One in four UK homes 'can access 1Gbps broadband'
17/12/2020 | news | technology | 184
Many in towns and more rural locations across the country are still struggling on really slow connections.
1
17/12/2020 13:00:56 3 2
bbc
1 in 4 = 25% only a quarter. Stand by for a massive price hike in the cost of your internet access.
6
17/12/2020 13:07:31 8 4
bbc
Okay, I feel like I'm missing the connection here. 1/4=25%=0.25, which is a quarter. Okay, we've successfully established the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percentages. I'm glad that people remember basic mathematics. Now how does that relate to price increases?
2
17/12/2020 13:02:25 7 2
bbc
I recently upgraded to Fibre to the Property - cracking service from BT and Openreach. Theoretically could get 1gbps - but really no need to, yet!
159
18/12/2020 10:52:43 0 0
bbc
Once in the property, connects to slow computers and slow TVs.
As for BT, they get a lot of stick, but I'm grateful for their services and the benefits of being connected are too long to list.
In particular, during the last 9-months, broadband and internet access have been a life-saver.
3
17/12/2020 13:05:15 2 5
bbc
am I right in thinking the only reason you want this sort of bandwidth, is to stream multiple 4k streams at once?

which Beeb had just told us is bad for the environment
5
17/12/2020 13:07:18 2 4
bbc
How long do you want to wait for a Windoze 10 update to download? :-)
9
17/12/2020 13:11:03 0 0
bbc
For the majority of people right now high quality streaming will be the main consumer of that level of bandwidth. But it's not what we need today that's important, it's what we may need in the years ahead and that opportunities that will enable. I upgraded recently and I'd recommend it to anyone.
174
18/12/2020 15:21:33 0 0
bbc
You need this type of speed when working from home and required large files being downloaded very quickly. There's more to life than streaming (UHD).
4
17/12/2020 13:05:55 6 6
bbc
1 in 4 homes! I don't believe a word of it.
3
17/12/2020 13:05:15 2 5
bbc
am I right in thinking the only reason you want this sort of bandwidth, is to stream multiple 4k streams at once?

which Beeb had just told us is bad for the environment
5
17/12/2020 13:07:18 2 4
bbc
How long do you want to wait for a Windoze 10 update to download? :-)
16
17/12/2020 13:35:44 0 0
bbc
On my 35mbps line it takes just couple of minutes to download semiannually upgrade which in the case I checked was 4GB in size. I was watching Netflix on my TV when it loaded and it didn't jam. Why would you pay £100s for line you only use on 1% most of the time (and probably up to 5% the rest as download is limited to source speed anyway)
1
17/12/2020 13:00:56 3 2
bbc
1 in 4 = 25% only a quarter. Stand by for a massive price hike in the cost of your internet access.
6
17/12/2020 13:07:31 8 4
bbc
Okay, I feel like I'm missing the connection here. 1/4=25%=0.25, which is a quarter. Okay, we've successfully established the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percentages. I'm glad that people remember basic mathematics. Now how does that relate to price increases?
7
17/12/2020 13:08:45 4 2
bbc
What I don't get is the tariffs/throttling when I first switched to Fibre on plus net I was getting 50+Mbps now I'm on the 32Mbps tariff, they probably told me they were going to switch onto the lower speed but I don't remember it - if the line can do 50+ then lets have it, and not have the ten quid in price difference.
175
18/12/2020 15:22:44 0 1
bbc
You are referring to FTTC, 1GBPS required FTTP.
8
17/12/2020 13:10:42 6 5
bbc
Upgraded recently to fast fibre, the 30Mbps minimum speed. Thought I finally arrived in the 21st century, only to be informed by this article that I am nearly one of the underprivileged ones ):-(

Despite that, it does all I need. Why would a domestic residence need over 30 times that speed?
26
17/12/2020 13:53:10 1 0
bbc
The main thing is it allows for faster on the devices you have, so whilst its what you need, 30Mbps is still limited to the ammount you can have at any one time. A good way to look at this is, My parents have the exact same speed as me. But as I live alone in effect I have a signifcantly faster speeds. Its almost like I am 4x faster
45
17/12/2020 15:01:19 0 0
bbc
For the HOLODECK style things that anit that far away in the future than Star Trek think.
157
18/12/2020 10:39:25 0 0
bbc
> Why would a domestic residence need..."

Just one example: online backups to the cloud.

Great services - all your data photos and videos backed up off-site automatically.

Down side is that it can take weeks or months to backup and restore on a slow Internet connection.
3
17/12/2020 13:05:15 2 5
bbc
am I right in thinking the only reason you want this sort of bandwidth, is to stream multiple 4k streams at once?

which Beeb had just told us is bad for the environment
9
17/12/2020 13:11:03 0 0
bbc
For the majority of people right now high quality streaming will be the main consumer of that level of bandwidth. But it's not what we need today that's important, it's what we may need in the years ahead and that opportunities that will enable. I upgraded recently and I'd recommend it to anyone.
64
17/12/2020 16:03:28 0 0
bbc
I generally don't stream anyway, even if it's legal (I know youtube is streaming yes yes..). set a download going, it's usually here 30 mins later depending on the number of seeders. I mean the speed of the site I'm downloading from.

but I agree, getting full holographic images over fibre is veeeeery slow :)
10
17/12/2020 13:15:44 14 2
bbc
Well this doe..

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sn't seem right!
11
17/12/2020 13:27:20 1 8
bbc
More is not necessarily better & most people already have more than enough.

Put the money somewhere where it might actually do some good. Like the health & social care services which were struggling to the point of near collapse long before Covid appeared.

Can't wait a picosecond to load the next advert but 4 years wait for treatment for an arthritic knee is OK? MADNESS!
17
GA
17/12/2020 13:36:30 5 0
bbc
There's always that one person who turns a none-political story into a political one.
12
17/12/2020 13:29:30 2 8
bbc
We get over 70mbps from our power company (uses old BT line) for 17.99 a month + free phone + no download limits or throttling, we live out in deepest Virus laden Kent.
No need for 1gbps, I can play COD all night while my other 1/2 streams films and facebookagrams people with no lags or buffers.
1gbps is overkill for domestic households
15
GA
17/12/2020 13:32:52 7 0
bbc
The benefit of full 1GB fibre isn't just the download speed. I signed up for BT's Full Fibre 900 package which gives 1GB down and 110Mbps up. It's actually the upload speed that's more useful for me now I'm working from home. However, I can also download a 40-50GB game in around 15 minutes (which is nice). Well worth the money.
13
17/12/2020 13:30:22 2 5
bbc
Top speed is irrelevant. Reliable 10MBPs network is enough for most users. You can listen to online radio, whilst browsing, whilst someone is watching Netflix. I have 35MBPS for years and it only struggles to cope when there is an issue with the network. With 100+MBPS network you may probably saturate the router on LAN side than use full speed of the internet.
19
17/12/2020 13:38:54 3 0
bbc
How many people are using your 35Mbps? This is what makes a difference the more people using the network the less bandwidth you get. 4 people using 10Mbps will seriously reduce down their speeds!
135
18/12/2020 07:49:31 1 0
bbc
I'm alright Jack, and I'm obviously representative of 99% of users ...

That said, we should be prioritising getting everyone 100M rather than leaving some high and dry on sub 10M while we roll out 1G
14
17/12/2020 13:30:45 17 5
bbc
Should it not read 1 in 4 who live in city's ?
72
17/12/2020 16:32:04 20 4
bbc
No, definitely not. It could perhaps read '1 in 4 who live in cities' though.
12
17/12/2020 13:29:30 2 8
bbc
We get over 70mbps from our power company (uses old BT line) for 17.99 a month + free phone + no download limits or throttling, we live out in deepest Virus laden Kent.
No need for 1gbps, I can play COD all night while my other 1/2 streams films and facebookagrams people with no lags or buffers.
1gbps is overkill for domestic households
15
GA
17/12/2020 13:32:52 7 0
bbc
The benefit of full 1GB fibre isn't just the download speed. I signed up for BT's Full Fibre 900 package which gives 1GB down and 110Mbps up. It's actually the upload speed that's more useful for me now I'm working from home. However, I can also download a 40-50GB game in around 15 minutes (which is nice). Well worth the money.
47
17/12/2020 15:02:38 1 0
bbc
Curious as to what you do? I'm in construction design so work in 3D cad packages. A large drawing would be 10meg. Gone in half a second and it's only that long because of software handshaking. If your live editing video from home then yup, you need that upload but I can't think of many other uses.
5
17/12/2020 13:07:18 2 4
bbc
How long do you want to wait for a Windoze 10 update to download? :-)
16
17/12/2020 13:35:44 0 0
bbc
On my 35mbps line it takes just couple of minutes to download semiannually upgrade which in the case I checked was 4GB in size. I was watching Netflix on my TV when it loaded and it didn't jam. Why would you pay £100s for line you only use on 1% most of the time (and probably up to 5% the rest as download is limited to source speed anyway)
31
17/12/2020 14:01:49 0 0
bbc
I've got 200mbps cable, and the extra speed is well worth it occasionally - my car satnav has a 35GB map update every month...

But that's the point - I don't need the speed 24/7, but when I do, the cost is well worth it to me.

I can't be bothered to upgrade to the 350mbit that is the fastest Virgin offer here at the moment, but when their gigabit pipes arrive I might be tempted :-)
11
17/12/2020 13:27:20 1 8
bbc
More is not necessarily better & most people already have more than enough.

Put the money somewhere where it might actually do some good. Like the health & social care services which were struggling to the point of near collapse long before Covid appeared.

Can't wait a picosecond to load the next advert but 4 years wait for treatment for an arthritic knee is OK? MADNESS!
17
GA
17/12/2020 13:36:30 5 0
bbc
There's always that one person who turns a none-political story into a political one.
18
17/12/2020 13:37:52 2 7
bbc
If one in four homes can have it then 15 out of the 60 homes in my street could have it. But nobody can, which is zero out of 60.
57
17/12/2020 15:32:39 3 1
bbc
Yes but in streets where it is fully available, 100% can have it. Don't forget it an average. Averages can be very misleading by themselves (especially to the unsophisticated).
13
17/12/2020 13:30:22 2 5
bbc
Top speed is irrelevant. Reliable 10MBPs network is enough for most users. You can listen to online radio, whilst browsing, whilst someone is watching Netflix. I have 35MBPS for years and it only struggles to cope when there is an issue with the network. With 100+MBPS network you may probably saturate the router on LAN side than use full speed of the internet.
19
17/12/2020 13:38:54 3 0
bbc
How many people are using your 35Mbps? This is what makes a difference the more people using the network the less bandwidth you get. 4 people using 10Mbps will seriously reduce down their speeds!
102
17/12/2020 18:12:30 0 0
bbc
Large families - who presumably can afford to pay more.
20
17/12/2020 13:42:39 10 1
bbc
folk living a few miles outside Forres in Moray get 'dead slow'.....we're not talking about a remote glen here.....talking about homes along the main road between inverness and aberdeen...instead of spending billions on a rail line maybe spend it on getting EVERYONE access to fast broadband! To get fast broad band these folk need to pay £0000's yet those living in cities just plug in.....
32
17/12/2020 14:03:16 18 1
bbc
Quite right. for about 1/3 the cost of 19th century technology HS2 we could have 21st century fiber to every premises in the country. Then you wouldn't need to get to Birmingham 15 minutes earlier for your business meeting.
108
17/12/2020 18:54:49 0 1
bbc
but a road between inverness and aberdeen is a remote glen :-).
21
17/12/2020 13:42:42 2 1
bbc
Give me a break! Living in the SE of England and only get 22Mbps with BT. Absolutely appalling support in such a densely populated part of the country!!! No sign of any improvements pending either, and sick and tired waiting for any improvements!!!
22
17/12/2020 13:44:34 31 3
bbc
Should turn the headline around "Three in four UK homes 'can't access 1Gbps broadband'
29
17/12/2020 13:59:37 9 16
bbc
The BBC usually does ... it was refreshing to see a positive spin on progress so far ... don't be a Debby Downer all your life.
106
17/12/2020 18:51:02 1 3
bbc
And 99 out of 100 probably don't need it.
117
17/12/2020 23:36:16 2 3
bbc
Exactly. A large proportions can't even access 1/10th of that. It's time the phone network was returned to the people who actually paid for it and is nationalised so it can be made universal without worrying about profitability.
23
17/12/2020 13:45:55 40 5
bbc
An impressive number of "I've only got x speed, why would anyone want more?" posts...

Some things don't change - I've been on the internet long enough to remember the "My 28.8 Kilobit/second modem is fast enough for what I need, why should I upgrade to 56.4 Kilobits?" posts on usenet.

Where would we be now, if everyone had listened to the "what I've got is plenty" brigade? :-)
30
17/12/2020 14:00:13 20 2
bbc
Me too, I remember 28.6 Kb, heck I'm old enough to remember 300 baud!
But I'd never swap them for my current true 1Gb bidirectional fiber with unlimited data from Gigaclear.
56
17/12/2020 15:31:50 13 0
bbc
Luxury !

When I were a lad were had t'use carrier pigeon fort tinternet
66
17/12/2020 16:05:31 1 0
bbc
neh I never thought "28.8 is enough for anyone"

I did think "when the hell are we getting free local phone calls"
126
18/12/2020 02:15:28 2 2
bbc
Yes, the problem is developers are used to the best computers and best internet speeds so they learn to be lazy and wasteful. Really they should be restricted to the oldest computers/phones and slowest internet.
134
18/12/2020 07:47:39 1 0
bbc
It's like how I don't need a car that's more powerful or bigger than a Corsa 1.2. I'm not being sarcastic. I really don't.
138
37p
18/12/2020 08:41:56 0 0
bbc
There comes a point where there is enough speed to satisfy what you need at the time. Yes 14.4 dial up was difficult and caused a few issues and clearly was going to speed up.

As far as I'm concerned running at 70 mpbs on my home connection and 130 mpbs on my mobile is fine at the moment.
For other techies speed is important and a "how fast is my broadband" badge is a mark of honour
156
18/12/2020 10:38:28 0 0
bbc
28.8 kb?
That's fast.
1.2 kb both ways or 2.4 one way if you were lucky in the early 90's.
Watching Electronic Yellow Pages build up one line at a time on a black and white Wyse terminal was a breakthrough.
But these early searches and sending any data down the phone line was where it all started.
You had to be your own telephone engineer unlike taken for granted plug and play
24
17/12/2020 13:47:06 3 6
bbc
Why bother spending all that energy digging holes when Elon Musk's 'Starlink' delivers Gbps speeds from above?
25
17/12/2020 13:49:18 4 1
bbc
Its very very expensive, and not roled out yet.
49
17/12/2020 15:15:34 0 0
bbc
There is a high latency with connections from satellites. Good for streaming, bad for gaming and real time data.
97
17/12/2020 18:05:03 0 0
bbc
Overall capacity is also limited. The entire frequency spectrum is shared by everyone, with a fibre connection it's available on each fibre.
24
17/12/2020 13:47:06 3 6
bbc
Why bother spending all that energy digging holes when Elon Musk's 'Starlink' delivers Gbps speeds from above?
25
17/12/2020 13:49:18 4 1
bbc
Its very very expensive, and not roled out yet.
8
17/12/2020 13:10:42 6 5
bbc
Upgraded recently to fast fibre, the 30Mbps minimum speed. Thought I finally arrived in the 21st century, only to be informed by this article that I am nearly one of the underprivileged ones ):-(

Despite that, it does all I need. Why would a domestic residence need over 30 times that speed?
26
17/12/2020 13:53:10 1 0
bbc
The main thing is it allows for faster on the devices you have, so whilst its what you need, 30Mbps is still limited to the ammount you can have at any one time. A good way to look at this is, My parents have the exact same speed as me. But as I live alone in effect I have a signifcantly faster speeds. Its almost like I am 4x faster
104
17/12/2020 18:21:10 0 1
bbc
" I am 4x faster" This is you on your own compared with your (two I presume) parents. What on earth are they doing which means they each use twice the bandwidth you use?
27
17/12/2020 13:53:47 1 2
bbc
You mean the cities, while others don't even have broadband.
28
17/12/2020 13:58:24 2 1
bbc
Where I am, high speed fibre stops half way up the street. So there's a sudden line where people can get 350mbits/sec, and anyone after it is lucky to get 30.
22
17/12/2020 13:44:34 31 3
bbc
Should turn the headline around "Three in four UK homes 'can't access 1Gbps broadband'
29
17/12/2020 13:59:37 9 16
bbc
The BBC usually does ... it was refreshing to see a positive spin on progress so far ... don't be a Debby Downer all your life.
147
18/12/2020 09:52:28 2 1
bbc
'The government had promised everyone access to broadband speeds of up to 1Gbps by 2025 - but that target has been cut to 85% of homes.'
Another populist promise that grabbed big headlines but in reality could and would never be delivered.
But let's carry on pretending everything is wonderful and blame the messenger when we we're told it's not.
23
17/12/2020 13:45:55 40 5
bbc
An impressive number of "I've only got x speed, why would anyone want more?" posts...

Some things don't change - I've been on the internet long enough to remember the "My 28.8 Kilobit/second modem is fast enough for what I need, why should I upgrade to 56.4 Kilobits?" posts on usenet.

Where would we be now, if everyone had listened to the "what I've got is plenty" brigade? :-)
30
17/12/2020 14:00:13 20 2
bbc
Me too, I remember 28.6 Kb, heck I'm old enough to remember 300 baud!
But I'd never swap them for my current true 1Gb bidirectional fiber with unlimited data from Gigaclear.
129
AJ
18/12/2020 06:43:22 6 0
bbc
Yep. 300 up, 75 down in the old Wildcat BBS days on an ancient acoustic coupler. Then 9600 with Compuserve where downloading Netscape took hours to download a couple of megabytes. I think that makes my 380mbps connection over a million times faster then I was getting them. Heady days!
166
18/12/2020 13:08:42 1 0
bbc
Assuming your not a buisness, what do you actually do that requires that speed?
16
17/12/2020 13:35:44 0 0
bbc
On my 35mbps line it takes just couple of minutes to download semiannually upgrade which in the case I checked was 4GB in size. I was watching Netflix on my TV when it loaded and it didn't jam. Why would you pay £100s for line you only use on 1% most of the time (and probably up to 5% the rest as download is limited to source speed anyway)
31
17/12/2020 14:01:49 0 0
bbc
I've got 200mbps cable, and the extra speed is well worth it occasionally - my car satnav has a 35GB map update every month...

But that's the point - I don't need the speed 24/7, but when I do, the cost is well worth it to me.

I can't be bothered to upgrade to the 350mbit that is the fastest Virgin offer here at the moment, but when their gigabit pipes arrive I might be tempted :-)
20
17/12/2020 13:42:39 10 1
bbc
folk living a few miles outside Forres in Moray get 'dead slow'.....we're not talking about a remote glen here.....talking about homes along the main road between inverness and aberdeen...instead of spending billions on a rail line maybe spend it on getting EVERYONE access to fast broadband! To get fast broad band these folk need to pay £0000's yet those living in cities just plug in.....
32
17/12/2020 14:03:16 18 1
bbc
Quite right. for about 1/3 the cost of 19th century technology HS2 we could have 21st century fiber to every premises in the country. Then you wouldn't need to get to Birmingham 15 minutes earlier for your business meeting.
33
17/12/2020 14:16:56 0 2
bbc
Try as you might you cannot yet push physical goods through fibre-optic cable yet. Willy wonka tried and we know how that worked out for Mike.
37
17/12/2020 14:25:12 0 2
bbc
4k streaming upstairs, just hd downstairs (old big TV). Fiddling around with phones etc and I still don't get any buffering on 35meg broadband. Surely 5g make more sense infrastructure wise?
32
17/12/2020 14:03:16 18 1
bbc
Quite right. for about 1/3 the cost of 19th century technology HS2 we could have 21st century fiber to every premises in the country. Then you wouldn't need to get to Birmingham 15 minutes earlier for your business meeting.
33
17/12/2020 14:16:56 0 2
bbc
Try as you might you cannot yet push physical goods through fibre-optic cable yet. Willy wonka tried and we know how that worked out for Mike.
34
17/12/2020 14:19:31 23 1
bbc
Those who say 20Mb or 30Mb is fast enough are missing the point. They may be adequate for now (possibly) but 1Gb is far more future proof and won't need further upgrading for quite a few years. When it eventually does, the current fiber should be good for 10 or even 100Gb. Meanwhile, anyone who claims 30Mb is "Superfast" is seriously deluded, by world standards that's slow.
53
17/12/2020 15:29:21 1 1
bbc
Good point re: "future proof" infrastructure. That means it ought to make sense to offer cheaper speeds below the (current) 1Gbps limit on it. How many providers do this, how many have been sold? If there is validity in the "X is fast enough argument" (& there is, but the value of X is debatable & variable), then I'd expect there is a lot of it. What people say they need & what they'll pay for...
58
17/12/2020 15:33:45 1 3
bbc
The fastest upload speed we have in my city is 5mb, I wouldn't call that "Superfast". The USA is blessed with 10gb symmetrical home connections, that's what the UK should be aiming for.
127
18/12/2020 02:20:18 0 0
bbc
The simple fact is that economic performance and Internet speed is linked. We might also draw inverse links to pollution and road conjestion. Faster speeds means more efficient employees, faster decisions, less messing about trying to transfer a big file, easier OS upgrades/virus upgrades, more robust systems.
35
17/12/2020 14:20:54 2 3
bbc
A HYS moaning about our rubbish broadband

It's no surprise it's rubbish, we have UNICEF feeding the kids in Plymouth

No HYS though, not a news item, not even a web page

Just a bit on the tail end of the today programme
36
17/12/2020 14:21:01 0 3
bbc
I can and don't. HA
32
17/12/2020 14:03:16 18 1
bbc
Quite right. for about 1/3 the cost of 19th century technology HS2 we could have 21st century fiber to every premises in the country. Then you wouldn't need to get to Birmingham 15 minutes earlier for your business meeting.
37
17/12/2020 14:25:12 0 2
bbc
4k streaming upstairs, just hd downstairs (old big TV). Fiddling around with phones etc and I still don't get any buffering on 35meg broadband. Surely 5g make more sense infrastructure wise?
101
17/12/2020 18:10:30 2 0
bbc
Only when there are few users, because the frequency spectrum is shared by them all. Why do you think mobile operators always use cables (now mostly, if not all fibre) to link back to their core network, i's because the frequency spectrum is NOT shared across fibres.
38
17/12/2020 14:43:01 0 1
bbc
So of that 25% that can, how much of it is with BT and how much of it is with a different provider
83
Bob
17/12/2020 17:15:59 0 1
bbc
Click the link to the report. It tells you.

18% via BT network.
39
17/12/2020 14:43:07 1 2
bbc
Fantastic now my games will download 1 millisecond faster :). This is definitely future proofing though, and will certainly be needed down the line as we become more technologically advanced.
54
17/12/2020 15:29:23 3 1
bbc
Having faster reliable web connections creates jobs around the entire country, allowing people to not have to live in large cities.
40
17/12/2020 14:45:15 3 4
bbc
I don't think Ofcom are living in the same reality as the rest of us then....
41
17/12/2020 14:46:57 1 1
bbc
There's a huge 'caveat' concerning claims of percentages of the coverage within the UK
I've seen the 'map' they use to make these claims & the areas of 'Best UK broadband coverage' looks like a large 'reversed letter Z' stretching from the Northeast to the Northwest, diagonally down to London and across to Bristol down the M4 corridor
Most of Scotland, Wales, East Anglia & the Southwest not on it!
69
17/12/2020 16:25:52 2 3
bbc
Sorry, i'm in the southwest, actually in a village 8 miles outside of Barnstaple and I have a 500/70 FTTP connection. I could go higher, but can't justify the cost. However even 500 is far more than the house can consume at any point, and the router tells me there's 28 devices hanging off it.
42
17/12/2020 14:49:18 4 1
bbc
Yea availability is one thing, but being able to afford often extortionate prices, not mentioning any names - Virgin, is another.
43
17/12/2020 14:51:06 3 3
bbc
Boris will sort it, he said he would
76
17/12/2020 16:42:51 3 2
bbc
Boris is going to lie down in front of the photon's.
44
17/12/2020 14:53:01 4 7
bbc
1-4 where do they get these ludicrous stats from. No one on our estate has gigabyte broadband and there must be 100 houses so 1-4 is utter crap. :)
61
CT
17/12/2020 15:59:02 7 1
bbc
I also live on an estate, but I only have four houses. Mine, the cook's, the gardener's and the house keeper's. I have gigabit speeds, the others don't. So 1 in four is about right.
63
17/12/2020 16:01:12 0 1
bbc
They can claim this as you can pay for fibre laying to your house from the cab if your in a fttc area

Problem is the cost is eyewatering for a private household to pay
8
17/12/2020 13:10:42 6 5
bbc
Upgraded recently to fast fibre, the 30Mbps minimum speed. Thought I finally arrived in the 21st century, only to be informed by this article that I am nearly one of the underprivileged ones ):-(

Despite that, it does all I need. Why would a domestic residence need over 30 times that speed?
45
17/12/2020 15:01:19 0 0
bbc
For the HOLODECK style things that anit that far away in the future than Star Trek think.
46
17/12/2020 15:01:23 6 2
bbc
I live in Scotland, fairly rural but only about 1.5 miles from the nearest town. It annoys me when I see governmental promises to get the whole country fast broadband when there is NO hope of me ever getting even fibre, who would pay for that?
48
17/12/2020 15:14:05 10 2
bbc
You? Why should anyone else pay for you to have fibre. If you're not willing to pay for your own, it highly unlikely you'd pay for someone else to have it, fair is fair.

It's the "bonus" of living outside the largest towns, you get very little handed to you on a plate.
15
GA
17/12/2020 13:32:52 7 0
bbc
The benefit of full 1GB fibre isn't just the download speed. I signed up for BT's Full Fibre 900 package which gives 1GB down and 110Mbps up. It's actually the upload speed that's more useful for me now I'm working from home. However, I can also download a 40-50GB game in around 15 minutes (which is nice). Well worth the money.
47
17/12/2020 15:02:38 1 0
bbc
Curious as to what you do? I'm in construction design so work in 3D cad packages. A large drawing would be 10meg. Gone in half a second and it's only that long because of software handshaking. If your live editing video from home then yup, you need that upload but I can't think of many other uses.
103
17/12/2020 18:17:05 0 0
bbc
Well on the whole at least not (conventional) work related. Besides if being used for primarily business use then there will be symmetric products you could buy, admittedly at high cost, but as they say, you get what you pay for.
176
18/12/2020 15:26:03 0 0
bbc
That's not large. Try downloading a Navisworks file at over 6GB. When you need a file that size instantly then you need a FAST connection (FTTP).
46
17/12/2020 15:01:23 6 2
bbc
I live in Scotland, fairly rural but only about 1.5 miles from the nearest town. It annoys me when I see governmental promises to get the whole country fast broadband when there is NO hope of me ever getting even fibre, who would pay for that?
48
17/12/2020 15:14:05 10 2
bbc
You? Why should anyone else pay for you to have fibre. If you're not willing to pay for your own, it highly unlikely you'd pay for someone else to have it, fair is fair.

It's the "bonus" of living outside the largest towns, you get very little handed to you on a plate.
71
17/12/2020 16:30:56 1 0
bbc
Exactly, we are lucky to have a fibre to cabinet broadband service (27 Mbps), the next village doesn't because they couldn't get enough people to register their interest. Suppliers aren't obligated to provide fibre infrastructure for one or two properties out of an entire village. It's quite a complex undertaking involving a lot of red tape. Especially in areas of outstanding natural beauty.
152
18/12/2020 10:20:03 1 0
bbc
The FTTC cabinet is on the pavement outside of my house but I cant have FTTP. I would pay £1000 to get off of copper and paying "line rental" for a piece of 50 year old copper thats been paid for 1000 x over.
161
18/12/2020 11:16:35 0 0
bbc
I should pay pay for a company to lay a fibre line from the closest box 1.5 miles away, even though the government has stated it wants all of the UK to have fast (at least 10Mbps, I get 4)? Errr, OK.
24
17/12/2020 13:47:06 3 6
bbc
Why bother spending all that energy digging holes when Elon Musk's 'Starlink' delivers Gbps speeds from above?
49
17/12/2020 15:15:34 0 0
bbc
There is a high latency with connections from satellites. Good for streaming, bad for gaming and real time data.
50
17/12/2020 15:17:26 13 2
bbc
I'd like to know how many of these 1 in 4 actually have (and pay for) 1Gbps connections.
55
17/12/2020 15:30:10 7 2
bbc
Almost none, I suspect!
75
17/12/2020 16:42:12 2 1
bbc
I can now get 900mb connection but BT have set the price so high its not affordable as a consumer. BT upgrade from my 300mb would be from £45 to £81 !! although as a *new* customer it would be £60. Will stick to my 300mb which has been a godsend in our village and handles all my sky/netflix 4k needs.
51
CG
17/12/2020 15:16:27 4 3
bbc
Gigabit speed internet has long been available to anyone willing to spend ££££ for a leased line. Surely the question should be... What portion of the country can get gigabit internet within say £30/month of the national average.
Somehow doubt it will come out anywhere near 1 in 4.

In other words... nonsense!
52
17/12/2020 15:25:40 2 4
bbc
UK govenment should be investing into 1gb connection to every home within a much sooner timeframe. Not wasting our billions on building a trainline to get people to an office location 10 minutes quicker.

In certain parts of the USA, homes have a 10gb connection. Mine in comparison is a thousand times slower.
150
18/12/2020 10:16:20 0 0
bbc
But the Gigabit line won't let me get to the museums in London in person, will it?

Online is good, but there was just no comparison between watching a space shuttle launch in person at the Cape, and watching it on TV, or the interweb...
34
17/12/2020 14:19:31 23 1
bbc
Those who say 20Mb or 30Mb is fast enough are missing the point. They may be adequate for now (possibly) but 1Gb is far more future proof and won't need further upgrading for quite a few years. When it eventually does, the current fiber should be good for 10 or even 100Gb. Meanwhile, anyone who claims 30Mb is "Superfast" is seriously deluded, by world standards that's slow.
53
17/12/2020 15:29:21 1 1
bbc
Good point re: "future proof" infrastructure. That means it ought to make sense to offer cheaper speeds below the (current) 1Gbps limit on it. How many providers do this, how many have been sold? If there is validity in the "X is fast enough argument" (& there is, but the value of X is debatable & variable), then I'd expect there is a lot of it. What people say they need & what they'll pay for...
172
18/12/2020 14:46:59 0 0
bbc
BT in the UK offer that - if you get full fibre to premises (via Openreach) you can choose a retail download offer of 100 (or it might be 150), 300 or 1Gb. So it offers an upgrade path. The problem is that not everyone can get the FFTP in the first place.
39
17/12/2020 14:43:07 1 2
bbc
Fantastic now my games will download 1 millisecond faster :). This is definitely future proofing though, and will certainly be needed down the line as we become more technologically advanced.
54
17/12/2020 15:29:23 3 1
bbc
Having faster reliable web connections creates jobs around the entire country, allowing people to not have to live in large cities.
50
17/12/2020 15:17:26 13 2
bbc
I'd like to know how many of these 1 in 4 actually have (and pay for) 1Gbps connections.
55
17/12/2020 15:30:10 7 2
bbc
Almost none, I suspect!
23
17/12/2020 13:45:55 40 5
bbc
An impressive number of "I've only got x speed, why would anyone want more?" posts...

Some things don't change - I've been on the internet long enough to remember the "My 28.8 Kilobit/second modem is fast enough for what I need, why should I upgrade to 56.4 Kilobits?" posts on usenet.

Where would we be now, if everyone had listened to the "what I've got is plenty" brigade? :-)
56
17/12/2020 15:31:50 13 0
bbc
Luxury !

When I were a lad were had t'use carrier pigeon fort tinternet
74
17/12/2020 16:37:57 2 0
bbc
Ah yes, RFC 1149 and RFC 2549 :-)
18
17/12/2020 13:37:52 2 7
bbc
If one in four homes can have it then 15 out of the 60 homes in my street could have it. But nobody can, which is zero out of 60.
57
17/12/2020 15:32:39 3 1
bbc
Yes but in streets where it is fully available, 100% can have it. Don't forget it an average. Averages can be very misleading by themselves (especially to the unsophisticated).
34
17/12/2020 14:19:31 23 1
bbc
Those who say 20Mb or 30Mb is fast enough are missing the point. They may be adequate for now (possibly) but 1Gb is far more future proof and won't need further upgrading for quite a few years. When it eventually does, the current fiber should be good for 10 or even 100Gb. Meanwhile, anyone who claims 30Mb is "Superfast" is seriously deluded, by world standards that's slow.
58
17/12/2020 15:33:45 1 3
bbc
The fastest upload speed we have in my city is 5mb, I wouldn't call that "Superfast". The USA is blessed with 10gb symmetrical home connections, that's what the UK should be aiming for.
85
Bob
17/12/2020 17:17:29 3 0
bbc
The USA has some of the worst broadband in the developed world. You could make the same claim about the UK if you want to cast a broad brush based on one small niche provider.
59
ST
17/12/2020 15:48:51 6 7
bbc
Where'd they get this from, Donald Trump?

FAKE NEWS! ;-)
60
17/12/2020 15:53:57 5 6
bbc
Total rubbish - please try the truth for once OfCom.
44
17/12/2020 14:53:01 4 7
bbc
1-4 where do they get these ludicrous stats from. No one on our estate has gigabyte broadband and there must be 100 houses so 1-4 is utter crap. :)
61
CT
17/12/2020 15:59:02 7 1
bbc
I also live on an estate, but I only have four houses. Mine, the cook's, the gardener's and the house keeper's. I have gigabit speeds, the others don't. So 1 in four is about right.
62
17/12/2020 15:59:22 5 2
bbc
I'm sorry but giving me the option to pay for fibre laying to your house is not giving them access to 1gbps connections when the cost of a install is a few hundred to a few thousand pound
99
17/12/2020 18:10:07 0 3
bbc
"the cost of a install is a few hundred to a few thousand pound"

Not at all true..What fantasy land are you living in? LoLz
44
17/12/2020 14:53:01 4 7
bbc
1-4 where do they get these ludicrous stats from. No one on our estate has gigabyte broadband and there must be 100 houses so 1-4 is utter crap. :)
63
17/12/2020 16:01:12 0 1
bbc
They can claim this as you can pay for fibre laying to your house from the cab if your in a fttc area

Problem is the cost is eyewatering for a private household to pay
9
17/12/2020 13:11:03 0 0
bbc
For the majority of people right now high quality streaming will be the main consumer of that level of bandwidth. But it's not what we need today that's important, it's what we may need in the years ahead and that opportunities that will enable. I upgraded recently and I'd recommend it to anyone.
64
17/12/2020 16:03:28 0 0
bbc
I generally don't stream anyway, even if it's legal (I know youtube is streaming yes yes..). set a download going, it's usually here 30 mins later depending on the number of seeders. I mean the speed of the site I'm downloading from.

but I agree, getting full holographic images over fibre is veeeeery slow :)
65
17/12/2020 16:05:13 30 2
bbc
While the govt is adjusting planning policy, can they make it compulsory that for any housing development of more than 5 houses, the developer must pay for 1gbps infrastructure to be installed AT THE TIME OF BUILDING.

Common sense.
81
Bob
17/12/2020 17:13:11 6 2
bbc
Openreach has provided it for free for a couple of years now.

Any councils worth their salt will put it into S106 agreements as well.
90
17/12/2020 17:48:33 4 1
bbc
Why just five or more, make all builds, including self-builds fibre-up.
116
17/12/2020 23:09:38 3 0
bbc
When we dug in our B4RN community fibre network we actually laid out spare conduits for every household, even if they said that they weren't interested, just so that it would be easier for the next owner - and also in areas where we knew that developments were planned, but not yet started.
131
18/12/2020 07:01:53 1 0
bbc
I was a hardware and software developer of digital telephony in the late 70's and early 80's. I developed an ISDN based fibre to the phone (FTTP) in 1980 and we were offering the Post Office (BT) fibre to the cabinet (FTTC) back then for new build estates. Needless to say, lack of foresight prevented that. If that fibre had been laid, even today it would have given 10Mb/s to the premises.
141
18/12/2020 09:06:41 0 0
bbc
They already do. Our Persimmon development has fibre to the premises in all homes.
23
17/12/2020 13:45:55 40 5
bbc
An impressive number of "I've only got x speed, why would anyone want more?" posts...

Some things don't change - I've been on the internet long enough to remember the "My 28.8 Kilobit/second modem is fast enough for what I need, why should I upgrade to 56.4 Kilobits?" posts on usenet.

Where would we be now, if everyone had listened to the "what I've got is plenty" brigade? :-)
66
17/12/2020 16:05:31 1 0
bbc
neh I never thought "28.8 is enough for anyone"

I did think "when the hell are we getting free local phone calls"
67
17/12/2020 16:18:14 9 2
bbc
Just so people can share cute dog/cat videos a bit more quickly.
107
17/12/2020 18:53:52 2 0
bbc
Please no. Not more 'cute cat vids'.... That and the ever increasing number of adverts will use up all that extra bandwidth almost as soon as you get it.
158
18/12/2020 10:47:01 0 0
bbc
Slightly off topic, but the blue LED used to be the Holy Grail of optoelectronics.
The inventors got the Nobel Prize.
Little did they know that every Christmas tree in the land and every cheap gadget that lights up would be the main beneficiaries.
Nor did Tim Berners-Lee expect such huge growth in our digital dependence.
68
17/12/2020 16:18:29 9 3
bbc
It's a bit meaningless though isn't it. That's just Virgin Media's service, so you can get a tokenistic 1Gbps speed if you test it, but your upload speed is 50Mbps.

The problem is that everyone wanting to stream at the same time still causes problems with buffering or the quality being downgraded to accommodate it, the exchanges and backbone are what really need to be upgraded.
79
17/12/2020 17:04:44 3 2
bbc
Nope, Openreach also provide a 1Gb FTTP service which is available from the likes of BT internet, Zen, etc.
41
17/12/2020 14:46:57 1 1
bbc
There's a huge 'caveat' concerning claims of percentages of the coverage within the UK
I've seen the 'map' they use to make these claims & the areas of 'Best UK broadband coverage' looks like a large 'reversed letter Z' stretching from the Northeast to the Northwest, diagonally down to London and across to Bristol down the M4 corridor
Most of Scotland, Wales, East Anglia & the Southwest not on it!
69
17/12/2020 16:25:52 2 3
bbc
Sorry, i'm in the southwest, actually in a village 8 miles outside of Barnstaple and I have a 500/70 FTTP connection. I could go higher, but can't justify the cost. However even 500 is far more than the house can consume at any point, and the router tells me there's 28 devices hanging off it.
70
17/12/2020 16:30:34 5 1
bbc
They have been laying this all over my area. You try and go a different route to avoid the traffic lights, just to find another set! But its a small price to pay. We may not need 1 Gbps now, but its nice to see a bit of future proofing. As for rural areas. This cost Companies money to do. They are not charities. They need a certain level of return to make it worth while. Its called business.
48
17/12/2020 15:14:05 10 2
bbc
You? Why should anyone else pay for you to have fibre. If you're not willing to pay for your own, it highly unlikely you'd pay for someone else to have it, fair is fair.

It's the "bonus" of living outside the largest towns, you get very little handed to you on a plate.
71
17/12/2020 16:30:56 1 0
bbc
Exactly, we are lucky to have a fibre to cabinet broadband service (27 Mbps), the next village doesn't because they couldn't get enough people to register their interest. Suppliers aren't obligated to provide fibre infrastructure for one or two properties out of an entire village. It's quite a complex undertaking involving a lot of red tape. Especially in areas of outstanding natural beauty.
132
18/12/2020 07:07:50 0 0
bbc
Erm, confused! Where there is a copper cable, there can be fibre. Doh!
14
17/12/2020 13:30:45 17 5
bbc
Should it not read 1 in 4 who live in city's ?
72
17/12/2020 16:32:04 20 4
bbc
No, definitely not. It could perhaps read '1 in 4 who live in cities' though.
177
18/12/2020 15:28:18 0 0
bbc
No. If 1 person in said City has access to FTTP then you'll find 99% of people in the same City has access.
73
17/12/2020 16:36:09 3 2
bbc
In SPENNYMOOR, County Durham (yes it’s. Or there so who cares eh!) the copper wire is mostly rotten in the ground amd is constantly being repaired, even though fibre is 300m away in a cabinet, the copper connects the homes. The mobile phone masts have been placed too far away for 1/2 the town to get 3G forget 4G. And it’s a town of 30,000. Luckily it’s only a northern town.
56
17/12/2020 15:31:50 13 0
bbc
Luxury !

When I were a lad were had t'use carrier pigeon fort tinternet
74
17/12/2020 16:37:57 2 0
bbc
Ah yes, RFC 1149 and RFC 2549 :-)
50
17/12/2020 15:17:26 13 2
bbc
I'd like to know how many of these 1 in 4 actually have (and pay for) 1Gbps connections.
75
17/12/2020 16:42:12 2 1
bbc
I can now get 900mb connection but BT have set the price so high its not affordable as a consumer. BT upgrade from my 300mb would be from £45 to £81 !! although as a *new* customer it would be £60. Will stick to my 300mb which has been a godsend in our village and handles all my sky/netflix 4k needs.
87
Bob
17/12/2020 17:23:59 4 1
bbc
So basically you want a sports car, but don't want to pay sports car prices?
93
17/12/2020 17:53:04 3 1
bbc
Triple the bandwidth for less than double the price! If you "need" it, then it's a bargain. Black mark to BT for doing sweetheart new customer deals for less though, although it what their competitors do, along with cherry picking locations; that's something Ofcom should tackle.
43
17/12/2020 14:51:06 3 3
bbc
Boris will sort it, he said he would
76
17/12/2020 16:42:51 3 2
bbc
Boris is going to lie down in front of the photon's.
77
17/12/2020 16:41:35 6 5
bbc
There is no way on earth this stat of 1 in 4 have access to 1Gps is true! No where near that figure. I've stuck with 10mbs for years and no sign of anything any faster is coming!! Total rubbish
80
Bob
17/12/2020 17:09:54 3 4
bbc
Hint: you are part of the 3 out of 4.
78
MRG
17/12/2020 16:53:45 2 4
bbc
These stats just cannot be true? Surely this needs to be revisted and questioned?
88
17/12/2020 17:42:54 1 1
bbc
The claim contains the words "up to"...
68
17/12/2020 16:18:29 9 3
bbc
It's a bit meaningless though isn't it. That's just Virgin Media's service, so you can get a tokenistic 1Gbps speed if you test it, but your upload speed is 50Mbps.

The problem is that everyone wanting to stream at the same time still causes problems with buffering or the quality being downgraded to accommodate it, the exchanges and backbone are what really need to be upgraded.
79
17/12/2020 17:04:44 3 2
bbc
Nope, Openreach also provide a 1Gb FTTP service which is available from the likes of BT internet, Zen, etc.
167
18/12/2020 13:18:06 1 0
bbc
Except that is not widely available at all. The one in four households figure is due to Virgin's offering, otherwise the figure would be more like 1 in 100 households.

https://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local/broadband-map#7/50.799/-0.126/geafttp/

Openreach native FTTP selected, zoom all the way in to see exactly how tiny the coverage is, and a lot of those are business installations.
77
17/12/2020 16:41:35 6 5
bbc
There is no way on earth this stat of 1 in 4 have access to 1Gps is true! No where near that figure. I've stuck with 10mbs for years and no sign of anything any faster is coming!! Total rubbish
80
Bob
17/12/2020 17:09:54 3 4
bbc
Hint: you are part of the 3 out of 4.
65
17/12/2020 16:05:13 30 2
bbc
While the govt is adjusting planning policy, can they make it compulsory that for any housing development of more than 5 houses, the developer must pay for 1gbps infrastructure to be installed AT THE TIME OF BUILDING.

Common sense.
81
Bob
17/12/2020 17:13:11 6 2
bbc
Openreach has provided it for free for a couple of years now.

Any councils worth their salt will put it into S106 agreements as well.
82
17/12/2020 17:15:20 1 1
bbc
I am pleased for those people who can get gigabit speeds. It does annoy me that I pay the same monthly price while getting 3.5 meg (on a good day) and putting up with Openreach's continually moving promises. Three years ago I was told it would only take 18 months to get fibre - I am still waiting !!
38
17/12/2020 14:43:01 0 1
bbc
So of that 25% that can, how much of it is with BT and how much of it is with a different provider
83
Bob
17/12/2020 17:15:59 0 1
bbc
Click the link to the report. It tells you.

18% via BT network.
173
18/12/2020 14:56:18 0 0
bbc
I think you might be interpreting the report a little differently then me. I see 18% FTTP,
FTTP isn't specifically mean 1GB (or more) and there are area's of the country (eg kcom) which aren't BT.
84
17/12/2020 17:16:17 5 1
bbc
Stats?
Well big cities may have 1Gbit/s but there are lots of places in the country where they still have to send out a raven!
151
18/12/2020 10:16:50 1 0
bbc
Absolutely. My father lives a stones throw from Glasgow and gets 5Mbps. Its better to tether from his 4G phone. Embarrasing.
58
17/12/2020 15:33:45 1 3
bbc
The fastest upload speed we have in my city is 5mb, I wouldn't call that "Superfast". The USA is blessed with 10gb symmetrical home connections, that's what the UK should be aiming for.
85
Bob
17/12/2020 17:17:29 3 0
bbc
The USA has some of the worst broadband in the developed world. You could make the same claim about the UK if you want to cast a broad brush based on one small niche provider.
95
17/12/2020 18:01:06 4 0
bbc
Well said. If you're old enough to remember "shared service" lines, in the UK it was never shared by more than 2, in the USA, it was not uncommon for it to be between as many as 10.

The USA has never had a "universal service obligation" on it's providers. They vary greatly & provide only that which makes money for them. Commercially sensible, but not what many in the UK would recognise as right.
86
SCM
17/12/2020 17:19:38 1 1
bbc
Now if they could just get my house to 1Mbps (Mbps, not MB or GB or GBps, Mbps) that would be great!!!
75
17/12/2020 16:42:12 2 1
bbc
I can now get 900mb connection but BT have set the price so high its not affordable as a consumer. BT upgrade from my 300mb would be from £45 to £81 !! although as a *new* customer it would be £60. Will stick to my 300mb which has been a godsend in our village and handles all my sky/netflix 4k needs.
87
Bob
17/12/2020 17:23:59 4 1
bbc
So basically you want a sports car, but don't want to pay sports car prices?
125
18/12/2020 02:07:19 1 0
bbc
Don't see where I suggest that i want a 900mb "sports car", just that the price is too high and happy with my "saloon" car, it does the job. I still think that it is over priced if you compare to many European countries and what they charge.
I lived with 2mb broadband for years (with 2 teenagers) and that was painful.
78
MRG
17/12/2020 16:53:45 2 4
bbc
These stats just cannot be true? Surely this needs to be revisted and questioned?
88
17/12/2020 17:42:54 1 1
bbc
The claim contains the words "up to"...
89
17/12/2020 17:46:10 6 2
bbc
Happy for the 25%, but the rest of us can go whistle for anything close to those speeds. Shortly after the Government announced £5 Billion funding required for the ultrafast Broadband rollout it's been cut down to £1.2 Billion, and earlier promises of all houses having superfast broadband have been cut back to 85%

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-55092421

Yet more broken promises from Boris
114
17/12/2020 22:56:36 1 1
bbc
This thing called Covid-19 happened. And as you won't want to pay more tax the money has to be saved from somewhere.
65
17/12/2020 16:05:13 30 2
bbc
While the govt is adjusting planning policy, can they make it compulsory that for any housing development of more than 5 houses, the developer must pay for 1gbps infrastructure to be installed AT THE TIME OF BUILDING.

Common sense.
90
17/12/2020 17:48:33 4 1
bbc
Why just five or more, make all builds, including self-builds fibre-up.
91
17/12/2020 17:49:03 2 3
bbc
Gigabit is Sooo last decade. should be laying dark fibre at lest
By the time BT get 75% of the country done, the rest of the world will be in the Tbits
98
17/12/2020 18:06:08 1 0
bbc
Educate your self's not everybody will know what "DARK FIBER" is.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_fibre
92
17/12/2020 17:50:19 1 2
bbc
They installed Fibre to the Pole where I live last year but as yet it is not live (maybe to BT customers which I am not). Plus the inevitable cost for the Innovators/Pioneers.

The faster speeds allow more of the background cookies/tracking by the likes of Google, Facebook, etc together with the auto start videos on many websites.

Open Reach/BT are behind on their smarthub to RJ11 knowledge too.
96
17/12/2020 18:03:27 2 0
bbc
There are plenty of browser addons that can and do block a lot of this background garbage on the interweb, we never see any auto play videos or other nasty infected adverts, We don't need or use spacebook or google. or any anti-social website's. Just make the internet you want by simply blocking all the nasty garbage and then and only then you will have the internet that you want clean & safe. <3
142
37p
18/12/2020 09:10:13 0 0
bbc
Openreach provide the infrastructure. BT are simply customers as are all other providers so it's up to those providers to take advantage of fibre to the pole.
75
17/12/2020 16:42:12 2 1
bbc
I can now get 900mb connection but BT have set the price so high its not affordable as a consumer. BT upgrade from my 300mb would be from £45 to £81 !! although as a *new* customer it would be £60. Will stick to my 300mb which has been a godsend in our village and handles all my sky/netflix 4k needs.
93
17/12/2020 17:53:04 3 1
bbc
Triple the bandwidth for less than double the price! If you "need" it, then it's a bargain. Black mark to BT for doing sweetheart new customer deals for less though, although it what their competitors do, along with cherry picking locations; that's something Ofcom should tackle.
94
17/12/2020 17:53:40 2 1
bbc
We have 1GB fiber in my house and we use it to the max kids have xbox's and PC's and there are more pc's for the rest of the household & then there are all the mobile phones and android tablets besides & netflix is on amlost all of the time. So yeah we love the 1gb fiber connection, more than enough speed for this house hold.

HAPPY CHRISTMAS EVERYBODY - STAY SAFE AND STAY WELL - Much <3 FROM US
85
Bob
17/12/2020 17:17:29 3 0
bbc
The USA has some of the worst broadband in the developed world. You could make the same claim about the UK if you want to cast a broad brush based on one small niche provider.
95
17/12/2020 18:01:06 4 0
bbc
Well said. If you're old enough to remember "shared service" lines, in the UK it was never shared by more than 2, in the USA, it was not uncommon for it to be between as many as 10.

The USA has never had a "universal service obligation" on it's providers. They vary greatly & provide only that which makes money for them. Commercially sensible, but not what many in the UK would recognise as right.
92
17/12/2020 17:50:19 1 2
bbc
They installed Fibre to the Pole where I live last year but as yet it is not live (maybe to BT customers which I am not). Plus the inevitable cost for the Innovators/Pioneers.

The faster speeds allow more of the background cookies/tracking by the likes of Google, Facebook, etc together with the auto start videos on many websites.

Open Reach/BT are behind on their smarthub to RJ11 knowledge too.
96
17/12/2020 18:03:27 2 0
bbc
There are plenty of browser addons that can and do block a lot of this background garbage on the interweb, we never see any auto play videos or other nasty infected adverts, We don't need or use spacebook or google. or any anti-social website's. Just make the internet you want by simply blocking all the nasty garbage and then and only then you will have the internet that you want clean & safe. <3
112
17/12/2020 20:31:35 0 0
bbc
I went on a certain news site a while back and found, with all the video adverts, one page took 150MB! Good thing I have unlimited.
113
17/12/2020 20:50:48 1 1
bbc
Yes, I know that but so many are not that technically knowledgeable to do it.

Even being set up by people like us then they still end up returning for help when the system has a problem (slow/unusable).
149
18/12/2020 10:08:35 0 0
bbc
So you don't have any friends who are only on Farcebook, then?

I know quite a few geeks who are inordinately proud of not being on Farcebook, but then they complain they can't talk to people...
24
17/12/2020 13:47:06 3 6
bbc
Why bother spending all that energy digging holes when Elon Musk's 'Starlink' delivers Gbps speeds from above?
97
17/12/2020 18:05:03 0 0
bbc
Overall capacity is also limited. The entire frequency spectrum is shared by everyone, with a fibre connection it's available on each fibre.
91
17/12/2020 17:49:03 2 3
bbc
Gigabit is Sooo last decade. should be laying dark fibre at lest
By the time BT get 75% of the country done, the rest of the world will be in the Tbits
98
17/12/2020 18:06:08 1 0
bbc
Educate your self's not everybody will know what "DARK FIBER" is.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_fibre
62
17/12/2020 15:59:22 5 2
bbc
I'm sorry but giving me the option to pay for fibre laying to your house is not giving them access to 1gbps connections when the cost of a install is a few hundred to a few thousand pound
99
17/12/2020 18:10:07 0 3
bbc
"the cost of a install is a few hundred to a few thousand pound"

Not at all true..What fantasy land are you living in? LoLz
148
18/12/2020 09:57:29 1 0
bbc
A lot of the UK?
100
fin
17/12/2020 18:10:15 0 1
bbc
Hmm...the government rural gigabit voucher scheme was meant to help rural communities upgrade...i am community lead for our area, and Openreach gave us a price of £46000 to upgrade, and said we needed to get 30 out of 51 homes to sign up. That is 60%. Seriously nowhere in the UK is there 60% signup as this article says, so what are openreach playing