Covid vaccine: More than 130,000 vaccinated in UK in first week
16/12/2020 | news | health | 1,134
Health Minister Nadhim Zahawi says it is a "really good start" to the UK's programme.
1
16/12/2020 10:57:35 83 14
bbc
Great job NHS England !!

Keep going....we're with you.
133
16/12/2020 11:19:05 46 7
bbc
ditto Wales, Scotland and NI?
443
16/12/2020 12:02:48 6 2
bbc
eh?? Why just "NHS England"
2
16/12/2020 10:58:02 29 3
bbc
That's a good start well done. Now let's keep ramping things up!!!
3
16/12/2020 10:58:05 11 2
bbc
Hooray!!!!!!
4
16/12/2020 10:58:37 131 7
bbc
Hopefully when the easier to store Oxford Uni vaccine is ready to go we can get moving quickly and get our live back.
No one has taken my life so far and if they had it could not be taken back, that is what the restrictions and vaccines are protecting as well as the NHS. A Silly phrase used in advertising to make trivial problems seem massively important aimed mainly at women. Removed
308
16/12/2020 11:43:45 2 17
bbc
We might not need it by then. Although it could be handy for the 3rd wave.
787
16/12/2020 13:17:51 2 1
bbc
Hopefully you can support all the vaccination initiatives.
941
16/12/2020 17:43:42 0 2
bbc
Yes, hopefully that is the case because at this rate it will be about 8 or so years to get around to us all.
5
16/12/2020 10:58:38 2 8
bbc
Is there a breakdown of which groups have received the vaccine and which areas? Anyone?
19
16/12/2020 11:02:08 4 10
bbc
Of course not. Useful info never available.
6
Den
16/12/2020 10:58:51 43 4
bbc
That's great news. Although remember with only the first jab, your not fully vaccinated!
26
16/12/2020 11:03:40 25 8
bbc
A few weeks before you get the second jab and a few weeks more before it becomes fully effective. So it's not going to be any use over Christmas.
7
16/12/2020 10:57:49 4 12
bbc
there appears to be a real lack of consistency as to how the vaccine is being delivered. I have a 100 year old grandmother who even after repeated calls to her GP is still none the wiser as to where and when she will get the vaccine.
25
16/12/2020 11:03:21 6 1
bbc
Apparently we will receive a letter or text sending us our appointment time. The GP practices are not responsible for organising the programme.
29
16/12/2020 11:03:49 10 1
bbc
Obviously both she, and you, missed the news that you're supposed to wait to be contacted by th NHS ... and not clog up the phone lines by ringing in.
289
16/12/2020 11:40:29 2 1
bbc
Maybe the government should sit down and make a list of all 67M people in priority order to make sure everyone gets the vaccine exactly in their correct position in the pecking order.

Or maybe they should crack on with what they have and vaccinate people in the top priority groups as quickly as they can based on what vaccine is available and where the logistics make it easier to vaccinate.
666
16/12/2020 12:40:15 0 1
bbc
Is she in a care home? If so then the whole care home will be contacted, if not then she will be contacted when the over 80 group starts.
8
16/12/2020 10:58:31 8 20
bbc
So with a UK population of 66.65 million it's going to take about 10 years?
51
16/12/2020 11:05:55 14 2
bbc
bet you are fun guy to be around at parties
55
16/12/2020 11:08:52 5 1
bbc
A) This is with 70 vaccination centres, they have opened another 200 this week and 1000 by the end of the year.
B) Vaccinating 60% will put us near herd immunity
C) Only vaccinating those 70+ years (about 10million) will reduce Covid deaths dramatically.
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
31
16/12/2020 11:04:13 7 7
bbc
Wrong. 1 million per week x 2 doses and it'll take closer to three years before the whole population have been vaccinated (66 million plus overseas territories).
36
16/12/2020 11:05:46 8 1
bbc
And as we don't ned to vaccinate the entire population it'll be done and dusted a lot faster than that.
38
16/12/2020 11:05:52 8 2
bbc
No. Never heard of herd immunity.As vaccinated numbers increase, virus will decline. Taking existing ' had the virus' people into account a substantial improvement would arise wihtin a quarter of that timescale.
42
16/12/2020 11:06:41 9 1
bbc
In fairness, those under the age of 40 with no health issues are by the vast majority already protected from any significant consequences or inconvenience. We should be aiming to protect those at risk.
43
16/12/2020 11:04:00 11 1
bbc
They don’t need to vaccinate all the population. Once they vaccinate about 10 million older and vulnerable people, deaths should drop by 99 percent and, if results from the trials are right, minimise people going into hospital.
64
16/12/2020 11:09:52 5 1
bbc
There are about 24 million people over 50 at the moment. Perhaps target them first?
10
16/12/2020 10:59:51 305 15
bbc
My mum got vaccinated yesterday. She's 84 and delighted. We have decided to not meet at Christmas but instead after January 4th when she gets her second dose. We can wait a little longer now that her risk of catching is going to be much reduced (we do understand it is not zero but much reduced).
I expect less problems than track & trace - as giving vaccinations is a well understood process.
34
16/12/2020 11:04:27 164 10
bbc
Remember she isn't fully protected until a week after the second dose
137
16/12/2020 11:19:57 8 45
bbc
Sorry to say, but this kind of back to normal attitude will only spread it as much as it would have without a vaccine
304
16/12/2020 11:42:50 10 3
bbc
Remember that's the Orthodox Christmas, or you could celebrate Epiphany. And your mum can have a hug (which I bet she's missed).
330
16/12/2020 11:45:54 15 41
bbc
I really think the government are prioritising the wrong groups. Health workers should be first followed by students, teachers, transport workers and the retail / hospitality sectors. How is vaccinating the old going to open up the economy? We need to put the future of the young first for the sake of our long term prosperity as opposed to constantly trying to avoid sensationalist headlines.
377
16/12/2020 11:51:52 8 3
bbc
Have Christmas separate from her on 25th.
Then celebrate the orthodox Christmas in January with her.
Tell her she can be like the Queen with two birthdays!
409
16/12/2020 11:55:48 17 2
bbc
if you could share some of your common sense around the country we would be very grateful, merry xmas to you and nan
675
16/12/2020 12:44:07 3 1
bbc
Remember, they don't know if she can still catch it and spread it.
692
16/12/2020 12:47:42 5 2
bbc
I am sorry to say that you have been misled. I have no problem with your mum (or my 86 year old Dad) getting the vaccine if they want it. The government has not announced that the lockdown rules will change to not applying to those who have had the vaccine. They will still have to wear masks in shops, queue up outside the doctors, not go to the pub, and not be able to mix indoors with others.
816
16/12/2020 13:33:42 0 3
bbc
But she could still be a carrier and give it to the rest of you - they are vaccinated you may not be. And remember more likely to have bad reactions over 50 yet there are thousands of under 50's who have perished in this pandemic.
889
16/12/2020 15:23:13 0 0
bbc
you think that the science of micro biology (vaccines) is simpler than programming (tgrack and trace)? yeah?
947
16/12/2020 17:48:28 0 0
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She may get it, but after a vaccine not be so ill with it. A good outcome.
972
16/12/2020 18:56:42 0 3
bbc
Big mistake, you will regret this if she doesn’t make next Christmas. Live life today, here and now. She is 84 make every Christmas a good for her.
16/12/2020 23:03:17 2 0
bbc
My Mum got hers today, too. Really thankful.
11
16/12/2020 11:00:16 13 2
bbc
Amazing numbers. Well done to everyone involved.
12
16/12/2020 11:00:19 21 2
bbc
Nice one ! - keep it going.
13
16/12/2020 11:00:37 7 25
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Not convinced this government are upto delivering what they promised on vaccines . They have over promised on everything
else and failed to deliver on this pandemic so far. They are now in last chance saloon on vaccines.
And lets not forget the vaccine has all been down to private sector enterprise not Hancock et al.
14
16/12/2020 11:00:48 12 6
bbc
There appears to be time to test 300,000 people a day (approx 2 million a week) so surely some of that manpower could get more vaccinations done!
50
16/12/2020 11:05:30 9 2
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I think its a case of supply vrs demand, there isnt an infinite supply and as other countries in the EU approve it will get harder to source
91
16/12/2020 11:14:10 3 1
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Not as simple as that!
378
16/12/2020 11:52:12 2 1
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It’s all about balance still need to test this can not stop just because of the vaccine
15
16/12/2020 11:01:00 374 43
bbc
Over 130 000 people vaccinated and only two allergic reactions (in people with a history of allergic reactions) reported as serious side effects. Both those people fully recovered within 48 hours.

Meanwhile in the same period of time around 2900 British people died through Covid 19. None of them are expected to recover.
37
16/12/2020 11:05:48 82 398
bbc
Bizarre. Give it a few years and then see if there are any bad reactions . The testing period has not been long enough to know what consequences there might be
53
16/12/2020 11:08:14 37 10
bbc
People who died will never recover.
134
16/12/2020 11:19:14 44 94
bbc
But did the 2900 die from Covid or just test positive ?

How many of the 60,000 who have (allegedly) died from covid would have died regardless ?

Heart disease, cancer, strokes.
244
16/12/2020 11:34:52 5 22
bbc
I think its a case of being Two that you know about. Full details are being held on the new Genpact AI software which is tracking adverse reactions, and the government are highly unlikely to publish data unless there are mass bad reactions that they cant keep a lid on.
342
16/12/2020 11:47:21 4 11
bbc
Only two allergic reactions after the first day, after people were told it was safe for those with allergic reactions. On day two those with allergic reactions were told not to take the vaccine. The advice changed.

Therefore to state that 130,000 vaccinations and only two allergic reactions is misleading, as those with allergies have been told not to take the vaccine!
478
16/12/2020 12:07:55 2 3
bbc
But what you accept as being 'safe' here is very few acute responses. This would be assessed in phase I trials. We need to know if there are any medium- to long-terms side effects. That's partly why phase III clinical trials normally take such a long time. More than months. I'd encourage those at most risk from covid to get vaccinated. As someone with more to lose, I'll refuse for the time being.
554
16/12/2020 12:22:33 0 1
bbc
Several may.
567
16/12/2020 12:24:43 2 3
bbc
Brilliant news and well done NHS!
We know that current stock of vaccine will run out this week or the beginning of next week (400k 1st doses). I wish the government would give us more information.
- when is next batch of Pfizer vaccine being delivered.
- what is current stockpile of Oxford vaccine
- what is the delivery capacity of the NHS (jabs/day, jabs/week)
Elected reps -more transparency pls
609
16/12/2020 12:30:04 1 4
bbc
You obviously work for the Govt., PHE or SAGE then cos only those idiots could come out with such a rash statement so soon after 130k people have been injected with an unproven vaccine...BTW if you believe that 2900 died through Covid in the same period (but you don't say what the period was) then you need sectioning :-)
16
16/12/2020 11:01:09 6 13
bbc
So we'll be good to get back to normal in about...5 years
17
16/12/2020 11:01:42 5 10
bbc
Super news, no denying. But once again, as with everything COVID (and beyond), there doesn't seem to be any easy way to keep track on all numbers.
"The figure does not take into account people who have been vaccinated by GPs and nurses in the community, which started on Monday."
Again, it's really great news. But I'm just a bit fed up of all the caveats that come with the stats.
32
Bob
16/12/2020 11:04:19 6 1
bbc
Why would a figure for the first 7 days include data for something that occurred outside of those seven days?
18
16/12/2020 11:01:51 1 20
bbc
Why aren't real countries such as Germany, Switzerland and Denmark not adopting and using vaccination programmes?
44
16/12/2020 11:04:26 10 1
bbc
"real countries" ?! They will all be vaccinating as soon as they are approved by the EU medical directors (which is due this week)
45
16/12/2020 11:05:09 1 2
bbc
These are the real countries that were praised on HYS for their control of Covid-19 at it's outbreak. These are the same countries moving into stringent lock-down, not because of their failure but because of Boris.
5
16/12/2020 10:58:38 2 8
bbc
Is there a breakdown of which groups have received the vaccine and which areas? Anyone?
19
16/12/2020 11:02:08 4 10
bbc
Of course not. Useful info never available.
20
16/12/2020 11:02:16 4 19
bbc
At that rate, it should only take another 23 months to vaccinate all the 12 million over 65's in the UK.
27
16/12/2020 11:03:41 13 2
bbc
Do you know the concept of the "S Curve" for projects?
21
16/12/2020 11:02:33 6 2
bbc
This is great news - give me the jab so I can start living again.
22
16/12/2020 11:02:44 113 11
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Not everyone need the vaccine so it wont take 12 months. Please be grateful we have a vaccine available fo those that do need it.
46
16/12/2020 11:07:15 11 32
bbc
Why do you assume people's aren't grateful?
66
16/12/2020 11:09:54 12 4
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Awwwww.....don't say that. It'll ruin the miseryguts' opportunities to try and drag everybody else down again like they've been doing every day this past year on here..... :)
213
16/12/2020 11:31:33 4 14
bbc
This is brilliant news but why aren't we questioning the speed of the rollout given the hammering the Government received in the past over their handling of PPE etc. Why are we now trusting the Govt saying this will be 'ramped up'. To what?

We've known this vaccine has been coming for weeks. Even with its particular handling requirements I am genuinely surprised we haven't done more in a week.
238
16/12/2020 11:34:15 10 15
bbc
Quite funny, you look at who is top priority for the vaccine (basically 80+) and that just proves how little a threat it ever was... All we had to do was shield the vulnerable and wash hands. NHS had months to prepare for inevitable spike in winter but did nothing and nightingale's sat empty. Meanwhile the economy goes down the pan which in turn effects NHS.....
23
16/12/2020 11:02:59 11 11
bbc
Why are residents of care homes being bundled into buses and taken to GP surgeries for the vaccine? Surely its more protective of a bubble to have 1 or 2 nursing staff visit a care home than it is to have 30 plus extremely vulnerable people exposed to the world outside their bubble
63
16/12/2020 11:09:51 26 2
bbc
might be something to do with storing at -70C. Not your average fridge temp ;-)
71
16/12/2020 11:10:41 7 1
bbc
I think its something to do with how the vaccine has to be stored right up until the time it is given. Also any adverse affects can be dealt with more expediently in a surgery.
74
16/12/2020 11:11:00 5 1
bbc
Nope. It isnt.
81
16/12/2020 11:12:44 9 1
bbc
I believe it is to do with the logistics of vaccine storage etc for this particular vaccine.
When the AstraZeneca one becomes available that will be much easier to administer in homes etc.
The current vaccine I am told needs 2 pharmacists to help break down the vials into 975 doses.
281
16/12/2020 11:39:40 4 1
bbc
Have you read anything about the vaccine and the storage issues? This isn't currently possible due to the temperature that the vaccine needs to be stored at.
562
16/12/2020 12:06:38 0 1
bbc
i dont know but might be having to keep vaccine cold
24
16/12/2020 11:03:18 229 4
bbc
A great start.
What a huge logistical exercise this will be.
Good luck to all those involved and I do hope it's a big success.
326
16/12/2020 11:45:43 27 44
bbc
Great start, but at that rate it'll be a while until the whole of the UK is treated.
507
16/12/2020 12:13:21 9 13
bbc
Totally agree.

My only concern is the competence of the Government in getting this done. Their track record worries me. Indeed, I think their lack of competence throughout this pandemic has cost lives.

If they don't get this right, I think they will be out of office for years, and would deserve to be, so I hope that is the motivation that they need.
7
16/12/2020 10:57:49 4 12
bbc
there appears to be a real lack of consistency as to how the vaccine is being delivered. I have a 100 year old grandmother who even after repeated calls to her GP is still none the wiser as to where and when she will get the vaccine.
25
16/12/2020 11:03:21 6 1
bbc
Apparently we will receive a letter or text sending us our appointment time. The GP practices are not responsible for organising the programme.
6
Den
16/12/2020 10:58:51 43 4
bbc
That's great news. Although remember with only the first jab, your not fully vaccinated!
26
16/12/2020 11:03:40 25 8
bbc
A few weeks before you get the second jab and a few weeks more before it becomes fully effective. So it's not going to be any use over Christmas.
607
16/12/2020 12:29:54 4 4
bbc
Are you complaining about this? For heaven's sake, try looking on the positve side.
798
16/12/2020 13:21:39 2 2
bbc
So what? We have made a start. Chew on that whilst opening your presents.
826
16/12/2020 13:39:07 3 1
bbc
Stop your moaning. You sound like you lost a shilling and picked up sixpence.
20
16/12/2020 11:02:16 4 19
bbc
At that rate, it should only take another 23 months to vaccinate all the 12 million over 65's in the UK.
27
16/12/2020 11:03:41 13 2
bbc
Do you know the concept of the "S Curve" for projects?
28
16/12/2020 11:03:43 30 7
bbc
As not everyone will need a vaccine, this is a great start.
72
16/12/2020 11:10:50 37 5
bbc
Read it again - IN THE FIRST WEEK
This will ramp up when more vaccines become available. Last year about 15 million people were vaccinated against flu in a few months and that was without trying hard.
7
16/12/2020 10:57:49 4 12
bbc
there appears to be a real lack of consistency as to how the vaccine is being delivered. I have a 100 year old grandmother who even after repeated calls to her GP is still none the wiser as to where and when she will get the vaccine.
29
16/12/2020 11:03:49 10 1
bbc
Obviously both she, and you, missed the news that you're supposed to wait to be contacted by th NHS ... and not clog up the phone lines by ringing in.
30
16/12/2020 11:03:56 4 20
bbc
130,000 a week? They need to massively increase that to inoculate the population. At that rate it would take almost a year and a half. Bit of spin with the facts.
39
16/12/2020 11:06:15 3 12
bbc
10 years for the whole population.
58
16/12/2020 11:09:25 7 1
bbc
Good grief!
They have only just got started.
This is a new vaccine with storage difficulties and other logistical problems.
That they have managed so many so quickly should be applauded!
59
16/12/2020 11:09:29 5 1
bbc
There are no plans to vaccinate the entire population. Only those considered to be most at risk. They have never made any secret that it will be over 50s plus those under 50 with underlying health conditions.
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
31
16/12/2020 11:04:13 7 7
bbc
Wrong. 1 million per week x 2 doses and it'll take closer to three years before the whole population have been vaccinated (66 million plus overseas territories).
17
16/12/2020 11:01:42 5 10
bbc
Super news, no denying. But once again, as with everything COVID (and beyond), there doesn't seem to be any easy way to keep track on all numbers.
"The figure does not take into account people who have been vaccinated by GPs and nurses in the community, which started on Monday."
Again, it's really great news. But I'm just a bit fed up of all the caveats that come with the stats.
32
Bob
16/12/2020 11:04:19 6 1
bbc
Why would a figure for the first 7 days include data for something that occurred outside of those seven days?
109
16/12/2020 11:16:17 2 1
bbc
Errr, yeah, OK. You got me there.
33
16/12/2020 11:04:22 5 3
bbc
It would be useful to know how many people are in each age band. So 140k over 80's done in first week, but how many are there?
54
16/12/2020 11:08:14 9 1
bbc
3.37 million, not all will be vaccinated so let's say 3 million. The vaccination rate will ramp up if/ when the Astra Zeneca vaccine is available. In theory they can all have their first vaccine in about 6/7 weeks
447
16/12/2020 12:04:32 1 1
bbc
Have a read of this article

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-55274833

Lots of info on the vaccine and a break down of how many people are in each priority grouping.
10
16/12/2020 10:59:51 305 15
bbc
My mum got vaccinated yesterday. She's 84 and delighted. We have decided to not meet at Christmas but instead after January 4th when she gets her second dose. We can wait a little longer now that her risk of catching is going to be much reduced (we do understand it is not zero but much reduced).
I expect less problems than track & trace - as giving vaccinations is a well understood process.
34
16/12/2020 11:04:27 164 10
bbc
Remember she isn't fully protected until a week after the second dose
141
16/12/2020 11:20:21 12 39
bbc
She isn't fully protected at all - get your facts right
152
16/12/2020 11:22:05 51 4
bbc
I think none of us individually are ever fully protected ... just significantly less risk. As my Mum says "something is going to get me darling" ... it's all about risk management and as I have kids who are students it's definitely best to stay away for a little while ... but then the risk balance goes leans towards her need for a big hug :)
832
16/12/2020 13:42:18 3 1
bbc
The Pfizer BionTech vaccine has not been shown to provide protection against transmission or infection. The criteria for success was the reduction in one or more of the major covid symptoms. Stop spreading false news; it is dangerous to the vulnerable.
890
16/12/2020 15:23:32 0 0
bbc
these things are facts.
952
16/12/2020 17:56:54 0 0
bbc
good for you for reminding them ...well done
17/12/2020 08:04:41 0 0
bbc
He did note that in is post??
35
16/12/2020 11:02:47 16 2
bbc
These are the numbers that should be reported after the news
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
36
16/12/2020 11:05:46 8 1
bbc
And as we don't ned to vaccinate the entire population it'll be done and dusted a lot faster than that.
15
16/12/2020 11:01:00 374 43
bbc
Over 130 000 people vaccinated and only two allergic reactions (in people with a history of allergic reactions) reported as serious side effects. Both those people fully recovered within 48 hours.

Meanwhile in the same period of time around 2900 British people died through Covid 19. None of them are expected to recover.
37
16/12/2020 11:05:48 82 398
bbc
Bizarre. Give it a few years and then see if there are any bad reactions . The testing period has not been long enough to know what consequences there might be
49
16/12/2020 11:07:42 73 9
bbc
What's your experience in this field?
84
16/12/2020 11:13:03 18 141
bbc
Thats why they have chosen the higher age brackets first. They are likely to die anyway so no adverse effects will be known before they die anyway. It won't be questioned like it would be if the under 50s started getting auto immune conditions or worse.
145
16/12/2020 11:20:42 112 22
bbc
The only thing "bizarre" is your comment. You Anti-Vac's are DANGEROUS. You are the one thing than can prevent society returning to normal. Tens of Thousands of people have been inoculated in Phase1&2&3 trials over several months, with no major issues. Its SAFE, in fact the UNSAFE thing to do would be to NOT take it. For your sake and more importantly for the sake of anyone you meet.
155
16/12/2020 11:22:29 42 15
bbc
In a few years, without it, we might all be dead!
224
16/12/2020 11:32:47 50 5
bbc
The only thing that’s bizarre is your post : supported by no evidence and roundly dismissed by the scientific community
247
16/12/2020 11:35:22 19 5
bbc
Good job that Pfizer employs experts to develop these vaccines then.
270
DDP
16/12/2020 11:38:03 25 8
bbc
Absolute nonsense and an insult to the scientists involved. It's safe and that is a fact, not an opinion.
271
16/12/2020 11:38:15 22 8
bbc
Take the jab or face burying your parents prematurely.

Tough choice that.

What choice would you make mate?
275
16/12/2020 11:38:58 23 3
bbc
Equally, we can't know for sure whether there are long term effects from COVID-19. Based on scientists knowledge of vaccines and viruses, its beyond reasonable doubt that it is far less likely that there will be long term negative consequences from the vaccine.
303
16/12/2020 11:42:46 16 3
bbc
If you have a reaction it is likely to be in the first few days as with any allergic reaction, So why you are peddling this BS is beyond me?
315
16/12/2020 11:44:23 17 3
bbc
Vaccines which don’t have any side effects for years and then suddenly do have a side effect, are so incredibly rare, you’re at far greater of danger risk of getting long term side effects from catching Covid.
327
16/12/2020 11:45:46 8 4
bbc
And give Covid19 a few years to carry on, and see what damage it has done by then, eh.
338
16/12/2020 11:46:47 7 2
bbc
That was owenwatts1964 there, a vaccine expert who spearheaded Oxford University's campaign to achieve a working vaccine. The fascinating thing is he still has time to be on the BBC HYS section as well.
472
16/12/2020 12:07:22 3 2
bbc
These is no history of long term adverse reactions from from any of the numerous other vaccines that are given routinely. Adverse responses to vaccination (usually allergic reactions) always occur soon after the vaccine is administered. There is no reason to think that any of these vaccines will be any different.
486
16/12/2020 12:09:21 4 2
bbc
Had it not been fully tested as required then it would not be approved.
557
16/12/2020 12:22:56 0 2
bbc
You are entitled to an opinion, I assume you will back it up by declining the vaccine so someone else can have your dose.
571
16/12/2020 12:25:25 1 2
bbc
Millions upon millions of vaccinations have been administered over the past 200 years. There is no history of any of them causing long term ill effects. Adverse effects from vaccination (usually allergic reactions) always occur shortly after the vaccine is administered, or in some very rare instances through a worse reaction to catching the illness that the vaccine is against.
572
16/12/2020 12:25:29 0 2
bbc
The testing periodis irrelevant. The UK population are willing Guinea Pigs.It is high risk but unlikelyto be as devastating as losing the economy which potentially kills 68 million unless they move abroad but where to go? Hmmm...... A Covid free nation with first world living standards and workopportunity? Where is that place?
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
38
16/12/2020 11:05:52 8 2
bbc
No. Never heard of herd immunity.As vaccinated numbers increase, virus will decline. Taking existing ' had the virus' people into account a substantial improvement would arise wihtin a quarter of that timescale.
30
16/12/2020 11:03:56 4 20
bbc
130,000 a week? They need to massively increase that to inoculate the population. At that rate it would take almost a year and a half. Bit of spin with the facts.
39
16/12/2020 11:06:15 3 12
bbc
10 years for the whole population.
40
16/12/2020 11:06:31 6 30
bbc
Last week Hancock said the limiting factor was the production of the vaccine. We got 800,000 last week and did 130,000 .
Looks like more broken promises and confusion . If you want to see how to vaccinate at pace look what USA are doing
52
16/12/2020 11:08:12 16 4
bbc
Give it a rest.
62
16/12/2020 11:09:43 5 1
bbc
lol. You have absolutely no clue. You been trained to a dog whistle though.
65
16/12/2020 11:09:53 5 1
bbc
Delboy, get back to the market stall
87
16/12/2020 11:13:46 4 1
bbc
The issue is that it needs to be stored at -70 degrees so can’t just be sent out to GP surgeries and care homes. Its not an excuse its fact
97
16/12/2020 11:14:32 5 1
bbc
How many projects do you know with complex logistics that are working at full capacity after one week? Hancock never promised that all 400,000 would be done in the first week. GP surgeries have now started vaccinating this week so numbers should increase quickly. How can you start talking about broken promises and confusion after just one week.
103
16/12/2020 11:15:59 5 2
bbc
The last place we want to emulate on anything Covid is the USA presently.
143
16/12/2020 11:20:36 5 1
bbc
Typical can not give praise when it is due. Ask the germans french etc when they are getting theirs.!!
147
16/12/2020 11:21:22 3 2
bbc
Are you having a laugh. Do not compare us with the US, how many deaths there??and a president with abnormal brain cells if he has any at all
41
16/12/2020 11:06:41 14 2
bbc
Great news!!
85
16/12/2020 11:13:18 7 11
bbc
The government must publish daily updates on vaccines given so that the public can be assured the roll out is really happening.
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
42
16/12/2020 11:06:41 9 1
bbc
In fairness, those under the age of 40 with no health issues are by the vast majority already protected from any significant consequences or inconvenience. We should be aiming to protect those at risk.
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
43
16/12/2020 11:04:00 11 1
bbc
They don’t need to vaccinate all the population. Once they vaccinate about 10 million older and vulnerable people, deaths should drop by 99 percent and, if results from the trials are right, minimise people going into hospital.
18
16/12/2020 11:01:51 1 20
bbc
Why aren't real countries such as Germany, Switzerland and Denmark not adopting and using vaccination programmes?
44
16/12/2020 11:04:26 10 1
bbc
"real countries" ?! They will all be vaccinating as soon as they are approved by the EU medical directors (which is due this week)
76
16/12/2020 11:11:54 0 1
bbc
I thought the EU approval meeting had only been brought forward from the 29th to the 23rd?
18
16/12/2020 11:01:51 1 20
bbc
Why aren't real countries such as Germany, Switzerland and Denmark not adopting and using vaccination programmes?
45
16/12/2020 11:05:09 1 2
bbc
These are the real countries that were praised on HYS for their control of Covid-19 at it's outbreak. These are the same countries moving into stringent lock-down, not because of their failure but because of Boris.
22
16/12/2020 11:02:44 113 11
bbc
Not everyone need the vaccine so it wont take 12 months. Please be grateful we have a vaccine available fo those that do need it.
46
16/12/2020 11:07:15 11 32
bbc
Why do you assume people's aren't grateful?
139
16/12/2020 11:20:00 15 3
bbc
Have you seen some of the comments on here?
576
16/12/2020 12:25:44 6 2
bbc
Because there are a lot of cynical and negative comments on the BBC discussions.
47
16/12/2020 11:07:36 31 16
bbc
Excellent news and I understand they weren't all Tory donors too........
618
16/12/2020 12:31:42 6 2
bbc
So who does your edgy little comment refer to?
48
16/12/2020 11:07:40 74 19
bbc
Great stuff. And before some armchair critics have a moan about it, this is a success story.
Partly the result of a very early commitment by the UK to fund the research by private and research institutions, and to precommit to contracts. Our European neighbors, Canada and many other nations will be months behind the UK in this respect.
82
16/12/2020 11:12:54 37 12
bbc
Canada began vaccinating yesterday. Keep up at the back......
88
16/12/2020 11:14:00 9 4
bbc
I see some German scientists have been pressurising the EMA to bring forward the ruling about the vaccine as it will be December 21st before a decision about its safety has been made for Europe, originally December 29th.

Meanwhile, we'll have vaccinated upwards of a quarter of a million people by that point. Great stuff.
117
16/12/2020 11:17:20 13 1
bbc
Agreed. Very few countries have even started vaccinating and most have not even yet approved the vaccine, yet people are already complaining because all 400,000 people in the first batch of vaccines delivered weren't all vaccinated in the first week. On this our government have acted early and done well.
208
16/12/2020 11:30:58 11 2
bbc
We have some of the best universities in the world, staffed by some of the best and brightest scientists.....who incidentally come from all over the world.....and the universities (like Oxford) are major beneficiaries of EU scientific funding. This isn't a "British" success story, but a worldwide success story of which the UK is part.
332
16/12/2020 11:45:54 4 1
bbc
EU and others are committed to rolling it out, and like UK government have funded and supported first class efforts from all scientists internationally.
Canada started vaccinating its citizens two days ago. EU expected next week once their authorities have fully approved the American companies product, manufactured in Belgium, and delivered to UK.
Fear not, they are not months away as you suggest.
345
16/12/2020 11:47:40 1 14
bbc
A vaccine developed by a German biotech company founded by children of Turkish immigrants in partnership with an American pharmaceutical company. A great British success story. The Oxford vaccine is far less effective by the way.
471
16/12/2020 12:07:05 1 1
bbc
Pfizer doesn't yet know whether the vaccine prevents transmission of the virus. Says it will know by 2021 according to Bloomberg News.
510
16/12/2020 12:13:43 1 3
bbc
I think many countries have now started. Even the EU, by far the slowest country in the developed world, say they might bring forward approval to Dec. 23rd
QED
17/12/2020 12:03:16 0 0
bbc
Other countries did as much or more, US, China, Russia, Europe, to name some Countries funding and precommitting. China and Russia had already started vaccinating before us. US started now. The rest expected in the next few weeks. Months behind? World effort produced the success story, to which we contributed, don’t pretend otherwise.
37
16/12/2020 11:05:48 82 398
bbc
Bizarre. Give it a few years and then see if there are any bad reactions . The testing period has not been long enough to know what consequences there might be
49
16/12/2020 11:07:42 73 9
bbc
What's your experience in this field?
131
16/12/2020 11:18:36 6 62
bbc
History
14
16/12/2020 11:00:48 12 6
bbc
There appears to be time to test 300,000 people a day (approx 2 million a week) so surely some of that manpower could get more vaccinations done!
50
16/12/2020 11:05:30 9 2
bbc
I think its a case of supply vrs demand, there isnt an infinite supply and as other countries in the EU approve it will get harder to source
8
16/12/2020 10:58:31 8 20
bbc
So with a UK population of 66.65 million it's going to take about 10 years?
51
16/12/2020 11:05:55 14 2
bbc
bet you are fun guy to be around at parties
420
16/12/2020 11:58:26 1 1
bbc
Parties? We are allowed to go to parties...??
40
16/12/2020 11:06:31 6 30
bbc
Last week Hancock said the limiting factor was the production of the vaccine. We got 800,000 last week and did 130,000 .
Looks like more broken promises and confusion . If you want to see how to vaccinate at pace look what USA are doing
52
16/12/2020 11:08:12 16 4
bbc
Give it a rest.
15
16/12/2020 11:01:00 374 43
bbc
Over 130 000 people vaccinated and only two allergic reactions (in people with a history of allergic reactions) reported as serious side effects. Both those people fully recovered within 48 hours.

Meanwhile in the same period of time around 2900 British people died through Covid 19. None of them are expected to recover.
53
16/12/2020 11:08:14 37 10
bbc
People who died will never recover.
339
16/12/2020 11:46:58 0 3
bbc
You never know?
33
16/12/2020 11:04:22 5 3
bbc
It would be useful to know how many people are in each age band. So 140k over 80's done in first week, but how many are there?
54
16/12/2020 11:08:14 9 1
bbc
3.37 million, not all will be vaccinated so let's say 3 million. The vaccination rate will ramp up if/ when the Astra Zeneca vaccine is available. In theory they can all have their first vaccine in about 6/7 weeks
221
16/12/2020 11:32:31 0 1
bbc
Thanks, it's rare to have useful info on here!
8
16/12/2020 10:58:31 8 20
bbc
So with a UK population of 66.65 million it's going to take about 10 years?
55
16/12/2020 11:08:52 5 1
bbc
A) This is with 70 vaccination centres, they have opened another 200 this week and 1000 by the end of the year.
B) Vaccinating 60% will put us near herd immunity
C) Only vaccinating those 70+ years (about 10million) will reduce Covid deaths dramatically.
56
16/12/2020 11:08:58 54 7
bbc
Absolutely brilliant news, well done NHS - the best of our country.
90
16/12/2020 11:14:04 52 17
bbc
The NHS is not that great. It's the people who work in it that are wonderful.
57
16/12/2020 11:08:58 380 42
bbc
Oh my god quick - please can all the keyboard warriors get on here to tell PhD Scientists how to do their jobs? Your C in Biology at GSCE is desperately needed!!
119
16/12/2020 11:17:28 60 10
bbc
????
136
16/12/2020 11:19:24 21 68
bbc
That's a weirdly anti-education attitude. Scientists aren't priests, commenting isn't sacrilege.
242
16/12/2020 11:34:26 23 9
bbc
Brilliant- love it!??
246
NMT
16/12/2020 11:35:21 35 1
bbc
Is my B in CSE Rural Studies any good to them?
250
Bob
16/12/2020 11:35:57 16 15
bbc
Quick! - this is a call for all the keyboard warriors to get on there to tell everyone else that their opinion is worthless. Their level of ignorance is needed!!!
318
16/12/2020 11:44:38 12 20
bbc
Stopped reading after you said “oh my god”
383
16/12/2020 11:53:03 10 6
bbc
What makes you think those PhD scientists didn't get a grade C in GCSE biology as well??
415
16/12/2020 11:57:23 11 2
bbc
Made me laugh out loud! excellent!
590
16/12/2020 12:27:25 5 6
bbc
Some of those keyboard warriors also slated the NHS at the start of this for releasing 25,000 old people from their care in to care homes without being tested; as events showed they were right. Preaching success early is not a strength and shutting down an alternative opinion is a weakness.
616
16/12/2020 12:31:27 1 3
bbc
Quick, can all the keyboard warriors get on here and tell the rest of us what opinions, anxieties and questions we can and can't discuss on social media. Your C in Philosophy, RE and Sociology is desperately needed too!
626
16/12/2020 12:33:08 5 2
bbc
Brilliant post! There's a serious point there though.

I'm constantly amazed by the overwhelming 'confidence' of people who genuinely think they're experts in something, having watched a couple of documentaries or news spots.

The epidemiologists, virologists and doctors here have each spent more than a decade studying and researching... But HYS experts still know better. Dunning Kruger in action!
672
16/12/2020 12:43:02 0 3
bbc
Bill Gates seems to be an expert on vaccinations and pandemics and has a lot to say on these issues, yet he has the same medical qualifications as me

For the record I have no medical qualifications
680
16/12/2020 12:44:48 1 5
bbc
Whether lockdown policies and restrictions work is not in the domain of PhD scientists. It is statistical analysis of large amounts of data. Economists and Statisticians have been doing this for decades.

This is why we are in such a mess. Scientists have no experience of the the real world to understand the impact of their lockdown policies.
697
16/12/2020 12:48:24 0 4
bbc
and how many PhD scientists do a job that is related to the little projects they did to gain their PhD?
777
16/12/2020 13:12:05 1 4
bbc
Fair comment but should be tempered by remembering scientists are people and have egos and desire for cash. Barry Marshall was told to go away by multiple lofty PhD's as his findings would damage drug sales of the pharma companies produced he now holds a Nobel prize. Pfizer has a $20bn shortfall due to lapsed patents by 2025. Scientists don't walk on water at least not when I worked in pharma
871
16/12/2020 14:37:49 0 2
bbc
Your sounding like a very angry keyboard warrior yourself. Chill out, have a cigar.
910
16/12/2020 16:16:46 0 1
bbc
The biology is done subject to the Oxford vaccine being approved. Rapid logistics is now needed of which I have zero confidence in the government based on previous track record - PPE, testing and track and trace etc. Fingers crossed this time but to put things into perspective at this rate we won’t all be vaccinated till 2027 (I did the maths).
30
16/12/2020 11:03:56 4 20
bbc
130,000 a week? They need to massively increase that to inoculate the population. At that rate it would take almost a year and a half. Bit of spin with the facts.
58
16/12/2020 11:09:25 7 1
bbc
Good grief!
They have only just got started.
This is a new vaccine with storage difficulties and other logistical problems.
That they have managed so many so quickly should be applauded!
30
16/12/2020 11:03:56 4 20
bbc
130,000 a week? They need to massively increase that to inoculate the population. At that rate it would take almost a year and a half. Bit of spin with the facts.
59
16/12/2020 11:09:29 5 1
bbc
There are no plans to vaccinate the entire population. Only those considered to be most at risk. They have never made any secret that it will be over 50s plus those under 50 with underlying health conditions.
92
16/12/2020 11:14:12 0 7
bbc
Good luck to everyone under 50 left to risk permanent health damage from Covid.
60
16/12/2020 11:09:31 1 23
bbc
let's hope for there sake scientist they got it right, because if any one who has had this vaccine, and it turns out wrong in there body, God help the public, for listening to them. me personally I think it's been rushed, and with brexit as well. a woman on TV from W. H. O. said this morning on TV breathing and talking and droplets, this virus loves the way it performs what bull. ??
121
16/12/2020 11:17:36 7 1
bbc
So you won’t be having the vaccine then. That’s good one more vaccine for those who understand the way this virus spreads and who want to do the right thing.
178
16/12/2020 11:25:49 3 1
bbc
There is a risk with any vaccine. This pandemic is severe, and a vaccine had to be developed PDQ. How would you have handled this situation where many people are dying daily, many losing their livelihood, and hospitals full? Leave it to luck?
61
pTc
16/12/2020 11:09:41 4 12
bbc
Technically nobody has been vaccinated until 7 days after the 2nd injection. We remain to see how many will turn up for the second one.
79
16/12/2020 11:12:27 14 1
bbc
Cup half empty
101
16/12/2020 11:15:35 1 1
bbc
that's the spirit...Mery Xmas Scrooge, Bah Humbug!
179
16/12/2020 11:20:41 2 2
bbc
Immunity doesn't go from 0 to 100 overnight on the 35th day. Full immunity is achieved at this point but many people will be starting to develop antibodies that would alleviate the severe symptoms almost immediately (a few days) after the first dose.
741
Rob
16/12/2020 12:56:50 0 1
bbc
Well statistically considering the demographic of those being vaccinated, around 900 who were vaccinated last week will die before the 3 weeks elapses for the second vaccine to be administered. That's straight forward probability based on mortality rate statistics for our care-home and 90+ year old populations. Old people die; that's a simple fact lost during this hysteria.
40
16/12/2020 11:06:31 6 30
bbc
Last week Hancock said the limiting factor was the production of the vaccine. We got 800,000 last week and did 130,000 .
Looks like more broken promises and confusion . If you want to see how to vaccinate at pace look what USA are doing
62
16/12/2020 11:09:43 5 1
bbc
lol. You have absolutely no clue. You been trained to a dog whistle though.
23
16/12/2020 11:02:59 11 11
bbc
Why are residents of care homes being bundled into buses and taken to GP surgeries for the vaccine? Surely its more protective of a bubble to have 1 or 2 nursing staff visit a care home than it is to have 30 plus extremely vulnerable people exposed to the world outside their bubble
63
16/12/2020 11:09:51 26 2
bbc
might be something to do with storing at -70C. Not your average fridge temp ;-)
9
jon
16/12/2020 10:59:41 8 18
bbc
If we ever get to one million per week. it will take 12 months to protect the population.
64
16/12/2020 11:09:52 5 1
bbc
There are about 24 million people over 50 at the moment. Perhaps target them first?
40
16/12/2020 11:06:31 6 30
bbc
Last week Hancock said the limiting factor was the production of the vaccine. We got 800,000 last week and did 130,000 .
Looks like more broken promises and confusion . If you want to see how to vaccinate at pace look what USA are doing
65
16/12/2020 11:09:53 5 1
bbc
Delboy, get back to the market stall
22
16/12/2020 11:02:44 113 11
bbc
Not everyone need the vaccine so it wont take 12 months. Please be grateful we have a vaccine available fo those that do need it.
66
16/12/2020 11:09:54 12 4
bbc
Awwwww.....don't say that. It'll ruin the miseryguts' opportunities to try and drag everybody else down again like they've been doing every day this past year on here..... :)
67
16/12/2020 11:10:02 11 7
bbc
It’s going to be tough to start with but good effort. 140k a solid effort and great achievement by nhs to date. Now let’s push on to the full 70 million asap
132
16/12/2020 11:18:56 6 4
bbc
Only 66.6M people in the UK, nearly 2M of them don't need the vaccine because they've had Covid. There are probably at least 4M people who can't have the vaccine due to other conditions, and I doubt that all of the remaining 60M people will be willing to have a vaccine rushed through the process with no data on long term effects. As such we're probably only looking at 40M more people
68
16/12/2020 11:10:21 12 19
bbc
Need to do it 10x quicker if rules are to be relaxed next summer.
96
16/12/2020 11:14:31 24 4
bbc
There is always one ?? is it so hard to have a positive comment
69
16/12/2020 11:10:38 44 2
bbc
Great start, especially seen as this is the more complex vaccine which needs to be stored below -70. Am sure when the Oxford one comes out it’ll be quicker and much easier to administer as can live in a fridge
105
16/12/2020 11:16:14 19 24
bbc
They were going to name the new one after an ex Oxford graduate who also can live in a fridge, but I think they declined ;-)
70
16/12/2020 11:10:39 22 8
bbc
Great news, while the EU will discuss the vaccine next week....
23
16/12/2020 11:02:59 11 11
bbc
Why are residents of care homes being bundled into buses and taken to GP surgeries for the vaccine? Surely its more protective of a bubble to have 1 or 2 nursing staff visit a care home than it is to have 30 plus extremely vulnerable people exposed to the world outside their bubble
71
16/12/2020 11:10:41 7 1
bbc
I think its something to do with how the vaccine has to be stored right up until the time it is given. Also any adverse affects can be dealt with more expediently in a surgery.
28
16/12/2020 11:03:43 30 7
bbc
As not everyone will need a vaccine, this is a great start.
72
16/12/2020 11:10:50 37 5
bbc
Read it again - IN THE FIRST WEEK
This will ramp up when more vaccines become available. Last year about 15 million people were vaccinated against flu in a few months and that was without trying hard.
427
16/12/2020 11:59:32 3 1
bbc
Dont forget that the flu jab is only a single dose and this is two. So 15m in a “few months” will take longer as people needing to go back for the second dose in effect are filling up a slot for someone first does this increasing the time to get people through.
495
16/12/2020 12:10:45 2 1
bbc
800,000 doses received with 130,000 of them administered in the 1st week. I think another 2 million due by end of December? (but dont quote me). A good start so far, but we need to ramp up to 1.85million doses per week very quickly if we are all to get done by the Spring.
508
16/12/2020 12:13:36 0 3
bbc
Oh...and by the way, why do you think the vaccination will ramp up as more doses become available? If this logic were to currently hold, then why wasn't the whole batch of 800,000 already received not administered in week 1?
73
16/12/2020 11:10:57 1 9
bbc
Does vaccine need topping up every few months?
23
16/12/2020 11:02:59 11 11
bbc
Why are residents of care homes being bundled into buses and taken to GP surgeries for the vaccine? Surely its more protective of a bubble to have 1 or 2 nursing staff visit a care home than it is to have 30 plus extremely vulnerable people exposed to the world outside their bubble
74
16/12/2020 11:11:00 5 1
bbc
Nope. It isnt.
75
16/12/2020 11:11:05 27 4
bbc
Well done to everyone who helped make this happen.
106
16/12/2020 11:14:37 6 31
bbc
Yes - experts. I didn't think you leavers liked experts ???
44
16/12/2020 11:04:26 10 1
bbc
"real countries" ?! They will all be vaccinating as soon as they are approved by the EU medical directors (which is due this week)
76
16/12/2020 11:11:54 0 1
bbc
I thought the EU approval meeting had only been brought forward from the 29th to the 23rd?
77
16/12/2020 11:12:10 76 4
bbc
Only 34 Million people in front of me then!
Well done to those who have had the jab - I hope it starts to improve your quality of life very soon!
267
Bob
16/12/2020 11:37:53 20 29
bbc
You don't need it then.
598
16/12/2020 12:28:19 6 6
bbc
If you are at low risk you are probably better waiting to see long term risks from the vaccines first. There is another very good reason to test the vaccine on the vulnerable, in that the risk reward ratio is higher.
793
16/12/2020 13:19:19 5 2
bbc
The queue is based on risk. Are you a dissatisfied queue jumper?
78
16/12/2020 11:12:27 95 7
bbc
Seems to be a lot of sneering at the numbers. This is from a standing start with a very few amount of vaccines delivered. This is almost approaching the capacity. It’s a rare thing we have got right so far.

When we have more vaccines and there’s a system in place, the only slow part is how long it takes you to roll your sleeve up
671
16/12/2020 12:28:35 24 2
bbc
They’ve already thought of that - my flu jab instructions were to wear short sleeves! ??
955
16/12/2020 18:06:24 1 0
bbc
now other countries are using the vacine i would expect shortages i do hope they hold enough back for peoples second jabs and dont rely on the supply chain
61
pTc
16/12/2020 11:09:41 4 12
bbc
Technically nobody has been vaccinated until 7 days after the 2nd injection. We remain to see how many will turn up for the second one.
79
16/12/2020 11:12:27 14 1
bbc
Cup half empty
123
16/12/2020 11:17:42 1 3
bbc
No, a realistic assessment. Optimism does nothing in the real world other than make people feel better, it of itself does nothing, zero, nada, rien, a bit like praying.
80
16/12/2020 11:12:34 167 9
bbc
It's a good start. And all you keyboard warriors with PhD's in every topic you comment on. You don't actually need to vaccinate 66 million people to slow the rate of transmission. As more people are vaccinated there will be less opportunity for the virus to spread.
194
16/12/2020 11:29:26 49 14
bbc
Probably only need to vaccinate 40 Million to achieve herd immunity, assuming vaccination stops transmission, which is likely but unproven.
278
16/12/2020 11:39:19 2 3
bbc
But do we know if you can still carry the virus, even if you have been immunised?
336
16/12/2020 11:46:37 6 2
bbc
In the interests of balance - no one knows the effect the vaccine has on transmission yet - the data simply doesn't exist and won't for some time
406
16/12/2020 11:56:27 2 4
bbc
Thats true, but we dont know how long the vaccine will work for. If we only need such a small dose for the population, then why has the Government ordered 355million doses for the UK (enough for 2 times the population)?
457
16/12/2020 12:06:19 6 1
bbc
Pfizer doesn't yet know whether the vaccine prevents transmission of the virus. Says it will know by 2021 according to Bloomberg News.
498
16/12/2020 12:11:11 1 2
bbc
What about people who have already had the virus and have antibodies; how do you factor them in?
516
16/12/2020 12:14:35 2 3
bbc
You would need to actually vaccinate the people out and about - the ones likely to spread it.
540
16/12/2020 12:20:22 8 1
bbc
Also, by vaccinating the most vulnerable, it will reduce the death rate and the pressure on the NHS of treating a large number of serious COVID cases.
544
16/12/2020 12:21:00 11 1
bbc
And as long as the vulnerable are vaccinated, getting infected is far less an issue. Stopping people dyng or needing hospital in large numbers is the aim. If we can achieve that we can go back to normal. People will always die from illnesses, its impossible to prevent it entirely.
681
16/12/2020 12:44:52 1 5
bbc
You'd be surprised how stupid some people with PhD's can be. I remember when some scientists with PhD's had to apologise for tricking the PM into imposing a lockdown when they'd presented misleading and inaccurate data.
23
16/12/2020 11:02:59 11 11
bbc
Why are residents of care homes being bundled into buses and taken to GP surgeries for the vaccine? Surely its more protective of a bubble to have 1 or 2 nursing staff visit a care home than it is to have 30 plus extremely vulnerable people exposed to the world outside their bubble
81
16/12/2020 11:12:44 9 1
bbc
I believe it is to do with the logistics of vaccine storage etc for this particular vaccine.
When the AstraZeneca one becomes available that will be much easier to administer in homes etc.
The current vaccine I am told needs 2 pharmacists to help break down the vials into 975 doses.
48
16/12/2020 11:07:40 74 19
bbc
Great stuff. And before some armchair critics have a moan about it, this is a success story.
Partly the result of a very early commitment by the UK to fund the research by private and research institutions, and to precommit to contracts. Our European neighbors, Canada and many other nations will be months behind the UK in this respect.
82
16/12/2020 11:12:54 37 12
bbc
Canada began vaccinating yesterday. Keep up at the back......
462
16/12/2020 11:59:47 0 1
bbc
your right and germany hope to start early next year
83
16/12/2020 11:12:59 171 9
bbc
These armchair critics make me laugh. Knocking the NHS achievements in the first few days of the biggest vaccination programme the country has ever taken on.
In the real world operations of this scale will always have initial challenges and take some time to get up to full capacity, but the knockers will never accept that
422
16/12/2020 11:58:49 40 6
bbc
Who are the knockers? I think any sane person can only congratulate the majority of workers in the NHS who have, are and will be doing great work.
654
16/12/2020 12:38:08 9 3
bbc
But you keep forgetting that this country is full of complete idiots. If you don't wish to get upset then I would avoid reading HYS, as this is where they all congregate, like hippos, to wallow in the murky waters of the self bloody righteous!
708
16/12/2020 12:49:39 2 3
bbc
Exactly. How dare anybody criticise the NHS or track and trace.
945
16/12/2020 17:45:40 0 2
bbc
Like the 'World Beating" Track and Trace system Boris Bunter and Tony Handcock conjured up??? Whatever happened to STAY AT HOME AND SAVE THE NHS?
17/12/2020 08:17:53 1 0
bbc
They will say the private sector would have done it better. Look how well that worked with track and trace which was privatised out.
37
16/12/2020 11:05:48 82 398
bbc
Bizarre. Give it a few years and then see if there are any bad reactions . The testing period has not been long enough to know what consequences there might be
84
16/12/2020 11:13:03 18 141
bbc
Thats why they have chosen the higher age brackets first. They are likely to die anyway so no adverse effects will be known before they die anyway. It won't be questioned like it would be if the under 50s started getting auto immune conditions or worse.
138
16/12/2020 11:19:58 49 11
bbc
I can never quite figure out if commenters like you are serious, trolling or a bot. Which one is it?
153
16/12/2020 11:22:12 67 8
bbc
They are vaccinating older people first because they are at most risk and most likely to need hospitalisation. Your argument makes no sense. Even if there are adverse side effects they will become known when younger people are vaccinated so knowledge would only be delayed.
251
16/12/2020 11:36:08 29 4
bbc
Absolute poppycock. They have chosen to vaccinate the higher age bracket (and other vulnerable groups) because they are most at risk of premature death from Covid. To do otherwise would be senseless, not to mention completely unethical.
277
16/12/2020 11:39:08 22 3
bbc
I already have two auto-immune conditions and I will be getting the vaccine as soon as it is offered to me.

Newsflash: better to be vaccinated than take your chances with this coronavirus when you have an auto-immune condition, imo.
426
16/12/2020 11:59:29 1 3
bbc
No they were chosen as they are the most vulnerable to the virus, we are all going to die!
595
16/12/2020 12:28:03 2 1
bbc
On the contrary, they are taking a risk by vaccinating the people who need it most, even though people like you will claim every octogenarian who has a heart attack with six months of vaccination was killed by the vaccine.
41
16/12/2020 11:06:41 14 2
bbc
Great news!!
85
16/12/2020 11:13:18 7 11
bbc
The government must publish daily updates on vaccines given so that the public can be assured the roll out is really happening.
532
16/12/2020 12:17:19 5 1
bbc
Please no....once a week. We already have enough problems and confusion with pedantics picking holes in daily virus data.

The important thing is to ship the vaccine, not fiscal accounting of daily activity.
805
16/12/2020 13:25:27 4 1
bbc
Rolling news updates are not helpfull. Why are you not assured that the numbers are really happening? What is your motive and where is your evidence?
86
16/12/2020 11:13:38 123 6
bbc
I am no fan of this government, but I do think that this is a good start. The process should speed up as time goes on. Well done to the scientists, and all others who have made this possible. It must be a logistical nightmare.
436
16/12/2020 12:01:27 22 2
bbc
I have no idea about the logistic plans for inoculation, but can imagine its a daunting task. For us all to face inoculation by the Spring though, vaccinations need to increase by at least 14 fold on the rate we've so far seen in the first week. Good luck.
521
16/12/2020 12:15:31 7 2
bbc
Yes Mr J arse I'm with you there. All the negative vaxx naysayers in my pub saying there are no vaccines coming after Lockdown 1.0. I hope they are man enough to get jabbed !
596
16/12/2020 12:28:18 9 2
bbc
When we are through this, I think the government will be shown to have done as well as most others, and certainly better than some.
911
16/12/2020 16:18:06 2 4
bbc
I'm no fan of this government either......and I would give them little credit for what so many others have actually achieved DESPITE this government of clowns!
40
16/12/2020 11:06:31 6 30
bbc
Last week Hancock said the limiting factor was the production of the vaccine. We got 800,000 last week and did 130,000 .
Looks like more broken promises and confusion . If you want to see how to vaccinate at pace look what USA are doing
87
16/12/2020 11:13:46 4 1
bbc
The issue is that it needs to be stored at -70 degrees so can’t just be sent out to GP surgeries and care homes. Its not an excuse its fact
48
16/12/2020 11:07:40 74 19
bbc
Great stuff. And before some armchair critics have a moan about it, this is a success story.
Partly the result of a very early commitment by the UK to fund the research by private and research institutions, and to precommit to contracts. Our European neighbors, Canada and many other nations will be months behind the UK in this respect.
88
16/12/2020 11:14:00 9 4
bbc
I see some German scientists have been pressurising the EMA to bring forward the ruling about the vaccine as it will be December 21st before a decision about its safety has been made for Europe, originally December 29th.

Meanwhile, we'll have vaccinated upwards of a quarter of a million people by that point. Great stuff.
653
16/12/2020 12:38:07 0 2
bbc
Nothing like being a guinea pig for others :-)
89
jb
16/12/2020 11:14:01 3 16
bbc
Why oh why such a slow start? Apparently all care home residents and staff should be vaccinated by now, along with all over 80s. No GPs in my area have even started yet. My father is 89 and has heard nothing.
114
Vid
16/12/2020 11:16:42 7 1
bbc
As you are such a logistical genius, could I suggest you put yourself forward to manage the Vaccine rollout?
56
16/12/2020 11:08:58 54 7
bbc
Absolutely brilliant news, well done NHS - the best of our country.
90
16/12/2020 11:14:04 52 17
bbc
The NHS is not that great. It's the people who work in it that are wonderful.
171
16/12/2020 11:24:45 9 3
bbc
Yes, the people in it are the best of Britain
452
16/12/2020 12:05:39 9 2
bbc
I'd say the MAJORITY of NHS staff are great. However, I certainly wouldn't use the word "great" to describe them all; like many big organisations there is a % of shitgibbons who get through the net.
463
16/12/2020 12:00:36 4 2
bbc
they are the nhs
468
16/12/2020 12:06:36 7 2
bbc
The concept is brilliant, it is the slobby people we have in this country who abuse it and don't take personal responsibility for their own health that bring it down.
795
16/12/2020 13:20:38 6 2
bbc
Try your luck in the US and see how you get on.
14
16/12/2020 11:00:48 12 6
bbc
There appears to be time to test 300,000 people a day (approx 2 million a week) so surely some of that manpower could get more vaccinations done!
91
16/12/2020 11:14:10 3 1
bbc
Not as simple as that!
59
16/12/2020 11:09:29 5 1
bbc
There are no plans to vaccinate the entire population. Only those considered to be most at risk. They have never made any secret that it will be over 50s plus those under 50 with underlying health conditions.
92
16/12/2020 11:14:12 0 7
bbc
Good luck to everyone under 50 left to risk permanent health damage from Covid.
93
16/12/2020 11:13:09 2 12
bbc
As an over-50, I shall be angry if we get to say April, and the government still haven't vaccinated me.

Life HAS to get back to normal. This time, I hope "world beating" isn't just some inane phrase......
118
16/12/2020 11:17:22 4 4
bbc
"I want my vaccine !!! And I want it now !!!!!"
94
16/12/2020 11:13:29 5 12
bbc
So 80 year old Prue Leith has had her jab in a burst of publicity while my 94 year old mum (and thousands like her) wait patiently having no idea at al when they will receive their injections. So where does the priority list sit now, Celebrities first?
115
16/12/2020 11:16:49 10 1
bbc
For what it's worth it discredits the anti-vaxers.. Prue will survive and that will give the public confidence.
127
16/12/2020 11:17:29 6 1
bbc
My grandmother-in-law is getting hers on Friday and she is in no way a celebrity. They will be invited when their GP has sufficient stock.
95
16/12/2020 11:13:48 4 7
bbc
‘Use your own judgement’ - that’s a fantastic idea??????????????
102
16/12/2020 11:15:55 1 4
bbc
Yes, because it has worked so well before.
112
16/12/2020 11:16:36 2 2
bbc
Just because you're incapable doesn't mean the rest of us are.
68
16/12/2020 11:10:21 12 19
bbc
Need to do it 10x quicker if rules are to be relaxed next summer.
96
16/12/2020 11:14:31 24 4
bbc
There is always one ?? is it so hard to have a positive comment
140
16/12/2020 11:20:02 0 7
bbc
Hancock said we'll be back to normal by Easter. Is that the sort of positive comment you want, despite it being false.
40
16/12/2020 11:06:31 6 30
bbc
Last week Hancock said the limiting factor was the production of the vaccine. We got 800,000 last week and did 130,000 .
Looks like more broken promises and confusion . If you want to see how to vaccinate at pace look what USA are doing
97
16/12/2020 11:14:32 5 1
bbc
How many projects do you know with complex logistics that are working at full capacity after one week? Hancock never promised that all 400,000 would be done in the first week. GP surgeries have now started vaccinating this week so numbers should increase quickly. How can you start talking about broken promises and confusion after just one week.
98
bbc
Beware the auto-immune response.

Don't have any of the vaccines. Do not allow the Government to vaccinate our children.
Removed
126
16/12/2020 11:17:54 4 1
bbc
So you rely on the rest of us to get vaccinated to protect you.
148
16/12/2020 11:21:23 1 1
bbc
Shush yoghurt knitter.
151
16/12/2020 11:21:57 2 1
bbc
Where are children on the list? And you know it's not compulsory, right?
185
16/12/2020 11:27:04 3 1
bbc
That's good, you're one less that needs doing.
99
JP
16/12/2020 11:14:58 33 3
bbc
That's a pretty good start. Hopefully the Oxford Vaccine gets approval soon, so we can really ramp up the numbers vaccinated.
100
16/12/2020 11:15:13 3 7
bbc
Yes its a start. But its only the 1st of two jabs as well. At that rate it will take over 2 years to do everyone. So we need to be going at about 5 times that rate if we want to do all the 50+ and vulnerable people by April and start to get back to some sort of normality.
125
16/12/2020 11:17:48 6 2
bbc
Not sure everyone needs a jab. Get the vulnerable, key workers and elderly sorted and let the rest of us return to normal life
130
16/12/2020 11:18:36 2 1
bbc
Yes early days, i would have thought we can expect more volume of vaccinations, especially if we get the Oxford vaccine and are not constrained so much by temperature control.