Openreach creating 5,300 new jobs to speed fibre rollout
18/12/2020 | news | business | 110
The wholesale internet division of BT has been told to speed up the rollout of ultra-fast connections.
1
18/12/2020 10:26:31 12 3
bbc
Shouldn't have thrown away all that money on already obsolete FTTC and gone straight for a full FTTP roll out, a missed opportunity and wasted investment.
4
18/12/2020 10:51:51 8 0
bbc
As I understand it, the only difference between the 2 systems if the final run from the cabinet to the premises. Unfortunately, it involves a lot of work (and money) to lay fibre lines.
I notice CityFibre have said they are laying new FTTP Gigabit systems - but only in cities (60+ of them at the moment, they say) so smaller communities are being ignored again!
26
18/12/2020 11:54:58 6 0
bbc
Installing FTTP requires access to the premises, may require a wayleave, and is a nightmare when they have absentee landlords who can't be bothered with the paperwork.
98
19/12/2020 09:16:10 0 0
bbc
You clearly understand nothing about the deployment of the access network (between your home & the exchange). FTTC is more a stepping stone and meant that higher (albeit not the highest) speeds could be made available to more customers sooner.
2
18/12/2020 10:30:05 2 6
bbc
I see OpenReach are panicking now that the likes of City Fibre, Hyperoptic and Virgin are rolling out ultra fast connections nationwide, too little too late!
24
18/12/2020 11:53:03 7 0
bbc
Aye, but they are not rolling it out in the sticks, just where they can make a decent profit.
97
19/12/2020 09:12:04 1 0
bbc
It may co me as a shock to you, but BT (along with AT&T) were doing ground-breaking research into the use of fibre way back in the 70s, it was being field trialled in the early 80s and BT wanted approval for large scale deployment from the early 90s. Guess what, their major shareholder wouldn't agree, step forward HMG and take a bow.
3
18/12/2020 10:44:48 4 3
bbc
Cant happen soon enough and The government has told telecoms firms it wants ultra-fast broadband networks to reach every corner of the UK by 2025. Ultra-fast means 1Gigabit to the door. This will entail full fibre rollout to the door and not just the cabinet. We are miles behind many other leading economy countries such as South Korea who have up to FIVE Gigabit with Three Gigabit the norm.
23
18/12/2020 11:52:19 3 0
bbc
You'll find that is restricted to those that live in densely populated tower blocks, which is the norm for a lot of Koreans. In the UK we are sparsely populated and out of the main conurbations many individual houses will require miles of fibre to conenct them up.
27
18/12/2020 11:55:08 2 0
bbc
In our version of capitalism, companies deem their purpose to be making money. They will milk existing assets for as long as poss & resist roll out of expensive infrastructure, if the payback takes longer. In this economic climate, private cos will always drag their heels. All very well being offended by it but it's the reality of our system. Don't like it - champion a different one.
1
18/12/2020 10:26:31 12 3
bbc
Shouldn't have thrown away all that money on already obsolete FTTC and gone straight for a full FTTP roll out, a missed opportunity and wasted investment.
4
18/12/2020 10:51:51 8 0
bbc
As I understand it, the only difference between the 2 systems if the final run from the cabinet to the premises. Unfortunately, it involves a lot of work (and money) to lay fibre lines.
I notice CityFibre have said they are laying new FTTP Gigabit systems - but only in cities (60+ of them at the moment, they say) so smaller communities are being ignored again!
7
18/12/2020 11:14:15 2 1
bbc
It suited BT for FTTC because they still wanted to sweat their remaining copper/aluminium network but isn't good for the rest of us, FTTC is subject to a lot of technical limitations such as cross talk and external RF interference which degrades advertised performance, FTTP suffers no such issue.
42
18/12/2020 12:29:24 2 0
bbc
Unless government grants are backing it, why would you pay to lay fibre for 10 customers when for the same cost you could get 800 customers?
5
18/12/2020 10:54:17 3 2
bbc
"Fibre to the home" has been rolled out where I live but not by Openreach.

Too little, too late.
6
18/12/2020 11:11:12 2 12
bbc
What a load of bull manure. A friend of mine in Ilford has been told that superfast broadband is available.
Only problem is that due to "Covid" he is unable get this until June 2021 to ensure the safety of the workers (bull manure).
BT is disgrace, BT should be fined for late delivery.
Ofcom are a waste of time and money as they seem to be in support of BT, Talk-Talk and Skymay agree with me.
4
18/12/2020 10:51:51 8 0
bbc
As I understand it, the only difference between the 2 systems if the final run from the cabinet to the premises. Unfortunately, it involves a lot of work (and money) to lay fibre lines.
I notice CityFibre have said they are laying new FTTP Gigabit systems - but only in cities (60+ of them at the moment, they say) so smaller communities are being ignored again!
7
18/12/2020 11:14:15 2 1
bbc
It suited BT for FTTC because they still wanted to sweat their remaining copper/aluminium network but isn't good for the rest of us, FTTC is subject to a lot of technical limitations such as cross talk and external RF interference which degrades advertised performance, FTTP suffers no such issue.
38
18/12/2020 12:10:52 2 0
bbc
Yes, but those problems are surely just generated from the cabinet to the home! If that copper is swapped to a fibre line, then it all goes away!
I'm on FTTC and I get about 55 meg - a much faster line would make very little difference to me! I can record 2 programmes, watch a 3rd and do a speed test all at the same time with no problems at all!
99
19/12/2020 09:28:37 1 0
bbc
True. But less crosstalk than with an entirely copper line. FTTP suffers the issue of a vastly greater cost to deploy. It was a sensible compromise to get somewhat higher speeds to larger numbers of customers sooner. You think it better to leave more people on just copper for longer while a lucky few gain FTTP speeds?
8
gjb
18/12/2020 11:17:25 18 1
bbc
Surely if covid has taught us anything, it is the ability to adapt our working practices. A full fibre network would allow people to work remotely where necessary and also allow businesses to offer a good service to their customers. Maybe high speed broadband should take priority over the HS2 rail link.
37
18/12/2020 12:10:32 4 7
bbc
HS2 could have the ability to provide FO cabling along its entire length to help speed up the roll-out! Breakout to road based routes at every bridge if required, provides a great high capacity route.
51
18/12/2020 12:48:08 0 0
bbc
Probably a too later for FTTP to be prioritised over HS2 now unfortunately
103
19/12/2020 10:13:27 0 1
bbc
Don't need a full fibre network for "ordinary office work" done from home. 10Mbps is enough for that, provided you're not trying to access it over dodgy, congested home WiFi at the other end of the house.

Yes it should have priority over HS2; the only justification for continuing with HS2 is if the added capacity is essential for freight and I suspect there are other ways round that!
9
18/12/2020 11:18:18 6 0
bbc
I've been on fibre for years, but only getting 18Mb, so no idea how far away the cabinet is that it is connected to. Last visit by an OR engineer said the best I would get would be 22Mb. This despite Offcom and local council showing this area as getting 30Mb.
14
18/12/2020 11:32:27 5 0
bbc
That "fibre" is a bit of a con. Thats FTTC - fibre to the cabinet. Your actual feed is still copper. I got around 6mbps when I was on the same as I live a fair way from the cabinet. Thankfully I now have FTTP (at a cost ....) and get around 142mbps, but only because we were a not-spot for a long time and the local superfast broadband campaign subsidised the engineering.
47
18/12/2020 12:40:00 2 0
bbc
The 30MB will be some average for the postcode, trouble with FTTC is if the cable/cables from the Cabinet to your dwelling are poor = less Mb
10
18/12/2020 11:18:47 13 1
bbc
I had no option but to go to Virgin Media to escape the curse of Openreach standards. VM is brilliant..........but when things go wrong you might as well ask your cat for help. VMs customer service is just as bad as the rest.
30
18/12/2020 11:59:11 7 0
bbc
I got a new build house once on a street where VM had already installed cable, but they just refused to extend it 30m to my property, even though I wanted both broadband and TV services.
11
18/12/2020 10:59:46 2 5
bbc
How much money has the UK Government given BT over many years to get fibre around the country? Multi £ bn. And still nit sorted. Even new build houses still not plumbed in to fibre. So backwards and getting much further behind.

BT need to sort themselves out, like most companies they have mega debt, esp in the pension scheme, around £ 2bn, and get away paying bonuses. WHY?
22
18/12/2020 11:50:12 2 0
bbc
It seems very patchy by region. We used to live in SW England. Bloody awful. Now in North Wales, halfway up a mountain, & it's fab!! Over copper, exceptional performance. And we have fibre available too.
12
18/12/2020 11:04:40 1 0
bbc
Won't help us. The rest of the village is being upgraded but not our road so have few options left.
13
18/12/2020 11:32:08 8 11
bbc
Absolute national disgrace that it has taken BT decades to build up our fibre infrastructure when we lag well behind some third world countries and most of the first world for broadband speed.

Yet another national company that has spent all its £ lining pockets rather than investing. New homes still built with copper. Role should be taken off BT as a failed company.
20
18/12/2020 11:48:26 6 2
bbc
That's our version of capitalism for you. Businesses believe they are there to make money. Nope, that's only the Royal Mint. Other businesses are there to make something &/or offer a service, for which they are paid money. Fundamental problem with a form of capitalism that really hasn't moved beyond 'Greed is Good'. There are alternative forms, which overlay more constructive considerations.
28
18/12/2020 11:56:34 6 1
bbc
Nothing to stop other companies to provide it in areas. In fact some like Virgin already do, although they cherry pick very selectively where.
49
Si
18/12/2020 12:33:37 5 0
bbc
I'm not sure it's possible but every point you make is totally incorrect.
75
18/12/2020 17:45:50 2 0
bbc
Don't blame BT/OR, blame OFCOM & Sharon white
9
18/12/2020 11:18:18 6 0
bbc
I've been on fibre for years, but only getting 18Mb, so no idea how far away the cabinet is that it is connected to. Last visit by an OR engineer said the best I would get would be 22Mb. This despite Offcom and local council showing this area as getting 30Mb.
14
18/12/2020 11:32:27 5 0
bbc
That "fibre" is a bit of a con. Thats FTTC - fibre to the cabinet. Your actual feed is still copper. I got around 6mbps when I was on the same as I live a fair way from the cabinet. Thankfully I now have FTTP (at a cost ....) and get around 142mbps, but only because we were a not-spot for a long time and the local superfast broadband campaign subsidised the engineering.
15
18/12/2020 11:21:19 3 13
bbc
yay! suck on that lefties haters of GB

democracy and capitalism at work
18
18/12/2020 11:46:20 6 4
bbc
Now remind me.... Which party was championing a massive programme of upgrading Broadband at the GE. Too massive, arguably. Oh yeah, the 'lefty' Party. So your post is bigoted, ill-informed & stupid. Surprise, surprise.
PS: Why did you deliberately diss 1.9m British citizens in your post? Think about it; it'll click eventually. But UNPATRIOTIC of you. Seems you hate the UK... well, part of it.
21
Ant
18/12/2020 11:49:53 4 3
bbc
Yea, and its a bag of sh*te. You only need to look at the demographic figures to see beyond a reasonable doubt that the current economic system is only delivering for a minority of the population and in Democracies minorities don't win elections unless you capture them with emotion (Brexit) instead of fact (economic reality).

A minority are doing very well, not everyone else.

F*ck business.
58
18/12/2020 14:32:53 0 0
bbc
Care in the community at work.
16
18/12/2020 11:26:15 21 1
bbc
No sign of fibre where I live and it's not Openreach's fault. The contract, was awarded by Herefordshire CC to Gigaclear 3 years ago and still no sign of it. If it arrives I understand Gigaclear doesn't support phone calls and as we do not get a mobile signal in doors we will still need to pay for a traditional line ££££. Those moaning about Openreach should be careful in what they wish for.
35
18/12/2020 12:04:19 3 4
bbc
You will be able to use VOIP telephony.
17
18/12/2020 11:44:18 6 5
bbc
Service availability is one thing; paying for it is another. I doubt that BT will be giving this away to consumers. And there'll be little to no competition. Monopoly, anyone?
31
18/12/2020 11:59:33 6 0
bbc
You make an excellent point. Privatisation was all well & good & it did deliver significant improvements in service (if you can remember that far back). I was working for BT then & oversaw massive changes. But the sector just wasn't geared to competition & it's been a semi-monopoly ever since, with incomers nibbling at the edges of the data piece.
48
Si
18/12/2020 12:31:13 3 0
bbc
Other service providers get fibre broadband at wholesale cost so they can sell BT's fibres cheaper. After they have contributed nothing to it's installation.
95
19/12/2020 08:57:23 0 0
bbc
How many other business give their stuff free to consumers? If it was easy, cheap and profitable there would be plenty of competition.
105
19/12/2020 10:59:40 1 0
bbc
There are only two (arguably only one) nationwide networks: Openreach and VM. All the service providers (who have no access network) use them, mostly OR. The new entrants like like Gigaclear only do cherry pick build outs. If it was easy, cheap and profitable, they'd all build their own, it isn't, they don't.
15
18/12/2020 11:21:19 3 13
bbc
yay! suck on that lefties haters of GB

democracy and capitalism at work
18
18/12/2020 11:46:20 6 4
bbc
Now remind me.... Which party was championing a massive programme of upgrading Broadband at the GE. Too massive, arguably. Oh yeah, the 'lefty' Party. So your post is bigoted, ill-informed & stupid. Surprise, surprise.
PS: Why did you deliberately diss 1.9m British citizens in your post? Think about it; it'll click eventually. But UNPATRIOTIC of you. Seems you hate the UK... well, part of it.
19
Ant
18/12/2020 11:47:05 5 0
bbc
Not even seen 1 job advertisement from BT in my area, in Engineering, Construction or anything else for that matter, and I live in an urban area.
60
18/12/2020 14:39:02 4 0
bbc
https://www.bt.com/careers

Does anyone really advertise jobs these days?
94
19/12/2020 08:53:48 0 0
bbc
Where have you been looking, in telephone kiosks?
13
18/12/2020 11:32:08 8 11
bbc
Absolute national disgrace that it has taken BT decades to build up our fibre infrastructure when we lag well behind some third world countries and most of the first world for broadband speed.

Yet another national company that has spent all its £ lining pockets rather than investing. New homes still built with copper. Role should be taken off BT as a failed company.
20
18/12/2020 11:48:26 6 2
bbc
That's our version of capitalism for you. Businesses believe they are there to make money. Nope, that's only the Royal Mint. Other businesses are there to make something &/or offer a service, for which they are paid money. Fundamental problem with a form of capitalism that really hasn't moved beyond 'Greed is Good'. There are alternative forms, which overlay more constructive considerations.
15
18/12/2020 11:21:19 3 13
bbc
yay! suck on that lefties haters of GB

democracy and capitalism at work
21
Ant
18/12/2020 11:49:53 4 3
bbc
Yea, and its a bag of sh*te. You only need to look at the demographic figures to see beyond a reasonable doubt that the current economic system is only delivering for a minority of the population and in Democracies minorities don't win elections unless you capture them with emotion (Brexit) instead of fact (economic reality).

A minority are doing very well, not everyone else.

F*ck business.
11
18/12/2020 10:59:46 2 5
bbc
How much money has the UK Government given BT over many years to get fibre around the country? Multi £ bn. And still nit sorted. Even new build houses still not plumbed in to fibre. So backwards and getting much further behind.

BT need to sort themselves out, like most companies they have mega debt, esp in the pension scheme, around £ 2bn, and get away paying bonuses. WHY?
22
18/12/2020 11:50:12 2 0
bbc
It seems very patchy by region. We used to live in SW England. Bloody awful. Now in North Wales, halfway up a mountain, & it's fab!! Over copper, exceptional performance. And we have fibre available too.
3
18/12/2020 10:44:48 4 3
bbc
Cant happen soon enough and The government has told telecoms firms it wants ultra-fast broadband networks to reach every corner of the UK by 2025. Ultra-fast means 1Gigabit to the door. This will entail full fibre rollout to the door and not just the cabinet. We are miles behind many other leading economy countries such as South Korea who have up to FIVE Gigabit with Three Gigabit the norm.
23
18/12/2020 11:52:19 3 0
bbc
You'll find that is restricted to those that live in densely populated tower blocks, which is the norm for a lot of Koreans. In the UK we are sparsely populated and out of the main conurbations many individual houses will require miles of fibre to conenct them up.
2
18/12/2020 10:30:05 2 6
bbc
I see OpenReach are panicking now that the likes of City Fibre, Hyperoptic and Virgin are rolling out ultra fast connections nationwide, too little too late!
24
18/12/2020 11:53:03 7 0
bbc
Aye, but they are not rolling it out in the sticks, just where they can make a decent profit.
25
18/12/2020 11:54:27 14 0
bbc
Perhaps those companies that make large amounts of money by using both broadband & mobile networks, in fact their businesses are 100% dependent on them, could contribute to the cost of them. Where would Amazon be without them, or the roads networks, as well as the services to dispose of all the packing for the goods they sell. All that plastic doesn't get into landfill by itself after all
34
18/12/2020 12:03:14 3 9
bbc
The people who use the likes of Amazon pay. They pay to have broadband and mobile phones, they pay Council Tax, fuel tax and other taxes to provide roads and to deal with packaging recycling etc.
62
18/12/2020 14:49:41 1 0
bbc
They are already doing so. Whose connectivity contracts do you think are underpinning the investments of players like City Fibre underpinning. The problem is funding fibre to SMEs and homes. That requires Scandinavian style contracts (allowing you to pay up front for connection including 5 - 10 years service) of the type banned by Ofcom because you cannot switch suppliers until your time is up.
1
18/12/2020 10:26:31 12 3
bbc
Shouldn't have thrown away all that money on already obsolete FTTC and gone straight for a full FTTP roll out, a missed opportunity and wasted investment.
26
18/12/2020 11:54:58 6 0
bbc
Installing FTTP requires access to the premises, may require a wayleave, and is a nightmare when they have absentee landlords who can't be bothered with the paperwork.
41
18/12/2020 12:22:11 2 0
bbc
Yes - a very good point!
That's the sort of work that never gets thought about, but can take up a lot of time and money.
50
18/12/2020 12:46:09 1 0
bbc
So does installing a Smart meter. however if they have an existing copper phone line then you already have a wayleave.
3
18/12/2020 10:44:48 4 3
bbc
Cant happen soon enough and The government has told telecoms firms it wants ultra-fast broadband networks to reach every corner of the UK by 2025. Ultra-fast means 1Gigabit to the door. This will entail full fibre rollout to the door and not just the cabinet. We are miles behind many other leading economy countries such as South Korea who have up to FIVE Gigabit with Three Gigabit the norm.
27
18/12/2020 11:55:08 2 0
bbc
In our version of capitalism, companies deem their purpose to be making money. They will milk existing assets for as long as poss & resist roll out of expensive infrastructure, if the payback takes longer. In this economic climate, private cos will always drag their heels. All very well being offended by it but it's the reality of our system. Don't like it - champion a different one.
13
18/12/2020 11:32:08 8 11
bbc
Absolute national disgrace that it has taken BT decades to build up our fibre infrastructure when we lag well behind some third world countries and most of the first world for broadband speed.

Yet another national company that has spent all its £ lining pockets rather than investing. New homes still built with copper. Role should be taken off BT as a failed company.
28
18/12/2020 11:56:34 6 1
bbc
Nothing to stop other companies to provide it in areas. In fact some like Virgin already do, although they cherry pick very selectively where.
29
18/12/2020 11:57:24 8 12
bbc
Creating jobs - good lord. This must be a Brexit trick. The world is about to end and nobody will ever have a job again if you listen to the Remainers. Run chicken licken - this is just fake news. Back to Brussels
33
18/12/2020 12:01:43 9 7
bbc
And, yes, someone managed to shoe horn in Brexit into a story about the UK's largest domestic comms provider.... so point is entirely moot, entirely irrelevant & entirely ill-informed. Yay, another Brexiteer proves critical thinking is not part of their MO ??
10
18/12/2020 11:18:47 13 1
bbc
I had no option but to go to Virgin Media to escape the curse of Openreach standards. VM is brilliant..........but when things go wrong you might as well ask your cat for help. VMs customer service is just as bad as the rest.
30
18/12/2020 11:59:11 7 0
bbc
I got a new build house once on a street where VM had already installed cable, but they just refused to extend it 30m to my property, even though I wanted both broadband and TV services.
40
18/12/2020 12:21:40 2 0
bbc
That must be a joke :) VM seems to be down every other day in London.
17
18/12/2020 11:44:18 6 5
bbc
Service availability is one thing; paying for it is another. I doubt that BT will be giving this away to consumers. And there'll be little to no competition. Monopoly, anyone?
31
18/12/2020 11:59:33 6 0
bbc
You make an excellent point. Privatisation was all well & good & it did deliver significant improvements in service (if you can remember that far back). I was working for BT then & oversaw massive changes. But the sector just wasn't geared to competition & it's been a semi-monopoly ever since, with incomers nibbling at the edges of the data piece.
32
18/12/2020 12:00:08 21 4
bbc
BBC, it's a pity that you couldn't find an up to date picture to use in the header article. Somebody working on an old copper cable termination has no real relevance to today's fibre optic installations.
39
18/12/2020 12:18:55 15 3
bbc
Couple that with a story yesterday about cancellation by BA of long haul flights, showing a short-haul aircraft and you have to wonder at the education level of some 'journalists' at the Beeb.
46
Si
18/12/2020 12:28:49 7 0
bbc
Copper will still be around in 50 years. Hell, there is still aluminium cables all over the place from the 70's when copper was expensive.
Believe it or not but not everyone wants super fast broadband and the price that goes with it. Just a bit of internet cheap and copper will do that.
65
18/12/2020 15:39:50 0 0
bbc
You live in Spain
68
18/12/2020 16:35:36 4 0
bbc
Well, obviously the main thing is that it is a woman in the picture. We all know how common it is to see female Openreach engineers. Not that I'm against them before anyone says so.
88
18/12/2020 20:47:41 1 1
bbc
fixed voice is copper 100% for vasty majority of the Country !
yes obsolete bit still needs to be maintained and that is where BT has crippled itself. Foolish Executive class- Vodafone , BG and Worldpay rejects of the UK Executive circus of circulating failure .. They are so bad they change growth to mean profit growth not revenue and so squeeze pay and conditions because if their own failure.
29
18/12/2020 11:57:24 8 12
bbc
Creating jobs - good lord. This must be a Brexit trick. The world is about to end and nobody will ever have a job again if you listen to the Remainers. Run chicken licken - this is just fake news. Back to Brussels
33
18/12/2020 12:01:43 9 7
bbc
And, yes, someone managed to shoe horn in Brexit into a story about the UK's largest domestic comms provider.... so point is entirely moot, entirely irrelevant & entirely ill-informed. Yay, another Brexiteer proves critical thinking is not part of their MO ??
74
18/12/2020 17:23:26 1 0
bbc
What does it matter who side you on these are new jobs & the Uk like so many other countries need all the jobs it can get.
25
18/12/2020 11:54:27 14 0
bbc
Perhaps those companies that make large amounts of money by using both broadband & mobile networks, in fact their businesses are 100% dependent on them, could contribute to the cost of them. Where would Amazon be without them, or the roads networks, as well as the services to dispose of all the packing for the goods they sell. All that plastic doesn't get into landfill by itself after all
34
18/12/2020 12:03:14 3 9
bbc
The people who use the likes of Amazon pay. They pay to have broadband and mobile phones, they pay Council Tax, fuel tax and other taxes to provide roads and to deal with packaging recycling etc.
16
18/12/2020 11:26:15 21 1
bbc
No sign of fibre where I live and it's not Openreach's fault. The contract, was awarded by Herefordshire CC to Gigaclear 3 years ago and still no sign of it. If it arrives I understand Gigaclear doesn't support phone calls and as we do not get a mobile signal in doors we will still need to pay for a traditional line ££££. Those moaning about Openreach should be careful in what they wish for.
35
18/12/2020 12:04:19 3 4
bbc
You will be able to use VOIP telephony.
25
18/12/2020 11:54:27 14 0
bbc
Perhaps those companies that make large amounts of money by using both broadband & mobile networks, in fact their businesses are 100% dependent on them, could contribute to the cost of them. Where would Amazon be without them, or the roads networks, as well as the services to dispose of all the packing for the goods they sell. All that plastic doesn't get into landfill by itself after all
8
gjb
18/12/2020 11:17:25 18 1
bbc
Surely if covid has taught us anything, it is the ability to adapt our working practices. A full fibre network would allow people to work remotely where necessary and also allow businesses to offer a good service to their customers. Maybe high speed broadband should take priority over the HS2 rail link.
37
18/12/2020 12:10:32 4 7
bbc
HS2 could have the ability to provide FO cabling along its entire length to help speed up the roll-out! Breakout to road based routes at every bridge if required, provides a great high capacity route.
96
19/12/2020 09:04:47 0 0
bbc
Core network deployment (which is what that would be) is the easiest cheapest and most complete already. However I agree joined up planning for civil works/infrastructure deployment makes a lot of sense.
7
18/12/2020 11:14:15 2 1
bbc
It suited BT for FTTC because they still wanted to sweat their remaining copper/aluminium network but isn't good for the rest of us, FTTC is subject to a lot of technical limitations such as cross talk and external RF interference which degrades advertised performance, FTTP suffers no such issue.
38
18/12/2020 12:10:52 2 0
bbc
Yes, but those problems are surely just generated from the cabinet to the home! If that copper is swapped to a fibre line, then it all goes away!
I'm on FTTC and I get about 55 meg - a much faster line would make very little difference to me! I can record 2 programmes, watch a 3rd and do a speed test all at the same time with no problems at all!
44
18/12/2020 12:30:49 0 0
bbc
We said that about 28.8k dial up years ago, Parkinson's Law.
32
18/12/2020 12:00:08 21 4
bbc
BBC, it's a pity that you couldn't find an up to date picture to use in the header article. Somebody working on an old copper cable termination has no real relevance to today's fibre optic installations.
39
18/12/2020 12:18:55 15 3
bbc
Couple that with a story yesterday about cancellation by BA of long haul flights, showing a short-haul aircraft and you have to wonder at the education level of some 'journalists' at the Beeb.
30
18/12/2020 11:59:11 7 0
bbc
I got a new build house once on a street where VM had already installed cable, but they just refused to extend it 30m to my property, even though I wanted both broadband and TV services.
40
18/12/2020 12:21:40 2 0
bbc
That must be a joke :) VM seems to be down every other day in London.
26
18/12/2020 11:54:58 6 0
bbc
Installing FTTP requires access to the premises, may require a wayleave, and is a nightmare when they have absentee landlords who can't be bothered with the paperwork.
41
18/12/2020 12:22:11 2 0
bbc
Yes - a very good point!
That's the sort of work that never gets thought about, but can take up a lot of time and money.
4
18/12/2020 10:51:51 8 0
bbc
As I understand it, the only difference between the 2 systems if the final run from the cabinet to the premises. Unfortunately, it involves a lot of work (and money) to lay fibre lines.
I notice CityFibre have said they are laying new FTTP Gigabit systems - but only in cities (60+ of them at the moment, they say) so smaller communities are being ignored again!
42
18/12/2020 12:29:24 2 0
bbc
Unless government grants are backing it, why would you pay to lay fibre for 10 customers when for the same cost you could get 800 customers?
43
18/12/2020 12:30:09 8 0
bbc
I've had fast broadband (BT 150 mbps) for a long while now but there are still people nearby who moan about Openreach and BT and slow broadband.

If they would just ask they could have fibre connected right to their house for no extra charge.
59
18/12/2020 14:37:31 1 0
bbc
BT's website can't access BT's own postcode lookup hosted on BT's hardware using BT's networking.

https://www.bt.com/broadband/full-fibre

Would have been simpler, and more obvious, to list the counties where it is / not available - as this won't change more often than monthly. Clearly they know best how to avoid transparency.
38
18/12/2020 12:10:52 2 0
bbc
Yes, but those problems are surely just generated from the cabinet to the home! If that copper is swapped to a fibre line, then it all goes away!
I'm on FTTC and I get about 55 meg - a much faster line would make very little difference to me! I can record 2 programmes, watch a 3rd and do a speed test all at the same time with no problems at all!
44
18/12/2020 12:30:49 0 0
bbc
We said that about 28.8k dial up years ago, Parkinson's Law.
56
18/12/2020 14:12:15 0 1
bbc
I still can't think of anything I'd NEED a lot more speed for!
I don't use anywhere near my full capacity at the moment.

The first system I worked on was for a bank, putting all their branches online. They were all dedicated lines, and ran at 1200 (or using the backup 'phone line, 600) - that was in the early 70s.
45
18/12/2020 12:26:37 19 7
bbc
More lies from Fred scuttle Johnson, BT makes senior engineers redundant then brings in newbies on cheaper terms, then Bangalore Telecom will have access to more UK call scams.
Where is the 40000 nurses and 20000 police more pieces lost on a board game.
PS ....no more Main Battle Tanks to be made in the UK due to Tory till fiddling.
LIONS led by Donkeys
73
18/12/2020 17:20:47 5 4
bbc
What the hell is this to do with Boris. BT is no longer in government hands. As for the rest of your comments I give up on these there just a dig at the government probably because it a Tory government
32
18/12/2020 12:00:08 21 4
bbc
BBC, it's a pity that you couldn't find an up to date picture to use in the header article. Somebody working on an old copper cable termination has no real relevance to today's fibre optic installations.
46
Si
18/12/2020 12:28:49 7 0
bbc
Copper will still be around in 50 years. Hell, there is still aluminium cables all over the place from the 70's when copper was expensive.
Believe it or not but not everyone wants super fast broadband and the price that goes with it. Just a bit of internet cheap and copper will do that.
53
18/12/2020 13:02:46 6 1
bbc
It's in an exchange, not in a distribution network. I'm sure the BBC could find a bit more modern example of a DDF! (Thats Digital Distribution Frame for those unfamiliar with the meaning)

Looks like a result of our University Education system and all those "Meja Studies" qualifications!
9
18/12/2020 11:18:18 6 0
bbc
I've been on fibre for years, but only getting 18Mb, so no idea how far away the cabinet is that it is connected to. Last visit by an OR engineer said the best I would get would be 22Mb. This despite Offcom and local council showing this area as getting 30Mb.
47
18/12/2020 12:40:00 2 0
bbc
The 30MB will be some average for the postcode, trouble with FTTC is if the cable/cables from the Cabinet to your dwelling are poor = less Mb
17
18/12/2020 11:44:18 6 5
bbc
Service availability is one thing; paying for it is another. I doubt that BT will be giving this away to consumers. And there'll be little to no competition. Monopoly, anyone?
48
Si
18/12/2020 12:31:13 3 0
bbc
Other service providers get fibre broadband at wholesale cost so they can sell BT's fibres cheaper. After they have contributed nothing to it's installation.
13
18/12/2020 11:32:08 8 11
bbc
Absolute national disgrace that it has taken BT decades to build up our fibre infrastructure when we lag well behind some third world countries and most of the first world for broadband speed.

Yet another national company that has spent all its £ lining pockets rather than investing. New homes still built with copper. Role should be taken off BT as a failed company.
49
Si
18/12/2020 12:33:37 5 0
bbc
I'm not sure it's possible but every point you make is totally incorrect.
26
18/12/2020 11:54:58 6 0
bbc
Installing FTTP requires access to the premises, may require a wayleave, and is a nightmare when they have absentee landlords who can't be bothered with the paperwork.
50
18/12/2020 12:46:09 1 0
bbc
So does installing a Smart meter. however if they have an existing copper phone line then you already have a wayleave.
100
19/12/2020 09:32:57 0 0
bbc
They wayleave would cover the existing cables (including maintenance) only, not be an open-ended approval to do as they please, when they please.
8
gjb
18/12/2020 11:17:25 18 1
bbc
Surely if covid has taught us anything, it is the ability to adapt our working practices. A full fibre network would allow people to work remotely where necessary and also allow businesses to offer a good service to their customers. Maybe high speed broadband should take priority over the HS2 rail link.
51
18/12/2020 12:48:08 0 0
bbc
Probably a too later for FTTP to be prioritised over HS2 now unfortunately
63
18/12/2020 14:54:00 0 0
bbc
Not too late to incorporate cable capacity within HS2 for the national network though!
52
18/12/2020 12:53:51 5 13
bbc
Another Labour idea nicked...
57
18/12/2020 14:13:12 12 6
bbc
?? The same Labour that wanted to re-nationalise BT? You'd be back to 3 months to get a POT installed. Shouldn't you be on an anti-Brexit/Government HYS article?
46
Si
18/12/2020 12:28:49 7 0
bbc
Copper will still be around in 50 years. Hell, there is still aluminium cables all over the place from the 70's when copper was expensive.
Believe it or not but not everyone wants super fast broadband and the price that goes with it. Just a bit of internet cheap and copper will do that.
53
18/12/2020 13:02:46 6 1
bbc
It's in an exchange, not in a distribution network. I'm sure the BBC could find a bit more modern example of a DDF! (Thats Digital Distribution Frame for those unfamiliar with the meaning)

Looks like a result of our University Education system and all those "Meja Studies" qualifications!
54
18/12/2020 13:20:56 1 0
bbc
i will be happy with just fibre to the toilet
80
18/12/2020 18:56:46 0 0
bbc
Roughage !!! Plenty roughage needed for that... Prunes recommended.
55
18/12/2020 14:08:48 12 0
bbc
BT would wipe the floor with the competition if OFCOM and Sharon White had not played up to those "providers" wanting to cherry pick locations. The result? BT put everything on hold (no investment) as the providers found it not so easy to install a national network. VM cable network covers around 44% of the UK. BT’s FTTC/P=70-75%. Now the UK is playing catch-up. But good that there are jobs.
44
18/12/2020 12:30:49 0 0
bbc
We said that about 28.8k dial up years ago, Parkinson's Law.
56
18/12/2020 14:12:15 0 1
bbc
I still can't think of anything I'd NEED a lot more speed for!
I don't use anywhere near my full capacity at the moment.

The first system I worked on was for a bank, putting all their branches online. They were all dedicated lines, and ran at 1200 (or using the backup 'phone line, 600) - that was in the early 70s.
101
19/12/2020 09:37:58 0 0
bbc
To be fair, in a larger household with many devices in simultaneous use, demand may be more than you imagine. However for many of them, I suspect performance is more often curtailed by them all (or most) being connected via WiFi. Not of course forgetting that there are other bottlenecks elsewhere.

Local WiFi issues may well be the cause of many "drop-outs" wrongly attributed to the line too.
52
18/12/2020 12:53:51 5 13
bbc
Another Labour idea nicked...
57
18/12/2020 14:13:12 12 6
bbc
?? The same Labour that wanted to re-nationalise BT? You'd be back to 3 months to get a POT installed. Shouldn't you be on an anti-Brexit/Government HYS article?
64
18/12/2020 15:38:59 1 1
bbc
The last TEN years have been such a pleasure cruise perhaps your well insulated. Away with you....
15
18/12/2020 11:21:19 3 13
bbc
yay! suck on that lefties haters of GB

democracy and capitalism at work
58
18/12/2020 14:32:53 0 0
bbc
Care in the community at work.
43
18/12/2020 12:30:09 8 0
bbc
I've had fast broadband (BT 150 mbps) for a long while now but there are still people nearby who moan about Openreach and BT and slow broadband.

If they would just ask they could have fibre connected right to their house for no extra charge.
59
18/12/2020 14:37:31 1 0
bbc
BT's website can't access BT's own postcode lookup hosted on BT's hardware using BT's networking.

https://www.bt.com/broadband/full-fibre

Would have been simpler, and more obvious, to list the counties where it is / not available - as this won't change more often than monthly. Clearly they know best how to avoid transparency.
19
Ant
18/12/2020 11:47:05 5 0
bbc
Not even seen 1 job advertisement from BT in my area, in Engineering, Construction or anything else for that matter, and I live in an urban area.
60
18/12/2020 14:39:02 4 0
bbc
https://www.bt.com/careers

Does anyone really advertise jobs these days?
108
Ant
19/12/2020 13:22:28 0 0
bbc
Is "https://www.bt.com/careers" not a place where BT places job advertisements?
61
18/12/2020 14:42:51 3 0
bbc
This refers only to those being trained for Openreach and its supply chain. It leaves out the very much large number being trained for backhaul/infrastructure suppliers and fixed/mobile network operators other than BT/EE - such as City Fibre, Community Fibre, Gamma, Gigaclear, Hyperoptic, O2, Sky, SSE, Virgin, Vodafone + over 100 others, including local authorities and property developers.
104
19/12/2020 10:54:24 0 0
bbc
True enough, Although I suspect it will be as much as all the other combined. Besides, LA & property developers seldom have this as a full time job, so will they count as pro-rata and for most of the smaller players it's probably just one or two subcontractors doing the actual work.
25
18/12/2020 11:54:27 14 0
bbc
Perhaps those companies that make large amounts of money by using both broadband & mobile networks, in fact their businesses are 100% dependent on them, could contribute to the cost of them. Where would Amazon be without them, or the roads networks, as well as the services to dispose of all the packing for the goods they sell. All that plastic doesn't get into landfill by itself after all
62
18/12/2020 14:49:41 1 0
bbc
They are already doing so. Whose connectivity contracts do you think are underpinning the investments of players like City Fibre underpinning. The problem is funding fibre to SMEs and homes. That requires Scandinavian style contracts (allowing you to pay up front for connection including 5 - 10 years service) of the type banned by Ofcom because you cannot switch suppliers until your time is up.
51
18/12/2020 12:48:08 0 0
bbc
Probably a too later for FTTP to be prioritised over HS2 now unfortunately
63
18/12/2020 14:54:00 0 0
bbc
Not too late to incorporate cable capacity within HS2 for the national network though!
69
18/12/2020 16:37:39 0 0
bbc
Why not use the existing rail network for that. I thought there was already fibre along the track actually? Network Rail Telecom, used to be part of Racal.
57
18/12/2020 14:13:12 12 6
bbc
?? The same Labour that wanted to re-nationalise BT? You'd be back to 3 months to get a POT installed. Shouldn't you be on an anti-Brexit/Government HYS article?
64
18/12/2020 15:38:59 1 1
bbc
The last TEN years have been such a pleasure cruise perhaps your well insulated. Away with you....
71
18/12/2020 16:42:42 1 0
bbc
you're
72
18/12/2020 17:15:41 1 0
bbc
The last 63 years hasn't been a pleasure cruise either who ever was in government Labour or Tory. They are the same.
32
18/12/2020 12:00:08 21 4
bbc
BBC, it's a pity that you couldn't find an up to date picture to use in the header article. Somebody working on an old copper cable termination has no real relevance to today's fibre optic installations.
65
18/12/2020 15:39:50 0 0
bbc
You live in Spain
66
18/12/2020 15:51:04 2 3
bbc
These roll outs of communication technology should have to start with the most remote customers, partly because they have the most to gain from them but also to give the likes of Openreach an incentive. They would have upgraded the 600 000 properties with a <10Mbps connection in just a few months if that then gave them access to upgrading the main population centres.
79
18/12/2020 18:41:05 4 1
bbc
No. That won't work. Need to do the easy and lucrative ones first to provide the finance for the difficult and costly ones.
67
18/12/2020 16:24:41 0 0
bbc
FYI.

You don't get much change out of 10k for every 100m of fibre laid (this is not purely material cost, but also includes planning, PM time and wayleave costs).

OR INV is welcome and brings in newly qualified personnel to our industry. We're a CNI sector for national resilience, yet how many schools and colleges are teaching students networking, splicing and project management skills?
78
18/12/2020 18:38:59 1 0
bbc
Nowhere near enough!
I guess it must be too expensive to teach Engineering skills in general?
32
18/12/2020 12:00:08 21 4
bbc
BBC, it's a pity that you couldn't find an up to date picture to use in the header article. Somebody working on an old copper cable termination has no real relevance to today's fibre optic installations.
68
18/12/2020 16:35:36 4 0
bbc
Well, obviously the main thing is that it is a woman in the picture. We all know how common it is to see female Openreach engineers. Not that I'm against them before anyone says so.
93
19/12/2020 08:49:22 0 0
bbc
Yep, far more important than technical accuracy; who apart from a few geeks will have any idea about what telecommunications equipment is being show. A picture is worth a 1000 words and this picture is explaining that women can be engineers - who knew!
63
18/12/2020 14:54:00 0 0
bbc
Not too late to incorporate cable capacity within HS2 for the national network though!
69
18/12/2020 16:37:39 0 0
bbc
Why not use the existing rail network for that. I thought there was already fibre along the track actually? Network Rail Telecom, used to be part of Racal.
70
18/12/2020 16:40:08 0 2
bbc
Gigaclear are digging up the pavements here for FTTH (small town in Buckinghamshire). This is a race and BT Openreach are not doing well. They will be left with the unprofitable remote locations only.
64
18/12/2020 15:38:59 1 1
bbc
The last TEN years have been such a pleasure cruise perhaps your well insulated. Away with you....
71
18/12/2020 16:42:42 1 0
bbc
you're
77
18/12/2020 18:32:23 0 0
bbc
Political do you mean Tiny Tim...?
64
18/12/2020 15:38:59 1 1
bbc
The last TEN years have been such a pleasure cruise perhaps your well insulated. Away with you....
72
18/12/2020 17:15:41 1 0
bbc
The last 63 years hasn't been a pleasure cruise either who ever was in government Labour or Tory. They are the same.
76
18/12/2020 18:31:33 1 0
bbc
Cant argue with that statement..
45
18/12/2020 12:26:37 19 7
bbc
More lies from Fred scuttle Johnson, BT makes senior engineers redundant then brings in newbies on cheaper terms, then Bangalore Telecom will have access to more UK call scams.
Where is the 40000 nurses and 20000 police more pieces lost on a board game.
PS ....no more Main Battle Tanks to be made in the UK due to Tory till fiddling.
LIONS led by Donkeys
73
18/12/2020 17:20:47 5 4
bbc
What the hell is this to do with Boris. BT is no longer in government hands. As for the rest of your comments I give up on these there just a dig at the government probably because it a Tory government
87
18/12/2020 20:43:31 0 3
bbc
govt keeps giving private company (BT) and shareholders tax payer bail outs ... And they still did not deliver rural speed !! That is why Govt is getting involved .... Nationalise ..
33
18/12/2020 12:01:43 9 7
bbc
And, yes, someone managed to shoe horn in Brexit into a story about the UK's largest domestic comms provider.... so point is entirely moot, entirely irrelevant & entirely ill-informed. Yay, another Brexiteer proves critical thinking is not part of their MO ??
74
18/12/2020 17:23:26 1 0
bbc
What does it matter who side you on these are new jobs & the Uk like so many other countries need all the jobs it can get.
13
18/12/2020 11:32:08 8 11
bbc
Absolute national disgrace that it has taken BT decades to build up our fibre infrastructure when we lag well behind some third world countries and most of the first world for broadband speed.

Yet another national company that has spent all its £ lining pockets rather than investing. New homes still built with copper. Role should be taken off BT as a failed company.
75
18/12/2020 17:45:50 2 0
bbc
Don't blame BT/OR, blame OFCOM & Sharon white
72
18/12/2020 17:15:41 1 0
bbc
The last 63 years hasn't been a pleasure cruise either who ever was in government Labour or Tory. They are the same.
76
18/12/2020 18:31:33 1 0
bbc
Cant argue with that statement..
71
18/12/2020 16:42:42 1 0
bbc
you're
77
18/12/2020 18:32:23 0 0
bbc
Political do you mean Tiny Tim...?
67
18/12/2020 16:24:41 0 0
bbc
FYI.

You don't get much change out of 10k for every 100m of fibre laid (this is not purely material cost, but also includes planning, PM time and wayleave costs).

OR INV is welcome and brings in newly qualified personnel to our industry. We're a CNI sector for national resilience, yet how many schools and colleges are teaching students networking, splicing and project management skills?
78
18/12/2020 18:38:59 1 0
bbc
Nowhere near enough!
I guess it must be too expensive to teach Engineering skills in general?
66
18/12/2020 15:51:04 2 3
bbc
These roll outs of communication technology should have to start with the most remote customers, partly because they have the most to gain from them but also to give the likes of Openreach an incentive. They would have upgraded the 600 000 properties with a <10Mbps connection in just a few months if that then gave them access to upgrading the main population centres.
79
18/12/2020 18:41:05 4 1
bbc
No. That won't work. Need to do the easy and lucrative ones first to provide the finance for the difficult and costly ones.
86
18/12/2020 20:40:24 0 1
bbc
AS IF ... who are you some 'yes sir' sweat the asset BT Graduate? BT have fleeced the tax payer over and over for rural failure ... BDUK etc ... SPINE ... Bailouts to a private company by another name .... Nationalise Openreach due to unfit ownership and leaving the UK exposed and behind in the tech race.
54
18/12/2020 13:20:56 1 0
bbc
i will be happy with just fibre to the toilet
80
18/12/2020 18:56:46 0 0
bbc
Roughage !!! Plenty roughage needed for that... Prunes recommended.
70
18/12/2020 16:40:08 0 2
bbc
Gigaclear are digging up the pavements here for FTTH (small town in Buckinghamshire). This is a race and BT Openreach are not doing well. They will be left with the unprofitable remote locations only.
82
18/12/2020 20:13:07 2 2
bbc
The clear message to Clive Selley , Alison Wilcox , Gareth Tipton , Simon Lowth and Jansen is make sure Openreach has stopped Operating Illegally with its own time Engineer Contracts with enforced home parking where up to 12.5 hrs a week Contractual unpaid Work was expected by managers who failed to record the Working Time as Clarified in Court in 2015. BT has fallen from best to worst Employer.
83
18/12/2020 20:17:49 1 2
bbc
From 2012-2019 BT/OR Managers were altering Timesheets and Engineers were ubable to record unpaid Contractual Working Time on the NJR systems. The BT Executive and Compliance and HR knew this and yet continued to Operate Illegally (according to the Openreach Legal Team).
If they dont change the Executive Culture, then the Public should do to BT what they did to British Gas (Centrica) - Hang Up!
84
18/12/2020 20:23:46 1 2
bbc
It is time for a HSE follow up at BT to make sure they and the CWU have sorted out Compliance with the UK Working Time Regulation.
Useless CWU created an Our Hours Campaign 2 years ago. instead of going to Court-maybe because they too were implicated in the Openreach Contracts in 2012.
OR engineers also get 90% of pay pensionable as they brought in the OTE Bonus trick on basic paid roles. SELL
85
18/12/2020 20:28:05 0 1
bbc
Will BT replace / upgrade the existing copper to the customers premise with fibre at no extra cost or will we have a first or second class service depending what you pay?
92
19/12/2020 08:37:02 0 0
bbc
However the do the rollout, don't expect to get fibre speed for copper prices. Although I suspect you won't be forced pay fibre prices if you're happy with copper speeds.
79
18/12/2020 18:41:05 4 1
bbc
No. That won't work. Need to do the easy and lucrative ones first to provide the finance for the difficult and costly ones.
86
18/12/2020 20:40:24 0 1
bbc
AS IF ... who are you some 'yes sir' sweat the asset BT Graduate? BT have fleeced the tax payer over and over for rural failure ... BDUK etc ... SPINE ... Bailouts to a private company by another name .... Nationalise Openreach due to unfit ownership and leaving the UK exposed and behind in the tech race.
73
18/12/2020 17:20:47 5 4
bbc
What the hell is this to do with Boris. BT is no longer in government hands. As for the rest of your comments I give up on these there just a dig at the government probably because it a Tory government
87
18/12/2020 20:43:31 0 3
bbc
govt keeps giving private company (BT) and shareholders tax payer bail outs ... And they still did not deliver rural speed !! That is why Govt is getting involved .... Nationalise ..
32
18/12/2020 12:00:08 21 4
bbc
BBC, it's a pity that you couldn't find an up to date picture to use in the header article. Somebody working on an old copper cable termination has no real relevance to today's fibre optic installations.
88
18/12/2020 20:47:41 1 1
bbc
fixed voice is copper 100% for vasty majority of the Country !
yes obsolete bit still needs to be maintained and that is where BT has crippled itself. Foolish Executive class- Vodafone , BG and Worldpay rejects of the UK Executive circus of circulating failure .. They are so bad they change growth to mean profit growth not revenue and so squeeze pay and conditions because if their own failure.
102
19/12/2020 10:08:08 0 0
bbc
"fixed voice is copper 100% for vasty majority of the Country !
yes obsolete bit still needs to be maintained and that is where BT has crippled itself. "

Your second statement contradicts the first.

How has BT crippled itself? BT has wanted to move to an all fibre network for years (engineers, managers), it's been delayed by the cost at every turn (HMG, accountants, bankers, other ankers.).
89
18/12/2020 20:52:37 1 2
bbc
Just to add balance the UK Govt. were also involved in attempting to evade Working Time Regulations in 2015 but unlike BT at least they accepted the Court Clarification BT just continued with its extended 50 hr overtime displaced by unpaid Contractual time week (losing income tax for Govt and racing the UK to the bottom). By the time they get to 45 the engineers will be done in with 60 hr weeks.
90
18/12/2020 21:55:20 1 1
bbc
59b worth of new GDP, well well well, remainers wont like that.
91
19/12/2020 07:51:31 2 0
bbc
BT is forced to supply service, even when difficult and expensive, it's competitors are not. BT sets yearly budgets, and has to abide by them, and has borrowing restrictions. you cannot cure decades of under investment over night.
when a state run company, the increase of prices, was used to limit demand, rather than increase the number of services, a distortion of customer service
85
18/12/2020 20:28:05 0 1
bbc
Will BT replace / upgrade the existing copper to the customers premise with fibre at no extra cost or will we have a first or second class service depending what you pay?
92
19/12/2020 08:37:02 0 0
bbc
However the do the rollout, don't expect to get fibre speed for copper prices. Although I suspect you won't be forced pay fibre prices if you're happy with copper speeds.
68
18/12/2020 16:35:36 4 0
bbc
Well, obviously the main thing is that it is a woman in the picture. We all know how common it is to see female Openreach engineers. Not that I'm against them before anyone says so.
93
19/12/2020 08:49:22 0 0
bbc
Yep, far more important than technical accuracy; who apart from a few geeks will have any idea about what telecommunications equipment is being show. A picture is worth a 1000 words and this picture is explaining that women can be engineers - who knew!
19
Ant
18/12/2020 11:47:05 5 0
bbc
Not even seen 1 job advertisement from BT in my area, in Engineering, Construction or anything else for that matter, and I live in an urban area.
94
19/12/2020 08:53:48 0 0
bbc
Where have you been looking, in telephone kiosks?
107
Ant
19/12/2020 13:21:10 0 0
bbc
I think there would be more questions than answers if you found me in a telephone kiosk at all.
17
18/12/2020 11:44:18 6 5
bbc
Service availability is one thing; paying for it is another. I doubt that BT will be giving this away to consumers. And there'll be little to no competition. Monopoly, anyone?
95
19/12/2020 08:57:23 0 0
bbc
How many other business give their stuff free to consumers? If it was easy, cheap and profitable there would be plenty of competition.
37
18/12/2020 12:10:32 4 7
bbc
HS2 could have the ability to provide FO cabling along its entire length to help speed up the roll-out! Breakout to road based routes at every bridge if required, provides a great high capacity route.
96
19/12/2020 09:04:47 0 0
bbc
Core network deployment (which is what that would be) is the easiest cheapest and most complete already. However I agree joined up planning for civil works/infrastructure deployment makes a lot of sense.
2
18/12/2020 10:30:05 2 6
bbc
I see OpenReach are panicking now that the likes of City Fibre, Hyperoptic and Virgin are rolling out ultra fast connections nationwide, too little too late!
97
19/12/2020 09:12:04 1 0
bbc
It may co me as a shock to you, but BT (along with AT&T) were doing ground-breaking research into the use of fibre way back in the 70s, it was being field trialled in the early 80s and BT wanted approval for large scale deployment from the early 90s. Guess what, their major shareholder wouldn't agree, step forward HMG and take a bow.
1
18/12/2020 10:26:31 12 3
bbc
Shouldn't have thrown away all that money on already obsolete FTTC and gone straight for a full FTTP roll out, a missed opportunity and wasted investment.
98
19/12/2020 09:16:10 0 0
bbc
You clearly understand nothing about the deployment of the access network (between your home & the exchange). FTTC is more a stepping stone and meant that higher (albeit not the highest) speeds could be made available to more customers sooner.
7
18/12/2020 11:14:15 2 1
bbc
It suited BT for FTTC because they still wanted to sweat their remaining copper/aluminium network but isn't good for the rest of us, FTTC is subject to a lot of technical limitations such as cross talk and external RF interference which degrades advertised performance, FTTP suffers no such issue.
99
19/12/2020 09:28:37 1 0
bbc
True. But less crosstalk than with an entirely copper line. FTTP suffers the issue of a vastly greater cost to deploy. It was a sensible compromise to get somewhat higher speeds to larger numbers of customers sooner. You think it better to leave more people on just copper for longer while a lucky few gain FTTP speeds?
50
18/12/2020 12:46:09 1 0
bbc
So does installing a Smart meter. however if they have an existing copper phone line then you already have a wayleave.
100
19/12/2020 09:32:57 0 0
bbc
They wayleave would cover the existing cables (including maintenance) only, not be an open-ended approval to do as they please, when they please.