Long Covid: Hospital patients to get checks at six weeks
18/12/2020 | news | health | 200
Official guidance has identified 28 common symptoms like dizziness, breathlessness and chest pain.
1
18/12/2020 10:45:11 37 7
bbc
No need for comments on this it seems eminently sensible to follow up on patients with possible long term issues.
4
18/12/2020 11:28:02 42 31
bbc
It would be eminently sensible to allow people to see a GP or dentist as normal and for everyone to have their NHS tests and treatments (especially cancer patients) restored.

But panic and hysteria rules for a disease with a 99.75% survival rate and no one seems to care about the collateral damage in our 'Covid Only' NHS
2
18/12/2020 10:55:53 8 0
bbc
Surely there should be some mention that a British company (Synairgen) has today announced clinical trials to prove they have a drug that can mitigate the risks of long covid? It has been recognised as a National Priority by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and has also been awarded Fast Track status by the FDA in the US?

15
18/12/2020 13:09:39 11 1
bbc
Hadn't heard of this, if true that is excellent news
36
18/12/2020 16:22:42 1 1
bbc
Can M.E sufferers also get one? No. Of course we can't. Because we don't matter to the NHS.
3
18/12/2020 11:23:31 21 11
bbc
Fantastic. Now if they can only see their way to ceasing the 'Covid-19 only NHS' and reinstate everyone's routine tests and treatments then open up GP surgeries and dental practices so that we can actually see a dentist or doctor wouldn't that be great?

Oh and by the way a long recovery from a respiratory disease is nothing new

https://www.blf.org.uk/support-for-you/pneumonia/recovery
1
18/12/2020 10:45:11 37 7
bbc
No need for comments on this it seems eminently sensible to follow up on patients with possible long term issues.
4
18/12/2020 11:28:02 42 31
bbc
It would be eminently sensible to allow people to see a GP or dentist as normal and for everyone to have their NHS tests and treatments (especially cancer patients) restored.

But panic and hysteria rules for a disease with a 99.75% survival rate and no one seems to care about the collateral damage in our 'Covid Only' NHS
6
QED
18/12/2020 12:39:59 18 18
bbc
Sure, let’s let lots more people die of COVID so you can go back to normal. My experience here is that if you need to see a doctor you can, just wear your mask. And cancer patients treatments still ongoing. The problem is that those who may need to see the doctor are weighing the possible risk of something being wrong against the risk of infection and may not go. This is not panic or hysteria.
9
18/12/2020 12:49:55 6 5
bbc
I don't disagree
14
18/12/2020 13:08:46 10 7
bbc
You can, it's just whatever concerns they have been rejecting for you must not be severe or of enough danger to your long term health to be worth seeing during a crisis.

Just remember its elective surgeries that were cancelled, not essential ones
107
18/12/2020 17:59:29 1 5
bbc
Look at the proper figures it is more like a 96.5% survival rate - for the first 28 days - after that if you die it was not Covid - but the deaths keep on happening - long Covid plays a long game 28 week , 28 months , 28 years it is still a covid death - there is a real risk that the eventual survival rate could be as low as 20%
178
18/12/2020 20:32:05 0 0
bbc
I’ve been to the dentist twice in lockdown. Maybe you were banned because you were abusive to the staff?
5
18/12/2020 11:28:19 1 5
bbc
Story focuses upon finding to NHS England and only mentions difference in Scotland.
Separate stories please BBC.
4
18/12/2020 11:28:02 42 31
bbc
It would be eminently sensible to allow people to see a GP or dentist as normal and for everyone to have their NHS tests and treatments (especially cancer patients) restored.

But panic and hysteria rules for a disease with a 99.75% survival rate and no one seems to care about the collateral damage in our 'Covid Only' NHS
6
QED
18/12/2020 12:39:59 18 18
bbc
Sure, let’s let lots more people die of COVID so you can go back to normal. My experience here is that if you need to see a doctor you can, just wear your mask. And cancer patients treatments still ongoing. The problem is that those who may need to see the doctor are weighing the possible risk of something being wrong against the risk of infection and may not go. This is not panic or hysteria.
7
18/12/2020 12:45:23 14 9
bbc
It's out of control.

Proof, if you ever needed it that...

Religion is nonsense ("where are the 'sky fairies' when you need them?")
Politicians are useless, overrated windbags ("do as I say, not what I do")
Many people are selfish ("it won't affect me, so why bother")

And Science is ignored by the ignorant ("the many")!
142
18/12/2020 19:22:59 1 0
bbc
Science once told us the world was flat.
8
18/12/2020 12:48:09 74 7
bbc
Why only patients in hospitals? Tens of thousands of people presenting with long-Covid will have never been anywhere near a hospital because their accute infection was mild or moderate rather than severe. Indeed, some will have not even had a positive test. No one should be denied routine monitoring. Post-viral illnesses wreck lives, often for years or even decades.
20
Ken
18/12/2020 13:28:06 35 2
bbc
Most of the people I know with long Covid were never near hospital. The issue is that in the early days of the pandemic you could only get a Covid test if admitted to hospital.
50
18/12/2020 16:46:51 9 0
bbc
And yet THE post-viral illness (ME/CFS), which effects at least 260,000 people in the UK, gets almost zero funding by the NHS or Goverment.

But "long CV-19" gets 69 new specialised clinics straight away.
145
18/12/2020 19:33:09 0 0
bbc
Tell that to the deniers!
171
18/12/2020 20:22:30 0 0
bbc
That's true and the people I know who had it bad had aftercare anyway as they had been in a coma so had other issues relating to being bedridden for weeks so are already being seen.
200
PCS
19/12/2020 23:59:06 0 0
bbc
Tested + and albeit not life threatening still have loss of taste, smell, running nose and diarrhoea.
4
18/12/2020 11:28:02 42 31
bbc
It would be eminently sensible to allow people to see a GP or dentist as normal and for everyone to have their NHS tests and treatments (especially cancer patients) restored.

But panic and hysteria rules for a disease with a 99.75% survival rate and no one seems to care about the collateral damage in our 'Covid Only' NHS
9
18/12/2020 12:49:55 6 5
bbc
I don't disagree
10
18/12/2020 12:40:43 38 1
bbc
Brain fog is not a mental health problem.

It's a neurological symptom, & listed as such in the Long Covid NICE Guidelines. Depression & anxiety are listed as psychological / psychiatric symptoms. Neurological symptoms need to be recognised and treated as such. They don't respond to treatment for psychiatric issues.

It's lazy, misleading and potentially very dangerous to lump the two together.
108
18/12/2020 18:02:06 11 16
bbc
But whatever, a lot of malingerers formally using the ME angle will now be migrating to the Long-covid bandwagon.
Genuine sufferers must be angry about the opportunists.
11
18/12/2020 13:02:23 15 15
bbc
what the hell?
They identified 28 of the most common symptoms, from breathlessness and dizziness to chest pain.

Mental health problems including depression, anxiety and struggling to think clearly, have also been reported.

Thats not long covid. That's the effects of lockdown. At some point, we have to stop blaming everything on Covid.
12
18/12/2020 13:06:36 13 8
bbc
So what's your medical background to know this? Or are you just having a rant?
130
18/12/2020 18:59:53 0 0
bbc
Sorry, but you are wrong. It's not caused by lockdown. Many other long term post viral conditions (ME, CFS etc) triggered by other viruses, including flu and glandular fever, have the same list of symptoms. It would be good if research on long covid helped understanding of other similar conditions, because there are many sufferers and we are often very badly served by the medical profession.
168
18/12/2020 20:13:43 0 0
bbc
Yes stress anxiety isolation depression loneliness can manifest in physical symptoms such as what people are having with long covid
11
18/12/2020 13:02:23 15 15
bbc
what the hell?
They identified 28 of the most common symptoms, from breathlessness and dizziness to chest pain.

Mental health problems including depression, anxiety and struggling to think clearly, have also been reported.

Thats not long covid. That's the effects of lockdown. At some point, we have to stop blaming everything on Covid.
12
18/12/2020 13:06:36 13 8
bbc
So what's your medical background to know this? Or are you just having a rant?
16
18/12/2020 13:15:08 4 1
bbc
Far from it. But depression, anxiety and struggling to think clearly are absolutely not Covid only symptoms. Am going through CBT having being bullied, and if someone tells me now these symptoms are long covid, I will tell them, politely, that they are not. So it is not a rant. It is just an exasperation that these symptoms are now being batched with being the cause, when there are other causes.
13
18/12/2020 13:06:50 48 6
bbc
Sorry to put dampers on this. All the doctors and nurses are exhausted,worn out and suffering from PTSD. Most have had no holiday or leave. Many have been or are ill themselves. Some have died,some have retired. So where the hell do we get a work force to do this large amount of new work? The magic workforce box? If you beat the staff harder and harder, more and more will leave. That does not help
56
18/12/2020 16:54:43 16 35
bbc
What a load of rubbish.
87
18/12/2020 17:23:39 6 2
bbc
Where’s the evidence for all this? Figures show hospitals less busy than last year
133
18/12/2020 19:05:38 0 0
bbc
What do you suggest then?
134
18/12/2020 19:07:52 1 0
bbc
What??
ALL of the nurses and doctors?! Are you 100% sure.
And yes it’s hard for nurses and doctors, truly it is. But it is also have for 1000s of others of people who have been ill, lost livelihoods, lost homes, relationships etc.
All of this them (doctors, nurses, teachers) v us (self employed, private sector) is tiring.
182
18/12/2020 20:43:01 2 0
bbc
Yeh.. medicine is tough at the best of times but working these extended hours and being constantly aware of the danger and watching your colleagues get sick takes it out of you. We are fortunate and, out of 20 of us, have only lost one nurse from Covid... I redid my will right back in March when we saw this coming and have not dared visit my parents, aunts and uncles since this thing started.
4
18/12/2020 11:28:02 42 31
bbc
It would be eminently sensible to allow people to see a GP or dentist as normal and for everyone to have their NHS tests and treatments (especially cancer patients) restored.

But panic and hysteria rules for a disease with a 99.75% survival rate and no one seems to care about the collateral damage in our 'Covid Only' NHS
14
18/12/2020 13:08:46 10 7
bbc
You can, it's just whatever concerns they have been rejecting for you must not be severe or of enough danger to your long term health to be worth seeing during a crisis.

Just remember its elective surgeries that were cancelled, not essential ones
54
18/12/2020 16:50:12 15 1
bbc
arcangel - "its elective surgeries that were cancelled, not essential ones"

Not remotely true

The cancelled all surgery that wasn't basically going to directly kill you

My father spent 6 months in agony, unable to walk, doped up to the eyeballs on opiod pain killers because the NHS was shut

He's surgery was utterly "essenstial", but it still didn't happen because of the NHSs reaction to CV-19!
2
18/12/2020 10:55:53 8 0
bbc
Surely there should be some mention that a British company (Synairgen) has today announced clinical trials to prove they have a drug that can mitigate the risks of long covid? It has been recognised as a National Priority by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and has also been awarded Fast Track status by the FDA in the US?

15
18/12/2020 13:09:39 11 1
bbc
Hadn't heard of this, if true that is excellent news
26
18/12/2020 14:13:43 2 0
bbc
Yes, it was announced today. Phase 3 trials are to start "imminently" & due to being fast tracked, the time to results will be shortened-though assessments needed at 60 and 90 days to prove efficacy.
Lancet journal peer reviewed study for the P2 trial showed 79% reduction in patients progressing to ICU on the drug.3 people died with the placebo on the trial but 0 (zero) died who had taken SNG001.
12
18/12/2020 13:06:36 13 8
bbc
So what's your medical background to know this? Or are you just having a rant?
16
18/12/2020 13:15:08 4 1
bbc
Far from it. But depression, anxiety and struggling to think clearly are absolutely not Covid only symptoms. Am going through CBT having being bullied, and if someone tells me now these symptoms are long covid, I will tell them, politely, that they are not. So it is not a rant. It is just an exasperation that these symptoms are now being batched with being the cause, when there are other causes.
24
18/12/2020 14:07:11 4 1
bbc
But have you even had covid? It says they've been reported by people with symptoms of long covid. They would have had other symptoms as well. It isn't saying that those with depression or anxiety are long covid sufferers. I can't see how you could have interpreted it that way but if you have an issue take it up with the writer of the article as the medical community have done nothing of the sort.
17
18/12/2020 13:18:39 3 1
bbc
Is this to actually help patients with the effects or for research data?
18
Ken
18/12/2020 13:25:10 19 1
bbc
This will require new money if the services are to be delivered without detriment to existing services, which have suffered greatly because of C-19 this year.
There are not enough skilled staff in the NHS to deliver all that is needed.
19
18/12/2020 13:27:44 42 9
bbc
For 6 months after having Covid I had issues with fatigue and shortness of breath, only just started to feel 'normal' again.

This is why this disease is such an issue, it isn't a case of it only kills 1% so why bother. I'm 32 with no prior issues and it still hit me hard. Its not a binary outcome of completely fine or death. Many will suffer for far longer and much worse than I did.
40
18/12/2020 16:26:38 22 6
bbc
Same here, mid 40s elite cyclist, been feeling bad for 9 weeks since we got covid in early october
102
18/12/2020 17:41:46 9 1
bbc
You have summed up exactly the main problem with this disease. It hasn’t got an exceptionally high death rate but it can make you very ill for a long time. Given that it is highly contagious there is a real danger of the NHS getting overwhelmed with the extremely sick.
8
18/12/2020 12:48:09 74 7
bbc
Why only patients in hospitals? Tens of thousands of people presenting with long-Covid will have never been anywhere near a hospital because their accute infection was mild or moderate rather than severe. Indeed, some will have not even had a positive test. No one should be denied routine monitoring. Post-viral illnesses wreck lives, often for years or even decades.
20
Ken
18/12/2020 13:28:06 35 2
bbc
Most of the people I know with long Covid were never near hospital. The issue is that in the early days of the pandemic you could only get a Covid test if admitted to hospital.
103
18/12/2020 17:42:26 2 1
bbc
Same thing happened to me Ken, i now cant sleep correctly, still get night sweats sometimes and a range of symptoms.
158
18/12/2020 19:51:52 0 0
bbc
Who do you know who has had it?
21
18/12/2020 13:28:22 3 3
bbc
Eminently sensible.
22
18/12/2020 13:29:00 2 1
bbc
I suspect it is un-costed in terms of impact on primary care, use of doctor and nurse appointments, blood tests etc. Like NICE stating that any one with a 10% Qrisk score should be on statins - (basically any man over age 50) based on savings to secondary care admissions with no costing for massive impact on Primary Care, prescription charges, blood tests, follow up GP and nurse appointments.
23
JDB
bbc
Removed
16
18/12/2020 13:15:08 4 1
bbc
Far from it. But depression, anxiety and struggling to think clearly are absolutely not Covid only symptoms. Am going through CBT having being bullied, and if someone tells me now these symptoms are long covid, I will tell them, politely, that they are not. So it is not a rant. It is just an exasperation that these symptoms are now being batched with being the cause, when there are other causes.
24
18/12/2020 14:07:11 4 1
bbc
But have you even had covid? It says they've been reported by people with symptoms of long covid. They would have had other symptoms as well. It isn't saying that those with depression or anxiety are long covid sufferers. I can't see how you could have interpreted it that way but if you have an issue take it up with the writer of the article as the medical community have done nothing of the sort.
25
18/12/2020 14:11:17 2 2
bbc
Very probably, as a colleague has family in the Wuhan area and a family member returned to China, quite ill, with flu like symptoms.

So, tested for, no. In all likelyhood, yes. That does not mean though that stress like symptom which pre-existed in any case are Covid.

We are in danger of conflating issues, helping no-one,
24
18/12/2020 14:07:11 4 1
bbc
But have you even had covid? It says they've been reported by people with symptoms of long covid. They would have had other symptoms as well. It isn't saying that those with depression or anxiety are long covid sufferers. I can't see how you could have interpreted it that way but if you have an issue take it up with the writer of the article as the medical community have done nothing of the sort.
25
18/12/2020 14:11:17 2 2
bbc
Very probably, as a colleague has family in the Wuhan area and a family member returned to China, quite ill, with flu like symptoms.

So, tested for, no. In all likelyhood, yes. That does not mean though that stress like symptom which pre-existed in any case are Covid.

We are in danger of conflating issues, helping no-one,
15
18/12/2020 13:09:39 11 1
bbc
Hadn't heard of this, if true that is excellent news
26
18/12/2020 14:13:43 2 0
bbc
Yes, it was announced today. Phase 3 trials are to start "imminently" & due to being fast tracked, the time to results will be shortened-though assessments needed at 60 and 90 days to prove efficacy.
Lancet journal peer reviewed study for the P2 trial showed 79% reduction in patients progressing to ICU on the drug.3 people died with the placebo on the trial but 0 (zero) died who had taken SNG001.
27
18/12/2020 14:41:02 28 3
bbc
This is a problem in the UK because off "stiff upper lip", "can't grumble", lack of proper sick pay.

Too often we fail to realise when we are really, truly, ill. I've lost count of people phoning in with "flu" (in reality, a cold), but they come in the following day. Real flu leaves you grounded for weeks.

This must be a society change. People get ill, accept, but people must not abuse it.
99
18/12/2020 17:36:22 15 2
bbc
Two types of people.
Those who battle on regardless until they drop.
And those who swing the lead with just a sniffle.
100
18/12/2020 17:36:55 5 0
bbc
The issue is that medical professionals/NICE have for years dismissed people suffering from ME/CFS/post-viral illness as malingerers, who are not suffering from an actual physical illness. I have had repeated long periods of fatigue following post-viral illness. There was no help for me, despite repeated trips to the GP. What is needed is more research and raised awareness.
28
18/12/2020 14:52:32 26 6
bbc
Here's the thing with these "Long Covid" symptoms...

They are basically the same symptoms that can be caused by numerous other forms of illness...

So if someone who has had Covid is getting checked every six weeks and showing some of these symptoms and it's simply put down to being "Long Covid", then how many people will be misdiagnosed when their symptoms are in fact caused by another illness ?
73
18/12/2020 17:14:58 7 5
bbc
Or you could stop looking at the dark side of things and think, "hey maybe we'll do both catch people who are indeed suffering and learn more about when these assumptions don't apply." They're not gods, ffs, they're doctors and sometimes they even are human and get things wrong, but let's not allow that??
29
bbc
Skiver's charter. Like M.E. some will milk it for a sick note. Removed
Hope you get M.E and then see what you are able to do with your life once you've got it. Cretin. Removed
30
18/12/2020 16:17:26 53 2
bbc
Would be nice for M.E / CFS / Fibro patients to also get the same level of attention. As it is, we've been left for dead by the great Sir Simon Stevens and his overpaid and underworked cronies in the NHS. Such caring folk. Post viral fatigue syndromes have been affecting people of all ages for years but it's not Covid so we don't matter. Long Covid is just another PVS that's all. But they get help
37
18/12/2020 16:24:57 20 5
bbc
Covid lives matter, is the single most important issue according to mainstream media outlets.
89
18/12/2020 17:08:42 4 0
bbc
Spot on......
96
18/12/2020 17:32:55 6 0
bbc
Very good point!
There are a number of diseases and conditions that leave variable physical side affects.
128
18/12/2020 18:55:41 4 0
bbc
The average cost of a hospitalised CV-19 patient for the NHS is £185,000, now bear in mind NICE won't let you have a cancer treatment if it cost more than £21,000 per year of life

It would definately be nice to see MS/CFS getting funding like that
131
18/12/2020 19:03:28 2 2
bbc
You have a good point but ruin it by childishly suggesting that highly qualified, intelligent people working under great duress are overpaid and underworked
137
18/12/2020 19:09:50 0 0
bbc
Sad thought it is, posting the same thing on HYS repeatedly won't help
140
18/12/2020 19:11:48 0 0
bbc
well said!!
155
sjw
18/12/2020 19:40:53 0 0
bbc
You missed recovered from sepsis.
179
18/12/2020 20:34:47 0 0
bbc
Bang on. But I suspect this is more about research and statistics than actually doing anything useful.
Have seen a lot of CFS over the years.. and some magic recoveries.. usually when something has happened... a complete reset like peritonitis or a broken arm.. very strange and most docs find it very difficult to understand that all perception happens in the brain which controls everything else.
31
18/12/2020 16:19:02 6 12
bbc
What a waste of GP resources. If you feel sick see the doctor. If not, get on with your life. Fill a survey in but don't take up NHS resources.
68
18/12/2020 17:09:58 5 0
bbc
These people do feel sick - did you miss the point of this article ?
32
18/12/2020 16:20:09 9 24
bbc
Lockdowns are designed to collapse the NHS. The easy way to privatise healthcare through unsustainable backlog of serious illnesses and insufficient tax revenue
Save the NHS stop lockdowns now .
35
18/12/2020 16:22:35 14 6
bbc
You need to get a Gripper on reality.

Totally the opposite is true.

Plank!
38
18/12/2020 16:25:04 5 3
bbc
Good point but perhaps by a different mechanism. Lockdown won't collapse the NHS but will drive more people to seek private healthcare as the National Covid Service doesn't cater for us anymore. Once only the poorest still use it it will have been privatised by the back door without anyone noticing.
Skiver's charter. Like M.E. some will milk it for a sick note. Removed
Hope you get M.E and then see what you are able to do with your life once you've got it. Cretin. Removed
34
18/12/2020 16:21:33 24 3
bbc
"Because this is a new condition, there is still much that we don't know about it," said Paul Chrisp of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence."

It is NOT a new condition.

I have had Long *Virus* for 23 years.

Like Covid sufferers, I had a devastating viral condition. It caused paralysis and took me 2 years to walk properly again.

I have many of the symptoms listed.
44
18/12/2020 16:34:27 14 0
bbc
You mean NICE who recently had to revise their guidelines for the treatment of M.E patients from the ones that caused further illness and death in patients for many years previously? That NICE? They weren't so nice for those people.
84
18/12/2020 17:06:49 3 0
bbc
I am so pleased to hear this as I have had it for 8 years and have most of the symptoms,not been out now for years.Mine was from a viral condition as well. Not unusual then.
32
18/12/2020 16:20:09 9 24
bbc
Lockdowns are designed to collapse the NHS. The easy way to privatise healthcare through unsustainable backlog of serious illnesses and insufficient tax revenue
Save the NHS stop lockdowns now .
35
18/12/2020 16:22:35 14 6
bbc
You need to get a Gripper on reality.

Totally the opposite is true.

Plank!
42
18/12/2020 16:30:19 2 0
bbc
The unacceptable backlog of people in need of urgent cancer treatments has risen astronomically since March, including many young children .
Secretary of state for health has failed to address this diabolical situation.
2
18/12/2020 10:55:53 8 0
bbc
Surely there should be some mention that a British company (Synairgen) has today announced clinical trials to prove they have a drug that can mitigate the risks of long covid? It has been recognised as a National Priority by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and has also been awarded Fast Track status by the FDA in the US?

36
18/12/2020 16:22:42 1 1
bbc
Can M.E sufferers also get one? No. Of course we can't. Because we don't matter to the NHS.
46
18/12/2020 16:37:26 3 0
bbc
If there is any research that shows that ME is caused by a lack of/reduced interferon production within the body, then a case could be made for its administration. Otherwise it wouldn't be of much use. Essentially SNG001 is a broad spectrum anti-viral treatment.
30
18/12/2020 16:17:26 53 2
bbc
Would be nice for M.E / CFS / Fibro patients to also get the same level of attention. As it is, we've been left for dead by the great Sir Simon Stevens and his overpaid and underworked cronies in the NHS. Such caring folk. Post viral fatigue syndromes have been affecting people of all ages for years but it's not Covid so we don't matter. Long Covid is just another PVS that's all. But they get help
37
18/12/2020 16:24:57 20 5
bbc
Covid lives matter, is the single most important issue according to mainstream media outlets.
39
18/12/2020 16:26:25 10 0
bbc
Maybe we should start a movement - M.E LIVES MATTER lol
32
18/12/2020 16:20:09 9 24
bbc
Lockdowns are designed to collapse the NHS. The easy way to privatise healthcare through unsustainable backlog of serious illnesses and insufficient tax revenue
Save the NHS stop lockdowns now .
38
18/12/2020 16:25:04 5 3
bbc
Good point but perhaps by a different mechanism. Lockdown won't collapse the NHS but will drive more people to seek private healthcare as the National Covid Service doesn't cater for us anymore. Once only the poorest still use it it will have been privatised by the back door without anyone noticing.
37
18/12/2020 16:24:57 20 5
bbc
Covid lives matter, is the single most important issue according to mainstream media outlets.
39
18/12/2020 16:26:25 10 0
bbc
Maybe we should start a movement - M.E LIVES MATTER lol
19
18/12/2020 13:27:44 42 9
bbc
For 6 months after having Covid I had issues with fatigue and shortness of breath, only just started to feel 'normal' again.

This is why this disease is such an issue, it isn't a case of it only kills 1% so why bother. I'm 32 with no prior issues and it still hit me hard. Its not a binary outcome of completely fine or death. Many will suffer for far longer and much worse than I did.
40
18/12/2020 16:26:38 22 6
bbc
Same here, mid 40s elite cyclist, been feeling bad for 9 weeks since we got covid in early october
60
18/12/2020 17:00:59 4 1
bbc
Hope you both find the path to recovery soon.
41
18/12/2020 16:27:47 3 0
bbc
Don't forget the lovely itchy rash too...
35
18/12/2020 16:22:35 14 6
bbc
You need to get a Gripper on reality.

Totally the opposite is true.

Plank!
42
18/12/2020 16:30:19 2 0
bbc
The unacceptable backlog of people in need of urgent cancer treatments has risen astronomically since March, including many young children .
Secretary of state for health has failed to address this diabolical situation.
43
18/12/2020 16:30:28 17 2
bbc
So if you have pneumonia the NHS will tell you that it can take six months to recover and you will always have scat tissue on your lungs that will affect your breathing. You can die from this and Covid yet six weeks is a checkup period. Anyone with medical knowledge explain why the fuss over "long-term covid?"
45
18/12/2020 16:37:22 9 6
bbc
Many more people are affected by covid-19 than pneumonia maybe?
34
18/12/2020 16:21:33 24 3
bbc
"Because this is a new condition, there is still much that we don't know about it," said Paul Chrisp of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence."

It is NOT a new condition.

I have had Long *Virus* for 23 years.

Like Covid sufferers, I had a devastating viral condition. It caused paralysis and took me 2 years to walk properly again.

I have many of the symptoms listed.
44
18/12/2020 16:34:27 14 0
bbc
You mean NICE who recently had to revise their guidelines for the treatment of M.E patients from the ones that caused further illness and death in patients for many years previously? That NICE? They weren't so nice for those people.
43
18/12/2020 16:30:28 17 2
bbc
So if you have pneumonia the NHS will tell you that it can take six months to recover and you will always have scat tissue on your lungs that will affect your breathing. You can die from this and Covid yet six weeks is a checkup period. Anyone with medical knowledge explain why the fuss over "long-term covid?"
45
18/12/2020 16:37:22 9 6
bbc
Many more people are affected by covid-19 than pneumonia maybe?
48
18/12/2020 16:45:17 2 1
bbc
Obviously not
122
18/12/2020 18:41:43 4 0
bbc
Not true. Far more people have died of pneumonia this year and every year. It's just the numbers aren't published daily on the BBC so no hysteria.
36
18/12/2020 16:22:42 1 1
bbc
Can M.E sufferers also get one? No. Of course we can't. Because we don't matter to the NHS.
46
18/12/2020 16:37:26 3 0
bbc
If there is any research that shows that ME is caused by a lack of/reduced interferon production within the body, then a case could be made for its administration. Otherwise it wouldn't be of much use. Essentially SNG001 is a broad spectrum anti-viral treatment.
47
18/12/2020 16:39:35 3 1
bbc
My wife and I were tested positive in early November, I am in the severely at risk group and was quite ill.
We both are still suffering from what we feel are the after effects of covid, they know who are affected by a positive result are these people going to be followed up.
Since the track and trace phone calls we have had no one ring to ask how we are feeling, we just got on with it.
45
18/12/2020 16:37:22 9 6
bbc
Many more people are affected by covid-19 than pneumonia maybe?
48
18/12/2020 16:45:17 2 1
bbc
Obviously not
49
LJD
18/12/2020 16:46:01 3 1
bbc
It would be interesting to see if there's any crossover with PTSD and other mental illness - we live in unprecedented times and I wonder if there's any psychological connection
88
18/12/2020 17:23:45 0 1
bbc
I'm sitting in the room with a psychologist family member so I asked. To precis what she said: Current understanding is that there's generally not a specific link between the two, but the one CAN be a trigger or contributor to the other and vice versa.
8
18/12/2020 12:48:09 74 7
bbc
Why only patients in hospitals? Tens of thousands of people presenting with long-Covid will have never been anywhere near a hospital because their accute infection was mild or moderate rather than severe. Indeed, some will have not even had a positive test. No one should be denied routine monitoring. Post-viral illnesses wreck lives, often for years or even decades.
50
18/12/2020 16:46:51 9 0
bbc
And yet THE post-viral illness (ME/CFS), which effects at least 260,000 people in the UK, gets almost zero funding by the NHS or Goverment.

But "long CV-19" gets 69 new specialised clinics straight away.
138
18/12/2020 18:56:58 0 0
bbc
Exactly! And long Covid sufferers should get help too, not against that at all, but as you say that about the many who have ME/CFS?
51
18/12/2020 16:47:48 8 6
bbc
The NHS getting all sorts of applause.... Until the worn out staff dare ask for a pay rise next year... then it'll be the same austerity shortages of funds as the police and paramedics who also kept working throughout..
Brace yourselves for strikes next summer
78
18/12/2020 17:19:40 3 0
bbc
Didn't the government appalud THEMSELVES this year when they voted NOT to award NHS staff a raise ... again?
52
18/12/2020 16:33:08 2 13
bbc
So Covid-19 now causes "long Covid"?
Er no. The reason people experience all those symptoms (myself included) is because we are all a year older than we were last year! The reason professional footballers who have had Covid seem not to get these symptoms, is because they are 24 years old.
59
18/12/2020 16:59:48 4 0
bbc
Unfortunately, despite the logic, it doesn't work like that.
77
18/12/2020 17:18:46 1 0
bbc
Nah. A very fit young guy who had the virus go through him and his family. They luckily shrugged it off. He still can't walk too far without struggling with his breathing. He wasn't really obeying the rules when he got it, but still, it's a horrible thing to have. wouldn't wish it on anyone
124
18/12/2020 18:51:51 0 0
bbc
You could try reading Lewis Hamilton's comments on covid, describing himself as feeling "destroyed" by the virus, despite the fact that F1 drivers are some of the fittest people on the planet. Or Steve Bruce's fears that some of his players - young professional footballers of the age you mention - may not fully recover. Youth and fitness are no protection against long covid.
166
18/12/2020 20:01:44 1 0
bbc
Lewis Hamilton was positive and had symptoms quite bad from what I've read and there can't be many people fitter than him
53
18/12/2020 16:33:12 5 2
bbc
had covis symptons end of april.got onto nhs,isolated for 10 days.fever went within a day,grim for another four/five .sadly never recovered stamina,endurance etc.when i got in touch with gp(phone only) was asked about depression,laughed and said if you aint depressed,you aint taking notice.convinced by gp to have a course depressing drugs.still struggling 6 months later.the new bad back?
57
18/12/2020 16:57:00 10 0
bbc
The issue with a lot of GP's is that they don't know how to treat complex conditions like M.E. They also, in many cases are reluctant to send patients for endless tests. It's easier to come to the easiest solution and send patients away with anti-depressants / painkillers / counselling than actually admit that they don't know how to treat it. I'd rather honesty than a GP just fobbing me off.
14
18/12/2020 13:08:46 10 7
bbc
You can, it's just whatever concerns they have been rejecting for you must not be severe or of enough danger to your long term health to be worth seeing during a crisis.

Just remember its elective surgeries that were cancelled, not essential ones
54
18/12/2020 16:50:12 15 1
bbc
arcangel - "its elective surgeries that were cancelled, not essential ones"

Not remotely true

The cancelled all surgery that wasn't basically going to directly kill you

My father spent 6 months in agony, unable to walk, doped up to the eyeballs on opiod pain killers because the NHS was shut

He's surgery was utterly "essenstial", but it still didn't happen because of the NHSs reaction to CV-19!
Pull the other one. Excuse for time off work! Removed
13
18/12/2020 13:06:50 48 6
bbc
Sorry to put dampers on this. All the doctors and nurses are exhausted,worn out and suffering from PTSD. Most have had no holiday or leave. Many have been or are ill themselves. Some have died,some have retired. So where the hell do we get a work force to do this large amount of new work? The magic workforce box? If you beat the staff harder and harder, more and more will leave. That does not help
56
18/12/2020 16:54:43 16 35
bbc
What a load of rubbish.
132
18/12/2020 19:04:43 1 0
bbc
I presume you are referring to your own pointless comment.
53
18/12/2020 16:33:12 5 2
bbc
had covis symptons end of april.got onto nhs,isolated for 10 days.fever went within a day,grim for another four/five .sadly never recovered stamina,endurance etc.when i got in touch with gp(phone only) was asked about depression,laughed and said if you aint depressed,you aint taking notice.convinced by gp to have a course depressing drugs.still struggling 6 months later.the new bad back?
57
18/12/2020 16:57:00 10 0
bbc
The issue with a lot of GP's is that they don't know how to treat complex conditions like M.E. They also, in many cases are reluctant to send patients for endless tests. It's easier to come to the easiest solution and send patients away with anti-depressants / painkillers / counselling than actually admit that they don't know how to treat it. I'd rather honesty than a GP just fobbing me off.
123
18/12/2020 18:45:47 1 0
bbc
Same here. My GP is dismissive and makes no secret that he thinks chronic pain/fatigue is a mental health issue. It isn't - there is a big difference between depression and loss of motivation, and the sort of draining exhaustion (like someone just switched the power off) that hits ME/CFS sufferers. A willingness to listen to patient experience and take symptoms seriously would go a long way.
58
18/12/2020 16:59:21 38 7
bbc
I got covid doing my job as a care worker in March. I went from being a fit and healthy 26 year old who would walk 10 miles for fun to intensely fatigued overnight. Nine months on I still can't work, have to rest constantly and don't know if I'll ever fully recover.

Anyone saying this isn't real, keep your opinions to yourself. This is debilitating and life-wrecking and we deserve help.
61
18/12/2020 17:03:05 16 1
bbc
I hope that your fears are unfounded and that you will recover sooner rather than later.
66
18/12/2020 17:09:19 6 1
bbc
Exactly, people who have not had it doesn't understand
70
18/12/2020 17:12:35 5 0
bbc
I was 47 and fairly fit,
Now I'm constantly short of breath and tired all the time, And they still don't know why
71
18/12/2020 17:14:17 5 0
bbc
I hope you recover from it soon Emily. I know a very fit industrial pipe fitter who had the virus and 6 weeks later still struggles to breathe climbing the staircase
85
18/12/2020 17:08:20 4 0
bbc
Its the same for us with CFS and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome but nobody cares, no help for us.
101
18/12/2020 17:40:28 8 1
bbc
Nobody saying not real. It just nothing new. Post viral fatigue been around forever. They have just branded it Long Covid to keep project fear going.
I had Hepatitis A 10 years ago. I had Post viral fatigue for a year. I am fine now

My advice is. Try and be positive. Do tings you enjoy. Light exercise. Slowly start building your physical and mental strength. It is hard. But nothing new
164
18/12/2020 19:57:24 0 0
bbc
I think people are saying that there are similar other conditions that cause the same symptoms and which have not really been taken seriously by health care professionals for a long time
52
18/12/2020 16:33:08 2 13
bbc
So Covid-19 now causes "long Covid"?
Er no. The reason people experience all those symptoms (myself included) is because we are all a year older than we were last year! The reason professional footballers who have had Covid seem not to get these symptoms, is because they are 24 years old.
59
18/12/2020 16:59:48 4 0
bbc
Unfortunately, despite the logic, it doesn't work like that.
63
18/12/2020 17:06:27 3 0
bbc
There was no "logic" unless he thinks footballers don't also age ;-)
40
18/12/2020 16:26:38 22 6
bbc
Same here, mid 40s elite cyclist, been feeling bad for 9 weeks since we got covid in early october
60
18/12/2020 17:00:59 4 1
bbc
Hope you both find the path to recovery soon.
58
18/12/2020 16:59:21 38 7
bbc
I got covid doing my job as a care worker in March. I went from being a fit and healthy 26 year old who would walk 10 miles for fun to intensely fatigued overnight. Nine months on I still can't work, have to rest constantly and don't know if I'll ever fully recover.

Anyone saying this isn't real, keep your opinions to yourself. This is debilitating and life-wrecking and we deserve help.
61
18/12/2020 17:03:05 16 1
bbc
I hope that your fears are unfounded and that you will recover sooner rather than later.
79
18/12/2020 17:19:47 6 2
bbc
Whoever has down thumbed this comment needs to seek help immediately.
I'd like to meet the scum who downvoted this comment Removed
62
18/12/2020 17:05:15 4 3
bbc
Hospitalised for 9 Days in April with severe covid19
Released with no follow ups to this day,
All of a sudden they want to start testing people
What about us, I'm having to do it all myself with no help
67
18/12/2020 17:09:52 3 1
bbc
Welcome to the club my friend. I urge you to persist with your GP. Demand tests. Demand answers. Educate them also and work with them for the best outcome. Those who show reticence or resistance, report them and see another GP.
69
18/12/2020 17:12:31 1 0
bbc
Sad and very sorry you've had to deal with this horrible disease, but perhaps complaining about the health service when they're dealing with 1) a brand new disease, while 2) having to take care of the continuing and unabating numbers of new infections may be just a little "me-me-me-oriented," no?
59
18/12/2020 16:59:48 4 0
bbc
Unfortunately, despite the logic, it doesn't work like that.
63
18/12/2020 17:06:27 3 0
bbc
There was no "logic" unless he thinks footballers don't also age ;-)
64
18/12/2020 17:06:37 23 1
bbc
Long covid sounds a lot like ME. Which is also usually triggered by another illness.
65
18/12/2020 17:07:51 19 0
bbc
I think it's also important to get some perspective here. Many people get post viral illnesses and illnesses like M.E but it takes so long to get diagnosed because you are back and forth to the quacks for years whilst they faff about. With Covid we're seeing people in one short tranche of infection. There will be lots of people get flu and get M.E in one year but not diagnosed for a long time.
58
18/12/2020 16:59:21 38 7
bbc
I got covid doing my job as a care worker in March. I went from being a fit and healthy 26 year old who would walk 10 miles for fun to intensely fatigued overnight. Nine months on I still can't work, have to rest constantly and don't know if I'll ever fully recover.

Anyone saying this isn't real, keep your opinions to yourself. This is debilitating and life-wrecking and we deserve help.
66
18/12/2020 17:09:19 6 1
bbc
Exactly, people who have not had it doesn't understand
62
18/12/2020 17:05:15 4 3
bbc
Hospitalised for 9 Days in April with severe covid19
Released with no follow ups to this day,
All of a sudden they want to start testing people
What about us, I'm having to do it all myself with no help
67
18/12/2020 17:09:52 3 1
bbc
Welcome to the club my friend. I urge you to persist with your GP. Demand tests. Demand answers. Educate them also and work with them for the best outcome. Those who show reticence or resistance, report them and see another GP.
31
18/12/2020 16:19:02 6 12
bbc
What a waste of GP resources. If you feel sick see the doctor. If not, get on with your life. Fill a survey in but don't take up NHS resources.
68
18/12/2020 17:09:58 5 0
bbc
These people do feel sick - did you miss the point of this article ?
98
18/12/2020 17:34:07 0 0
bbc
Agreed. But they don't just feel sick, they ARE sick despite what some of the people on this comment forum are saying. Simply because they haven't experienced it. Typical uncaring selfish attitude
62
18/12/2020 17:05:15 4 3
bbc
Hospitalised for 9 Days in April with severe covid19
Released with no follow ups to this day,
All of a sudden they want to start testing people
What about us, I'm having to do it all myself with no help
69
18/12/2020 17:12:31 1 0
bbc
Sad and very sorry you've had to deal with this horrible disease, but perhaps complaining about the health service when they're dealing with 1) a brand new disease, while 2) having to take care of the continuing and unabating numbers of new infections may be just a little "me-me-me-oriented," no?
75
18/12/2020 17:17:23 1 0
bbc
The issue is WilliamLondon that Gaffer73 will most probably be still saying the same thing in 5 years time and still trying to get help. With M.E patients the first hurdle is to actually be BELIEVED by your GP and this is before you are offered any sort of help. There are specialist M.E clinics in the NHS but all they do is offer you information offer and no tangible support or help. A joke.
58
18/12/2020 16:59:21 38 7
bbc
I got covid doing my job as a care worker in March. I went from being a fit and healthy 26 year old who would walk 10 miles for fun to intensely fatigued overnight. Nine months on I still can't work, have to rest constantly and don't know if I'll ever fully recover.

Anyone saying this isn't real, keep your opinions to yourself. This is debilitating and life-wrecking and we deserve help.
70
18/12/2020 17:12:35 5 0
bbc
I was 47 and fairly fit,
Now I'm constantly short of breath and tired all the time, And they still don't know why
58
18/12/2020 16:59:21 38 7
bbc
I got covid doing my job as a care worker in March. I went from being a fit and healthy 26 year old who would walk 10 miles for fun to intensely fatigued overnight. Nine months on I still can't work, have to rest constantly and don't know if I'll ever fully recover.

Anyone saying this isn't real, keep your opinions to yourself. This is debilitating and life-wrecking and we deserve help.
71
18/12/2020 17:14:17 5 0
bbc
I hope you recover from it soon Emily. I know a very fit industrial pipe fitter who had the virus and 6 weeks later still struggles to breathe climbing the staircase
72
18/12/2020 17:14:42 0 1
bbc
Sorry for sounding stupid here but what is M.E?
80
18/12/2020 17:19:56 2 1
bbc
https://www.meresearch.org.uk/what-is-me/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-9DbooTY7QIVDtd3Ch25tgm3EAAYASAAEgKu9_D_BwE

Also called 'Yuppie Flu'. Not an expert but know a couple of people who gt it.

Frequently occurs in otherwise very energetic people who fail to slow down during some other minor illness and then seem to suffer complete 'burn out'.
82
18/12/2020 17:20:38 1 0
bbc
Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. M.E for short. It is classed as a neurological condition by the WHO . Often more debilitating than cancer and multiple sclerosis. Also many medical professionals are too scared to admit they don't know how to treat it or have the same attitude as a few on here in terms of grow up and deal with it. Symptoms are fluctuating / unpredictable. This makes everything harder.
28
18/12/2020 14:52:32 26 6
bbc
Here's the thing with these "Long Covid" symptoms...

They are basically the same symptoms that can be caused by numerous other forms of illness...

So if someone who has had Covid is getting checked every six weeks and showing some of these symptoms and it's simply put down to being "Long Covid", then how many people will be misdiagnosed when their symptoms are in fact caused by another illness ?
73
18/12/2020 17:14:58 7 5
bbc
Or you could stop looking at the dark side of things and think, "hey maybe we'll do both catch people who are indeed suffering and learn more about when these assumptions don't apply." They're not gods, ffs, they're doctors and sometimes they even are human and get things wrong, but let's not allow that??
74
18/12/2020 16:51:01 5 7
bbc
I had a dodgy Chinese last night and now have most of those symptoms on the list. Whole lumps of chewed chicken in the pan this morning and I wont describe the lumps of pineapple - Must have "long term covid" ...
69
18/12/2020 17:12:31 1 0
bbc
Sad and very sorry you've had to deal with this horrible disease, but perhaps complaining about the health service when they're dealing with 1) a brand new disease, while 2) having to take care of the continuing and unabating numbers of new infections may be just a little "me-me-me-oriented," no?
75
18/12/2020 17:17:23 1 0
bbc
The issue is WilliamLondon that Gaffer73 will most probably be still saying the same thing in 5 years time and still trying to get help. With M.E patients the first hurdle is to actually be BELIEVED by your GP and this is before you are offered any sort of help. There are specialist M.E clinics in the NHS but all they do is offer you information offer and no tangible support or help. A joke.
76
18/12/2020 17:01:38 5 0
bbc
I had Legionnaires disease 8 years ago.I was very ill and never got over it.I have been left with the symptoms the same as long covid.I am on medication for COPD dizzyness and my fatigue is just as bad today as it was at the start.I have had every test you can think of and no doctor can say why I am like this.One nurosurgeon put it down to chronic fatigue.I have been in hospital 4 times.
52
18/12/2020 16:33:08 2 13
bbc
So Covid-19 now causes "long Covid"?
Er no. The reason people experience all those symptoms (myself included) is because we are all a year older than we were last year! The reason professional footballers who have had Covid seem not to get these symptoms, is because they are 24 years old.
77
18/12/2020 17:18:46 1 0
bbc
Nah. A very fit young guy who had the virus go through him and his family. They luckily shrugged it off. He still can't walk too far without struggling with his breathing. He wasn't really obeying the rules when he got it, but still, it's a horrible thing to have. wouldn't wish it on anyone
51
18/12/2020 16:47:48 8 6
bbc
The NHS getting all sorts of applause.... Until the worn out staff dare ask for a pay rise next year... then it'll be the same austerity shortages of funds as the police and paramedics who also kept working throughout..
Brace yourselves for strikes next summer
78
18/12/2020 17:19:40 3 0
bbc
Didn't the government appalud THEMSELVES this year when they voted NOT to award NHS staff a raise ... again?
61
18/12/2020 17:03:05 16 1
bbc
I hope that your fears are unfounded and that you will recover sooner rather than later.
79
18/12/2020 17:19:47 6 2
bbc
Whoever has down thumbed this comment needs to seek help immediately.
72
18/12/2020 17:14:42 0 1
bbc
Sorry for sounding stupid here but what is M.E?
80
18/12/2020 17:19:56 2 1
bbc
https://www.meresearch.org.uk/what-is-me/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-9DbooTY7QIVDtd3Ch25tgm3EAAYASAAEgKu9_D_BwE

Also called 'Yuppie Flu'. Not an expert but know a couple of people who gt it.

Frequently occurs in otherwise very energetic people who fail to slow down during some other minor illness and then seem to suffer complete 'burn out'.
86
18/12/2020 17:23:11 0 0
bbc
Thanks pal. I must admit it does look like it makes sense considering it sounds like a lot of these cases seem to be amongst fitness fanatics
81
18/12/2020 17:06:28 32 3
bbc
How about some help for those of us who've had exactly the same symptoms with CFS, ME, MAS for many years, all I'm told is " sorry nothing we can do to help you " just go away and carry on existing rather than living !
Now it's called " long covid" and suddenly specialist centres, funding and lots of help, support and treatment is available, sorry folks it's just not fair !
83
18/12/2020 17:21:31 5 2
bbc
Spot on. Only the fantastic Sir Simon Stevens to thank for this. What a legend.
97
18/12/2020 17:33:11 6 0
bbc
Hopefully this might help everyone suffering from this.
117
18/12/2020 18:22:16 4 0
bbc
I'd second the call for more help for ME, CFS and the like, but don't knock the sudden interest in PVS because of long covid. It might turn up some useful diagnostics or treatment, and raise public awareness of these conditions. If awareness of long covid helps convince my GP that my flu-related chronic fatigue is real and debilitating and stops him treating me like dirt, that would be progress.
156
18/12/2020 19:50:36 2 0
bbc
I would include fibromyalgia and inflammatory conditions like pmr. As people generally don't look unwell public view these conditions as almost fake.I'm wondering if you have to have a positive covid result to be diagnosed with long covid What about people that had the virus but never got tested
72
18/12/2020 17:14:42 0 1
bbc
Sorry for sounding stupid here but what is M.E?
82
18/12/2020 17:20:38 1 0
bbc
Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. M.E for short. It is classed as a neurological condition by the WHO . Often more debilitating than cancer and multiple sclerosis. Also many medical professionals are too scared to admit they don't know how to treat it or have the same attitude as a few on here in terms of grow up and deal with it. Symptoms are fluctuating / unpredictable. This makes everything harder.
162
18/12/2020 19:53:52 0 0
bbc
I was diagnosed with ME many years ago it took quite a long time to resolve. There were no tests offered scans or anything like that. Does eventually go and I'm sure the same thing will be the case with long covid
81
18/12/2020 17:06:28 32 3
bbc
How about some help for those of us who've had exactly the same symptoms with CFS, ME, MAS for many years, all I'm told is " sorry nothing we can do to help you " just go away and carry on existing rather than living !
Now it's called " long covid" and suddenly specialist centres, funding and lots of help, support and treatment is available, sorry folks it's just not fair !
83
18/12/2020 17:21:31 5 2
bbc
Spot on. Only the fantastic Sir Simon Stevens to thank for this. What a legend.
154
18/12/2020 19:47:51 2 0
bbc
" Sir Simon Stevens "

I hope he gets introduced to Chris Eubank.
34
18/12/2020 16:21:33 24 3
bbc
"Because this is a new condition, there is still much that we don't know about it," said Paul Chrisp of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence."

It is NOT a new condition.

I have had Long *Virus* for 23 years.

Like Covid sufferers, I had a devastating viral condition. It caused paralysis and took me 2 years to walk properly again.

I have many of the symptoms listed.
84
18/12/2020 17:06:49 3 0
bbc
I am so pleased to hear this as I have had it for 8 years and have most of the symptoms,not been out now for years.Mine was from a viral condition as well. Not unusual then.
58
18/12/2020 16:59:21 38 7
bbc
I got covid doing my job as a care worker in March. I went from being a fit and healthy 26 year old who would walk 10 miles for fun to intensely fatigued overnight. Nine months on I still can't work, have to rest constantly and don't know if I'll ever fully recover.

Anyone saying this isn't real, keep your opinions to yourself. This is debilitating and life-wrecking and we deserve help.
85
18/12/2020 17:08:20 4 0
bbc
Its the same for us with CFS and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome but nobody cares, no help for us.
80
18/12/2020 17:19:56 2 1
bbc
https://www.meresearch.org.uk/what-is-me/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-9DbooTY7QIVDtd3Ch25tgm3EAAYASAAEgKu9_D_BwE

Also called 'Yuppie Flu'. Not an expert but know a couple of people who gt it.

Frequently occurs in otherwise very energetic people who fail to slow down during some other minor illness and then seem to suffer complete 'burn out'.
86
18/12/2020 17:23:11 0 0
bbc
Thanks pal. I must admit it does look like it makes sense considering it sounds like a lot of these cases seem to be amongst fitness fanatics
119
18/12/2020 18:34:09 1 0
bbc
You don't have to be a fitness fanatic to get this. I wasn't, although I was active and a keen fell walker. Several years ago I caught a vicious flu bug and since I had a heavy workload that term, didn't take time off. I've never fully recovered, although the fatigue and joint pains fluctuate. Its a nasty thing and it affects many thousands of people but GPs tend to be scandalously dismissive.
13
18/12/2020 13:06:50 48 6
bbc
Sorry to put dampers on this. All the doctors and nurses are exhausted,worn out and suffering from PTSD. Most have had no holiday or leave. Many have been or are ill themselves. Some have died,some have retired. So where the hell do we get a work force to do this large amount of new work? The magic workforce box? If you beat the staff harder and harder, more and more will leave. That does not help
87
18/12/2020 17:23:39 6 2
bbc
Where’s the evidence for all this? Figures show hospitals less busy than last year
170
18/12/2020 20:21:28 1 0
bbc
Check out the governments daily coronavirus dashboard, as of today there are over 18,000 patients in hospital with Covid 19. That on top of the annual winter admissions means the health service is at breaking point.

This week hospitals in Northern Ireland are having to treat patients in car parks as there is no room inside.

Open your eyes and follow the rules
49
LJD
18/12/2020 16:46:01 3 1
bbc
It would be interesting to see if there's any crossover with PTSD and other mental illness - we live in unprecedented times and I wonder if there's any psychological connection
88
18/12/2020 17:23:45 0 1
bbc
I'm sitting in the room with a psychologist family member so I asked. To precis what she said: Current understanding is that there's generally not a specific link between the two, but the one CAN be a trigger or contributor to the other and vice versa.
30
18/12/2020 16:17:26 53 2
bbc
Would be nice for M.E / CFS / Fibro patients to also get the same level of attention. As it is, we've been left for dead by the great Sir Simon Stevens and his overpaid and underworked cronies in the NHS. Such caring folk. Post viral fatigue syndromes have been affecting people of all ages for years but it's not Covid so we don't matter. Long Covid is just another PVS that's all. But they get help
89
18/12/2020 17:08:42 4 0
bbc
Spot on......
90
18/12/2020 17:10:33 6 0
bbc
I contracted Covid in March and have struggled with long Covid for 9 months. I'm part of a medical trial, where MRI scans have suggested people often have inflammed kidneys/spleen/pancreas/liver/heart. Not so much the lungs.
For anyone struggling, a few tips that worked for me: ice on the pain (not heat); ibuprofen (not paracetemol); slow walks; don't fight the fatigue, just go to sleep.
104
18/12/2020 17:47:18 6 0
bbc
And, for anyone struggling with this mentally, it does seem to very slowly get better. My GP recommended keeping a symptom diary, which really helps chart small improvements (i.e. I now sleep for 20 minutes instead of 2 hours). Comparing yourself to what you could do in the past is completely demoralising, but I've found charting the improvements over, say, a two month period, really helps.
91
GS
18/12/2020 17:25:44 5 5
bbc
Wow, the long lasting side effects of many many illnesses. But let's stick a media buzz tag on it and scare the public. The Amish people of Pennsylvania where asked why they were not scared of Covid-19, they said it was because they didn't have tvs or the internet. Says a lot really
93
18/12/2020 17:29:33 3 0
bbc
Did they though? How did they know there were "scare tactics" on tv and the internet if they don't have tv or the internet?
Did you just make that up to prove a pointy?
95
18/12/2020 17:31:57 0 0
bbc
Not really.
92
18/12/2020 17:29:25 2 2
bbc
Sounds like one of those things you find when you actually look for it.

I had an infection and major surgery in dec last year and so far the follow up from the NHS has been exactly one phone call. I have had similar symptoms to the above on and off the whole year but know one would know because they haven't asked.
94
18/12/2020 17:31:36 2 0
bbc
Good reason why we should take it seriously, whatever the cause.
113
18/12/2020 18:13:33 0 0
bbc
Did you think to pick up a telephone & tell someone?

They're pretty cool down at my surgery, whenever I do that.
91
GS
18/12/2020 17:25:44 5 5
bbc
Wow, the long lasting side effects of many many illnesses. But let's stick a media buzz tag on it and scare the public. The Amish people of Pennsylvania where asked why they were not scared of Covid-19, they said it was because they didn't have tvs or the internet. Says a lot really
93
18/12/2020 17:29:33 3 0
bbc
Did they though? How did they know there were "scare tactics" on tv and the internet if they don't have tv or the internet?
Did you just make that up to prove a pointy?
153
18/12/2020 19:47:02 0 0
bbc
"How did they know there were "scare tactics" on tv and the internet if they don't have tv or the internet?"

Maybe someone told them and they're not deaf?
92
18/12/2020 17:29:25 2 2
bbc
Sounds like one of those things you find when you actually look for it.

I had an infection and major surgery in dec last year and so far the follow up from the NHS has been exactly one phone call. I have had similar symptoms to the above on and off the whole year but know one would know because they haven't asked.
94
18/12/2020 17:31:36 2 0
bbc
Good reason why we should take it seriously, whatever the cause.
91
GS
18/12/2020 17:25:44 5 5
bbc
Wow, the long lasting side effects of many many illnesses. But let's stick a media buzz tag on it and scare the public. The Amish people of Pennsylvania where asked why they were not scared of Covid-19, they said it was because they didn't have tvs or the internet. Says a lot really
95
18/12/2020 17:31:57 0 0
bbc
Not really.
30
18/12/2020 16:17:26 53 2
bbc
Would be nice for M.E / CFS / Fibro patients to also get the same level of attention. As it is, we've been left for dead by the great Sir Simon Stevens and his overpaid and underworked cronies in the NHS. Such caring folk. Post viral fatigue syndromes have been affecting people of all ages for years but it's not Covid so we don't matter. Long Covid is just another PVS that's all. But they get help
96
18/12/2020 17:32:55 6 0
bbc
Very good point!
There are a number of diseases and conditions that leave variable physical side affects.
81
18/12/2020 17:06:28 32 3
bbc
How about some help for those of us who've had exactly the same symptoms with CFS, ME, MAS for many years, all I'm told is " sorry nothing we can do to help you " just go away and carry on existing rather than living !
Now it's called " long covid" and suddenly specialist centres, funding and lots of help, support and treatment is available, sorry folks it's just not fair !
97
18/12/2020 17:33:11 6 0
bbc
Hopefully this might help everyone suffering from this.
68
18/12/2020 17:09:58 5 0
bbc
These people do feel sick - did you miss the point of this article ?
98
18/12/2020 17:34:07 0 0
bbc
Agreed. But they don't just feel sick, they ARE sick despite what some of the people on this comment forum are saying. Simply because they haven't experienced it. Typical uncaring selfish attitude
27
18/12/2020 14:41:02 28 3
bbc
This is a problem in the UK because off "stiff upper lip", "can't grumble", lack of proper sick pay.

Too often we fail to realise when we are really, truly, ill. I've lost count of people phoning in with "flu" (in reality, a cold), but they come in the following day. Real flu leaves you grounded for weeks.

This must be a society change. People get ill, accept, but people must not abuse it.
99
18/12/2020 17:36:22 15 2
bbc
Two types of people.
Those who battle on regardless until they drop.
And those who swing the lead with just a sniffle.
181
18/12/2020 20:38:12 3 0
bbc
As a manager I don’t want colleagues battling on spreading germs. I want them at home until they are fit to return. I can work with people being absent. It’s much more difficult to manage a team of sick people.

I am lucky we respect our colleagues and pay full salary for the first six months when someone is ill.
27
18/12/2020 14:41:02 28 3
bbc
This is a problem in the UK because off "stiff upper lip", "can't grumble", lack of proper sick pay.

Too often we fail to realise when we are really, truly, ill. I've lost count of people phoning in with "flu" (in reality, a cold), but they come in the following day. Real flu leaves you grounded for weeks.

This must be a society change. People get ill, accept, but people must not abuse it.
100
18/12/2020 17:36:55 5 0
bbc
The issue is that medical professionals/NICE have for years dismissed people suffering from ME/CFS/post-viral illness as malingerers, who are not suffering from an actual physical illness. I have had repeated long periods of fatigue following post-viral illness. There was no help for me, despite repeated trips to the GP. What is needed is more research and raised awareness.