Will schools be closed next term by variant of virus?
22/12/2020 | news | education | 60
The new variant of coronavirus could overtake plans for returning to school in England next term.
1
23/12/2020 10:58:55 19 5
bbc
No doubt it will be the teachers / unions fault - nothing to do with the government at all! (I am being sarcastic)
4
23/12/2020 11:38:23 13 3
bbc
Perfect politically: keep blaming the teachers so there is no pressure to give them a real rise for another 10 years
Removed
2
23/12/2020 11:00:10 2 8
bbc
No they have to provide childcare!
5
23/12/2020 11:40:25 25 0
bbc
Schools are places of education not childcare.
3
23/12/2020 11:14:25 0 0
bbc
Wonder if this would be closing day mothers and nursery schools?
1
23/12/2020 10:58:55 19 5
bbc
No doubt it will be the teachers / unions fault - nothing to do with the government at all! (I am being sarcastic)
4
23/12/2020 11:38:23 13 3
bbc
Perfect politically: keep blaming the teachers so there is no pressure to give them a real rise for another 10 years
2
23/12/2020 11:00:10 2 8
bbc
No they have to provide childcare!
5
23/12/2020 11:40:25 25 0
bbc
Schools are places of education not childcare.
6
23/12/2020 11:45:03 18 3
bbc
Children and school staff should be prioritised to receive the Covid vaccine - that’s the only way schools can, hopefully, return safely to providing a normal education.
Call me old-fashioned, and with delusions about oaths like "first do no harm", but children do not need vaccination.

If there are any long term unforeseen effects of these vaccines, then the most at risk from them are children. Since the risk posed by covid-19 to them is negligible it is totally unethical to vaccinate them.
Removed
45
24/12/2020 07:22:47 0 0
bbc
Totally agree. Vaccinate school age and NHS /front line first. That will reduce spread by the greatest amount whilst protecting the sick and those who provide treatment to anyone who gets covid. Isolate elderly until that is done, doing so is upsetting I appreciate but is the best way to keep them safe. All risk management is about likelihood and impact. In this case reduced likelihood wins.
7
23/12/2020 11:47:51 3 2
bbc
Can the BBC please add that this story is only about England.
8
23/12/2020 12:02:08 17 12
bbc
Obviously schools should be closed at least till the summer. Good weather held back the virus last year. School enviroment is the worst posdible behaviour with this virus pandemic. Far worse than a few minutes passing in a shop or street. Stuck in confined soaces all day together. Get ahead, get it sorted out now for the next six months.
Removed
9
23/12/2020 13:27:41 10 22
bbc
So now this cowardly PM is once again considering screwing up kids' education, which has suffered grievously.

Please don't believe the complete lies about online learning being a decent substitute: it comes a very bad second.

What kind of person, or society, sacrifices the welfare of its children? Especially over something that only kills 1 in a 1000, who are mainly both very old and very sick.
27
23/12/2020 19:53:32 10 3
bbc
You are clearly living in a different world. Children understand the impact that they are having on spreading the virus and it scares them. This is doing far more damage to their mental health than online learning. In the last 10 days of being open we have 45 positive cases within the student body, 2 of those ended up in hospital. Just because they aren't dying as often, does not make them immune.
10
23/12/2020 13:32:24 17 3
bbc
If you close the schools, you destroy the education and mental health of tens of thousands of vulnerable students. I've seen this first hand.

If you don't, this virus will kill many more vulnerable people.

Not a choice I would like to be making.
14
23/12/2020 13:49:15 8 23
bbc
Easy choice for me.

Most of those that die have already had a very long life. Students have many years ahead of them and need to be educated to cope with them.

The Great Barrington Declaration had the right idea. We need to focus all measures purely on the vulnerable, and not impact the lives of the 999 in 1000 who aren't in the least at risk from this virus.
the people who makie the decisions won't be affected by the fallout
8
23/12/2020 12:02:08 17 12
bbc
Obviously schools should be closed at least till the summer. Good weather held back the virus last year. School enviroment is the worst posdible behaviour with this virus pandemic. Far worse than a few minutes passing in a shop or street. Stuck in confined soaces all day together. Get ahead, get it sorted out now for the next six months.
Removed
6
23/12/2020 11:45:03 18 3
bbc
Children and school staff should be prioritised to receive the Covid vaccine - that’s the only way schools can, hopefully, return safely to providing a normal education.
Call me old-fashioned, and with delusions about oaths like "first do no harm", but children do not need vaccination.

If there are any long term unforeseen effects of these vaccines, then the most at risk from them are children. Since the risk posed by covid-19 to them is negligible it is totally unethical to vaccinate them.
Removed
16
23/12/2020 15:03:44 8 0
bbc
My granddaughter's best friend was sent home from school a week before they broke up. She messaged her yesterday to say that her mum is in hospital with fluid on her lungs and will not be home for some time and she is only in her late thirties and was fit. The daughter is herself rather ill and says its like a really bad case of 'flu, but she feels so guilty about passing it on like this.
41
24/12/2020 00:53:39 3 1
bbc
Children are far from immune. Their death rate may be low (although I personally wouldn't consider ANY child dying acceptable...) but the long covid issues are very real, and surprisingly common in younger people it seems. I have a young family member who caught covid at school and they are still suffering long covid 2 months later. One of their school friends has been wiped out for 6 months...
1
23/12/2020 10:58:55 19 5
bbc
No doubt it will be the teachers / unions fault - nothing to do with the government at all! (I am being sarcastic)
Removed
10
23/12/2020 13:32:24 17 3
bbc
If you close the schools, you destroy the education and mental health of tens of thousands of vulnerable students. I've seen this first hand.

If you don't, this virus will kill many more vulnerable people.

Not a choice I would like to be making.
14
23/12/2020 13:49:15 8 23
bbc
Easy choice for me.

Most of those that die have already had a very long life. Students have many years ahead of them and need to be educated to cope with them.

The Great Barrington Declaration had the right idea. We need to focus all measures purely on the vulnerable, and not impact the lives of the 999 in 1000 who aren't in the least at risk from this virus.
15
23/12/2020 14:58:57 9 0
bbc
That declaration would have me abandon the child I am raising as I am over 70. I would be taken to live with others like me. If there was anyone else younger who could have brought her up she would not be with me under a court order.
There are many thousands of families in the same position and I cannot see how Social Services could cope with all the kids. They did not allow for us all.
14
23/12/2020 13:49:15 8 23
bbc
Easy choice for me.

Most of those that die have already had a very long life. Students have many years ahead of them and need to be educated to cope with them.

The Great Barrington Declaration had the right idea. We need to focus all measures purely on the vulnerable, and not impact the lives of the 999 in 1000 who aren't in the least at risk from this virus.
15
23/12/2020 14:58:57 9 0
bbc
That declaration would have me abandon the child I am raising as I am over 70. I would be taken to live with others like me. If there was anyone else younger who could have brought her up she would not be with me under a court order.
There are many thousands of families in the same position and I cannot see how Social Services could cope with all the kids. They did not allow for us all.
Call me old-fashioned, and with delusions about oaths like "first do no harm", but children do not need vaccination.

If there are any long term unforeseen effects of these vaccines, then the most at risk from them are children. Since the risk posed by covid-19 to them is negligible it is totally unethical to vaccinate them.
Removed
16
23/12/2020 15:03:44 8 0
bbc
My granddaughter's best friend was sent home from school a week before they broke up. She messaged her yesterday to say that her mum is in hospital with fluid on her lungs and will not be home for some time and she is only in her late thirties and was fit. The daughter is herself rather ill and says its like a really bad case of 'flu, but she feels so guilty about passing it on like this.
17
23/12/2020 15:30:44 15 0
bbc
Cry havoc and let loose the teacher bashing!!
18
23/12/2020 15:45:09 22 1
bbc
Oh well, I guess school wasn't "the safest place for kids to be" after all. The Education Department's handling of this pandemic has been an embarrassment from the very beginning, I see they're looking to continue that trend.
19
23/12/2020 15:57:50 35 2
bbc
Can the BBC stop using photos of students socially distancing on ever article about schools? No schools have been implementing social distancing since Sept, and this is giving a really warped image about what schools are like at the moment. 32 students in a class is not socially distanced!
25
23/12/2020 18:50:34 16 1
bbc
Absolutely. They should post a picture of 32-35 11 year olds crammed into a classroom, windows closed because it's cold, with two teaching assistants and one teacher trying to move around the desks and leaning over them to help them with their work. That's what is actually happening.
it doesn't matter what reality is

the BBC have to push what they want us to *think* reality is
20
23/12/2020 16:16:54 12 1
bbc
Waits for the piranhas to scent teacher blood and swarm.....
48
24/12/2020 07:46:59 6 0
bbc
Or the pignoramus, the unevolved ancestor of the piranha that lurks HYS, sharing their fact free opinions on all subjects, expert on all things from the WTO to schools,
21
23/12/2020 16:38:53 14 3
bbc
It could be Coronavirus, Bubonic Plague, SARS, MERS, Nuclear War, Invasion by Russian Forces, All Out World War Three.
Boris will want All Schools Open.
No ifs.
No buts.
The Science says the biggest spreaders are young people 10 to 19, children in Primary, and people age 35 to 44 i.e. their parents.
Roll on teachers testing their pupils for Coronavirus, as if they don’t do enough tests already...
22
23/12/2020 16:46:05 16 1
bbc
I prefer the idea of shielding the vulnerable, but if you are going to try to stop community spread, then obviously you have to close the schools as the first step, not the last.
32
23/12/2020 21:39:52 1 1
bbc
In England Whitty won't close schools, everything else closed but not schools.
23
23/12/2020 17:38:29 3 14
bbc
Close the schools for 2-3 weeks use online teaching , put the country into a strict lockdown like back in March - during the three weeks vaccinate as many as possible this will push down the R number and give us a breathing space going into feb mar apr . Maybe teachers could give up a few weeks over the coming mid term breaks ? After all they are always complaining about children's lost education
39
24/12/2020 00:46:02 9 0
bbc
You obviously don't teach! I have never found the work so demanding and relentless as with Covid. When in school I trundle my equipment to each classroom. Have to use create more repro to reach students at back of class. Have increased marking and not able to take books home. Colleagues and I leave school at 6.00pm most days. Am totally exhausted - oh, and caught Covid.
52
RPH
24/12/2020 09:27:06 3 1
bbc
Just wondering how we give up "a few weeks" of a mid-term break, when the mid-term break is one week? It's almost as if you don't know what you are talking about!
24
23/12/2020 18:50:11 20 1
bbc
I teach. We are now set up to teach online (via Google classroom) and we assign work to the students, which they do on computers in class, whilst those not present do it online at home (or indeed anywhere). All the students I teach have a mobile phone and access to the internet. A months delay in returning to a classroom setting will not destroy their future, but will save lives.
26
23/12/2020 19:43:36 6 2
bbc
Massive difference between 15 year olds and 5 year olds, treating "schools" as a single entity doesn't work well
28
23/12/2020 20:26:00 1 5
bbc
i would suggest you are one of the few
most on line so called and home schooling fails
50
RPH
24/12/2020 09:25:06 0 0
bbc
6 of my year 3 class live in mobile caravans, with several siblings. They do not have any internet access, and if they did, their parents would make no effort to get them to do school-work. The girls will not go to secondary school, because "girls don't need school". Schools closing will be a disaster for these children (who should not be punished for their parents choices)
56
24/12/2020 09:55:11 0 1
bbc
Funny how my very bright and motivated students find that online learning really sucks. If they find it bloody awful then imagine how much worse it is for most students.

But you, and others, just keep telling yourselves how good it is, to salve your consciences.
19
23/12/2020 15:57:50 35 2
bbc
Can the BBC stop using photos of students socially distancing on ever article about schools? No schools have been implementing social distancing since Sept, and this is giving a really warped image about what schools are like at the moment. 32 students in a class is not socially distanced!
25
23/12/2020 18:50:34 16 1
bbc
Absolutely. They should post a picture of 32-35 11 year olds crammed into a classroom, windows closed because it's cold, with two teaching assistants and one teacher trying to move around the desks and leaning over them to help them with their work. That's what is actually happening.
36
23/12/2020 22:26:21 6 0
bbc
We're not allowed to move around and lean over desks.

Makes the whole helping students who are stuck thing nearly impossible
53
RPH
24/12/2020 09:30:05 2 0
bbc
Don't forget the bit about being instructed to turn off Track and Trace before entering school, because" the extensive measures in the school ensure there is no risk of infection"....
24
23/12/2020 18:50:11 20 1
bbc
I teach. We are now set up to teach online (via Google classroom) and we assign work to the students, which they do on computers in class, whilst those not present do it online at home (or indeed anywhere). All the students I teach have a mobile phone and access to the internet. A months delay in returning to a classroom setting will not destroy their future, but will save lives.
26
23/12/2020 19:43:36 6 2
bbc
Massive difference between 15 year olds and 5 year olds, treating "schools" as a single entity doesn't work well
9
23/12/2020 13:27:41 10 22
bbc
So now this cowardly PM is once again considering screwing up kids' education, which has suffered grievously.

Please don't believe the complete lies about online learning being a decent substitute: it comes a very bad second.

What kind of person, or society, sacrifices the welfare of its children? Especially over something that only kills 1 in a 1000, who are mainly both very old and very sick.
27
23/12/2020 19:53:32 10 3
bbc
You are clearly living in a different world. Children understand the impact that they are having on spreading the virus and it scares them. This is doing far more damage to their mental health than online learning. In the last 10 days of being open we have 45 positive cases within the student body, 2 of those ended up in hospital. Just because they aren't dying as often, does not make them immune.
24
23/12/2020 18:50:11 20 1
bbc
I teach. We are now set up to teach online (via Google classroom) and we assign work to the students, which they do on computers in class, whilst those not present do it online at home (or indeed anywhere). All the students I teach have a mobile phone and access to the internet. A months delay in returning to a classroom setting will not destroy their future, but will save lives.
28
23/12/2020 20:26:00 1 5
bbc
i would suggest you are one of the few
most on line so called and home schooling fails
31
23/12/2020 21:33:59 7 1
bbc
And, again, because I've asked you this more than once in the last few months, can you provide evidence for your 'most'? Interestingly enough, neither the DfEE or OFSTED seem to provide the evidence you imply and they're responsible for schools, overall. I would suggest you're suffering from an illusion that fits your prejudice.
I would suggest that you talk out of your posterior. Your lack of education shines through in your lamentable quality of English. As another poster queries, do you have any evidence to support your bilge or just your ignorance? Removed
57
24/12/2020 09:56:41 0 0
bbc
Trouble is most don't want to hear this, or believe it.
19
23/12/2020 15:57:50 35 2
bbc
Can the BBC stop using photos of students socially distancing on ever article about schools? No schools have been implementing social distancing since Sept, and this is giving a really warped image about what schools are like at the moment. 32 students in a class is not socially distanced!
29
23/12/2020 21:24:08 1 1
bbc
it doesn't matter what reality is

the BBC have to push what they want us to *think* reality is
10
23/12/2020 13:32:24 17 3
bbc
If you close the schools, you destroy the education and mental health of tens of thousands of vulnerable students. I've seen this first hand.

If you don't, this virus will kill many more vulnerable people.

Not a choice I would like to be making.
30
23/12/2020 21:24:41 2 0
bbc
the people who makie the decisions won't be affected by the fallout
28
23/12/2020 20:26:00 1 5
bbc
i would suggest you are one of the few
most on line so called and home schooling fails
31
23/12/2020 21:33:59 7 1
bbc
And, again, because I've asked you this more than once in the last few months, can you provide evidence for your 'most'? Interestingly enough, neither the DfEE or OFSTED seem to provide the evidence you imply and they're responsible for schools, overall. I would suggest you're suffering from an illusion that fits your prejudice.
46
24/12/2020 07:42:51 1 0
bbc
Bravo - very well put.
58
24/12/2020 09:58:28 0 1
bbc
A waste of time, since people like you are determined to believe that online learning is OK, but not honest enough to admit it.
22
23/12/2020 16:46:05 16 1
bbc
I prefer the idea of shielding the vulnerable, but if you are going to try to stop community spread, then obviously you have to close the schools as the first step, not the last.
32
23/12/2020 21:39:52 1 1
bbc
In England Whitty won't close schools, everything else closed but not schools.
33
23/12/2020 22:11:16 7 8
bbc
My son’s school has not had a single case all term. His teacher has diabetes and has worked every day. She deserves a vaccination My daughter’s secondary school has had about 4-5 cases She missed one week of school because too many teachers were isolating. Far too much damage has already been done to young. Vaccinate the workers in priority to elderly. Elderly should stop being so selfish
55
24/12/2020 09:51:44 1 0
bbc
"His teacher has diabetes and has worked every day."

Sadly, the decency and integrity shown by this teacher is lacking in so many: including an awful lot who post on HYS.
34
23/12/2020 22:14:25 7 6
bbc
That sounded harsh on elderly but they can stay at home. They have been least impacted by this lockdown. Give them priority hours to go out and we will all stay in. But it is time for elderly to step up and say we will take the hit fit a change. The rest of us will pay for this for the rest of our lives and so many are paying now. It is not fair
37
23/12/2020 23:11:31 2 0
bbc
I may be reading this wrong, but you seem to be implying that the elderly have made these decisions. They may suffer more under this, but I'm pretty sure that it wasn't the elderly that made the decision to be vaccinated first. I agree that isolating, etc. should be a priority for the elderly, but, as the group most at risk, I think there's a sound argument for them being vaccinated first.
54
24/12/2020 09:49:18 1 0
bbc
In fair measure what you are saying is exactly what's in the Great Barrington Declaration, drafted by some of the most eminent scientists in the world.

Focusing all efforts on the oldest and most vulnerable is both the rational and moral thing to do.

Sadly it takes governments with intelligence and integrity to understand this, and do it: qualities in short supply in Downing Street.
35
23/12/2020 22:18:42 6 3
bbc
Plus school is about so much more than academic learning. Closing schools impacts children’s mental health and there are massive child protection issues going unnoticed. COVID is by no means the only risk
25
23/12/2020 18:50:34 16 1
bbc
Absolutely. They should post a picture of 32-35 11 year olds crammed into a classroom, windows closed because it's cold, with two teaching assistants and one teacher trying to move around the desks and leaning over them to help them with their work. That's what is actually happening.
36
23/12/2020 22:26:21 6 0
bbc
We're not allowed to move around and lean over desks.

Makes the whole helping students who are stuck thing nearly impossible
40
24/12/2020 00:49:33 4 0
bbc
At some schools teachers are being told they are not doing their job UNLESS they are doing exactly that.
34
23/12/2020 22:14:25 7 6
bbc
That sounded harsh on elderly but they can stay at home. They have been least impacted by this lockdown. Give them priority hours to go out and we will all stay in. But it is time for elderly to step up and say we will take the hit fit a change. The rest of us will pay for this for the rest of our lives and so many are paying now. It is not fair
37
23/12/2020 23:11:31 2 0
bbc
I may be reading this wrong, but you seem to be implying that the elderly have made these decisions. They may suffer more under this, but I'm pretty sure that it wasn't the elderly that made the decision to be vaccinated first. I agree that isolating, etc. should be a priority for the elderly, but, as the group most at risk, I think there's a sound argument for them being vaccinated first.
38
24/12/2020 00:45:19 9 0
bbc
This pandemic has made good organisations look good, but poor organisations look really bad. Sadly the DfE has been made to look consistently incompetent. Time and again they have demonstrated they don’t understand how schools operate day to day. There is not a school in the country who have any faith in their ability to roll out a mass testing programme! I wish it were different.
23
23/12/2020 17:38:29 3 14
bbc
Close the schools for 2-3 weeks use online teaching , put the country into a strict lockdown like back in March - during the three weeks vaccinate as many as possible this will push down the R number and give us a breathing space going into feb mar apr . Maybe teachers could give up a few weeks over the coming mid term breaks ? After all they are always complaining about children's lost education
39
24/12/2020 00:46:02 9 0
bbc
You obviously don't teach! I have never found the work so demanding and relentless as with Covid. When in school I trundle my equipment to each classroom. Have to use create more repro to reach students at back of class. Have increased marking and not able to take books home. Colleagues and I leave school at 6.00pm most days. Am totally exhausted - oh, and caught Covid.
36
23/12/2020 22:26:21 6 0
bbc
We're not allowed to move around and lean over desks.

Makes the whole helping students who are stuck thing nearly impossible
40
24/12/2020 00:49:33 4 0
bbc
At some schools teachers are being told they are not doing their job UNLESS they are doing exactly that.
Call me old-fashioned, and with delusions about oaths like "first do no harm", but children do not need vaccination.

If there are any long term unforeseen effects of these vaccines, then the most at risk from them are children. Since the risk posed by covid-19 to them is negligible it is totally unethical to vaccinate them.
Removed
41
24/12/2020 00:53:39 3 1
bbc
Children are far from immune. Their death rate may be low (although I personally wouldn't consider ANY child dying acceptable...) but the long covid issues are very real, and surprisingly common in younger people it seems. I have a young family member who caught covid at school and they are still suffering long covid 2 months later. One of their school friends has been wiped out for 6 months...
42
24/12/2020 04:17:40 5 1
bbc
As someone who homeschools the spectrum opinions among state educating parents is interesting. I had no idea that schools were supposed to provide 'childcare', 30 years ago it was actually about educating students. No wonder 7.5 million adults in this county find reading difficult.
51
24/12/2020 09:26:12 0 0
bbc
7.5 million? Evidence please.
43
24/12/2020 06:15:34 3 1
bbc
Of course school is about education not childcare. Education in widest sense including academic and social skills alongside resilience- the latter too I worry homeschool cannot provide. But it is natural and expected that when children go to school their parents work and you can’t just pull the rug from under their feet.
44
24/12/2020 06:36:53 2 0
bbc
The article carefully avoids the issue of parental consent for those under 18. And whether a school can refuse entry to a pupil who has not taken a test.

Which parent - who needs to work to pay bills (and keep their jobs) - will consent if there is a risk of being isolated ?

Bit of a fly in the ointment that will be.
6
23/12/2020 11:45:03 18 3
bbc
Children and school staff should be prioritised to receive the Covid vaccine - that’s the only way schools can, hopefully, return safely to providing a normal education.
45
24/12/2020 07:22:47 0 0
bbc
Totally agree. Vaccinate school age and NHS /front line first. That will reduce spread by the greatest amount whilst protecting the sick and those who provide treatment to anyone who gets covid. Isolate elderly until that is done, doing so is upsetting I appreciate but is the best way to keep them safe. All risk management is about likelihood and impact. In this case reduced likelihood wins.
31
23/12/2020 21:33:59 7 1
bbc
And, again, because I've asked you this more than once in the last few months, can you provide evidence for your 'most'? Interestingly enough, neither the DfEE or OFSTED seem to provide the evidence you imply and they're responsible for schools, overall. I would suggest you're suffering from an illusion that fits your prejudice.
46
24/12/2020 07:42:51 1 0
bbc
Bravo - very well put.
28
23/12/2020 20:26:00 1 5
bbc
i would suggest you are one of the few
most on line so called and home schooling fails
I would suggest that you talk out of your posterior. Your lack of education shines through in your lamentable quality of English. As another poster queries, do you have any evidence to support your bilge or just your ignorance? Removed
20
23/12/2020 16:16:54 12 1
bbc
Waits for the piranhas to scent teacher blood and swarm.....
48
24/12/2020 07:46:59 6 0
bbc
Or the pignoramus, the unevolved ancestor of the piranha that lurks HYS, sharing their fact free opinions on all subjects, expert on all things from the WTO to schools,
49
24/12/2020 08:06:34 0 3
bbc
Answer....yes but ....no but.....maybe......who knows? ......who cares?......children will adapt...they are very adaptable. It’s the so called Grown Ups at the BBC who seem to be having worrying here.
24
23/12/2020 18:50:11 20 1
bbc
I teach. We are now set up to teach online (via Google classroom) and we assign work to the students, which they do on computers in class, whilst those not present do it online at home (or indeed anywhere). All the students I teach have a mobile phone and access to the internet. A months delay in returning to a classroom setting will not destroy their future, but will save lives.
50
RPH
24/12/2020 09:25:06 0 0
bbc
6 of my year 3 class live in mobile caravans, with several siblings. They do not have any internet access, and if they did, their parents would make no effort to get them to do school-work. The girls will not go to secondary school, because "girls don't need school". Schools closing will be a disaster for these children (who should not be punished for their parents choices)
42
24/12/2020 04:17:40 5 1
bbc
As someone who homeschools the spectrum opinions among state educating parents is interesting. I had no idea that schools were supposed to provide 'childcare', 30 years ago it was actually about educating students. No wonder 7.5 million adults in this county find reading difficult.
51
24/12/2020 09:26:12 0 0
bbc
7.5 million? Evidence please.
23
23/12/2020 17:38:29 3 14
bbc
Close the schools for 2-3 weeks use online teaching , put the country into a strict lockdown like back in March - during the three weeks vaccinate as many as possible this will push down the R number and give us a breathing space going into feb mar apr . Maybe teachers could give up a few weeks over the coming mid term breaks ? After all they are always complaining about children's lost education
52
RPH
24/12/2020 09:27:06 3 1
bbc
Just wondering how we give up "a few weeks" of a mid-term break, when the mid-term break is one week? It's almost as if you don't know what you are talking about!
25
23/12/2020 18:50:34 16 1
bbc
Absolutely. They should post a picture of 32-35 11 year olds crammed into a classroom, windows closed because it's cold, with two teaching assistants and one teacher trying to move around the desks and leaning over them to help them with their work. That's what is actually happening.
53
RPH
24/12/2020 09:30:05 2 0
bbc
Don't forget the bit about being instructed to turn off Track and Trace before entering school, because" the extensive measures in the school ensure there is no risk of infection"....
34
23/12/2020 22:14:25 7 6
bbc
That sounded harsh on elderly but they can stay at home. They have been least impacted by this lockdown. Give them priority hours to go out and we will all stay in. But it is time for elderly to step up and say we will take the hit fit a change. The rest of us will pay for this for the rest of our lives and so many are paying now. It is not fair
54
24/12/2020 09:49:18 1 0
bbc
In fair measure what you are saying is exactly what's in the Great Barrington Declaration, drafted by some of the most eminent scientists in the world.

Focusing all efforts on the oldest and most vulnerable is both the rational and moral thing to do.

Sadly it takes governments with intelligence and integrity to understand this, and do it: qualities in short supply in Downing Street.
33
23/12/2020 22:11:16 7 8
bbc
My son’s school has not had a single case all term. His teacher has diabetes and has worked every day. She deserves a vaccination My daughter’s secondary school has had about 4-5 cases She missed one week of school because too many teachers were isolating. Far too much damage has already been done to young. Vaccinate the workers in priority to elderly. Elderly should stop being so selfish
55
24/12/2020 09:51:44 1 0
bbc
"His teacher has diabetes and has worked every day."

Sadly, the decency and integrity shown by this teacher is lacking in so many: including an awful lot who post on HYS.
24
23/12/2020 18:50:11 20 1
bbc
I teach. We are now set up to teach online (via Google classroom) and we assign work to the students, which they do on computers in class, whilst those not present do it online at home (or indeed anywhere). All the students I teach have a mobile phone and access to the internet. A months delay in returning to a classroom setting will not destroy their future, but will save lives.
56
24/12/2020 09:55:11 0 1
bbc
Funny how my very bright and motivated students find that online learning really sucks. If they find it bloody awful then imagine how much worse it is for most students.

But you, and others, just keep telling yourselves how good it is, to salve your consciences.
28
23/12/2020 20:26:00 1 5
bbc
i would suggest you are one of the few
most on line so called and home schooling fails
57
24/12/2020 09:56:41 0 0
bbc
Trouble is most don't want to hear this, or believe it.
31
23/12/2020 21:33:59 7 1
bbc
And, again, because I've asked you this more than once in the last few months, can you provide evidence for your 'most'? Interestingly enough, neither the DfEE or OFSTED seem to provide the evidence you imply and they're responsible for schools, overall. I would suggest you're suffering from an illusion that fits your prejudice.
58
24/12/2020 09:58:28 0 1
bbc
A waste of time, since people like you are determined to believe that online learning is OK, but not honest enough to admit it.
59
24/12/2020 10:09:09 0 0
bbc
I don't believe online learning is OK, as I'm a teacher and I've seen how rubbish it is. It also takes an inordinate amount of time to prepare, if you consider the number of children who access it. Please don't put words in my mouth, it's dishonest.
58
24/12/2020 09:58:28 0 1
bbc
A waste of time, since people like you are determined to believe that online learning is OK, but not honest enough to admit it.
59
24/12/2020 10:09:09 0 0
bbc
I don't believe online learning is OK, as I'm a teacher and I've seen how rubbish it is. It also takes an inordinate amount of time to prepare, if you consider the number of children who access it. Please don't put words in my mouth, it's dishonest.
60
24/12/2020 10:57:27 1 0
bbc
This is weeks away. Who knows?
Apart from Kier Starmer of course.