'My season rail pass has risen £12,000 since 1997'
16/12/2020 | news | business | 674
Fares will rise more than expected next year, although the 2.6% increase will be delayed until March.
1
Ben
16/12/2020 13:17:16 173 11
bbc
They should reduce the cost, not increase it. Trains are far too expensive.

Around the world, you can use better train services for far less.

Why are we content to pay masses of money for a mediocre service?
walk u lazy cu- Removed
13
bob
16/12/2020 13:35:57 17 40
bbc
Because the unions have a stranglehold
44
16/12/2020 16:43:35 10 33
bbc
Ask the Trade Unions.
54
TV
16/12/2020 18:12:03 31 4
bbc
Don't forget the shareholders need to make their profit. Less for more.
128
16/12/2020 21:17:21 13 12
bbc
No. Just scrap all the trains, including HS2, and charge for motorway use. That will force companies to move out of London to find people to work for them. Absolute madness that so much of the population commutes so far to do work they could do near home.
129
16/12/2020 21:17:42 19 12
bbc
I don't commute and rarely use trains. Why should I subsidise through my taxes people who do.

I live in London and accepted higher property prices when zi bought. The mortgage remains the same but commuting costs rise every year
161
16/12/2020 21:32:27 30 1
bbc
Rome to Florence to venice was 72 euros return for two bought at the platform 30 mins before we traveled it was an open ticket too Uk prices are just legal theft
162
16/12/2020 21:33:22 8 2
bbc
My nearest railway station is an hours drive away, and buses every 2hrs at the most frequent... why would I ever use public transport??
167
16/12/2020 21:33:48 19 7
bbc
This is because in France, Germany, Japan, etc .. where train services are excellent, they are nationally owned and operated.

Unfortunately Thatcher convinced the country that the only way to drive standards was privatisation, which was achieved by underfunding the railways.

The same is happening now with the NHS.
365
16/12/2020 22:20:38 6 6
bbc
And why should we non rail users (my nearest station is 27 miles away) subsidise rail users? Fancy chipping in towards the cost of my next car?
399
16/12/2020 22:28:31 4 2
bbc
Rather than having a go at the railway companies who need to make a profit, have a look at government policy with regard to roads. Rail users have to make running train lines profitable while road building (read drivers) is massively subsidised by the tax payer. And “no” your annual car tax fee does not come close to covering the cost! Total scam
437
16/12/2020 22:36:42 2 6
bbc
... why should the taxpayer subsidise your journey to work? ... maybe I should get 10p a litre knock of my diesel
531
16/12/2020 23:03:27 3 1
bbc
I don't think many are content.
And the reason prices are high is Tories don't believe in public services any more.
636
17/12/2020 00:33:58 1 0
bbc
You're right and most of those are geographically larger and bigger networks to maintain. That's what you get when you concentrate infrastructure/jobs/new housing/population/wealth etc in one particular area of the country
2
16/12/2020 13:19:20 28 7
bbc
Its nice for the Unions to speak up for the beleaguered rail traveller for a change because too date they haven't.

Indeed, their support of a business model with unconditional pay and fare rises does not go unnoticed - the UK rail traveller (frequent or not) deserves a LOT better!
93
16/12/2020 20:15:57 28 6
bbc
Unions only support the needs of customers because it is ultimately they who pay for the jobs.

A hugely expensive 19th century white elephant for the 21st century.

Being green is not about taking the train - it is about working closer to home to completely avoid travel!
110
16/12/2020 20:45:04 4 7
bbc
I'm sure the unions recognize the importance of its customers. Without customers, who would be inconvenienced when they go on strike? Who would there be for them to fleece?
Don't think the unions are doing anything for you. They're doing it for their members and the union bosses.
They're diverting your attention away from their pay demands and using the govt to do it.
3
16/12/2020 13:19:56 192 35
bbc
A good friend of mine works for Net. Rail and received their £1000 bonus this year despite the pandemic. Unions fought hard to keep bonuses for staff. The same Unions are now fighting against a fare increase. Government intervention or not - a tax payer funded company spaffing out bonuses for under-utilised staff is not high on my list of praises.
A good friend of mine works for ur mum Removed
48
16/12/2020 17:46:01 24 9
bbc
"Network Rail" IS a Government owned Body . The Railway companies are Private. you Do realise that? as you seem to have mixed the two up
106
16/12/2020 20:40:27 26 7
bbc
During the pandemic, they've still been working hard - making sure essential workers get to work, completing way more maintenance than usual when it's quiet, keeping trains hygenic. Still got a bitter taste of RMT since 2016 but I disagree with the idea they don't deserve bonuses, esp. with covidiots screaming in faces + harrassing
140
16/12/2020 21:26:50 12 4
bbc
I don't want to call you a liar but....I'd like to see some actual evidence that Network rail employees were paid £1k bonus each (seems very unlikely) rather than aceept you or your "friend" (shades of "my cwife's friend has a cousin who...").

Also what you say is surely irrelevant? The question here is whether private rail serevice providers should continue to rip-off passengers.
146
PS
16/12/2020 21:28:18 0 1
bbc
Long love the Labour part, not.
179
xlr
16/12/2020 21:36:39 11 3
bbc
Reducing staff pay will not reduce costs. It will simply increase profits.
219
16/12/2020 21:44:04 11 1
bbc
I doubt you tell the truth. If you are what kind bonuses do you think the rail firms are on? The foreign owned tax payer subsidised owners.Did you feel the same about Tory bankers picking up millions whilst bankrupting the banks they work for?
241
16/12/2020 21:48:41 2 0
bbc
Can either you or your 'friend' provide any credible evidence that NR staff have of this £1000 bonus, bearing in mind that it's state owned.

You also need to bear in mind that the fare increases are made by privately run TOCs who run the train services, not the state.
267
16/12/2020 21:55:48 3 1
bbc
For one the bonus is capped, no one received a 1k bonus. Secondly, the bonus is for the last financial year, next year the bonus will be tiny if awarded at all.
315
16/12/2020 22:06:24 4 0
bbc
Our bonus at Network Rail this year was awarded for the previous years performance figures, not this years. Plus, the only people getting anywhere near £1,000+ bonuses are the higher management (I know this for a fact) not the majority of staff, we got nowhere near £1,000.
353
16/12/2020 22:18:35 2 0
bbc
Your good friend should therefore explain Network Rail does not set the fare increases - this is done by Government policy - and that the fares go to the privately owned train operating companies
374
16/12/2020 22:22:30 1 0
bbc
If the staff are under utilised then blame the planners and managers. Staff are not even allowed to put right faults they find while carrying out planned work. Every job has to be safety assessed and planned and have the correct paperwork. And rightly so. You might like to work in prepped next to 125mph tracks, no staff do.
436
16/12/2020 22:36:26 0 2
bbc
A grand bonus while staff in the NHS are £2000+/a behind with inflation...

Nice to see when the government's priorities are.
495
16/12/2020 22:51:34 2 1
bbc
Despite what you think you know, taxpayers’ taxes do not fund anything. It is all Government created money. Government creates the money first and then takes some of it back in taxes. So enough of this mumbo-jumbo about “taxes will have to rise to pay for it”.
617
17/12/2020 00:06:11 1 0
bbc
Doubtful a friend would show you his bank statements. You can draw your own conclusion.
4
16/12/2020 13:21:20 41 5
bbc
Who cares. We'll all be working from home for a long time yet...
im literally not even working at home now u blind bast4rd Removed
107
16/12/2020 20:40:55 8 2
bbc
Essential workers?
144
16/12/2020 21:17:03 0 0
bbc
yup, even without the pandemic they are masters of their own doom
648
Ish
17/12/2020 03:28:26 0 0
bbc
Funny you should say that. Am just waiting for my manager to install a loom in my attic /s
All will NOT be working from home anytime soon methinks
4
16/12/2020 13:21:20 41 5
bbc
Who cares. We'll all be working from home for a long time yet...
im literally not even working at home now u blind bast4rd Removed
im blind Removed
L Removed
8
16/12/2020 13:18:42 86 4
bbc
It's getting ridiculous, have abandoned the railways now and started driving in as its so much more cost effective. Will only be driving into the office post-Covid 2/3 times a week so rail season tickets are obsolete anyway. So out of touch.
bro get a car u cheap f-ck literally how much money do u earn ? are u homeless or something lollll Removed
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10
bob
16/12/2020 13:35:21 5 3
bbc
Of course fares will rise. People are traveling less but the costs are broadly the same - no union is going to allow productivity to increase or wages to be held, which is what would happen in any normal business. So the revenue has to be made up with higher prices.
15
16/12/2020 13:37:17 0 4
bbc
didnt ask mate
3
16/12/2020 13:19:56 192 35
bbc
A good friend of mine works for Net. Rail and received their £1000 bonus this year despite the pandemic. Unions fought hard to keep bonuses for staff. The same Unions are now fighting against a fare increase. Government intervention or not - a tax payer funded company spaffing out bonuses for under-utilised staff is not high on my list of praises.
A good friend of mine works for ur mum Removed
1
Ben
16/12/2020 13:17:16 173 11
bbc
They should reduce the cost, not increase it. Trains are far too expensive.

Around the world, you can use better train services for far less.

Why are we content to pay masses of money for a mediocre service?
walk u lazy cu- Removed
1
Ben
16/12/2020 13:17:16 173 11
bbc
They should reduce the cost, not increase it. Trains are far too expensive.

Around the world, you can use better train services for far less.

Why are we content to pay masses of money for a mediocre service?
13
bob
16/12/2020 13:35:57 17 40
bbc
Because the unions have a stranglehold
18
16/12/2020 14:19:35 24 14
bbc
We also don't pay sufficient tax to be able to subsidise the railways sufficiently to give us the service we want at the price that we want. Same as buses.
What drivel "The Unions..." How tdo Unions control the prices set by private companies you moron. We have private companies providing a rail sevice where the bottom line is to charge the most they can whilst providing the cheapest service the can get away with. Just like very other privatised service. Removed
280
16/12/2020 21:57:48 14 6
bbc
The unions don't run the rail services or set the fares. Their job is to provide help for the welfare of their hard working, long suffering members who work long unsociable hours and put up with a lot of abuse from disgruntled passengers. Why don't you apply for a job in the rail industry? You might find it more educational that being a keyboard warrior.
384
16/12/2020 22:25:31 7 3
bbc
Nothing to do with the unions but the fact that' it's privatised. Another liar.
8
16/12/2020 13:18:42 86 4
bbc
It's getting ridiculous, have abandoned the railways now and started driving in as its so much more cost effective. Will only be driving into the office post-Covid 2/3 times a week so rail season tickets are obsolete anyway. So out of touch.
bro get a car u cheap f-ck literally how much money do u earn ? are u homeless or something lollll Removed
10
bob
16/12/2020 13:35:21 5 3
bbc
Of course fares will rise. People are traveling less but the costs are broadly the same - no union is going to allow productivity to increase or wages to be held, which is what would happen in any normal business. So the revenue has to be made up with higher prices.
15
16/12/2020 13:37:17 0 4
bbc
didnt ask mate
16
16/12/2020 14:04:48 3 1
bbc
Rail costs are already too high... in the 1st 2 months of the first lockdown I saved enough to buy a high-end desktop computer!

But when (if?) I resume commuting, it will still be on a train. Driven by a delightful lady who's also an NHS volunteer and has been fetching my prescriptions, as it happens :heart:
17
16/12/2020 14:18:59 1 2
bbc
A year to sort out flexible season tickets!! Perfect example of rip off Britain.
Can be easily done on renewal in 10 minutes. Go to ticket office/ online, advise of authorised users for said season ticket. Purchase and issue one ticket that the authorised user for that day takes with them for that day when leaving the house.
13
bob
16/12/2020 13:35:57 17 40
bbc
Because the unions have a stranglehold
18
16/12/2020 14:19:35 24 14
bbc
We also don't pay sufficient tax to be able to subsidise the railways sufficiently to give us the service we want at the price that we want. Same as buses.
547
16/12/2020 23:08:49 2 2
bbc
I don't have any rail services available. Why should I subsidise high paid commuters, when the rural areas are left behind. Forget North v South, its cities v the rural backbone of England.

They must be well paid to pay the fares they are moaning about.
19
BPC
16/12/2020 14:14:53 7 1
bbc
In any other commercial business they would be looking to attract customers, more so if there is a need to encourage people into towns and cities. So why not discount the fares for 12 months all parties, unions, government and franchisees have a vested interest in encouraging people to the trains. This intention only encourage people to work from,home, use the car or visit occasionally.
20
16/12/2020 14:22:23 118 27
bbc
The average train user earns more than the average wage
Railways are funded through fares or general taxation
Rail costs are very high due to very high salaries, union dominance and practices that belong about 50 years ago
So, either taxpayer throws yet more money at this, or fare payers take hit and vote with their feet
Railway must wake up to fact Covid will stop the gravy train for railways...
74
BPC
16/12/2020 19:24:51 34 10
bbc
Agreed the government will have to subsidise the railways for a number of years to come. They must take a strategic decision to encourage the use of public transport if they want to reduce emissions and reenergise the cities and that means subsidising,it. Look at Europe cheap fares for public transport
168
16/12/2020 21:34:06 3 0
bbc
Rail costs are also very high due to the excessive waste. Off-peak 12-car Thameslink trains running every 10 minutes - empty! Saw it for myself last year between Luton and St Alban's. I was disgusted.
177
16/12/2020 21:36:18 8 9
bbc
>>Rail costs are very high due to very high salaries, union dominance and practices that belong about 50 years ago.

Absolutel drivel. Rail costs are high due to PRIVATE COMPANIES charging whatever they can get away with to PAY THEIR SHAREHOLDERS and INVESTORS
181
JDB
16/12/2020 21:30:46 5 3
bbc
The average train user does not earn more than the average wage...nothing like it..
258
16/12/2020 21:53:33 7 0
bbc
As someone who has worked on the rail network, it's the ever increasing number of managers that eats the money, plus the always changing standards too.

Penny-pinching on route knowledge also causes delays as they trim everything to the bone in the name of profit and it's easy to off-cost things to NR.

Glad I'm out of it.
383
16/12/2020 22:24:44 2 0
bbc
Cool. Stop subsidising railways and give me all the money I use to subsidise drivers back please.
407
16/12/2020 22:30:20 2 1
bbc
I'm pretty sure fare payers are also tax payers...
21
16/12/2020 14:37:43 18 2
bbc
They'll rise because we're going to use them less, working from home will be more common so a rebound to normal travel numbers is highly unlikely. We may see public ownership as rail co's give contracts back to Gov as the operator of last resort.
22
16/12/2020 14:42:24 3 3
bbc
Basically, it looks like rail tickets will keep going up until there is just 1 passenger left on the entire network, who can buy a £500M season ticket.

Wonder if there is a way to off set the cost of pollution, accidents, roadworks, wildlife damage etc caused by many more people using their cars, to the cost of travelling by rail?
23
16/12/2020 15:00:03 3 1
bbc
Privatise Profits, public losses and investment.

Shouldn't be subsidised private should mean private and pay the rate needed to keep the network going or close it.

Another south east / commuter money pit for the tax payer to bear.

An annual ticket to Brighton £100 a week.
Go by car instead see what that costs petrol parking time etc.
52
16/12/2020 17:57:36 5 4
bbc
"Commuting "from long distances should be BANNED
24
16/12/2020 14:56:11 13 6
bbc
It's a vicious circle;

Unions constantly strike for higher wages, less working hours etc = less staff + more staff on zero hour contracts + higher ticket prices for great public cash cow,

Better rolling stock + modernised tracks etc = higher costs + more expensive tickets - less passengers (+ spiralling ticket prices / repeat / repeat etc).

Nationalise? = Endless strikes + collapse of industry
202
16/12/2020 21:41:03 1 2
bbc
You forgot - maximise prices charged + minimal service = maximum profit for shareholders and investors
266
16/12/2020 21:55:25 0 0
bbc
The industry has already collapsed, why do you think the tories are spending 12bn a year keeping them afloat?

Ask what we get for 12bn. Should the uk tax payer be subsidising foreign operators to run inefficient service?
448
16/12/2020 22:39:04 0 0
bbc
When was the last rail strike for higher wages, and would you really be content with old outdated carriages?
25
16/12/2020 15:10:21 46 13
bbc
Jacqueline Starr makes no mention of bringing down the exorbitant salaries of railway workers which are utterly disproportionate. So many railway workers standing around doing nothing at Ashford international and all quite rude to boot
31
16/12/2020 15:43:49 33 18
bbc
what is it with this country, wee keep on thinking anyone who works in the railway industry earns a CEO salary. The chap you see standing around the train tracks is generally waiting for your train to continue their journey so he can get on with his job. In case you don't know having your back turned to a train hurtling at 125mph is dangerous and suicidal at best
I wonder how much you earn? Youve no idea how much any rail employe earns do you, you moron? Removed
247
16/12/2020 21:50:01 2 1
bbc
What do you think of as exorbitant? Do you think keeping the trains running and safe is more or less important than a banker?
408
16/12/2020 22:30:28 5 0
bbc
Are you talking about Station employees because I can assure you the average rail worker is neither rude nor lazy.
Give me an example of the “exorbitant salaries” you mention please.
635
17/12/2020 00:31:04 0 0
bbc
So leveling down is what you are suggesting. If you are unhappy with your salary why don’t you press your union to negotiate a raise or apply for job on the railways.
26
16/12/2020 15:19:22 3 4
bbc
Is mick cash still living in the seventies.

The railway industry is on its knees with the low passenger numbers from covid, which I cannot see ever recovering.

There is no profit.
27
16/12/2020 15:20:24 15 9
bbc
What a surprise - the most expensive and worst run national train system in Europe (I know we've left) is now becoming even more expensive. With more and more rail drivers on 100k + and HS2 proving a millionaires gravy train.

Is this what 'taking back control' looks like?

Seriously - is everything in the UK just going to hell in a handcart?
30
16/12/2020 15:38:49 15 6
bbc
I appreciate when you're playing with your Hornby train set, driving a train seems like a simple task to do, but I can assure its a complicated task and its a reason why you just can't drag anyone off the street to drive a train. Furthermore most train drivers are not on a 100k salary You need to get your facts right and stop using daily mail as fact checker
39
CG
16/12/2020 16:34:22 2 1
bbc
Oh No we have left Europe! must be an impressive government indeed to be able to manage that. where did they pick us up and move us?
49
16/12/2020 17:48:22 2 1
bbc
ERRR the railway companies are PRIVATE Companies.
28
16/12/2020 15:26:43 3 4
bbc
In the scheme of things right now and given most of us will travel far less in the future I don't see the problem.
29
16/12/2020 15:39:44 7 3
bbc
All done darlings to improve the network is the usual mantra spouted...……..

Cattle trucks are still used in the North... Powerhouse my *r*e Georgie Boy..
34
16/12/2020 15:52:02 10 2
bbc
UK Tory Government made a strategic mistake by closing the Woodhead Tunnel TransPennine rail link in 1981, one of the longest in the world. So many steam trains thundered through it that a 2nd tunnel was completed a couple of years later. Even as late as the 1950s, the direct link between Sheffield and Manchester was so strategic that a much wider 3rd tunnel was added for the first electric trains
27
16/12/2020 15:20:24 15 9
bbc
What a surprise - the most expensive and worst run national train system in Europe (I know we've left) is now becoming even more expensive. With more and more rail drivers on 100k + and HS2 proving a millionaires gravy train.

Is this what 'taking back control' looks like?

Seriously - is everything in the UK just going to hell in a handcart?
30
16/12/2020 15:38:49 15 6
bbc
I appreciate when you're playing with your Hornby train set, driving a train seems like a simple task to do, but I can assure its a complicated task and its a reason why you just can't drag anyone off the street to drive a train. Furthermore most train drivers are not on a 100k salary You need to get your facts right and stop using daily mail as fact checker
25
16/12/2020 15:10:21 46 13
bbc
Jacqueline Starr makes no mention of bringing down the exorbitant salaries of railway workers which are utterly disproportionate. So many railway workers standing around doing nothing at Ashford international and all quite rude to boot
31
16/12/2020 15:43:49 33 18
bbc
what is it with this country, wee keep on thinking anyone who works in the railway industry earns a CEO salary. The chap you see standing around the train tracks is generally waiting for your train to continue their journey so he can get on with his job. In case you don't know having your back turned to a train hurtling at 125mph is dangerous and suicidal at best
70
16/12/2020 19:16:44 2 1
bbc
mind you does his salary work out at 102k?
112
16/12/2020 20:47:29 2 3
bbc
If dangerous and suicidal is the best, what's the worst?
32
16/12/2020 15:49:28 18 3
bbc
Sensible and cost conscious commuters will avoid the train and work from home whenever and wherever possible.
33
16/12/2020 15:49:56 3 3
bbc
Humpty Dumpty
15:39
"All done darlings to improve the network is the usual mantra spouted...……..
Cattle trucks are still used in the North... Powerhouse my *r*e Georgie Boy.."

Not true! Northern and Transpennine both have shiny new trains running. Have used both types in recent months.
35
16/12/2020 15:53:39 4 3
bbc
Oh dear, shame the Tory Gov closed the world class Manchester - Sheffield Trans-Pennine direct rail link through the Woodhead Tunnel.
37
16/12/2020 16:06:13 0 1
bbc
Nope! Northern Rail have now retired all the cattle trucks - - - Unfortunately some passengers still behave as if they were cattle - but one cannot upgrade people's attitudes as quickly as one does the rolling stock!
29
16/12/2020 15:39:44 7 3
bbc
All done darlings to improve the network is the usual mantra spouted...……..

Cattle trucks are still used in the North... Powerhouse my *r*e Georgie Boy..
34
16/12/2020 15:52:02 10 2
bbc
UK Tory Government made a strategic mistake by closing the Woodhead Tunnel TransPennine rail link in 1981, one of the longest in the world. So many steam trains thundered through it that a 2nd tunnel was completed a couple of years later. Even as late as the 1950s, the direct link between Sheffield and Manchester was so strategic that a much wider 3rd tunnel was added for the first electric trains
51
16/12/2020 17:55:10 0 3
bbc
101
16/12/2020 20:26:27 1 2
bbc
The electrified Woodhead route was closed to passenger traffic initially to facilitate the large volume of slow moving coal traffic between the Midlands coal fields and Manchester. Passenger trains were diverted via Edale which was quicker than following the coal trains via Penistone. Then the coal mines closed and the rest is history - and bad planning.
33
16/12/2020 15:49:56 3 3
bbc
Humpty Dumpty
15:39
"All done darlings to improve the network is the usual mantra spouted...……..
Cattle trucks are still used in the North... Powerhouse my *r*e Georgie Boy.."

Not true! Northern and Transpennine both have shiny new trains running. Have used both types in recent months.
35
16/12/2020 15:53:39 4 3
bbc
Oh dear, shame the Tory Gov closed the world class Manchester - Sheffield Trans-Pennine direct rail link through the Woodhead Tunnel.
50
16/12/2020 17:53:43 0 1
bbc
????? SO WHAT there are two others even direct to manchester airport https://www.tpexpress.co.uk/travelling-with-us/routes/trains-from-manchester-airport-to-sheffield
36
16/12/2020 15:57:06 3 1
bbc
There are many socio-economic reasons for this 'pay or be damned' approach to rail fares. England has the 2nd largest long distance (1hr+ jrny time) commuter population in the world. Majority of London workers can't afford to live closer to the capital & employers aren't encouraged to move operations out of the SE. Unless in a 'profession' local salaries are poor, but living costs rise.
33
16/12/2020 15:49:56 3 3
bbc
Humpty Dumpty
15:39
"All done darlings to improve the network is the usual mantra spouted...……..
Cattle trucks are still used in the North... Powerhouse my *r*e Georgie Boy.."

Not true! Northern and Transpennine both have shiny new trains running. Have used both types in recent months.
37
16/12/2020 16:06:13 0 1
bbc
Nope! Northern Rail have now retired all the cattle trucks - - - Unfortunately some passengers still behave as if they were cattle - but one cannot upgrade people's attitudes as quickly as one does the rolling stock!
38
16/12/2020 16:18:04 26 2
bbc
You would think that the rail companies would want to encourage customers after this year.
368
16/12/2020 22:21:42 5 0
bbc
I think they've pretty much been bailed out by the government
27
16/12/2020 15:20:24 15 9
bbc
What a surprise - the most expensive and worst run national train system in Europe (I know we've left) is now becoming even more expensive. With more and more rail drivers on 100k + and HS2 proving a millionaires gravy train.

Is this what 'taking back control' looks like?

Seriously - is everything in the UK just going to hell in a handcart?
39
CG
16/12/2020 16:34:22 2 1
bbc
Oh No we have left Europe! must be an impressive government indeed to be able to manage that. where did they pick us up and move us?
40
16/12/2020 16:36:03 0 1
bbc
If rail companies had collected the fares due on conductor trains, from March 23 to November 10th, they would have had a bit more income.
Here, local trains are the only way to get from market town to market town.
Raising fares = fewer passengers = closure of the line?
Should I buy a 3-year Railcard again - decisions, decisions.
41
16/12/2020 16:38:19 1 2
bbc
how can you compare fares to earnings when all of the uk is in lock down in some way or another it dont make sense
42
16/12/2020 16:42:10 5 3
bbc
Why do all the posts think everyone on a train is a commuter?
Not everyone is.
Some prefer train travel to other possible means of transport, some have no other way to reach shops, some are tourists.
Remember the NON Commuter who relies on trains.
Think wider please,
53
16/12/2020 17:59:18 2 2
bbc
Because on line on the line I travel on they make up the majority of the passengers and travel companies make a packet on the season ticket holders. Greater Anglian do all kinds of discounts for peak travellers in fact the first off peak train used to be more popular. The ticket system needs to change as people will bill working at office a few times a week at the most in the future.
55
16/12/2020 18:17:30 1 1
bbc
If it's a preference, it's not a reliance, it's a choice, albeit maybe a Hobson's choice. Is there anywhere that a train goes from or to that a bus and/or taxi doesn't? If the majority of travellers are not commuters, who are they and how do the manage to make so many varied journeys. You're citing the impact on a tiny minority, not that it means they're irrelevant, but tails cannot not wag dogs.
43
16/12/2020 16:42:28 3 2
bbc
Birmingham to poole in dorset was 190 pounds now with this new rate 235 pounds national express 60 pounds return the train arrives 1 hr early than the coach yet you have a hour between coaches at victoria station London
1
Ben
16/12/2020 13:17:16 173 11
bbc
They should reduce the cost, not increase it. Trains are far too expensive.

Around the world, you can use better train services for far less.

Why are we content to pay masses of money for a mediocre service?
44
16/12/2020 16:43:35 10 33
bbc
Ask the Trade Unions.
What drivel "The Unions..." How do Unions control the prices set by private companies you moron? We have private companies providing a rail sevice where the bottom line is to charge the most they can whilst providing the cheapest service the can get away with. Just like very other privatised service. Removed
392
16/12/2020 22:27:33 8 2
bbc
Not too bright are you? Nothing to do with Unions but the fact that it's privatised and huge amounts are taken out to pay shareholders and big bonus for directors.
45
16/12/2020 16:46:44 5 2
bbc
More working from home looks like the only solution.

It is time this farce of an industry is called to account.
46
16/12/2020 16:46:12 6 5
bbc
Another good reason to work from home.

Lets face it, the only people paying these rip off railfares will be NHS/essential workers.

The railways should have been nationalised why they haven't is beyond me.
58
16/12/2020 18:48:23 3 3
bbc
But would that not just mean that taxpayers paid to subsidise the railways? People like NHS and essential workers?
62
16/12/2020 18:56:04 0 2
bbc
And if most people work from home, the rail system would become prohibitively expensive for those who have to travel to work/visit family etc
47
16/12/2020 17:24:05 4 4
bbc
RPI for what WE have to spend, when the government use CPI for what THEY have to spend, is just plain WRONG.
"They" keep going on about reducing carbon footprint - then pricing the lowest carbon mode of transport out of the market.
Quite honestly the marginal rate of driving (including the cost of parking) makes it more likely I'll change from commuting by train to using the car.
3
16/12/2020 13:19:56 192 35
bbc
A good friend of mine works for Net. Rail and received their £1000 bonus this year despite the pandemic. Unions fought hard to keep bonuses for staff. The same Unions are now fighting against a fare increase. Government intervention or not - a tax payer funded company spaffing out bonuses for under-utilised staff is not high on my list of praises.
48
16/12/2020 17:46:01 24 9
bbc
"Network Rail" IS a Government owned Body . The Railway companies are Private. you Do realise that? as you seem to have mixed the two up
149
PS
16/12/2020 21:28:51 1 0
bbc
Yeh, but their membership is largely union.
27
16/12/2020 15:20:24 15 9
bbc
What a surprise - the most expensive and worst run national train system in Europe (I know we've left) is now becoming even more expensive. With more and more rail drivers on 100k + and HS2 proving a millionaires gravy train.

Is this what 'taking back control' looks like?

Seriously - is everything in the UK just going to hell in a handcart?
49
16/12/2020 17:48:22 2 1
bbc
ERRR the railway companies are PRIVATE Companies.
35
16/12/2020 15:53:39 4 3
bbc
Oh dear, shame the Tory Gov closed the world class Manchester - Sheffield Trans-Pennine direct rail link through the Woodhead Tunnel.
50
16/12/2020 17:53:43 0 1
bbc
????? SO WHAT there are two others even direct to manchester airport https://www.tpexpress.co.uk/travelling-with-us/routes/trains-from-manchester-airport-to-sheffield
34
16/12/2020 15:52:02 10 2
bbc
UK Tory Government made a strategic mistake by closing the Woodhead Tunnel TransPennine rail link in 1981, one of the longest in the world. So many steam trains thundered through it that a 2nd tunnel was completed a couple of years later. Even as late as the 1950s, the direct link between Sheffield and Manchester was so strategic that a much wider 3rd tunnel was added for the first electric trains
51
16/12/2020 17:55:10 0 3
bbc
23
16/12/2020 15:00:03 3 1
bbc
Privatise Profits, public losses and investment.

Shouldn't be subsidised private should mean private and pay the rate needed to keep the network going or close it.

Another south east / commuter money pit for the tax payer to bear.

An annual ticket to Brighton £100 a week.
Go by car instead see what that costs petrol parking time etc.
52
16/12/2020 17:57:36 5 4
bbc
"Commuting "from long distances should be BANNED
42
16/12/2020 16:42:10 5 3
bbc
Why do all the posts think everyone on a train is a commuter?
Not everyone is.
Some prefer train travel to other possible means of transport, some have no other way to reach shops, some are tourists.
Remember the NON Commuter who relies on trains.
Think wider please,
53
16/12/2020 17:59:18 2 2
bbc
Because on line on the line I travel on they make up the majority of the passengers and travel companies make a packet on the season ticket holders. Greater Anglian do all kinds of discounts for peak travellers in fact the first off peak train used to be more popular. The ticket system needs to change as people will bill working at office a few times a week at the most in the future.
1
Ben
16/12/2020 13:17:16 173 11
bbc
They should reduce the cost, not increase it. Trains are far too expensive.

Around the world, you can use better train services for far less.

Why are we content to pay masses of money for a mediocre service?
54
TV
16/12/2020 18:12:03 31 4
bbc
Don't forget the shareholders need to make their profit. Less for more.
156
16/12/2020 21:31:06 24 2
bbc
Exatly. Just like every other privatised service in this country the company providign the service charge the most they can whilst providing the poorest service they can get away with.
323
16/12/2020 22:12:11 3 1
bbc
"Don't forget the shareholders need to make their profit. Less for more"
And don't feorget that mpost of the shareholders are pension funds - and they invest as shareholders in order to pay the pensions that the average working man is expecting - - - Remember that, with your pension - you receive it because somebody has paid for it!
42
16/12/2020 16:42:10 5 3
bbc
Why do all the posts think everyone on a train is a commuter?
Not everyone is.
Some prefer train travel to other possible means of transport, some have no other way to reach shops, some are tourists.
Remember the NON Commuter who relies on trains.
Think wider please,
55
16/12/2020 18:17:30 1 1
bbc
If it's a preference, it's not a reliance, it's a choice, albeit maybe a Hobson's choice. Is there anywhere that a train goes from or to that a bus and/or taxi doesn't? If the majority of travellers are not commuters, who are they and how do the manage to make so many varied journeys. You're citing the impact on a tiny minority, not that it means they're irrelevant, but tails cannot not wag dogs.
56
16/12/2020 18:18:27 3 1
bbc
As predictable as death and taxes!
57
16/12/2020 18:45:19 5 4
bbc
There we have it "works in London".

The whole rail fares thing is yet another subsidy for London - on top of ££s billions for TfL and Crossrail. Stop the London gravy train pun intended.
66
16/12/2020 19:07:16 4 7
bbc
London, the South East and East are the only areas of the country that make a positive contribution to the Treasury, the rest spends more than it raises in taxes. Those three areas subsidise the rest of the country to the tune of £35B a year. Be thankful you are being subsidised by London and the rest, your life would be much worse without it!
81
Dee
16/12/2020 19:44:33 1 1
bbc
Working from home will put an end to the London “gravy train” as you put it. Most London “commuters” (particularly 18-24 year olds) want to continue to work from home &, of those who live in the capital or SE, want to move out as they can’t afford to live in London due to the cost of housing and overcrowding. Employers are thus looking to attract talent in Birmingham, Cambridge & Milton Keynes.
46
16/12/2020 16:46:12 6 5
bbc
Another good reason to work from home.

Lets face it, the only people paying these rip off railfares will be NHS/essential workers.

The railways should have been nationalised why they haven't is beyond me.
58
16/12/2020 18:48:23 3 3
bbc
But would that not just mean that taxpayers paid to subsidise the railways? People like NHS and essential workers?
59
dwb
16/12/2020 18:51:19 5 2
bbc
If you can commute to work by train, you have already de facto received a huge subsidy from public funds. This is especially the case if you live in London and the South East. Only the other week the Mayor of London received a £1.8 billion hand out just to keep TFL solvent until April 2021.
205
16/12/2020 21:41:21 0 0
bbc
The alternative was to make the staff redundant and their benefits would have been paid by.... yes, the public.
60
Gaz
16/12/2020 18:53:47 3 4
bbc
Our train system is a joke. over £100 for a 2 hour trip between London and northern cities (which in somewhere like Japan would take 45 min). It limits the spread of wealth across the country, probably to keep house prices artificially high in London. Yet to get a plane to Spain it will cost you about £30.
85
16/12/2020 19:54:35 1 1
bbc
Bad comparison. Try turning up at the airport and asking for a ticket on the next flight to Spain and see how much it costs.
61
16/12/2020 18:53:50 69 1
bbc
Why is anybody commuting so far on a daily basis? That is madder than the rail fare.
565
16/12/2020 23:23:05 1 5
bbc
In an ideal world, I'm sure we'd all love a job that's based 50 yards from home.

But in the real world....
46
16/12/2020 16:46:12 6 5
bbc
Another good reason to work from home.

Lets face it, the only people paying these rip off railfares will be NHS/essential workers.

The railways should have been nationalised why they haven't is beyond me.
62
16/12/2020 18:56:04 0 2
bbc
And if most people work from home, the rail system would become prohibitively expensive for those who have to travel to work/visit family etc
63
16/12/2020 19:02:01 14 1
bbc
Drive then, 170mile round trip ish £88ish a day for fuel, insurance, depreciation, parking and lost time . Move closer. Work smarter and work from home.
64
16/12/2020 19:03:30 5 2
bbc
would cost even less if he had an electric car too!
273
16/12/2020 21:56:37 1 0
bbc
Where would he find the time to work after all that driving?
63
16/12/2020 19:02:01 14 1
bbc
Drive then, 170mile round trip ish £88ish a day for fuel, insurance, depreciation, parking and lost time . Move closer. Work smarter and work from home.
64
16/12/2020 19:03:30 5 2
bbc
would cost even less if he had an electric car too!
65
16/12/2020 19:04:56 2 1
bbc
I cant actually believe the increase? Is there anyone who can show that an annual season ticket has increased from 3400 to 15400 ?
57
16/12/2020 18:45:19 5 4
bbc
There we have it "works in London".

The whole rail fares thing is yet another subsidy for London - on top of ££s billions for TfL and Crossrail. Stop the London gravy train pun intended.
66
16/12/2020 19:07:16 4 7
bbc
London, the South East and East are the only areas of the country that make a positive contribution to the Treasury, the rest spends more than it raises in taxes. Those three areas subsidise the rest of the country to the tune of £35B a year. Be thankful you are being subsidised by London and the rest, your life would be much worse without it!
68
16/12/2020 19:13:33 0 2
bbc
You live in Spain...…. Adios
222
16/12/2020 21:44:32 0 0
bbc
Government are changing public investment rules which have favoured
these areas for decades. Move centre of Government to the Midlands for example which will rebalance the economy.
67
16/12/2020 19:02:30 152 9
bbc
I've just checked the season ticket price from Rugby to London, and the £15,400 quoted is for first class and includes a London travelcard. He could get it much cheaper standard class. And I'd like to see him drive in the 50 minutes the train takes to Euston!
73
16/12/2020 19:20:53 110 4
bbc
£5588 for cheapest ... wouldn’t be a news story then
124
16/12/2020 21:12:12 18 2
bbc
How dare you research somthing the BBC have posted!
On a serious note, nice to see it for a change.
187
16/12/2020 21:38:15 0 0
bbc
and how much is standard compared to a lower salary than he's being paid
410
16/12/2020 22:25:40 3 0
bbc
I agree with you.
455
16/12/2020 22:40:07 3 2
bbc
Rich people complain and get what they want, us poor folk just have to suffer.
553
16/12/2020 23:16:35 1 1
bbc
This comment. Nails it. Next!
596
16/12/2020 23:47:12 1 0
bbc
It does say first class in story
66
16/12/2020 19:07:16 4 7
bbc
London, the South East and East are the only areas of the country that make a positive contribution to the Treasury, the rest spends more than it raises in taxes. Those three areas subsidise the rest of the country to the tune of £35B a year. Be thankful you are being subsidised by London and the rest, your life would be much worse without it!
68
16/12/2020 19:13:33 0 2
bbc
You live in Spain...…. Adios
88
16/12/2020 19:59:20 1 1
bbc
I have a home within the M25 as well and I pay my taxes in the UK - not that they are much since I retired.
69
16/12/2020 19:14:19 16 2
bbc
I suppose the question is why should non train users subsidise train users?

It looks like the answer from the Government is that they shouldn't.
31
16/12/2020 15:43:49 33 18
bbc
what is it with this country, wee keep on thinking anyone who works in the railway industry earns a CEO salary. The chap you see standing around the train tracks is generally waiting for your train to continue their journey so he can get on with his job. In case you don't know having your back turned to a train hurtling at 125mph is dangerous and suicidal at best
70
16/12/2020 19:16:44 2 1
bbc
mind you does his salary work out at 102k?
71
16/12/2020 19:19:08 2 2
bbc
I remember the time I used to work in Guildford and I would occassionally see the Big Issue seller and his family ram barge through the ticket barriers.

Also, when the ticket inspectors would request to see the passengers tickets, on many occassions they would be very lenient towards the Big Issue seller as he would make it very clear that he did not speak English, or just ignore them.
72
16/12/2020 19:20:50 14 2
bbc
The BBC should really check their facts before printing such nonsense - annual season ticket Rugby to Euston is £5,588 - sounds good value for someone earning more than £100,000 a year - (he quotes £15,000 is 10-15% of his salary....
92
16/12/2020 20:15:54 4 1
bbc
OUCH.

So he has been telling porkies too.
94
16/12/2020 20:17:05 8 1
bbc
The £15K is for first class.

:-D

Awww .. poor thing.
419
16/12/2020 22:30:03 2 0
bbc
He pays for a high speed first class ticket
519
16/12/2020 22:59:36 0 0
bbc
He pays for first class high speed ticket. The most expensive. He should try 2nd class. Be cheaper.
67
16/12/2020 19:02:30 152 9
bbc
I've just checked the season ticket price from Rugby to London, and the £15,400 quoted is for first class and includes a London travelcard. He could get it much cheaper standard class. And I'd like to see him drive in the 50 minutes the train takes to Euston!
73
16/12/2020 19:20:53 110 4
bbc
£5588 for cheapest ... wouldn’t be a news story then
186
xlr
16/12/2020 21:37:45 8 3
bbc
That's still too expensive.
235
16/12/2020 21:47:11 1 3
bbc
I suspect the people paying 5588 aren’t moaning
652
17/12/2020 05:16:14 0 0
bbc
No, he can work on the train as he is not driving.

1hour each way = 10 hours a week. Say for 48 weeks a year = 480hours.

If he earns £11.70 per hour his commute is effectively free.
20
16/12/2020 14:22:23 118 27
bbc
The average train user earns more than the average wage
Railways are funded through fares or general taxation
Rail costs are very high due to very high salaries, union dominance and practices that belong about 50 years ago
So, either taxpayer throws yet more money at this, or fare payers take hit and vote with their feet
Railway must wake up to fact Covid will stop the gravy train for railways...
74
BPC
16/12/2020 19:24:51 34 10
bbc
Agreed the government will have to subsidise the railways for a number of years to come. They must take a strategic decision to encourage the use of public transport if they want to reduce emissions and reenergise the cities and that means subsidising,it. Look at Europe cheap fares for public transport
75
Dee
16/12/2020 19:27:50 39 2
bbc
£15,400pa is a ridiculous amount of money to pay for rail travel from Rugby to London. Why doesn’t Mr Nesbit find a job or have a business closer to home or move closer to work? Now that more people are working from home, there will be less need for rail travel anyway.
80
Eva
16/12/2020 19:42:36 19 4
bbc
It's not always that simple.At 10 to 15% of his salary he can afford it anyway.
165
16/12/2020 21:27:31 2 0
bbc
House prices in Rugby vs London....whopper saving!
207
16/12/2020 21:41:42 0 1
bbc
yes its easy to find a job in todays economy isnt it.....
411
16/12/2020 22:27:32 4 0
bbc
That’s because he pays for a first class high speed ticket
76
16/12/2020 19:30:37 2 2
bbc
typical thinking -- making a loss so put the prices up , less people then use the service so less income again so put the prices up again and so on
77
16/12/2020 19:31:41 8 4
bbc
The truth is, railways have been starved of investment since WW2 and management have had to fight outdated and heavily unionised working practices since then.
78
16/12/2020 19:33:32 2 2
bbc
Just as a reference in the Netherlands Eindhoven to Amsterdam 1st class 12 monthly tickets costs Euros 7,104. Distance = 111Km time by rail ~1.5 Hrs
79
16/12/2020 19:41:20 105 9
bbc
The solution to the problem is not to work in London in the first place.

Why anybody puts up with it is beyond me - expensive, smelly, waste of time, unhealthy etc.

People generally work 8 hours, sleep 8 hours and out of the remaining 8 hours have to bathe, eat etc. If you spend 4 hours a day commuting then you're just a robot, with no personal time left at all.
97
16/12/2020 20:21:54 69 7
bbc
"Why anybody puts up with it is beyond me - expensive, smelly, waste of time, unhealthy etc."

High salary.

But don't expect the taxpayer to subsidise your travel to work from some remote leafy town.
240
16/12/2020 21:48:12 5 1
bbc
Smelly? Have you been to middlesborough ?
462
16/12/2020 22:42:14 6 0
bbc
Those spending 4 hours to get to work do it at choice, and for the money earned. London for example.
Why else would anyone spend 4 hours commuting? If you dont like it move closer and pay a lot more to live.
500
16/12/2020 22:53:09 1 3
bbc
sleep can be cut by 50%. It didn't do Maggie any harm, and I suspect work would be longer.Any missed sleep can be caught up by dozing on the train
625
mjp
17/12/2020 00:12:39 0 0
bbc
Salary, family, friends and ties. If you were born in London and grew up there then that is home. I enjoy the London salary but live out of the centre. My commute is a shade over an hour.

I'm surrounded by greenery, woods and nature reserves and I'm 5 mins away from green belt. A huge area of outstanding natural beauty is 10 mins drive away.

London isn't all inner city.
653
17/12/2020 05:19:25 0 0
bbc
Only if you are driving, on the train you are free to do want you want.
75
Dee
16/12/2020 19:27:50 39 2
bbc
£15,400pa is a ridiculous amount of money to pay for rail travel from Rugby to London. Why doesn’t Mr Nesbit find a job or have a business closer to home or move closer to work? Now that more people are working from home, there will be less need for rail travel anyway.
80
Eva
16/12/2020 19:42:36 19 4
bbc
It's not always that simple.At 10 to 15% of his salary he can afford it anyway.
57
16/12/2020 18:45:19 5 4
bbc
There we have it "works in London".

The whole rail fares thing is yet another subsidy for London - on top of ££s billions for TfL and Crossrail. Stop the London gravy train pun intended.
81
Dee
16/12/2020 19:44:33 1 1
bbc
Working from home will put an end to the London “gravy train” as you put it. Most London “commuters” (particularly 18-24 year olds) want to continue to work from home &, of those who live in the capital or SE, want to move out as they can’t afford to live in London due to the cost of housing and overcrowding. Employers are thus looking to attract talent in Birmingham, Cambridge & Milton Keynes.
82
16/12/2020 19:48:55 56 4
bbc
Much like the internet 'did for' the high street
Covid 19 will 'all but' end commuting
People, who can, have learnt to work from home, not buy expensive lunches, have a lie-in and not come back in darkness having saved an hour or two at each end of the day!
Good luck with persuading them back on the trains by putting the price up!
87
16/12/2020 19:55:42 47 8
bbc
Wonder how long it will be before your employer realises that "working from home" can mean from places like India, Eastern Europe and the Philippines for a much lower wage than they pay you?
99
16/12/2020 20:09:07 13 2
bbc
I don't buy this. At the start companies thought it may lead to revolution, particularly with office workforces. In reality we'll see an evolution (not revolution) and much more flexible working e.g. more people working 2 or 3 days in the office. 5 days / 9-5 is out (esp. with these train fares), but don't underestimate the amount of people who can't wait to get back to the office.
83
16/12/2020 19:50:50 108 9
bbc
He's had 23 years to move closer to his place of work or find a similar position to near where he lives.
191
16/12/2020 21:39:17 13 43
bbc
why should he do that as opposed to getting a decent rail fare? It's his fault is it that the rail prices are high?
84
16/12/2020 19:52:34 73 5
bbc
The taxpayer can't keep subsidising rail fares for those on London salaries. If you're commuting to London then you're already causing problems by pricing out locals from wherever you are commuting from. If you don't like it then move to London and enjoy the higher cost of living and lack of space. If you do like it then pay the extra, keep calm and carry on. Personal responsibility - we love it!
297
16/12/2020 22:03:13 19 4
bbc
You’re missing the key point here of the government privatising rail profits but now they’re at a loss they’ve all stepped back until they can make a profit again.

That’s the big problem here with our rail system.

The example in this article is terrible. Usual, lazy beeb journalist though so I’d expect nothing more.
371
16/12/2020 22:22:13 3 2
bbc
As a train commuter I’d be happy for rail fares to not be subsidised if I can get all the tax I pay to subsidise roads back in return.
60
Gaz
16/12/2020 18:53:47 3 4
bbc
Our train system is a joke. over £100 for a 2 hour trip between London and northern cities (which in somewhere like Japan would take 45 min). It limits the spread of wealth across the country, probably to keep house prices artificially high in London. Yet to get a plane to Spain it will cost you about £30.
85
16/12/2020 19:54:35 1 1
bbc
Bad comparison. Try turning up at the airport and asking for a ticket on the next flight to Spain and see how much it costs.
86
16/12/2020 19:54:43 192 33
bbc
23 years commuting from Rugby to London - why didn't he move and he's a Telecomms Manager who should know more than most about how to home work
90
16/12/2020 20:11:24 128 33
bbc
Agree completely - a self inflicted financial and social burden. No sympathy!!
108
Adi
16/12/2020 20:41:45 16 4
bbc
How much has his salary risen over those year?
206
16/12/2020 21:41:36 16 2
bbc
10%-15% of his Salary paid in train fares accounts to £15 grand. Obviously earning in the region of £150K a year.
212
16/12/2020 21:42:36 37 6
bbc
Symptomatic of what’s wrong with this country. Selfishly wanting his cake and eating it. He wants the low costs of living in Rugby and the high salary of London and wants others to subsidise his ridiculous 220 mile round trip. When did we become a country so full of selfish people. Maybe I should count my blessings that he doesn’t drive it in an SUV!
234
16/12/2020 21:47:01 33 3
bbc
Could he not get a job nearer Rugby. His choice - he should live with it. Why should I pay for his decisions.
291
16/12/2020 22:01:23 8 4
bbc
Rugby to London journey is about 1h; house prices in Rugby are considerably cheaper than in the smoke. Most people that work in central London that travel from 'burbs spend an hour on the tube. Work it out.
Removed
521
16/12/2020 23:00:13 3 1
bbc
Not all staff can homebase.
If he and his staff are technical, they have to work where the equipment os. esp in telecooms

Sales staff. maybe, they can, and do. work in India.
548
16/12/2020 23:09:30 2 1
bbc
How does that cost relate to the "Mr or Mrs average cost of a reasonably priced car to do say a 40 mile round trip to work on an average salary.

My bet is this chap is quids in and does not have the stress of driving also does he get food and drink of any description thrown in?
605
16/12/2020 23:39:55 1 0
bbc
On the money, I am retired now, but used technology to undertakea "follow the sun" job. I wasdoi g that as an early adopter from around 2004. This article is not a real world story, First Class is a lifestyle thing - typically.
618
17/12/2020 00:06:22 1 0
bbc
Also option to use coaches.
Coach to London for me is about half train fare, with a guaranteed seat. Journey times not much different.
623
17/12/2020 00:12:07 0 0
bbc
If you grew up in eg Rugby, and were happy there with family and friends nearby why would you move because of a 'job'. Also, isn't it govt policy (for decades now) to be greener (reduce carbon footprint) and use public transport. Rail fares annually rising above pay rises/inflation. Kinda makes case for re-nationalisation of railways because it couldn't really get any worse....
657
17/12/2020 07:12:42 0 0
bbc
As a telecomms manager he has no need to commute. He'll be doing nothing that warrants his being in an office in London - and that's not just because of Covid. If his intelligence is reflected in his thinking then no wonder telecomms in the UK are such a shambles.
82
16/12/2020 19:48:55 56 4
bbc
Much like the internet 'did for' the high street
Covid 19 will 'all but' end commuting
People, who can, have learnt to work from home, not buy expensive lunches, have a lie-in and not come back in darkness having saved an hour or two at each end of the day!
Good luck with persuading them back on the trains by putting the price up!
87
16/12/2020 19:55:42 47 8
bbc
Wonder how long it will be before your employer realises that "working from home" can mean from places like India, Eastern Europe and the Philippines for a much lower wage than they pay you?
118
16/12/2020 20:54:23 10 1
bbc
Those that could already did that years ago.
160
JH
16/12/2020 21:32:04 14 0
bbc
This sort of sensationalist comment amuses me. I work for an outsourcing company with many nearshore and offshore locations. It simply isn't possible, desirable, or easy to move the vast majority of jobs to those destinations. As one other poster has already said, those roles that could be moved easily were done years ago. But that is the oldschool way, people should be more afraid of automation!
185
16/12/2020 21:37:33 5 0
bbc
I do site visits from home.. but far to ask someone abroad to do that...
251
16/12/2020 21:51:32 4 0
bbc
You’ve obviously never worked with those off shore. Many barely able to do anything other than basics. The best move here.

Why would the government allow a company who laid off all their uk staff for offshore staff to operate in this country?
They already do! That's why Great British companies like that thieving bunch of scumbags at British Telecom have call centres in the Philipines and India - suppose it helps keep the number of complaints down when they can't understand what the customer is complaining about Removed
474
16/12/2020 22:44:58 1 0
bbc
Wonder why they did not realise it before COVID19 ?

Then they rang BT because they had a problem with their phone .... put through to a foreign call centre .......

:-D
:-D
:-D
478
16/12/2020 22:44:34 6 0
bbc
I think those days are behind us. We all know how annoying it is when someone on the other line can’t understand us or we can’t understand them. That’s why more companies move their call centres back to U.K. and even advertise it like it’s something extra. I’m Polish and work for contact centre and I know that anyone with less then perfect English would struggle.
509
16/12/2020 22:56:59 1 0
bbc
its amazing how many people are so dense as to fail to grasp this simple truth
630
mjp
17/12/2020 00:15:45 0 0
bbc
Its happening already today.
68
16/12/2020 19:13:33 0 2
bbc
You live in Spain...…. Adios
88
16/12/2020 19:59:20 1 1
bbc
I have a home within the M25 as well and I pay my taxes in the UK - not that they are much since I retired.
89
16/12/2020 20:02:27 4 5
bbc
“Britain has the highest rail fares in Europe", you'll know this is only 15% of the story. The other 85% is that we have similar or even cheaper fares, too. The big picture is that Britain has the most commercially aggressive fares in Europe, with the highest fares designed to get maximum revenue from business travel, and some of the lowest fares designed to get more revenue by filling more seats.
95
Ian
16/12/2020 20:19:12 3 1
bbc
that is utter rubbish. we are twice as expensive by mile travelled as the next country and that is Sweden. Please research. The UK is the most expensive train travel in the world period, thank you Conservatives. The Party of Clowns and people who read the Daily Mail and think it is true.
86
16/12/2020 19:54:43 192 33
bbc
23 years commuting from Rugby to London - why didn't he move and he's a Telecomms Manager who should know more than most about how to home work
90
16/12/2020 20:11:24 128 33
bbc
Agree completely - a self inflicted financial and social burden. No sympathy!!
Removed
524
16/12/2020 23:01:43 0 1
bbc
See above.
The alternative is to move to London.
How much for reasonable accommodation there?
91
16/12/2020 20:14:32 85 4
bbc
His ticket costs £15K. It is 15% of his salary.

So ... he earns £100K a year.

His choice. He could move closer to London. He could get a job near Rugby.

He still has £85K a year left... unless he has been burning it in his woodstove, he would easily be able to retire. And buy a tiny violin as well ...
102
16/12/2020 20:26:35 20 40
bbc
"He still has £85K a year left" No he doesn't have £85k left. The £15k season ticket is from take home pay. That must be a lot less after deductions. And it k for kilo, K is for Kelvin.
367
16/12/2020 22:21:01 13 0
bbc
Assuming the 15k is from net pay he needs to earn £25gross ... if that represents 15% of his salary then he earns £166k. If the £15k is representing 15% of his salary then he earns £100k. It’s not clear if the 15% is based on his gross of net salary either way he is a very high earner and has been happy to earn a 6 figure salary whilst incurring high travel costs. Bit late to cry now
472
16/12/2020 22:44:30 8 0
bbc
I wonder if he had a house in London and sold it for a million and bought something cheaper and bigger in rugby...
Then moans...and moans.... Now, I'd like to complain about my telecoms charges
72
16/12/2020 19:20:50 14 2
bbc
The BBC should really check their facts before printing such nonsense - annual season ticket Rugby to Euston is £5,588 - sounds good value for someone earning more than £100,000 a year - (he quotes £15,000 is 10-15% of his salary....
92
16/12/2020 20:15:54 4 1
bbc
OUCH.

So he has been telling porkies too.
2
16/12/2020 13:19:20 28 7
bbc
Its nice for the Unions to speak up for the beleaguered rail traveller for a change because too date they haven't.

Indeed, their support of a business model with unconditional pay and fare rises does not go unnoticed - the UK rail traveller (frequent or not) deserves a LOT better!
93
16/12/2020 20:15:57 28 6
bbc
Unions only support the needs of customers because it is ultimately they who pay for the jobs.

A hugely expensive 19th century white elephant for the 21st century.

Being green is not about taking the train - it is about working closer to home to completely avoid travel!
72
16/12/2020 19:20:50 14 2
bbc
The BBC should really check their facts before printing such nonsense - annual season ticket Rugby to Euston is £5,588 - sounds good value for someone earning more than £100,000 a year - (he quotes £15,000 is 10-15% of his salary....
94
16/12/2020 20:17:05 8 1
bbc
The £15K is for first class.

:-D

Awww .. poor thing.
89
16/12/2020 20:02:27 4 5
bbc
“Britain has the highest rail fares in Europe", you'll know this is only 15% of the story. The other 85% is that we have similar or even cheaper fares, too. The big picture is that Britain has the most commercially aggressive fares in Europe, with the highest fares designed to get maximum revenue from business travel, and some of the lowest fares designed to get more revenue by filling more seats.
95
Ian
16/12/2020 20:19:12 3 1
bbc
that is utter rubbish. we are twice as expensive by mile travelled as the next country and that is Sweden. Please research. The UK is the most expensive train travel in the world period, thank you Conservatives. The Party of Clowns and people who read the Daily Mail and think it is true.
96
16/12/2020 20:20:08 166 9
bbc
Whilst there is something wrong with how expensive rail fares are in the UK .. and the stupid "games" to get a cheap deal.

BUT .. why have the Beeb picked about the worst possible case to illustrate the point ?

This guy CHOOSES to travel on a first class season ticket from nearly 100 miles away from London.

He must fuel his boiler with £20 notes too ....
122
16/12/2020 21:04:07 35 5
bbc
At least they picked a moaner on a Euston route, usually they go and stand at Paddington and wait for those commuting from Somerset!
147
16/12/2020 21:28:34 4 0
bbc
I guess he wants to work while on the train and by paying for a first class season ticket he is assured of a seat.
211
16/12/2020 21:42:36 13 0
bbc
They kind of gave the game away mentioning £15k is 10% of his salary (so £150k.) The UK average is just £30k
355
16/12/2020 22:18:44 4 0
bbc
Maybe because some BBC execs on even more than this guy makes (over £102,000 P/A) are commuters too ?
611
mjp
17/12/2020 00:00:10 0 0
bbc
He uses £50 notes on weekends
664
17/12/2020 09:04:33 0 0
bbc
The BBC always pick the extreme example. When the weather is really bad they send a reporter to the most exposed place, usually a Danny Savage, and say look at this weather !! They are an outfit with almost zero credibility
79
16/12/2020 19:41:20 105 9
bbc
The solution to the problem is not to work in London in the first place.

Why anybody puts up with it is beyond me - expensive, smelly, waste of time, unhealthy etc.

People generally work 8 hours, sleep 8 hours and out of the remaining 8 hours have to bathe, eat etc. If you spend 4 hours a day commuting then you're just a robot, with no personal time left at all.
97
16/12/2020 20:21:54 69 7
bbc
"Why anybody puts up with it is beyond me - expensive, smelly, waste of time, unhealthy etc."

High salary.

But don't expect the taxpayer to subsidise your travel to work from some remote leafy town.
220
16/12/2020 21:44:19 12 0
bbc
True. Cake and eat it springs to mind. Suspect it would cost him a shed load more than what he's paid in rail tickets to purchase a house in London the same spec as the one he has in Rugby. These people make the choice to work in London and commute so stop whinging about the cost of your travel.
98
16/12/2020 20:22:29 14 2
bbc
I live in a rural area - if wife and I use a train to go visit friends a few hours away means a taxi to the nearest station, a long train journey, and another taxi or bus (yuk!) the other end. The cost ? about £140 'off peak!' for two of us, plus taxis etc. total probably £170 and most of a day gone. - or a couple of hours in the car and about £30 petrol tops - a no brainer.
324
16/12/2020 22:12:54 8 3
bbc
Drive then and stop moaning.
522
16/12/2020 23:00:55 0 0
bbc
and for more Covid safe
82
16/12/2020 19:48:55 56 4
bbc
Much like the internet 'did for' the high street
Covid 19 will 'all but' end commuting
People, who can, have learnt to work from home, not buy expensive lunches, have a lie-in and not come back in darkness having saved an hour or two at each end of the day!
Good luck with persuading them back on the trains by putting the price up!
99
16/12/2020 20:09:07 13 2
bbc
I don't buy this. At the start companies thought it may lead to revolution, particularly with office workforces. In reality we'll see an evolution (not revolution) and much more flexible working e.g. more people working 2 or 3 days in the office. 5 days / 9-5 is out (esp. with these train fares), but don't underestimate the amount of people who can't wait to get back to the office.
100
16/12/2020 20:26:21 0 1
bbc
https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/currency-converter/#currency-result

calculate in history at the above link he would have got six horses 300 years ago and his buying power is the same now as it was in 1995 (£100k p.a. ish) if he got past Dick Turpin alive Robin Hood would have got him. What an idiot. Apply for a bus pass! Even better stop at 'ome an' moan at 'er indoors you greedy auld git.