UK borrowing hits highest November level on record
22/12/2020 | news | business | 1,371
The government borrowed £31.6bn last month as it continued to support the economy during the pandemic.
1
22/12/2020 10:25:23 33 28
bbc
This will get worse, once No Deal Brexit kicks in.
4
22/12/2020 10:26:21 20 20
bbc
Johnson simply doesn't care.
23
22/12/2020 10:28:42 1 6
bbc
No, I've seen an advert for buying New Zealand food so we're obviously getting all those sweet sweet deals from other countries who think just like us. /s
2
22/12/2020 10:25:42 18 7
bbc
January: hold my high tariff beer
6
22/12/2020 10:26:39 29 22
bbc
Populist Johnson simply doesn't care if food and other prices go higher.
22/12/2020 15:05:56 0 0
bbc
No tariffs on BRitish produce, obviously, lord help us all !
3
22/12/2020 10:26:15 7 6
bbc
What a surprise!!
1
22/12/2020 10:25:23 33 28
bbc
This will get worse, once No Deal Brexit kicks in.
4
22/12/2020 10:26:21 20 20
bbc
Johnson simply doesn't care.
5
22/12/2020 10:26:37 18 9
bbc
What can we say apart from this must surely have been expected due to all the support given to folks!
2
22/12/2020 10:25:42 18 7
bbc
January: hold my high tariff beer
6
22/12/2020 10:26:39 29 22
bbc
Populist Johnson simply doesn't care if food and other prices go higher.
81
22/12/2020 10:38:32 4 1
bbc
By definition a populist would have to care about things that make him unpopular!
180
22/12/2020 10:53:56 2 1
bbc
Neither does populist Sturgeon
353
22/12/2020 11:22:33 2 1
bbc
It is strange he does not as in history not feeding your people is a sure way to a bad ending.
22/12/2020 13:31:31 1 1
bbc
But he is not popular now as his rating as PM is now only 30%. All he needs to to now is go over the edge again (like he did on Saturday) and he has hung himself.

When that happens it will be the best news and morale booster of the century.
22/12/2020 15:06:17 0 0
bbc
He’s a wokeist, and always has been.
7
22/12/2020 10:26:48 9 13
bbc
Looks like future generations will be paying through the nose, for our own generation's self-indulgence in seeking to preserve every life from Covid no matter what the economic cost.
51
FF
22/12/2020 10:33:15 6 0
bbc
What lives would you have been happy to not preserve?
8
22/12/2020 10:26:53 236 22
bbc
We will only be able to pay this debt off fairly and effectively, if/when the time comes where lobbyists are banned from making contact with any politicians, and the general public see through the vested interests pursued by many media outlets.

This is what’s allowed tax haven use to prevail and is making a digital tax hard to implement.
147
22/12/2020 10:49:01 88 42
bbc
With inadequate taxation over the past decade and an inefficient wealth distribution, some form of wealth tax will be needed. Added to this, public sector debt may be at 100% of GDP but private sector debt is at 230% of GDP.
193
22/12/2020 10:56:19 37 19
bbc
The City of London financial industry is wholly based on tax avoidance and offshoring. People need to understand that they are NEVER going to tighten up on this. The whole reason for the UK 'taking back control' was to make it easier for tax avoidance, and less scrutiny from legislators like the EU.
367
22/12/2020 11:24:52 0 2
bbc
Commenting almost every day within a minute of the HYS opening, regardless of what time of day that is.

Extraordinary. I wonder how that can be ...
508
22/12/2020 11:43:22 5 1
bbc
If the Government can print as much money as it wants, then why pay taxes?

If the Governemnt can just create money out of thin air by adding numbers to a spreadsheet then why pay taxes?

No one should get a bailout. Companies that are badly run and have not saved for a rainy day should go bankrupt. New owners buy the business then run it better, we as consumers win when companies are better run.
785
22/12/2020 12:23:16 2 0
bbc
There is circa £1.7 trillion in unfounded public sector pension liabilities; nothing to do with media interests or the private sector rich people. The whole system needs sorting not just the tax havens.
965
22/12/2020 12:53:12 2 0
bbc
Whatever makes you think it has to be paid off?
You actually have common misconception.
The debt is financed by the Bank of England creating money and buying government debt with it. It never has to be paid back it just causes monetary expansion and hence long-term inflation. You have to look forward to inflation not paying off debt.
22/12/2020 13:03:56 1 0
bbc
One persons lobbyist is another persons expert - but who would want our politicians influenced by either!
9
22/12/2020 10:26:59 2 8
bbc


it is all about waiting for the vaccines now ...

and trying to avoid catching the virus in the interim

and why are we waiting for the regulator to approve our best 'not for profit' vaccine ...

oh yes ... because Boris forgot to ask them to start their review earlier

... all that should have been needed was a final review of the latest research ... not starting from page 1 line 1

32
22/12/2020 10:30:15 0 2
bbc
If Boris can give away millions of tax payers money to his cronies for bogus PPE contracts without following the usual procedures …. then the least he can do is to get the regulator to work with our best (not for profit) vaccine team
10
22/12/2020 10:26:59 8 12
bbc
Sunak made a half baked job.

Protected some jobs but not others.

So people went to work and spread the virus.

He produced the worst of both worlds.

Massive death rate and massive public debt.
11
22/12/2020 10:27:10 35 18
bbc
Not sure why anyone would be surprised by this. Every country in the world is in the same situation. At least those who look after their electorate
24
22/12/2020 10:28:59 43 37
bbc
No other country is pursuing a reckless ideology of economic self-harm under Brexit.

Price increases will push ordinary people further into debt.
39
22/12/2020 10:31:20 6 1
bbc
Except, they are only looking after the current-generation electorate. Future generations of taxpayers will suffer as a result of these decisions. I guess that's an unavoidable problem with democracy.
120
22/12/2020 10:33:45 4 6
bbc
Ha! tory quitter hypocrisy at its finest.
12
jon
22/12/2020 10:27:18 9 12
bbc
Meanwhile 16% growth!
26
22/12/2020 10:29:53 8 4
bbc
After falling 18.8% beforehand.
13
22/12/2020 10:27:39 4 12
bbc
At what cost do the government put on lives. Their primary goal is to protect its citizens by any means necessary. At the moment, this govt is failing to do that.
Impose a lockdown now.... get everyone indoors and safe and protect the citizens.
14
22/12/2020 10:27:45 5 9
bbc
Time to just cancel all debt globally, simple as.
36
Ben
22/12/2020 10:30:47 4 0
bbc
Perhaps not all of it, a mate owes me a tenner :)

But otherwise agree
15
Em
22/12/2020 10:27:47 5 7
bbc
News?
431
22/12/2020 11:32:23 2 0
bbc
Go elsewhere then.
16
22/12/2020 10:27:48 8 7
bbc
With inflation, how does that fare against WWII?
31
jon
22/12/2020 10:30:11 9 0
bbc
We only settled our WWII debts in 2006.
42
22/12/2020 10:31:44 0 0
bbc
I was wondering about that - obviously due to inflation the latest figures (for anything) will show as higher - but it would very interesting to see an inflation adjusted comparison
17
22/12/2020 10:27:51 35 27
bbc
Covid. Debt. Brexit and more debt.

Bojo - the worst possible PM at the worst possible time.
22/12/2020 15:16:47 0 0
bbc
He was by far, very far better than the other option, and I don’t and have never liked the man.
18
jay
22/12/2020 10:28:12 10 14
bbc
tories been robbing peter to pay paul all its existence !
19
22/12/2020 10:28:21 77 43
bbc
Boris confidently predicts we will pay this off in the first 2 months of 2021 due to saving £350 million per week by leaving the EU and a dramatic increase in the export of Unicorns.
33
22/12/2020 10:30:27 44 42
bbc
Lucky you're not the chancellor with your grip on maths! Is this Dianne Abbott's username?
509
22/12/2020 11:43:47 3 2
bbc
Never mind Wise 1... Some people are incapable of recognising satire...
806
22/12/2020 12:26:27 0 1
bbc
Oh dear, what fantasy world do you live in. The HMG view was that this will take Generations.

Facts not Fiction required.
966
22/12/2020 12:53:17 0 0
bbc
If anybody believes what Boris predicts then they would be extremely naive indeed.

The only thing that Boris should now be predicting is the early date of 2021 when he will get a vote of no confidence and lose his job as the PM. That would be the best belated Christmas present ever for the UK.
22/12/2020 14:52:45 0 0
bbc
Thick and relentlessly bigoted statement, I won’t refer you to the moderators because 1 they are the bbc
2 I believe in complete free speech, no matter how delusional.
20
22/12/2020 10:28:23 15 16
bbc
Surprisingly the BBC also told us it's going to rain this month. In Britain, in winter! Who'd have thought it?
28
22/12/2020 10:29:57 9 7
bbc
No they don’t report rainfall, but this is akin to the great flood. It’s not fake news to report facts, you don’t like them, criticise sunak not the bbc
21
22/12/2020 10:28:30 67 9
bbc
Simply not sustainable.
22/12/2020 16:15:19 8 1
bbc
I don't think being 'governed' in this way is sustainable. Where's the 1922 Committee when you need them to step up?
22
22/12/2020 10:28:38 12 14
bbc
And all because China won't change its eating habits
270
22/12/2020 11:09:48 2 0
bbc
Ignorance and arrogance personified.
1
22/12/2020 10:25:23 33 28
bbc
This will get worse, once No Deal Brexit kicks in.
23
22/12/2020 10:28:42 1 6
bbc
No, I've seen an advert for buying New Zealand food so we're obviously getting all those sweet sweet deals from other countries who think just like us. /s
22/12/2020 13:35:48 0 0
bbc
The UK has been buying Lamb from New Zealand for many decades, so buying from them is not new at all.
11
22/12/2020 10:27:10 35 18
bbc
Not sure why anyone would be surprised by this. Every country in the world is in the same situation. At least those who look after their electorate
24
22/12/2020 10:28:59 43 37
bbc
No other country is pursuing a reckless ideology of economic self-harm under Brexit.

Price increases will push ordinary people further into debt.
22/12/2020 13:41:03 1 1
bbc
oh yes they are
22/12/2020 15:02:08 1 2
bbc
Your proven facts are?
22/12/2020 19:54:59 1 1
bbc
This is what the Grate Bratish Sheeple voted for.
Suvrintea.
25
22/12/2020 10:29:48 12 14
bbc
I really don't know what the media expects, it's handout here there and everywhere, Scotland and Wales begging give us more money. Of course borrowing will be higher with less taxes coming in and more going out. Some journalists are poor but stating the bleeding obvious it is like they want to scare ppl.
12
jon
22/12/2020 10:27:18 9 12
bbc
Meanwhile 16% growth!
26
22/12/2020 10:29:53 8 4
bbc
After falling 18.8% beforehand.
371
22/12/2020 11:25:36 0 0
bbc
Remoaner by any chance?
27
bbc
Insert comment about bears, popes etc here. Removed
Popes shit in the woods. Removed
72
22/12/2020 10:36:44 1 5
bbc
Those kinds of comment tend to be from people who think they are being original and witty, when clearly neither apply.

But yes, this is a world beating mess. Well done Sunak.
89
22/12/2020 10:39:32 2 0
bbc
Yes all those (and the sherlocks), understand you're not being original.
We've heard it all before, more often than not multiple time in the same article. Talk about stating the bleedin' obvious.
None of you knew any of the data above, you just felt the need to post popular tripe.
20
22/12/2020 10:28:23 15 16
bbc
Surprisingly the BBC also told us it's going to rain this month. In Britain, in winter! Who'd have thought it?
28
22/12/2020 10:29:57 9 7
bbc
No they don’t report rainfall, but this is akin to the great flood. It’s not fake news to report facts, you don’t like them, criticise sunak not the bbc
54
22/12/2020 10:33:52 2 2
bbc
The BBC do report the weather, there's tab on the front page, near the top! I also didn't say it was fake news - it's just poor reporting to state the bleeding obvious continuously!
29
22/12/2020 10:30:05 5 8
bbc
And we thought the finances were bad under Mrs Thatchers brutal regime.....
57
22/12/2020 10:34:09 2 3
bbc
Or when borrowing was £170bn in 2010 under the last Labour government, who promised to end boom and bust. We didn't have a global pandemic then, either.
30
22/12/2020 10:30:10 65 28
bbc
Can someone work out the cost of each life saved?

I’m afraid to say it won’t be sustainable and cost effective in the long run

If we save tens of thousands of life’s and can’t afford the £140bn annual NHS in a couple of years is that a false economy
76
22/12/2020 10:37:24 27 23
bbc
I take it you count beans for a living ?
345
22/12/2020 11:21:22 8 6
bbc
You sound like that American lady who campaigned against free healthcare in the US and then died of a preventable illness as she had to pay for treatment. The thing you don't understand is that it could be you who are the one not cost effective to save. Pretty sure you would have a different view of things if it was you.
403
22/12/2020 11:29:00 8 0
bbc
I can give a fag packet calculation

Total cost/[population*(total current infections/deaths) - deaths] = cost per life saved

£280e9/[68e6*(2e6/75e3)-75e3] = £112,000

But being as the figure for total current infections is probably put by a factor of 2 or 3, it's likely to be > £250,000, if you assumed every person gets it and death rates stay stable.
416
22/12/2020 11:30:44 6 3
bbc
I reckon they have spent roughy 400 billion to save 400 thousand lives. 1million per life.

BUT - if we had let it blow the NHS would have been overwhelmed. People would NOT have accepted - don't treat the over 80s, let them go. Only treat over 70s if there is sufficient resources.

And maybe more than 400 000 would have died.
650
22/12/2020 11:52:55 0 5
bbc
You understand money is just a unit of value, a number in a computer system, an abstract concept? I'd like to think we haven't become so fanatical about capitalism that we are prepared to sacrifice thousands of lives in it's name.
22/12/2020 14:47:17 0 0
bbc
We havn’t been able to afford the £140 billion per annum for donkeys years, the nhs is a bottomless pit and until we can silence the wokeists, stop the banning of free speech and work out an agreeable and affordable health care system, it will carry on draining the lifeblood out of the economy and failing at core.
16
22/12/2020 10:27:48 8 7
bbc
With inflation, how does that fare against WWII?
31
jon
22/12/2020 10:30:11 9 0
bbc
We only settled our WWII debts in 2006.
60
22/12/2020 10:35:15 2 2
bbc
And Germany, Italy and Japan have never settled theirs.....
9
22/12/2020 10:26:59 2 8
bbc


it is all about waiting for the vaccines now ...

and trying to avoid catching the virus in the interim

and why are we waiting for the regulator to approve our best 'not for profit' vaccine ...

oh yes ... because Boris forgot to ask them to start their review earlier

... all that should have been needed was a final review of the latest research ... not starting from page 1 line 1

32
22/12/2020 10:30:15 0 2
bbc
If Boris can give away millions of tax payers money to his cronies for bogus PPE contracts without following the usual procedures …. then the least he can do is to get the regulator to work with our best (not for profit) vaccine team
19
22/12/2020 10:28:21 77 43
bbc
Boris confidently predicts we will pay this off in the first 2 months of 2021 due to saving £350 million per week by leaving the EU and a dramatic increase in the export of Unicorns.
33
22/12/2020 10:30:27 44 42
bbc
Lucky you're not the chancellor with your grip on maths! Is this Dianne Abbott's username?
86
22/12/2020 10:39:06 4 10
bbc
Never heard of Dianne Abbott.

Or is that Brexiteer inability to spell and you meant Diane Abbott.

You'll be banging on about Kier Starmer next!
111
22/12/2020 10:43:49 4 6
bbc
It was a joke, for godsake XD
215
22/12/2020 11:00:07 8 5
bbc
Another entry in today’s most stupid irrelevant post of the day.
22/12/2020 19:40:48 0 0
bbc
The old ones are the best.
If the government had a £ for every time you posted that, the debt would be cleared in no time.
34
22/12/2020 10:30:28 77 41
bbc
Wonder how much of that went straight to Conservative cronies ?
70
22/12/2020 10:36:28 44 8
bbc
Or as back handers to Liverpool property developers ...
78
22/12/2020 10:38:02 4 6
bbc
What a foolish thing to say
276
22/12/2020 11:10:53 6 1
bbc
Or £300k of council taxpayers money spent on legal fees trying to silence someone critical of council spending & performance.
320
22/12/2020 11:17:59 8 2
bbc
Yep the PPE for mates of the government scandal which the BBC does not want to report on. A number of court cases ongoing around a VIP fast lane for friends of the Tories while companies in our country making PPE were ignored. This has cost us all hundreds of millions of our taxes
35
22/12/2020 10:30:37 3 7
bbc
Could always sell the gold again...... at a bit more of a price than what Gordon Brown did.
48
22/12/2020 10:32:47 5 0
bbc
We could, but we haven't got any left......
407
22/12/2020 11:29:32 0 0
bbc
Ignorance personified.
14
22/12/2020 10:27:45 5 9
bbc
Time to just cancel all debt globally, simple as.
36
Ben
22/12/2020 10:30:47 4 0
bbc
Perhaps not all of it, a mate owes me a tenner :)

But otherwise agree
37
22/12/2020 10:31:01 10 13
bbc
And Keir Starmer would have us spend more
45
22/12/2020 10:32:02 7 5
bbc
To spend less in the long term.
55
CH
22/12/2020 10:34:06 4 1
bbc
So only supporting those who need it rather than throwing money at everybody is spending more? Some of you really need to take the blinkers off and actually look at what Starmer has been saying re furlough and support for workers rather than just repeat meaningless and false accusations.
105
22/12/2020 10:42:50 2 0
bbc
I don't think so. The Tory government has not got value for money due to it's mismanagement of this crisis. It could have been managed far more cost effectively if there was not a preoccupation with funnelling funds towards connected individuals and organisations. Under Labour I'm sure we would have had a test and trace system which actually worked.
259
22/12/2020 11:07:10 2 1
bbc
Prove that statement, go on, I defy you to provide credible evidence.
38
22/12/2020 10:31:15 7 8
bbc
Hardly surprising

Theres this pandemic thing happening apparently
11
22/12/2020 10:27:10 35 18
bbc
Not sure why anyone would be surprised by this. Every country in the world is in the same situation. At least those who look after their electorate
39
22/12/2020 10:31:20 6 1
bbc
Except, they are only looking after the current-generation electorate. Future generations of taxpayers will suffer as a result of these decisions. I guess that's an unavoidable problem with democracy.
40
22/12/2020 10:31:32 37 11
bbc
Looking at the debt curve this just puts us back on track with the debt increase of the first 7 years of Tory government which slowed in 2017 when they voted not to give NHS Nurses a pay rise.
22/12/2020 14:54:48 5 4
bbc
I notice you don’t mention the financial crash that the socialists ignored and the fact of Liam Byrnes note. Of course you don’t mention the facts being a socialist.
41
22/12/2020 10:31:32 9 12
bbc
Using 'Covid' as an excuse for borrowing? The Conservative Government have ALWAYS borrowed excessively, always have, always will.
79
22/12/2020 10:38:11 2 1
bbc
That's why they have brought borrowing down for £170bn in 2010 to £38bn last year.

But don't let a little thing like facts get in the way.....
85
22/12/2020 10:39:03 2 0
bbc
Errrrr?
110
22/12/2020 10:43:19 1 2
bbc
Really? Aren't you mixing them up with Labour who spend everything that's not theirs then leave office with a note that there is no money, leaving the incoming Conservative Government to make all the hard unpopular decisions to bring the economy back on track?
16
22/12/2020 10:27:48 8 7
bbc
With inflation, how does that fare against WWII?
42
22/12/2020 10:31:44 0 0
bbc
I was wondering about that - obviously due to inflation the latest figures (for anything) will show as higher - but it would very interesting to see an inflation adjusted comparison
43
22/12/2020 10:31:47 8 16
bbc
Thank God the Extreme left of Liebour are not in power.

It would be double!
82
22/12/2020 10:38:37 2 2
bbc
Poor deflection by someone who can't justify the government's poor handling of the situation.
383
22/12/2020 11:27:09 1 0
bbc
I defy you to prove that simple statement. Go on, provide evidence and the relevant data to support your assertion.
Somehow though...............
44
22/12/2020 10:31:51 83 43
bbc
It is only a blip, Boris and Rishi have it all under control...their own cash in offshore accounts that is.
71
22/12/2020 10:36:34 54 32
bbc
Really? Any link to evidence for that?
83
22/12/2020 10:38:40 13 20
bbc
Hooray...you win today's baseless slogan prize.

Do you have a shred of evidence to support what you say. I'll bet you also bang on about Boris being "a liar!"
131
22/12/2020 10:39:21 26 9
bbc
You forgot the king of the Cayman islands. Rees Mogg whos backbone is so weak he has to slouch in the Commons
Typical crap statement from the typical idiot on HYS. You really are a complete arse! Removed
664
22/12/2020 12:06:23 1 1
bbc
As the weeks go by we find out more about Rishi's hidden assets he and his wife have. Also the tax dodges he is giving his self not taxing Amazon etc. Buy on Amazon and make Rishi exceptionally wealthy. You dont have to buy his products.
22/12/2020 14:49:55 0 2
bbc
So! Anyone who has a pension is bound to have ‘off-shore’ assets, anyone who’s taking out a saving bond is legitimately saving on tax, anyone who takes their tax relief on paye is avoiding tax, get real
37
22/12/2020 10:31:01 10 13
bbc
And Keir Starmer would have us spend more
45
22/12/2020 10:32:02 7 5
bbc
To spend less in the long term.
61
22/12/2020 10:35:29 1 3
bbc
What you mean like paying billions to have cladding removed that couldn't be prevented from being used in the first place, as it passed EU standards and now witnesses from the company that made it can't testify due to French law?
46
22/12/2020 10:32:09 201 37
bbc
I see the BBC have slipped in about the ONS having to revise growth figures (yet again). They seem to get it wrong more often than they get it right these days, and by some margin - 1.5% of GDP.

The people complaining about government debt are the same ones demanding the government extend furlough and pay more to businesses. Where do they think this money comes from.
65
22/12/2020 10:35:55 121 86
bbc
The people complaining about this debt do not want more furlough. We, most of us anyway, want to get a better balance between the interests of our generation while also looking after the interests of future generations. If that means accepting more Covid deaths among our own generation, then so be it. Let's get back to normal economic life for the sake of our children and grandchildren .
188
22/12/2020 10:55:32 5 10
bbc
Why are you not Chancellor of the Exchequer?
451
22/12/2020 11:34:56 8 0
bbc
The money comes from us - bonds issued by The Bank of England - over time our cash becomes less valuable. We're borrowing from ourselves and the government can take say 30 years to repay it. There's no other source of taxation or 'wealth'; it's just us the population. Even company tax originates from us, the customers.
521
22/12/2020 11:44:50 4 1
bbc
Where does the money come from? Literally thin air...
711
22/12/2020 12:14:02 2 1
bbc
The data is eeked out over a quarter, each month. So as each month goes by, there is more data collected, so they revise their estimates. It isn't a secret.
22/12/2020 13:14:45 1 1
bbc
Since 2008 most Government borrowing has been from the BoE buying Government corporate bonds:

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/mar/08/the-verdict-on-10-years-of-quantitative-easing

The BoE is part of Government:

https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/knowledgebank/who-owns-the-bank-of-england

The BoE has conjured the money it has used to buy Government bonds out of thin air.
22/12/2020 13:17:27 1 0
bbc
The BoE has also been, since the 2008 crash, buying back Government bonds from financial institutions, who have in turn bought more Government bonds; and it's been going in that circular motion ever since.

This is all funded by the money conjured out of thin air; it has redirected lots more wealth to the rich, whilst we have been sold the lie we need to repay it through austerity & wage freezes.
47
22/12/2020 10:32:35 4 6
bbc
The first and paramount duty of govt is to take care of its citizens in either physical or metaphorical sense. What was the alternative to supporting businesses and physical well being? Simple, let businesses go to the wall and the unemployed to the dogs. Some true dyed in the wool tories are still angry about these actions but there wasn’t really any choice,was there?
59
22/12/2020 10:35:08 5 1
bbc
1st duty: upholding freedom & democracy
63
22/12/2020 10:35:41 4 1
bbc
Could of shielded the vulnerable and let the economy continue
35
22/12/2020 10:30:37 3 7
bbc
Could always sell the gold again...... at a bit more of a price than what Gordon Brown did.
48
22/12/2020 10:32:47 5 0
bbc
We could, but we haven't got any left......
Ignorance personified Removed
49
22/12/2020 10:32:55 5 9
bbc
See? We ARE good at something! Breaking all records, and it isn't even berxit day yet.

Hillllllarious.
50
22/12/2020 10:33:11 62 24
bbc
Letting people live their lives might help the economy. Just a thought.
170
22/12/2020 10:52:53 55 39
bbc
Won't help the economy much if they're all dead
7
22/12/2020 10:26:48 9 13
bbc
Looks like future generations will be paying through the nose, for our own generation's self-indulgence in seeking to preserve every life from Covid no matter what the economic cost.
51
FF
22/12/2020 10:33:15 6 0
bbc
What lives would you have been happy to not preserve?
90
22/12/2020 10:39:40 0 3
bbc
My own, for starters. I am in my sixties, I've had a good life, and I don't want to be leaving a crushing, life-destroying burden of debt and taxes for my children and grandchildren.
Insert comment about bears, popes etc here. Removed
Popes shit in the woods. Removed
91
22/12/2020 10:39:42 1 1
bbc
If you're the ruler of your own private country then there have to be some benefits......
53
22/12/2020 10:33:42 12 4
bbc
Crown jewels on eBay ??
92
22/12/2020 10:40:24 20 18
bbc
.... or get rid of the royal family
28
22/12/2020 10:29:57 9 7
bbc
No they don’t report rainfall, but this is akin to the great flood. It’s not fake news to report facts, you don’t like them, criticise sunak not the bbc
54
22/12/2020 10:33:52 2 2
bbc
The BBC do report the weather, there's tab on the front page, near the top! I also didn't say it was fake news - it's just poor reporting to state the bleeding obvious continuously!
37
22/12/2020 10:31:01 10 13
bbc
And Keir Starmer would have us spend more
55
CH
22/12/2020 10:34:06 4 1
bbc
So only supporting those who need it rather than throwing money at everybody is spending more? Some of you really need to take the blinkers off and actually look at what Starmer has been saying re furlough and support for workers rather than just repeat meaningless and false accusations.
56
22/12/2020 10:34:07 6 5
bbc
We could spend nothing of course and have a HYS on the government not supporting the UK through the pandemic.
Let's give that a go ...
29
22/12/2020 10:30:05 5 8
bbc
And we thought the finances were bad under Mrs Thatchers brutal regime.....
57
22/12/2020 10:34:09 2 3
bbc
Or when borrowing was £170bn in 2010 under the last Labour government, who promised to end boom and bust. We didn't have a global pandemic then, either.
417
22/12/2020 11:30:59 2 0
bbc
Another who doesn’t understand graphs, and probably not much else either ??
58
22/12/2020 10:34:14 69 8
bbc
The rate at which not just UK, but all countries must be spending money beggars belief.
I can't fathom the amounts or how it s all going to be paid back. A few months back it was $28tn. Since then, and with this latest escalation, it's going to increase. Where will it stop?
77
22/12/2020 10:37:53 11 35
bbc
Do you mean £28bn?
252
22/12/2020 11:05:59 7 4
bbc
Who said it had to be paid back?
£845 billion of UK government debt - including most of the recent increase - was borrowed from the UK government-controlled bank.

https://dmo.gov.uk/media/17118/jul-sep-2020.pdf bottom of page 3.
338
22/12/2020 11:04:44 12 5
bbc
Indeed. This will destroy the EU, because the south will keep asking for more money, and the north will say 'NO'. What with the east ignoring so many rules, the cracks are rapidly widening. Even Norway has been emboldened by Brexit to demand a better deal from the EU.
695
22/12/2020 12:11:28 4 1
bbc
It's true we don't know, the vaccines will stabilise the way we live, but it's going to be a mighty worldwide effort to recover
22/12/2020 13:08:32 4 1
bbc
Goes to show when there is a need even the stingiest of governments will find the money! Why can't they find it at other times to benefit the nation, to save jobs to invest in the 'right' infrastructure and do something about the yawning gap between rich and poor. Not just this country but the whole world. Where is it fair that a CEO/company owner can see their annual income rise by millions?
22/12/2020 19:32:17 0 0
bbc
It will stop in June or sooner when the vulnerable and at risk have had a vaccination.
47
22/12/2020 10:32:35 4 6
bbc
The first and paramount duty of govt is to take care of its citizens in either physical or metaphorical sense. What was the alternative to supporting businesses and physical well being? Simple, let businesses go to the wall and the unemployed to the dogs. Some true dyed in the wool tories are still angry about these actions but there wasn’t really any choice,was there?
59
22/12/2020 10:35:08 5 1
bbc
1st duty: upholding freedom & democracy
31
jon
22/12/2020 10:30:11 9 0
bbc
We only settled our WWII debts in 2006.
60
22/12/2020 10:35:15 2 2
bbc
And Germany, Italy and Japan have never settled theirs.....
428
22/12/2020 11:32:09 0 0
bbc
Evidence?
45
22/12/2020 10:32:02 7 5
bbc
To spend less in the long term.
61
22/12/2020 10:35:29 1 3
bbc
What you mean like paying billions to have cladding removed that couldn't be prevented from being used in the first place, as it passed EU standards and now witnesses from the company that made it can't testify due to French law?
62
22/12/2020 10:35:34 5 7
bbc
Katie Hopkins
10:31
Hardly surprising

Theres this pandemic thing happening apparently

--

Yep, govt gets its priorities right: excessive amounts spent on useless ppe etc provided by "friends of friends of friends".

Corrupt much? Never!!!
47
22/12/2020 10:32:35 4 6
bbc
The first and paramount duty of govt is to take care of its citizens in either physical or metaphorical sense. What was the alternative to supporting businesses and physical well being? Simple, let businesses go to the wall and the unemployed to the dogs. Some true dyed in the wool tories are still angry about these actions but there wasn’t really any choice,was there?
63
22/12/2020 10:35:41 4 1
bbc
Could of shielded the vulnerable and let the economy continue
64
22/12/2020 10:35:45 2 2
bbc
'Debt is rising' is the most unsurprising news all year.

Given the post covid levels of inflation may put the 1970s to shame it may not matter much!
46
22/12/2020 10:32:09 201 37
bbc
I see the BBC have slipped in about the ONS having to revise growth figures (yet again). They seem to get it wrong more often than they get it right these days, and by some margin - 1.5% of GDP.

The people complaining about government debt are the same ones demanding the government extend furlough and pay more to businesses. Where do they think this money comes from.
65
22/12/2020 10:35:55 121 86
bbc
The people complaining about this debt do not want more furlough. We, most of us anyway, want to get a better balance between the interests of our generation while also looking after the interests of future generations. If that means accepting more Covid deaths among our own generation, then so be it. Let's get back to normal economic life for the sake of our children and grandchildren .
201
22/12/2020 10:58:07 23 7
bbc
Difficult to sustain “normal economic life” when hospitals full and halt on “normal medical life”. That’s without addressing the moral question of deaths.
We have little idea of what would happen if restrictions mainly lifted. Most folk don’t want to find out.
360
22/12/2020 11:23:43 22 3
bbc
Willing to accept more deaths as long as your not one of the dead.
404
VoR
22/12/2020 11:29:02 12 5
bbc
I assume you mean lockdown rather than furlough (which doesn't have to exist in lockdown).

If lockdown had been done properly, there would have been less economic impact, not more, assuming adequate Test and Trace. Half-measures are what drags out economic pain.

Not all Covid deaths are confined to the elderly, and Covid appears to have severe long term health effects for some non-elderly.
528
22/12/2020 11:46:28 1 1
bbc
Sadly, all too true.
610
22/12/2020 11:49:38 11 3
bbc
Shall we start with your parents/grandparents, or is the rest of us expected to take this death?
786
22/12/2020 12:23:36 4 3
bbc
Seriously?

The economy is a man made construct.
If we all decided, we could pause all interest payments and help everyone through this financially.

Debts can be written off and reset once this is all over.

But no, the fat cats want every penny accounted for and paid back, destroying many livelihoods in the process.

Those deaths could be from your family! Is that what you want? No.
843
22/12/2020 12:31:14 4 2
bbc
I take it you don't have any dependants, this comment was used by singleton recluses at the start of the pandemic.
22/12/2020 13:12:07 0 2
bbc
Oh my God.

You must be the life and soul of the party! Shame on you.
22/12/2020 13:35:06 0 0
bbc
And sod the older generation like our Fathers/Mothers and Grandparents?
22/12/2020 14:09:33 0 0
bbc
OK, you choose the deaths, you have to tell them face to face and their families, good luck with your ghoulish task.
22/12/2020 19:18:12 0 0
bbc
I appreciate your personal sacrifice.
Post your address and I will send flowers to your funeral.
66
22/12/2020 10:35:56 28 12
bbc
Imagine what that money could have been spent on if people were less obsessed with this one virus and and money spent was proportional to the level of risk considering the long term and bigger picture. For example solar panels could have been put on hospitals.
473
VoR
22/12/2020 11:39:28 6 1
bbc
Solar panels already are put on public buildings with the cost covered by the tax payer.
22/12/2020 15:01:33 0 0
bbc
Yep, and generated nothing apart from more repair bills with the electricity still being pumped through the usual ways, windbines anyone?
67
22/12/2020 10:27:03 16 15
bbc
So the headline should be "Economy grew record amount in third quarter"? Or does that not fit the doom and gloom mantra of the BBC?
203
22/12/2020 10:58:30 2 0
bbc
10%of 1 is less than 5% of 100, but you know that, don’t you, if not then stop posting rubbish.
68
22/12/2020 10:36:21 12 6
bbc
Where is all this money being spent? Somebody must be doing very nicely out of this.
Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Tescos, ASDA?
113
22/12/2020 10:43:52 7 0
bbc
Try to understand...I know it's hard.

The key thing is that the money is not being spent on unemployment benefit and housing benefit whilst destroying the productive capacity of the economy.

A bit of basic economic knowledge reveals that there isn't really a sensible alternative!
138
22/12/2020 10:47:12 1 1
bbc
Probably into the pockets of bods who have had to be furloughed, so they can try and keep their heads just above the water. I feel myself lucky being a keyworker and going to work everyday... although losing staff to this self isolation and filling the gaps is flipping tiring.
375
22/12/2020 11:25:57 1 1
bbc
Yep friends of the government getting PPE plus track and trace contracts. Have you seen the massive houses they are buying with our tax money? So actually not much benefit as they are buying land not recirculating money into the economy.
69
22/12/2020 10:36:26 3 7
bbc
This tory policy of introducing coronavirus into the UK is disastrous! Mark my words...watch out for a U-Turn imminently.

Assorted extra slogans about lies and flip-flops.

That'll do...press "Post!"
34
22/12/2020 10:30:28 77 41
bbc
Wonder how much of that went straight to Conservative cronies ?
70
22/12/2020 10:36:28 44 8
bbc
Or as back handers to Liverpool property developers ...
205
22/12/2020 10:58:54 2 9
bbc
What are you on about?
22/12/2020 19:39:14 0 0
bbc
Last night a scouser saved my red face.
44
22/12/2020 10:31:51 83 43
bbc
It is only a blip, Boris and Rishi have it all under control...their own cash in offshore accounts that is.
71
22/12/2020 10:36:34 54 32
bbc
Really? Any link to evidence for that?
297
22/12/2020 11:14:14 13 6
bbc
In a true democracy government ministers would publish details of what accounts they have and how much money. What can see is that this government gave contracts to friends and associates without proper due diligence. That sort of lax governance would suggest that perhaps they are doing other dodgy things as well.
440
22/12/2020 11:33:20 13 6
bbc
They're Tories. What more evidence do you need.
461
VoR
22/12/2020 11:36:54 7 4
bbc
That's kind of the point of offshoring; minimal disclosure as well as minimal tax. The EU was addressing this lack of disclosure, but of course we're leaving now, so those who might have been affected will escape it unless we introduce comparable UK laws. Don't hold your breath.
535
22/12/2020 11:47:32 10 2
bbc
Rees-Mogg, Leadsom husband and brother in law, and other Tory peers or previous MP's have offshore accounts, or links to businesses to offshore accounts.

It have been known for at least 4 years, yet still no one on the media reminds us of this, and who they are. That is a problem.

You can search yourself, using keywords such a panama papers or paradise papers

The info is there on the internet
742
22/12/2020 12:17:53 2 0
bbc
As Rishi went to a school costing £20k PER TERM its fairly guaranteed to be the case - these are the super rich you are talking about , one of the richest families in the UK.
798
22/12/2020 12:25:14 1 3
bbc
No but you can't expect the numpties to do anything other than believe Conspiracy theories,

Most of the probably still think Elvis is Alive and cannot understand the basics of Finance hence why the country has to support so many people.
22/12/2020 19:34:24 0 0
bbc
For sure. Rishi tells everyone his personal bank details. That's why they made him Chancellor.
Insert comment about bears, popes etc here. Removed
72
22/12/2020 10:36:44 1 5
bbc
Those kinds of comment tend to be from people who think they are being original and witty, when clearly neither apply.

But yes, this is a world beating mess. Well done Sunak.
73
22/12/2020 10:36:47 122 32
bbc
A complete lack of basic economic understanding on this forum. This is not surprising but what is surprising is that so many people have some garbage to say. The government is borrowing at an interest rate of 0.19%. If inflation rising to 2% (the target) then the value of the debt is being eroded in real time by a considerable amount - this is why there is no panic. Unless things change.
97
22/12/2020 10:41:45 43 28
bbc
Get you - kind of like taking out a mortgage and then losing your job a month later. So what happens to this goverment debt when things do change, ask the taxpayers for more?
104
22/12/2020 10:42:44 22 1
bbc
"Unless things change"... Takes me back to the 80s and violently rising interest rates.
118
22/12/2020 10:44:15 16 5
bbc
Your observation about the interest rate is correct. For now. At some point in the future though, interest rates will start to go up again, as they always do. At that point, the burden of servicing this debt will become a heavier one. and the interest payments will mean there is less money available for spending on (among other things) the NHS.
194
22/12/2020 10:56:50 5 7
bbc
As you say in your 1st sentence then carry on proving it about yourself.
Clever.
293
22/12/2020 11:13:51 2 1
bbc
Yeah at 2% the debt halves...... every 35 years...
437
VoR
22/12/2020 11:33:10 4 4
bbc
While there's some sense in what you say, if the UK becomes less financially stable (or perceived as being so -- and let's face it, that's a near certainty), then the cost of borrowing is likely to rise over time. Existing borrowing will need to be rolled over if it hasn't been paid off, and the rates on that could be very painful. And paying it off isn't within our gift.
468
22/12/2020 11:38:05 7 2
bbc
Yep spot on; and most of the bonds I guess are issued by the Bank of England. So we're actually borrowing from ourselves and long term devaluing our currency. There's no other source of wealth, it's just us, the people.
908
22/12/2020 12:41:50 0 0
bbc
Quite right except for two points: Inflation isn't at 2% and those bonds mature in 5-10 years. So wrong really.
987
Dan
22/12/2020 12:57:32 1 0
bbc
Yes - if all else remains constant. You are confusing 'economic' with 'accountancy' which is a problem so many make
22/12/2020 13:09:59 0 0
bbc
It's not a problem until there's a problem
22/12/2020 15:00:21 0 0
bbc
"unless things change" LOL
22/12/2020 15:28:26 0 1
bbc
I believe the concern was that when we finally come out of all this, inflation may get too high requiring higher interest rates which would then cause the government problems.

I doubt it though, another decade of economic repression to come.
22/12/2020 17:07:54 0 0
bbc
Any 'basic understanding' of economics would tell you that the situation you are describing is totally artificial and has nothing whatsoever to do with 'economics' or the 'economy' as these words are typically understood.
74
22/12/2020 10:36:51 5 5
bbc
Costs of borrowing historically low and ultimately will be diminished by inflation . No news here .
84
22/12/2020 10:38:59 4 2
bbc
Yes but the lying tories will make a big deal of it so they can rape and underfund our public services again.
75
22/12/2020 10:37:11 70 26
bbc
Would a soft Brexit with internal market access and a customs union solve the issue?

No.

But at least we wouldn't be piling crisis on top of crisis.
955
22/12/2020 12:50:54 20 27
bbc
So long as we still get our blue passports and someone tells the Brexiters that we have our sovereignty back (which we never lost) then methinks your idea may just have legs...
30
22/12/2020 10:30:10 65 28
bbc
Can someone work out the cost of each life saved?

I’m afraid to say it won’t be sustainable and cost effective in the long run

If we save tens of thousands of life’s and can’t afford the £140bn annual NHS in a couple of years is that a false economy
76
22/12/2020 10:37:24 27 23
bbc
I take it you count beans for a living ?
101
22/12/2020 10:41:56 23 2
bbc
No, but we don’t spend this level of money saving life’s from say cancer or heart disease which kill more people

So dying of covid is now worse and worth bankrupting ourselves while other forms of dying are acceptable
449
VoR
22/12/2020 11:34:46 1 5
bbc
I do. And I completely disagree with him. For starters, we wouldn't be talking about tens of thousands of lives, we'd be talking higher numbers. We are closing in on 100k deaths even with all the (inadequate) measures taken.
58
22/12/2020 10:34:14 69 8
bbc
The rate at which not just UK, but all countries must be spending money beggars belief.
I can't fathom the amounts or how it s all going to be paid back. A few months back it was $28tn. Since then, and with this latest escalation, it's going to increase. Where will it stop?
77
22/12/2020 10:37:53 11 35
bbc
Do you mean £28bn?
129
22/12/2020 10:45:57 22 0
bbc
No. the post is talking about ALL countries. In October it was $28tn.
This is only what I read of course.
143
22/12/2020 10:47:54 1 9
bbc
Mind you, if that's Djabouti dollars or something, it's only 28p.
34
22/12/2020 10:30:28 77 41
bbc
Wonder how much of that went straight to Conservative cronies ?
78
22/12/2020 10:38:02 4 6
bbc
What a foolish thing to say
237
22/12/2020 11:03:22 9 2
bbc
So foolish that the National Audit Office are investigating non tender PPE contracts ?
852
22/12/2020 12:33:33 2 0
bbc
Not actually - I am in Liverpool & there are all sorts of un authorised developments in dispute this very minute causing endless dispute - get yer facts right
41
22/12/2020 10:31:32 9 12
bbc
Using 'Covid' as an excuse for borrowing? The Conservative Government have ALWAYS borrowed excessively, always have, always will.
79
22/12/2020 10:38:11 2 1
bbc
That's why they have brought borrowing down for £170bn in 2010 to £38bn last year.

But don't let a little thing like facts get in the way.....
80
22/12/2020 10:38:24 7 9
bbc
"UK borrowing hits highest November level on record"

Surely not ... wonder what could be causing it, anything to do with an almost total lockdown of the economy because of a global pandemic perhaps ?

Meanwhile, in other insightful BBC articles, the Pope is revealed a Catholic and bears do go potty in the woods ...
96
22/12/2020 10:41:16 3 1
bbc
Truly original (yawn!)
6
22/12/2020 10:26:39 29 22
bbc
Populist Johnson simply doesn't care if food and other prices go higher.
81
22/12/2020 10:38:32 4 1
bbc
By definition a populist would have to care about things that make him unpopular!
43
22/12/2020 10:31:47 8 16
bbc
Thank God the Extreme left of Liebour are not in power.

It would be double!
82
22/12/2020 10:38:37 2 2
bbc
Poor deflection by someone who can't justify the government's poor handling of the situation.
44
22/12/2020 10:31:51 83 43
bbc
It is only a blip, Boris and Rishi have it all under control...their own cash in offshore accounts that is.
83
22/12/2020 10:38:40 13 20
bbc
Hooray...you win today's baseless slogan prize.

Do you have a shred of evidence to support what you say. I'll bet you also bang on about Boris being "a liar!"
305
DVa
22/12/2020 11:15:30 14 7
bbc
Boris won't give you a piece of his offshore funds for defending him online you know. I say we go back to the post-war policies to overcome debt and tax the richest 1% at 90%! It's blindingly obvious that austerity did not and will not work.
483
22/12/2020 11:40:40 11 3
bbc
Sunak put much of his wealth in a blind trust before becoming chancellor. He refuses public scrutiny. In parliament he refused to answer John McDonnell's question regarding his hedge fund past. Sunak is a tax avoider...all legal of course - courtesy of taxation loopholes- but totally immoral and hypocritical. He tweaked furlough rules to allow his billionaire father-in-law to claim...
818
22/12/2020 12:28:17 0 0
bbc
He is
22/12/2020 21:54:38 0 0
bbc
He was fired from the Times for lying. He was fired from the Telegraph for lying. He was fired as a minister for lying. He claimed that he had an oven ready deal and he clearly did and does not, so that was a lie.

I call him Liar Johnson without any risk of libel, because he is a proven, fluent and serial liar.
74
22/12/2020 10:36:51 5 5
bbc
Costs of borrowing historically low and ultimately will be diminished by inflation . No news here .
84
22/12/2020 10:38:59 4 2
bbc
Yes but the lying tories will make a big deal of it so they can rape and underfund our public services again.
41
22/12/2020 10:31:32 9 12
bbc
Using 'Covid' as an excuse for borrowing? The Conservative Government have ALWAYS borrowed excessively, always have, always will.
85
22/12/2020 10:39:03 2 0
bbc
Errrrr?
33
22/12/2020 10:30:27 44 42
bbc
Lucky you're not the chancellor with your grip on maths! Is this Dianne Abbott's username?
86
22/12/2020 10:39:06 4 10
bbc
Never heard of Dianne Abbott.

Or is that Brexiteer inability to spell and you meant Diane Abbott.

You'll be banging on about Kier Starmer next!
87
22/12/2020 10:39:14 190 93
bbc
Would you 100% remortgage your house to give your elderly grandparent another year of life?

That’s essentially what we’ve done

It’s madness we don’t spend this much saving life’s of any other deadly illness

We’ve lost perspective
Hope you don't need a drug the NHS regards as too expensive based on the cost benefit principle ... oh how ironic that'll be.

Just lie down and die ... you aren't worth the money.
Removed
128
22/12/2020 10:45:29 39 21
bbc
If we hadn't had restrictions the NHS would have been completely overrun and hundreds of thousands would have died. Up to 20 times that number would be living with long term health issues.
211
22/12/2020 10:59:42 33 48
bbc
You are a disgrace, an absolute disgrace.
229
22/12/2020 11:02:03 13 7
bbc
So you wouldn't do it for a parent or sister
263
22/12/2020 11:08:01 27 7
bbc
I agree, if the cost of saving 2% of a ship's crew is sinking the ship as a captain I'd have to think of the ship and the other 98%.
347
22/12/2020 11:21:49 18 2
bbc
In recent years we have become obsessed with keeping people alive.

Even if they would not wish it, like a friends mother whose dementia was so advanced she didn't recognise her own family.

However much care they need, even if they need 1:1 care 24/7 that's 5 FTE's, and I don't mean for a few weeks to restore them to health.

Cost is more fundamental than money.
381
22/12/2020 11:26:51 23 10
bbc
I would happily remortgage my house to see my parents again.
542
22/12/2020 11:48:28 7 10
bbc
When life is at stake, we should do what we can to help preserve it. A normal person cannot live with themselves if they do otherwise. Simple as that - basic human code of honour and dignity.
646
22/12/2020 12:03:35 0 5
bbc
Sounds like a Faragist comment. If he and Trump, plus several other Tory MPs we would be re mortgaging our houses. We can leave thaat to the US.
838
Ant
22/12/2020 12:30:19 5 1
bbc
The more accurate analogy would be - "Would you take on debt in excess of your annual income to subsidize the balance sheets of businesses in the UK?"

The money hasn't gone directly to the NHS or to elderly grandparents to help them extend their life for another year, most has gone to businesses to subsidize their operation costs, costs which they alone are responsible for not the tax payer.
998
22/12/2020 13:01:23 1 2
bbc
So when do you propose we introduce euthanasia for people over the age of 80? People seem to forget many of our greatest talents in music, the arts and the sciences did much of their best work during retirement years! Many of the elderly are still working well after 65 and are contributing far more to society than many under the age of 40 ... like all those ables who've never worked!
22/12/2020 12:56:41 0 1
bbc
I would thou i love my mum
22/12/2020 13:16:23 2 2
bbc
You are essentially advocating euthanasia.
22/12/2020 13:21:28 2 4
bbc
You ask anyone who has a dead elderly relative what they would do for 1 more hour with them, the answer is i would give up everything for that.. So your comment that the elderly don't deserve one more year is Nasty, you should never forget you only get 1 chance at life. ONE.....
22/12/2020 13:33:46 1 2
bbc
i may be the only one but i would, the cost of a family member is more than my house, thats what proper families do
22/12/2020 19:19:19 0 0
bbc
If you are an expert on pandemics why aren't you at Rishi's elbow giving him all the answers?
88
22/12/2020 10:39:18 3 11
bbc
If people adhered to the rules we would be borrowing far less ...
95
22/12/2020 10:40:53 3 0
bbc
They do. That's why people don't have jobs.
102
22/12/2020 10:42:24 1 1
bbc
If the lying tories had invested in our public services properly over the years we would be borrowing less and it would have saved lives
124
22/12/2020 10:44:38 1 0
bbc
So slinging a rag over your gob is the answer to it all eh?

Strewth!????
Insert comment about bears, popes etc here. Removed
89
22/12/2020 10:39:32 2 0
bbc
Yes all those (and the sherlocks), understand you're not being original.
We've heard it all before, more often than not multiple time in the same article. Talk about stating the bleedin' obvious.
None of you knew any of the data above, you just felt the need to post popular tripe.
51
FF
22/12/2020 10:33:15 6 0
bbc
What lives would you have been happy to not preserve?
90
22/12/2020 10:39:40 0 3
bbc
My own, for starters. I am in my sixties, I've had a good life, and I don't want to be leaving a crushing, life-destroying burden of debt and taxes for my children and grandchildren.
511
22/12/2020 11:43:49 0 0
bbc
You might well do that anyway, given the plethora of afflictions that can come with old age, so why not commit euthanasia now? No, of course I don't really mean that, but you see where your thinking leads?
Popes shit in the woods. Removed
91
22/12/2020 10:39:42 1 1
bbc
If you're the ruler of your own private country then there have to be some benefits......
53
22/12/2020 10:33:42 12 4
bbc
Crown jewels on eBay ??
92
22/12/2020 10:40:24 20 18
bbc
.... or get rid of the royal family
93
22/12/2020 10:40:41 13 7
bbc
Don't worry you Tory lemmings, you can always blame Jeremy Corbyn.
94
22/12/2020 10:40:46 5 7
bbc
The tax payer will certainly pay next year I hope were not giving foreign aid to China it's them who caused this
117
22/12/2020 10:44:08 2 1
bbc
Wonder what China is doing about their live markets selling bats and mangalins stolen from the countryside to eat or drink.
88
22/12/2020 10:39:18 3 11
bbc
If people adhered to the rules we would be borrowing far less ...
95
22/12/2020 10:40:53 3 0
bbc
They do. That's why people don't have jobs.
80
22/12/2020 10:38:24 7 9
bbc
"UK borrowing hits highest November level on record"

Surely not ... wonder what could be causing it, anything to do with an almost total lockdown of the economy because of a global pandemic perhaps ?

Meanwhile, in other insightful BBC articles, the Pope is revealed a Catholic and bears do go potty in the woods ...
96
22/12/2020 10:41:16 3 1
bbc
Truly original (yawn!)
73
22/12/2020 10:36:47 122 32
bbc
A complete lack of basic economic understanding on this forum. This is not surprising but what is surprising is that so many people have some garbage to say. The government is borrowing at an interest rate of 0.19%. If inflation rising to 2% (the target) then the value of the debt is being eroded in real time by a considerable amount - this is why there is no panic. Unless things change.
97
22/12/2020 10:41:45 43 28
bbc
Get you - kind of like taking out a mortgage and then losing your job a month later. So what happens to this goverment debt when things do change, ask the taxpayers for more?
571
22/12/2020 11:51:43 6 0
bbc
The economy is not a mortgage...
621
22/12/2020 12:00:09 3 0
bbc
The Govts taken out a mortgage and isn't losing its job next. The bonds that are taken out now won't change the interest rate but will be repayable at some time in the future which could be at a higher rate. Of course we are going to pay and it's not our fault neither was WW1 and WW2
22/12/2020 13:36:17 0 0
bbc
Have you got a better suggestion?
98
22/12/2020 10:41:45 8 6
bbc
I think the BBC are trolling the public...
227
22/12/2020 11:01:52 3 0
bbc
Your 2nd word is where you failed.
99
22/12/2020 10:41:50 1 3
bbc
So the last time debt was this high was when all those 'lucky boomers' were born.
So maybe the future is not as bad as we think.
100
22/12/2020 10:41:54 16 11
bbc
This lockdown nonsense will carry on for at least the next two years until people realise lockdowns don't work I wonder what the national debt will be then pensions slashed no benefit payments etc
260
22/12/2020 11:07:14 12 1
bbc
didn't you notice how much the cases went down during lockdown? , and the lockdowns in Australia and New Zealand didn't work ? they are virtually free, or completely free in NZ, of the virus ...