public health england, CBI etc etc has not thought off? nothing.. your like Starmer, you shout from the sidelines but offer no structured solution which, in fact, makes you AND HIM part of the problem.. Bye.. have a great day..
10
05/01/2021 14:26:30 23 10
bbc
This one is a bit of a surprise as, unlike the dead shells that have been folding after years of struggles, this brand appeared to be doing well
49
05/01/2021 14:47:04 3 2
bbc
Not really. The main users of pen and paper in this age are school students, and even education post-primary is moving increasingly to digital.
109
05/01/2021 15:12:14 1 2
bbc
I write letters, personal and business, prefer doing the latter in ink and on paper as I can send it recorded delivery. Spending time at a screen isn't terribly healthy. Oh whoops look what I am doing right now.
Removed
22
05/01/2021 14:35:06 55 69
bbc
... 'greedy Councils' ? Not in my area! Their income has already been cut by more than half and most of the employees are on the minimum wage or barely above.

The only way to make the books balance is introduce swingeing increases in council tax for ordinary households where many are already paying 12-15% of their net income on the Poll Tax 'lite'.
51
05/01/2021 14:48:21 22 3
bbc
landlords??? they are absolutely cashing it in whilst the shops are shut. they still want their fill... thats were the issues is GREEDY LANDLORDS
222
05/01/2021 16:13:25 6 0
bbc
Landlords aren't greedy for charging market rates. They are however somewhat foolish not to realise that the same rents they charged during the high streets glory years are not viable these days.
322
05/01/2021 17:47:30 3 0
bbc
Not all landlords are greedy. Some own a single small property and have put their entire savings into it for a small income as a pension. Tenants unable to pay = no pension.
439
05/01/2021 23:58:51 0 0
bbc
Yes that's why we need TURNOVER RENTS and TURNOVER RATES
11
05/01/2021 14:27:20 163 37
bbc
The end of the High Street was sounded a long time ago, Covid has simply sped up the process! The main reason a lot of these shops can't continue to exist is they were rated out of existence even before Covid began by greedy Councils. When the shops are gone they will start on home owners - from my experience, that has already begun.
Time we trimmed them and their over spending and waste down!
52
05/01/2021 14:48:35 29 21
bbc
Councils are crying out for money - central government funding has been cut to the bone. When you say "greedy councils", what you mean is "Tory austerity". The ring wing press love to blame the councils when actually it's the govt that have forced the councils to find alternative sources of income. Like parking charges, rates & "litter fines" . All of which affect poorer councils more.
105
05/01/2021 15:11:33 13 5
bbc
Well said.
224
05/01/2021 16:14:29 10 5
bbc
Are they spending the money wisely? If my local councils are anything to go by, they have slashed front line spending but expanded their policy departments...
262
05/01/2021 16:48:38 4 1
bbc
The nail has been hit bang on the head here. Nicely done my friend.
387
Dee
05/01/2021 18:54:11 0 0
bbc
It depends on where you live. I’m guessing you don’t live in London.
405
05/01/2021 19:13:09 1 0
bbc
Suggest you take a look at your council accounts. Full time officers pay, pension costs for staff, councillors expenses etc. You will be amazed
420
05/01/2021 19:30:54 2 0
bbc
After the last local elections the very first thing that my local councillors did was to vote themselves an increase in their allowances.
53
05/01/2021 14:49:05 262 23
bbc
You have to keep moving in the stationery business.
67
05/01/2021 14:54:09 41 5
bbc
????????
92
05/01/2021 15:06:54 7 3
bbc
Almost good, almost.

Works better in sound ;)
130
05/01/2021 15:22:33 7 1
bbc
It was funny when Tommy Cooper said it.
177
05/01/2021 15:52:12 2 43
bbc
Very droll, you pathetic creature! Taking the ‘proverbial’ out of those who have more sensibility than to respond! Shame on you!
217
05/01/2021 16:11:58 28 0
bbc
You have to keep pushing the envelope?
305
05/01/2021 17:16:47 3 22
bbc
I'm sure that all those people who are about to lose their jobs laughed their socks off at that.

Arrogant fool.
317
05/01/2021 17:42:06 7 3
bbc
We can all blame tiers of the clown for this...
Removed
22
05/01/2021 14:35:06 55 69
bbc
... 'greedy Councils' ? Not in my area! Their income has already been cut by more than half and most of the employees are on the minimum wage or barely above.

The only way to make the books balance is introduce swingeing increases in council tax for ordinary households where many are already paying 12-15% of their net income on the Poll Tax 'lite'.
55
05/01/2021 14:49:49 23 5
bbc
You work for a council - vested interest perhaps?

Rows of empty shops in my area, when they close signs go up saying forced out by Council tax rises. Pubs close & frequently the business rates are higher than the rental they pay the brewery. My Council moved from offices -now empty to newly built with shopping centre that floods. They built it next to a river that has flooded since I was a kid!
440
06/01/2021 00:00:14 0 0
bbc
yes building things that are shut. Where I am new cinema ?? and empty shops what a waste and the brewery was new as well in Kent shut as well. Lots didn't want it and were vindicated!
40
rmw
05/01/2021 14:44:07 59 14
bbc
Fair taxes for online please. Otherwise traditional shops can't compete. It's only fair.

So many positive social externalities from real shopping. Very say to see this happening.
56
05/01/2021 14:50:42 68 20
bbc
The current arrangements are fair. Technology moves on. Nobody kept gas street lamps or blacksmiths when technology changed their lives. Time to let go of the past and move forward, not look backwards all the time.
131
05/01/2021 15:23:41 1 0
bbc
Blacksmiths make £100 k per year or farriers as they like to call themselves now.
Two of my associates are in the trade, one of them drives a red 2015 Ferrari[not for work ]
133
ggg
05/01/2021 15:24:14 12 3
bbc
The current tax arrangements are not fair. High business rates on physical shops mean that traditional retailers are not competing on a level playing field with on-line.
174
05/01/2021 15:49:36 10 7
bbc
Completely disagree. What is better:
-Bustling high streets full of workers in shops, or concreting over acres of countryside to build massive warehouses for Amazon run by actual robots and staff treated like robots
-Staff members socialising with the public in a shop or a staff member hidden away in a warehouse
-People walking around shops or sat on their behind at home ordering on a screen
343
05/01/2021 18:06:03 1 0
bbc
But they should be subject to the same consumer taxes as the same products sold in a different way
57
05/01/2021 14:50:42 12 5
bbc
Its the likes of Philip Greene that makes these situation much much worse
97
05/01/2021 15:08:02 6 4
bbc
Because?
473
06/01/2021 00:30:56 0 0
bbc
Yes why is he still Sir? I'm waiting for that parliamentary debate I signed 3 petitions to strip him of it
58
05/01/2021 14:50:54 3 4
bbc
Greedy landlords pay our pensions.

Greedy councils provide our services.

We still need to raise that money somewhere.

Which means either we have to get a lot cuter taxing the internet, or

we will have to take more tax from the middle earners. (sorry the really high net worth people will leave UK - see effects of France's 75% rich tax)
89
05/01/2021 15:05:46 2 1
bbc
It's a sad fact but it's true. I suspect middles earners are going to see some big tax hikes. It would be nice if well off pensioners also took some of the pain.

We also need to start making the likes of amazon, google and facebook pay tax more fairly. Unlike the really high earners they can't just leave without forgoing the profits and leaving a vacuum for potential competitors to grow in.
26
05/01/2021 14:36:40 8 1
bbc
The High Street has either to reinvent itself or die. Unfortunately the dead hand of local govt inertia hinders innovation because of needlessly restrictive processes around change of use, treating parking as a cash cow instead of a service etc. "Emergency" interest rates have kept some retailers alive for years longer than normal which has crowded out replacement businesses. Outlook: not good.
59
05/01/2021 14:51:11 3 2
bbc
It is hard to reinvent whwn traditional shops are hemmed in. Council car parking charges, high rent, taxes vs online retailers take their pick of tax laws, shipping locations etc. In lockdown supermarkets can clean up, the likes of 'the range' doing the same. Not a level playing field.
60
05/01/2021 14:51:17 85 8
bbc
Such a shame. A rare quality offering in a high street full of cheap imported tatt.
121
05/01/2021 15:16:12 38 9
bbc
Shops have been full of imported tatt for over 30 years , you just maybe haven't noticed until recently.
135
05/01/2021 15:26:33 5 2
bbc
Full of expensive imported tat I think!
202
05/01/2021 16:05:54 3 9
bbc
I remember when stuff was made in the UK. Now that really was tat, especially BL cars and Hornby trains. We're quite good at some of the very high technology (biotech, chip design) and niche products but we are terrible at quality mass production, except under Japanese management.
267
05/01/2021 16:51:29 5 0
bbc
I bought a few things before Xmas from paperchase. Every single one of them was made in China. Your point?
447
06/01/2021 00:08:04 0 0
bbc
I remember getting a notebook made from Nepalese paper it was so lovely and smelled of roses I think I got it in Paperchase in Canterbury in the 1990s!?? sock shop was featured on the Gregg Wallace show this evening and Paperchase was around the same time. I'm surprise this has survived so long since we email instead
61
05/01/2021 14:51:18 4 2
bbc
The only high street firms that will survive will be those with a strong online presence. The high street will evolve into somewhere you go for click and collect after you've purchased online. Shops will be drop-off points for online companies as the roads become saturated with delivery vans.
71
05/01/2021 14:55:46 4 2
bbc
Independent shops of all kinds will continue, as they have a loyal customer base, and provided exemplary service over the years. I for one am no fan of on-line shopping, much prefer to see 'in real life'. Bought a pair of shoes during first lock down, another of the same size and style I already had. No good. Never again.
10
05/01/2021 14:26:30 23 10
bbc
This one is a bit of a surprise as, unlike the dead shells that have been folding after years of struggles, this brand appeared to be doing well
62
05/01/2021 14:51:35 4 0
bbc
The article says Paperchase had entered a CVA agreement almost two years ago so I guess it couldn’t have been doing so well
44
05/01/2021 14:44:52 10 3
bbc
Remember that many of those 'greedy landlords' are pension funds - perhaps yours!
63
05/01/2021 14:51:37 1 2
bbc
and that makes it right?
42
Ian
05/01/2021 14:44:25 9 10
bbc
?????????? Love to all those affected ??????????

We must use this pandemic to rebuild a more compassionate world
64
05/01/2021 14:51:55 16 6
bbc
What?
Why don't you rush out and buy their stuff, that's what they need, not mindless fluff?
101
05/01/2021 15:08:46 3 3
bbc
Unnecessary comment
65
05/01/2021 14:53:38 39 4
bbc
Sadly, Paperchase always depended on precinct shopping - it was never a go-to destination, so when online shopping made people realise that traipsing around a shopping centre was in fact absolute bloody hell its fate was sealed.
85
05/01/2021 15:03:07 40 0
bbc
So very true....... having been an independent retailer in a medium sized town, we relied on the big shops to create the footfall. Each time a big name left, you'd see another fall trade.

The idea we can fill the high streets with independents, just won't work for most towns.
464
06/01/2021 00:22:11 0 0
bbc
I cannot stand shopping when there's no toilets nearby and everything in shops being dumped in the wrong place and too much reduced to clear shouldn't be stocking tóo much. Less is MORE.
15
05/01/2021 14:29:18 12 33
bbc
vote clown get cicus
capiche????
66
05/01/2021 14:53:51 4 6
bbc
and you would do what? and make sure your answer is not one that has already been considered by SAGE, Public health england, civil servants, CBI. Otherwise your just like starmer, you shout about the issues but have nothing concrete to add. In other words those that shout and have no solution are, in fact, part of the problem. Your gripe is Torys full stop, not the virus.. Try the truth
116
05/01/2021 15:13:58 7 3
bbc
The point is do not stand for office if you are incompetent, know your limits. Telling D Notice to do it instead is childish. BJ is where the buck stops, that is what he signed up for, no excuses for any of them in office. This is a problem with a govt that is more concerned with populism than actual civic welfare. He is the clown that was voted in, own it.
53
05/01/2021 14:49:05 262 23
bbc
You have to keep moving in the stationery business.
67
05/01/2021 14:54:09 41 5
bbc
????????
240
05/01/2021 16:25:39 3 0
bbc
????????
68
05/01/2021 14:55:07 52 0
bbc
Paperchase have been in trouble for years, as they've clung to selling expensive niche products to a shrinking market where the share of available market is being split out to online indy specialists too, who are often cheaper and better quality. They were slow to move online and have been slow to adapt overall I'm afraid. This has little to do with Covid, but sadly may hasten their end.
216
05/01/2021 16:11:00 21 0
bbc
It simply makes no sense whatever to run a retail chain, with all the costs of rent and salaries etc, selling items worth a few pounds a time.

Their day in the sun is over - the new normal will not support time expired business models.
69
05/01/2021 14:55:23 8 7
bbc
I’m surprised they have lasted this long. Do people still send cards? I just send e-cards, have done for years now. Technology moves on, it’s unstoppable!
79
05/01/2021 15:00:49 12 1
bbc
Well I still send cards but probably one of a dying breed. I just feel that an e-card is too transactional - if I can't be bothered to put the personal effort into writing a greeting then I don't think I should bother.
153
05/01/2021 15:38:35 1 1
bbc
Yes they do. Cards have warmth and personality worth far more during these difficult times.
44
05/01/2021 14:44:52 10 3
bbc
Remember that many of those 'greedy landlords' are pension funds - perhaps yours!
70
05/01/2021 14:55:35 0 2
bbc
I don't think they are.
And even if they are, that simply highlights the failings of pension schemes - thanks to inflation and longer life expectancies very few pay in enough to cover their own pension and rely on the young to top them up, it's called a Ponzi or pyramid scheme.
61
05/01/2021 14:51:18 4 2
bbc
The only high street firms that will survive will be those with a strong online presence. The high street will evolve into somewhere you go for click and collect after you've purchased online. Shops will be drop-off points for online companies as the roads become saturated with delivery vans.
71
05/01/2021 14:55:46 4 2
bbc
Independent shops of all kinds will continue, as they have a loyal customer base, and provided exemplary service over the years. I for one am no fan of on-line shopping, much prefer to see 'in real life'. Bought a pair of shoes during first lock down, another of the same size and style I already had. No good. Never again.
36
05/01/2021 14:43:26 6 13
bbc
We cannot keep shutting businesses for months on end, the country will be bankrupt. There will be riots and anarchy on the streets soon. . The internet has made this pandemic much worse than 1918 when there were rules closing meetings ,theatres and the like but essentially life went on with care. Stagger opening hours and get the shops open again!
72
05/01/2021 14:56:06 1 2
bbc
I agree! Three cheers for your common sense!
29
05/01/2021 14:38:11 192 15
bbc
The supermarkets are making a killing selling non-essential items at the expense of those shops forced to close.
73
05/01/2021 14:57:07 77 53
bbc
The charity shops have been doing it for decades as well - low to zero rates, staff are mostly vunteers and they sell new products almost at cost - bit it's okay, it's all for charity, never mind the shop owners and their families.
129
05/01/2021 15:21:33 20 20
bbc
Excellent post.
Charity shops staffed by volunteers is in effect a legal way of competing in the High Street without paying the guaranteed minimum wage.
It represents therefore a grossly unfair distortion of fair competition and costs job opportunities elsewhere on the High Street, often among young workers just starting out.
Apologies to the snowflakes for a lack of sentimentality.
172
05/01/2021 15:44:32 17 0
bbc
A lot of people working in charity shops are actually on community service! So another good service performed by charity shops! That is a fact incidentally, not a critiscism.
193
05/01/2021 16:02:35 21 3
bbc
Don't you just hate those pesky vunteers..
286
05/01/2021 17:05:18 16 2
bbc
When charity shops stock new items, they are unsuccessful/discontinued lines, given free or for nominal cost by wholesalers who would otherwise have to pay to send the unwanted goods to landfill. Charities can hardly be said to be competing with other retailers if they are selling the stuff that those retailers were unable to shift a year or two ago.
356
05/01/2021 18:19:32 1 0
bbc
Show me on the doll where the charity shop touched you
74
05/01/2021 14:57:58 3 2
bbc
Can’t wait for the clearance sale
75
05/01/2021 14:58:10 1 11
bbc
Why the HYS on this BBC, so soon after the 30th Dec 2020? What biased linkages are you trying to engineer?
138
05/01/2021 15:28:44 1 1
bbc
No one mentioned the b-word

BORE OFF
215
05/01/2021 16:10:35 1 0
bbc
Pointless idiotic post.
76
05/01/2021 14:58:21 7 31
bbc
Another business on the verge of administration due to the wrongful prioritisation of the health of a minute proportion of largely very old/ill people, who are close to death anyway, over business, the economy & the wellbeing of 99.8% of the population. Absolutely crazy.
103
05/01/2021 15:10:07 3 1
bbc
Completely wrong my friend ... do some background reading and realise this was a very sick, very indebted and over ambitious company.

It shot far too high due to greed and believing you can expand a company to infinity so long as you have enough idiots prepared to lend you the money to do it.
136
FF
05/01/2021 15:26:34 0 0
bbc
It's a pity you can't delete comments.

How embarrassing "The Wise One" LoL
30
05/01/2021 14:39:31 5 15
bbc
If those who are high-risk were to shield themselves (supported by the actions of their families) then we wouldn't need lockdowns. It seems however that they are either unable or unwilling to do so.
77
05/01/2021 14:59:51 4 0
bbc
Everyone over 70 cannot be expected to stay in for the best part of a year. It is impossible to hava all food delivered (try it) and it takes a toll on mental health. Older people who are fit need to be able to go to the supermarket, they are put at risk by selfish people who will not keep their distance or wear masks, and expect to bring their kids. Just normal good manners is what is needed.
37
05/01/2021 14:43:29 10 8
bbc
In the internet age it’s mad that people still buy and send cards that aren’t kept or cherished, they are just sent to the recycling plant or landfill. And on top that they cost a ridiculous amount of money per card.

Sure, some artists rely on cards as an income and produce some beautiful work. But let’s face it, most cards are trashy.
78
05/01/2021 15:00:02 4 0
bbc
I sent cards and letters to older friends who do not have the internet, and I usually have plenty of cards, writing paper and stamps etc. There are beautiful cards available, handmade using different materials. I know the sort of cards you mean, a lot of the cards I get (even Christmas cards) go straight in recycling. Some I treasure. And a love letter, well... it's good for handwriting too.
503
06/01/2021 01:06:24 0 0
bbc
Yes my mother doesn't use the web so get her a card I didn't because she has my old cards and I shared my old ones too didn't need new cards recycled my old badger card!
69
05/01/2021 14:55:23 8 7
bbc
I’m surprised they have lasted this long. Do people still send cards? I just send e-cards, have done for years now. Technology moves on, it’s unstoppable!
79
05/01/2021 15:00:49 12 1
bbc
Well I still send cards but probably one of a dying breed. I just feel that an e-card is too transactional - if I can't be bothered to put the personal effort into writing a greeting then I don't think I should bother.
144
05/01/2021 15:33:07 2 1
bbc
I'm with you. Cards for this years birthdays plus occasion cards ready. Birthday dates and anniversaries listed for hubby just in case I'm no longer around.
416
05/01/2021 19:24:59 0 0
bbc
You still need to put personal effort in to write and send an ecard, it's just that it is delivered electronically instead of having to send a person to the address - which also increases the risk of transmitting Covid.
12
05/01/2021 14:27:57 93 18
bbc
Though the health challenge is sad, you've got to seriously start wondering at what point are we going to say the economic collapse from lockdowns isn't worth it. I'd rather be seeing more nightingale hospitals spring up, and pay people who are tested positive to actually stay at home. Then the rest of us can get on with keeping the lights on and keeping a job.
80
05/01/2021 15:01:13 33 12
bbc
It might work if we had available and accurate tests.
145
05/01/2021 15:33:33 15 1
bbc
And if we had enough staff for the nightingale hospitals because we don't.
36
05/01/2021 14:43:26 6 13
bbc
We cannot keep shutting businesses for months on end, the country will be bankrupt. There will be riots and anarchy on the streets soon. . The internet has made this pandemic much worse than 1918 when there were rules closing meetings ,theatres and the like but essentially life went on with care. Stagger opening hours and get the shops open again!
81
05/01/2021 15:01:16 0 0
bbc
Stagger opening hours and get the shops open again! That is worth investigating. Surprised anarchy and riots not happened already.
31
05/01/2021 14:40:43 10 3
bbc
its all to do with greedy landlords who are not willing to compromise. In Hitchin where I live they are absolutely all about them selves.
82
05/01/2021 15:01:27 0 1
bbc
6 families
83
05/01/2021 15:02:01 2 2
bbc
Thanks for pointing out that 40% is the same as "just under half".
90
05/01/2021 15:05:48 6 0
bbc
I would have said it's closer to 'just over a third'.
91
05/01/2021 15:06:25 0 1
bbc
Sad that’s your only comment when a business is about to go bust and 1500 people will lose their jobs.
96
05/01/2021 15:07:53 0 1
bbc
Actually 40% is 20% under half. More than "just".
84
05/01/2021 15:02:12 2 1
bbc
I just spent a tenner on cards at Thortful so I didn’t have to go out to sainsburys. I’ve never really considered paperchase online. They are slightly more expensive and have prob suffered from this fact. I only used to go in when they gave me a free fiver to spend on my birthday. Prob needed to go more online more -much sooner and cut prices. Gotta be quick in these fast changing times.
65
05/01/2021 14:53:38 39 4
bbc
Sadly, Paperchase always depended on precinct shopping - it was never a go-to destination, so when online shopping made people realise that traipsing around a shopping centre was in fact absolute bloody hell its fate was sealed.
85
05/01/2021 15:03:07 40 0
bbc
So very true....... having been an independent retailer in a medium sized town, we relied on the big shops to create the footfall. Each time a big name left, you'd see another fall trade.

The idea we can fill the high streets with independents, just won't work for most towns.
25
05/01/2021 14:36:26 6 0
bbc
No, but I hear the dolphins know all about it.
86
05/01/2021 15:03:15 3 0
bbc
"No, but I hear the dolphins know all about it"

Nah, they're just using us to get lots of fish, they'll do away with us once they evolve opposable thumbs ??
33
05/01/2021 14:41:22 65 2
bbc
Paperchase was the go to place for an great card or two or some eccentric wrapping paper but it was always niche. Design leaders but became so expensive and distracted by their own style they did not keep up with changes in the market. Failed to move with the times. Blame hedge fund managers who are out for profit and not with the designers who often sell their work so cheaply. Market is changing.
87
05/01/2021 15:03:19 20 3
bbc
Agree. I liked, still like the shop. Would be card buyers take note, Oxfam have a great selection for all occasions, and the blank card range is really good. In shops and on-line. Look at Woodland Trust too.
149
05/01/2021 15:36:17 3 1
bbc
I don't have much time for Oxfam. They employ a lot of people on high salaries. Some of their aid workers were paying women in poor countries for sex. They charge high prices compared with other charity shops.
455
06/01/2021 00:14:09 0 0
bbc
yes I always try to get in charity shops
29
05/01/2021 14:38:11 192 15
bbc
The supermarkets are making a killing selling non-essential items at the expense of those shops forced to close.
88
05/01/2021 15:05:20 1 1
bbc
Be interesting to see if that happens this time round. I can't say that on my in person visits I noticed much difference in the trolley contents. Because of an accident I bought countless pairs of slippers, could not get shoes on, spent loads and no-one said anything. Pillows, towels and bedlinen too.
58
05/01/2021 14:50:54 3 4
bbc
Greedy landlords pay our pensions.

Greedy councils provide our services.

We still need to raise that money somewhere.

Which means either we have to get a lot cuter taxing the internet, or

we will have to take more tax from the middle earners. (sorry the really high net worth people will leave UK - see effects of France's 75% rich tax)
89
05/01/2021 15:05:46 2 1
bbc
It's a sad fact but it's true. I suspect middles earners are going to see some big tax hikes. It would be nice if well off pensioners also took some of the pain.

We also need to start making the likes of amazon, google and facebook pay tax more fairly. Unlike the really high earners they can't just leave without forgoing the profits and leaving a vacuum for potential competitors to grow in.
83
05/01/2021 15:02:01 2 2
bbc
Thanks for pointing out that 40% is the same as "just under half".
90
05/01/2021 15:05:48 6 0
bbc
I would have said it's closer to 'just over a third'.
83
05/01/2021 15:02:01 2 2
bbc
Thanks for pointing out that 40% is the same as "just under half".
91
05/01/2021 15:06:25 0 1
bbc
Sad that’s your only comment when a business is about to go bust and 1500 people will lose their jobs.
53
05/01/2021 14:49:05 262 23
bbc
You have to keep moving in the stationery business.
92
05/01/2021 15:06:54 7 3
bbc
Almost good, almost.

Works better in sound ;)
127
05/01/2021 15:20:17 16 1
bbc
Nah, it was good.
36
05/01/2021 14:43:26 6 13
bbc
We cannot keep shutting businesses for months on end, the country will be bankrupt. There will be riots and anarchy on the streets soon. . The internet has made this pandemic much worse than 1918 when there were rules closing meetings ,theatres and the like but essentially life went on with care. Stagger opening hours and get the shops open again!
93
05/01/2021 15:07:00 2 0
bbc
And how many died in the 1918 pandemic?

(Answer: Nearly a quarter of a million in the UK alone)
94
05/01/2021 15:07:31 6 2
bbc
On one hand, we are told to be considerate of the environment and to reduce paper waste

on the other, we're now being condemned for not spending money on small, physical cards, which require postage fee's and amazingly cannot have JPEG's attached to them of precious family moments for relatives who live thousands of miles away, in an increasingly interconnected, digital world

Strange eh?
108
05/01/2021 15:12:08 4 0
bbc
I don't think anyone is condemning anybody else for not buying cards. But if the world is so connected the jpegs can go via email at any time.
257
ET
05/01/2021 16:44:59 0 1
bbc
Buying and sending a card requires thought and effort.
Sending an email takes seconds and minimal effort or thought. Sending a picture from a phone if you bcc it takes 0 effort or thought.
Shallow behaviour leads to shallow lives.

It’s a bit like buying a thoughtful present or a gift token. One takes effort the other probably says “you’re not worth the effort”
95
05/01/2021 15:07:41 6 2
bbc
Paperchase is massively in debt and has been in trouble for a good few years.

It was bought out by a private equity company in 2010 and went on the notorious rapid expansive route.

Well guess what ... It has run out of money due to falling sales, high overheads and too much debt.

Who remembers 'Tie Rack' and 'Sock Shop' ... ?

Paperchase occupies the same Euston Station shop as Tie Rack did.
111
05/01/2021 15:12:57 2 5
bbc
Never heard of this company I do remember Sweater shop , they didn't last long either Single product companies tend not to be around for long .
And someone else posted that stamps are almost as expensive as cards nowadays.
Many of the businesses must be run by the same type of clowns we have in government .
486
06/01/2021 00:47:58 0 0
bbc
yes I said this above about the same shops in railway stations that I remember when I used to go to school in sussex in the 80s from London Victoria and the Sock Shop, Tie Rack, Paperchase,WH Smith the old burger king and the baguette place I remember loving the tuna one or having a McDonald's burger on the train I loved getting that back home! but hated going back to London still now
83
05/01/2021 15:02:01 2 2
bbc
Thanks for pointing out that 40% is the same as "just under half".
96
05/01/2021 15:07:53 0 1
bbc
Actually 40% is 20% under half. More than "just".
57
05/01/2021 14:50:42 12 5
bbc
Its the likes of Philip Greene that makes these situation much much worse
97
05/01/2021 15:08:02 6 4
bbc
Because?
Because, probably many reasons, including filtering £1 billion to his wife just before a recent store collapse and so the pension funds couldn't get their hands on it would be a good example.
Also he was one of the many shopping mall "entrepreneurs " who murdered the high streets in the 70s and 80s.
Removed
Removed
313
05/01/2021 17:35:54 2 0
bbc
Do you know Philip greene and his history? Pension fund.. 570 million black whole when he took a dividend of 580 million from BHS and needed dragging through the streets to repay 350 mil.. lots of people lost their lives pension.. does that answer your “because” you flunking rshole
98
05/01/2021 15:08:21 3 2
bbc
If they stocked up on "Sorry to hear you got COVID-19" cards, they'd have sold very few. Selling "Sorry to hear you lost your job" cards though: they would sell millions.
27
05/01/2021 14:37:22 37 3
bbc
Paperchase is about to fold.
99
05/01/2021 15:08:23 6 1
bbc
You crease me up.
14
05/01/2021 14:28:48 4 24
bbc
Well done, Nicola, Boris, Rishi and whoever else. Your ineptitude is causing economic death.
100
05/01/2021 15:08:44 1 0
bbc
Leave out Nicola. She's got her priorities right. the others have not a clue.