EU reveals plan to regulate Big Tech
15/12/2020 | news | technology | 943
Facebook, Google and others face yearly checks and limits on what they can do with users' data.
1
15/12/2020 16:24:00 11 24
bbc
Just a free for all approach in the UK then

And no tax to be paid as long as they let the Tories cheat their way to election wins
9
15/12/2020 16:27:17 17 4
bbc
No, the UK has already announced similar measures.
12
15/12/2020 16:28:23 3 7
bbc
Why lumber them with the bill when it's so much easier to clobber the ordinary men and women in the street? Plus the pathetic Tory desperation for a trade deal with the US means this government will never make them pay their fair share.
61
15/12/2020 16:36:31 2 1
bbc
Thank you for the constructive comment that hasn't come across as bitter at all despite less people agreeing with how you vote.
93
15/12/2020 16:44:10 7 2
bbc
You missed the bit were the UK announced measures last week, ahead of the EU. If you'd taken your remainer glasses off you would have spotted it.
2
15/12/2020 16:24:03 21 5
bbc
About time. Still it's good to see that the system works (eventually) and that corporate excesses can get reined in.
6
15/12/2020 16:26:31 31 57
bbc
This is only applicable in the European Union. We left the EU at the start of this year so we see no benefit from this.
3
15/12/2020 16:24:14 7 16
bbc
And what would the idiots in the UK government plan to cover within the UK for the areas called out by the EU? I suspect very little...
36
fos
15/12/2020 16:32:38 3 2
bbc
You have had your little rant now about “idiots” in the U.K. government and it’s very nice of you to let us know what the ‘idiots’ in the U.K. public think.
44
15/12/2020 16:33:15 3 2
bbc
Don't get too excited the EU can't regulate themselves - ask for a copy of their annual accounts - good luck with that.
84
15/12/2020 16:41:52 1 1
bbc
Try reading the article properly, there is a link to what the UK announced last week, ahead of the EU announcement.
4
15/12/2020 16:25:15 96 27
bbc
AS much of a fan of Technology I am, the Big Tech firms - I see a greater need for regulation to benefit society. The the horrors that social media has unleashed has been detrimental to younger generations and also damaging for society. As governments grapple with the rise and abuse of "fake news" and "information wars" it is good to see the EU grappling this thorny issue. I hope the UK follows.
15
15/12/2020 16:28:45 82 9
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
29
15/12/2020 16:31:02 26 20
bbc
The EU is brilliant. 52% of us never understood this.

I wish we could be part of it someday and share the benefits.
288
15/12/2020 17:28:42 9 8
bbc
The EU, are following us.. lol
327
15/12/2020 17:39:18 3 6
bbc
Not just the younger generation, in fact they are the generation most at ease with it. The baby boomers on the other hand, unleashed a torrent of lies and half truths.
611
Bob
15/12/2020 20:00:55 1 0
bbc
Damage to the youth's mental health? We had to deal with that before social media came along. Wanting to be the best, look the best, comparing to others is nothing new.

Social media may have made it a bigger problem, but what are you asking for exactly? Bans on people posting anything positive about their life? Sorry, you can't post that beach picture, Karen from Grimsby can't afford a holiday.
5
15/12/2020 16:26:16 198 12
bbc
It's good to see that both the EU and the UK are finally starting to rein in the abuse of our privacy and data by these large corporations.
73
15/12/2020 16:39:03 204 18
bbc
My own opinion is that social media in general is a cancer upon society. I have worked in IT for thirty years and increasingly find it difficult to maintain a healthy privacy level while using basic services on the internet. Unfortunately the UK has never lead the debate on online privacy, from either Labour or Conservative politicians. On past conduct both are happy for the status quo to continue
289
15/12/2020 17:28:52 12 5
bbc
I'll believe when I see it.

The biggest abusers in the world of personal privacy are the Governments of the USa and China, with the UK (GCHQ) not very far behind.
290
15/12/2020 17:28:52 16 6
bbc
Err, no. The UK has suggested it would do that, but hasn’t done anything. Why? Because we are desperate for a trade deal with the US. We don’t have the ‘muscle’ of the EU & I daresay the UK would water regulations down when threatened with trade tariffs. That’s the reality of being a small minnow on our own.
339
15/12/2020 17:42:15 10 6
bbc
You will see that EU's law is far more comprehensive and with more teeth.
remember seeing Zuckerberg in the UK parliament (no Zuckerberg's refused to testify before UK MP); he did test before EU MEPs
so, yes, the bigger the better, more power,
431
15/12/2020 18:30:17 2 2
bbc
Big lies and fakery by States. All they hate is thecpublic having any say that other can see. They only want themselves to be seen and heard.

Data claptrap is no issue or problem. It is so worryingly good they spend most of their time advertising stuff you just bought already. It is largely a con those paying are gullible enough to pay for. Also easy to foul up by visiting random junk. Non issue.
855
15/12/2020 22:37:12 0 0
bbc
HAHAHAHA That's a great joke. Ever thought of being a COMEDIAN?
903
16/12/2020 08:03:16 0 0
bbc
But EU/ UK are decade plus late!!
Tech (& possibilities & rules) change yearly.
No mention of UKgov position on this either.. Why should ukgov accept terms & legalese in USA for products brought and used in UK?
Why can't UK copy same laws as EU and copy fining policies?
941
16/12/2020 18:14:19 0 0
bbc
What's the UK got to do with this?
2
15/12/2020 16:24:03 21 5
bbc
About time. Still it's good to see that the system works (eventually) and that corporate excesses can get reined in.
6
15/12/2020 16:26:31 31 57
bbc
This is only applicable in the European Union. We left the EU at the start of this year so we see no benefit from this.
23
15/12/2020 16:29:53 23 11
bbc
The UK have just passed similar regulation just the BBC, who are openly pro-Europe have opened HYS on this legislation
27
15/12/2020 16:30:52 19 4
bbc
You didn't read the article, did you?
58
fos
15/12/2020 16:35:52 18 3
bbc
Try reading the article we announced our own plans to put limits on last week
284
15/12/2020 17:28:02 3 8
bbc
Except that we could be a low-tax base for trading into the EU, and doing a right-royal stuffing of their regulations.
546
15/12/2020 19:40:40 2 1
bbc
The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week
7
15/12/2020 16:26:32 262 21
bbc
Tech companies should be subject to the same rules of publishing and media broadcasting that other media is subject to.
Unacceptable content in an advert on TV or a magazine would result in fines for the distributor and that should be the same for tech.
57
15/12/2020 16:35:48 162 24
bbc
That was Donald Trump's position. That the social media giants should be stripped of their immunity and be made responsible for the content on their platforms, as any other media outlet would be.

They do act as "publishers" rather than hosts as they subject *legal* content to their own editorial control based on their own political views.

Therefore they are now no different to Newspapers.
66
15/12/2020 16:37:54 12 7
bbc
Also before you start banging on about EU vs. UK please read paragraph 8 and follow the link. Judging by most of the comments on this HYS people have only read the headline and then posted on how ill informed they are.
80
15/12/2020 16:40:34 6 13
bbc
the big sites are not even literally, but "actually" impossible to police.

"its government policy to regulate these sites"

it's impossible for governments to regulate them. governments do not have the power to regulate them. because that "power" does not exist.
163
15/12/2020 16:56:45 10 3
bbc
It needs to be slightly different, because TV companies ware able to vet adverts before they go live. There are however vastly more Facebook posts.
If we lived in a world where our Facebook posts were placed in a queue for months to be checked they could be published, then no one would use Facebook.
307
15/12/2020 17:33:55 0 3
bbc
I disagee. Two points: philospohically I believe in "free speech" even when I disagree or take offence at a specific item of content, and practically because there is no worldwide agreement on what content is "unacceptable" & the Net is a worldwide distribution network, therefore you can only enforce the "lowest common denominator", which is hardly worth the effort.
345
15/12/2020 17:45:11 2 1
bbc
It's a fine balance for user communication like social media, but one place I'd love to see regulated is online advertising. Make sites responsible for the adverts they carry. No more "Police in ${location} say everyone should carry (thing that looks like a lightsabre)"
374
15/12/2020 17:53:36 0 0
bbc
The problem with auto moderation is the genuine bad actors learn how to slightly miss-spell or rephrase things to get around it in no time. - and it mostly just ends up being a hindrance to ordinary users generating false positives.
396
15/12/2020 18:07:36 2 1
bbc
That includes content submitted for publication in the BBC's HYS sections. The shite that can be read here is unacceptable, by and standards.
397
15/12/2020 18:08:00 2 0
bbc
why would 9 (currently) people disagree with this, other than just to be awkward?Tech companies have got away with a complete lack of regulation for too long. Time to put responsibility before profit
423
15/12/2020 18:25:42 1 3
bbc
Rubbish. What next? Fact checking, official lines only on graffiti on public toilet walls? There is a world of difference between hosting gossip, opinions, and being the one pronouncing the content true.

Like saying pub landlords are responsible for everything said in their bar not just the notices they write and put up.

Cowards and tyrants fear free expression, hence the eu attitude.
450
15/12/2020 18:41:02 0 1
bbc
Tech companies should take 'reasonable measures' to control content. However pre-censorship of every post is not realistically possible (outside a genuinely totalitarian state) or desirable.

For example some pretty offensive stuff gets posted on HYS. Generally it is taken down but it's brief presence does not make the BBC a '...ist' organization.
486
15/12/2020 18:58:41 0 0
bbc
So back to centralisation of information... and all the propaganda, bias, narrow-mindedness, group think and censorship that goes with that. Governments and traditional media will fall all over each other to promote this. This whole article already headlines with its demon 'Big Tech'.

Centralise control of social media content and it's hello Big Brother.
557
15/12/2020 19:41:34 0 1
bbc
"Unacceptable content in an advert on TV or a magazine would result in fines for the distributor and that should be the same for tech"

Then you may as well make the Royal Mail responsible for the content of letters and packages. It's no different.
8
15/12/2020 16:27:04 8 11
bbc
Yes, tossing away EU membership is not just about the price of veg
22
15/12/2020 16:29:38 2 3
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
89
15/12/2020 16:43:06 0 1
bbc
The story isn't about leaving EU Membership. As standards and governance don't just disappear.
1
15/12/2020 16:24:00 11 24
bbc
Just a free for all approach in the UK then

And no tax to be paid as long as they let the Tories cheat their way to election wins
9
15/12/2020 16:27:17 17 4
bbc
No, the UK has already announced similar measures.
32
15/12/2020 16:31:26 2 1
bbc
A unit in the CMA, not ready until 2022 at the earliest, and that's only if the government gives itself time to legislate at the earliest opportunity. The word "toothless" springs to mind.
34
15/12/2020 16:32:20 1 8
bbc
You're right. Strange isn't it? It's almost like the EU is doing the right thing and we're just copying
129
15/12/2020 16:49:50 1 3
bbc
But this government promises everything but fails to deliver time after time
188
15/12/2020 17:02:33 1 1
bbc
Need a competent leadership to deliver these measures, unfortunately we seem to be lacking this on both sides of the political spectrum,
10
15/12/2020 16:28:03 13 14
bbc
The EU moves on to better things, while we stay behind, angry at everybody but ourselves for our own choices.

Little Britain ladies and gentlemen
18
15/12/2020 16:29:17 5 5
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
11
15/12/2020 16:28:11 3 4
bbc
It’s about time.
1
15/12/2020 16:24:00 11 24
bbc
Just a free for all approach in the UK then

And no tax to be paid as long as they let the Tories cheat their way to election wins
12
15/12/2020 16:28:23 3 7
bbc
Why lumber them with the bill when it's so much easier to clobber the ordinary men and women in the street? Plus the pathetic Tory desperation for a trade deal with the US means this government will never make them pay their fair share.
13
15/12/2020 16:28:23 5 12
bbc
dont care as we are not in the EU!! just keep out of waters :-)
30
15/12/2020 16:31:07 4 2
bbc
Codfinger, the man with an abnormal desire for lots of fish
14
15/12/2020 16:28:34 13 12
bbc
It isn't just BIG TECH that needs regulating... the world of capitalism has been enjoying so much freedom with the sky being the limit, which is exactly why we are now stuck with climate change & poverty. I used to think regulation was a bad thing in the 80's but little regulation has broken us and lead us to greed and destruction and left us with a decimated planet sucked dry of resources.
4
15/12/2020 16:25:15 96 27
bbc
AS much of a fan of Technology I am, the Big Tech firms - I see a greater need for regulation to benefit society. The the horrors that social media has unleashed has been detrimental to younger generations and also damaging for society. As governments grapple with the rise and abuse of "fake news" and "information wars" it is good to see the EU grappling this thorny issue. I hope the UK follows.
15
15/12/2020 16:28:45 82 9
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
144
15/12/2020 16:52:22 11 11
bbc
Of course they have its a product of brexit. The UK agreed with quite alot more than eurosceptics care to admit.
159
15/12/2020 16:55:31 13 12
bbc
Not at all prompted by seeing the EU take the lead again (such as GDPR)!
179
15/12/2020 17:00:06 13 3
bbc
That is good until we find out that either Chris Grayling will be in charge , A friend of a member of the cabinet , Or the work is put to tender and won by a overseas competitor,
296
15/12/2020 17:30:27 6 2
bbc
"online harms" is not "a monopoly abuse of data and privacy"

Expect something totally useless from CMA, presumably talking about "teh coderz knowing all the hashtags", rather than getting any insight whatsoever from the actual expoerts.
375
15/12/2020 17:53:43 0 0
bbc
Awesome. Thanks, UnMewt. I can believe it btw - I have dealt with a lot of Data / Fall-out issues in my work.
906
16/12/2020 08:10:32 0 0
bbc
When? Where's the link?
Why not simply follow EU lead, laws and copy prosecution results?
16
15/12/2020 16:28:48 18 18
bbc
In the meantime we're stuck here, a tiny island, isolated, cold, floating, alone with big tech, and all its money, here, in London, just putting up buildings, creating jobs and being evil. Good for them, good for the EU.
49
15/12/2020 16:33:54 6 13
bbc
Did i mention how tiny and isolated our island is?
90
15/12/2020 16:43:06 4 3
bbc
Think you missed this paragraph in the above article.

Obviously you are one of the few who've missed the 3 Brexit HYS's today having lost your vote. I think its been a nice rest but hey ho.
121
15/12/2020 16:49:01 3 3
bbc
Razz - not sure on your point. I think we are an amazing small island.
369
15/12/2020 17:52:13 0 1
bbc
What drivel.
17
15/12/2020 16:29:14 92 10
bbc
Social media is a platform for all the worlds nut jobs and weak minded, its open season for bullies and keyboard warriors, if it is going to regulate it needs to stop the abuse and keep it stopped. Further to that is to ensure these platforms are forced to pay tax on the vast profits they make....
206
15/12/2020 17:04:40 35 27
bbc
You do realise you are spouting this on social media...

And how often do folks complain when their posts are deleted for breaking the rules?
231
15/12/2020 17:12:33 10 8
bbc
Says a keyboard warrior posting under an alias. You literally couldn't make it up.
596
15/12/2020 19:47:39 0 2
bbc
"Further to that is to ensure these platforms are forced to pay tax on the vast profits they make"

They do. If you have evidence that they don't pay the required taxes you should report the matter. But you don't, do you?
847
15/12/2020 22:25:52 0 1
bbc
I wonder how much tax the BBC pays? And didn't they pay thousands of people as self employed contractors so the BBC could get out of paying national insurance and the employees avoided millions in income tax
10
15/12/2020 16:28:03 13 14
bbc
The EU moves on to better things, while we stay behind, angry at everybody but ourselves for our own choices.

Little Britain ladies and gentlemen
18
15/12/2020 16:29:17 5 5
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
52
15/12/2020 16:34:41 4 1
bbc
And who do you think Big Tech will pay more attention to: the UK with 66 million users of that tech, or the EU with almost 450 million?
65
15/12/2020 16:37:48 1 1
bbc
What "limits" might they be?

Only 75% of your boards of directors may be ex-Tory party MPs (or one ex-LibDem leader as - laughably - "Head of Global Affairs")?

Only 75% of the supply contracts you issue may be given to "friends of the PM"?

You may only provide user data to anyone rich enough to pay for it on 98% of your users?
106
15/12/2020 16:45:55 2 1
bbc
That will be before or after the world beating track and trace? ITs all meaningless lies.

They plan on doing NOTHING.

Enforcing NOTHING.

Prosecuting NOBODY.

Then retiring early to a lucrative board position.
19
15/12/2020 16:29:34 11 11
bbc
Yes, we'll enjoy living in Brexit Britain where we will all be at the rapacious mercy of undiluted Big Tech.

Thanks.
46
Vid
15/12/2020 16:33:23 8 8
bbc
You're welcome - To move to Europe if you wish
64
15/12/2020 16:36:56 3 3
bbc
You could move
20
15/12/2020 16:29:35 44 1
bbc
Good news with power comes reponsibility !!!
21
15/12/2020 16:29:35 8 15
bbc
Survival gasps from a dying institution try to still remain relevant pursuing American tech giants because theres is just nothing else left to do.
35
15/12/2020 16:32:31 6 3
bbc
I'm looking forward to your written apology. (Don't e-mail or WhatsApp it because it will invariably be read - unrestrictively - by Cambridge Analytica or something similar).
45
15/12/2020 16:33:17 3 3
bbc
Pathetic nonsense.
8
15/12/2020 16:27:04 8 11
bbc
Yes, tossing away EU membership is not just about the price of veg
22
15/12/2020 16:29:38 2 3
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
112
15/12/2020 16:46:53 1 1
bbc
Give up, clown. Copying and pasting a press release with no substance and absolutely no political will behind it is feeble stuff even for a troll.
6
15/12/2020 16:26:31 31 57
bbc
This is only applicable in the European Union. We left the EU at the start of this year so we see no benefit from this.
23
15/12/2020 16:29:53 23 11
bbc
The UK have just passed similar regulation just the BBC, who are openly pro-Europe have opened HYS on this legislation
269
15/12/2020 17:22:48 6 9
bbc
No they haven't passed legislation yet. It might happen in 2022, as long as parliamentary time is made available for it. I'm not hopeful, but then I have only followed digital privacy issues for the past 20 years. The UK does not have a good track record in this area.
24
15/12/2020 16:30:12 9 19
bbc
Who gives a monkeys on what "the EU" (The Extremely Useless) are doing or not doing - soon it will have no relevance and thank God for that. Roll on 1st Jan 2021!
39
15/12/2020 16:32:52 10 7
bbc
Just another Quitter letting his/her bigotry show through.
41
15/12/2020 16:32:56 1 2
bbc
You still no look at what the competition is doing... competitor analysis...
181
15/12/2020 17:00:54 0 1
bbc
Cold Turkey is going to be hard for Brexiteers once the cult bubble finally busts!
25
15/12/2020 16:30:22 134 10
bbc
Has anybody bothered to read the article before posting? The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
74
15/12/2020 16:39:21 140 17
bbc
Don’t be silly. Most read the headlines and spout off from that. Normally it starts off with Brexit then a meltdown follows ?????
87
15/12/2020 16:42:56 12 23
bbc
Their track record being somewhere between nothing at all and ABSOLUTLEY nothing at all.

Those of us with careers in IT are astonished at the cynicism of the Tories - though not in any way at your gullibility.

This country will be merely used to launder data the same way it is currently used to launder money.

And that is all teh Tories care about.
149
15/12/2020 16:53:13 11 16
bbc
Outside the leverage of the EU do you seriously think that any of them will care what the CMA think? Minnow in a large sea.
184
15/12/2020 17:01:07 13 2
bbc
I don't think you work in a field where data processing and associated legislation are pertinent to your everyday job. Those of us who have worked in the field for years know that both left and right minded politicians are not minded to do anything. A toothless quango will pay lip service to individual privacy while the politicians feed at the trough of the media giants. As it's always been!
211
15/12/2020 17:06:55 7 5
bbc
The French have been on to this for a couple of years. I understand the Germans were not so keen due their Exports to US. UK may just pay lip service due to the "wonderful" trade deal with US that's coming up!
213
15/12/2020 17:07:10 0 1
bbc
I didn't. Is it worth bothering? Is it true?
328
15/12/2020 17:39:52 2 1
bbc
Our response is essentially zero.
504
15/12/2020 19:13:46 2 5
bbc
Are you that gullible?

The UK only announced it was looking at this because I knew the EU was.

When has the UK ever actually put in place anything to protect consumers?

It can’t even have the balls to tell landlords to pay for cladding!
904
16/12/2020 08:05:20 0 0
bbc
So BBC not going its job properly?
Or ukgov?
12 months of ukgov covid fails must have proved to public that ukgov definitely isn't world beating.
Whats going to change?
26
15/12/2020 16:30:24 11 11
bbc
Meanwhile us lot on the Titanic scramble for the last lifeboat
43
15/12/2020 16:33:12 7 11
bbc
No one is stopping you leaving the country
55
15/12/2020 16:35:33 3 5
bbc
Haven't you heard? According to the Brexiteers, the iceberg is sinking. We're fine!
76
15/12/2020 16:39:23 4 4
bbc
off you go
6
15/12/2020 16:26:31 31 57
bbc
This is only applicable in the European Union. We left the EU at the start of this year so we see no benefit from this.
27
15/12/2020 16:30:52 19 4
bbc
You didn't read the article, did you?
256
15/12/2020 17:19:44 6 10
bbc
Yes, yes I did. I then applied 30 years of experience in the IT industry to disseminate the information and form an opinion. I have followed news in this area for decades so I have a better than average knowledge of the UK governments track record in this area. My analysis is that we in the UK will be getting a dud, sham unit which will pay lip service to our rights. Once bitten ....
28
15/12/2020 16:30:55 4 4
bbc
The EU needs to be careful. Many non-Eu companies simply blocked EU users from their sites when GDPR came in.

If rules are too stringent or the money-grab too greedy, online media companies could simply close to their EU customers.

"The internet was designed to survive a nuclear attack. It treats any form of censorship as damage and tries to find a way around it."
47
15/12/2020 16:33:28 6 8
bbc
Many non-Eu companies simply blocked EU users from their sites when GDPR came in.

So what many EU sites filled the gap...
53
15/12/2020 16:34:47 4 2
bbc
You don't just block nearly 450 millions of rich, rich, rich users. Their shareholders wouldn't let them.
258
15/12/2020 17:20:40 1 1
bbc
Fine, if they block you because they don't like GDPR, then it means their intentions are not clean. No problem by being blocked, I'll find a way round with sites that respect my right.
4
15/12/2020 16:25:15 96 27
bbc
AS much of a fan of Technology I am, the Big Tech firms - I see a greater need for regulation to benefit society. The the horrors that social media has unleashed has been detrimental to younger generations and also damaging for society. As governments grapple with the rise and abuse of "fake news" and "information wars" it is good to see the EU grappling this thorny issue. I hope the UK follows.
29
15/12/2020 16:31:02 26 20
bbc
The EU is brilliant. 52% of us never understood this.

I wish we could be part of it someday and share the benefits.
13
15/12/2020 16:28:23 5 12
bbc
dont care as we are not in the EU!! just keep out of waters :-)
30
15/12/2020 16:31:07 4 2
bbc
Codfinger, the man with an abnormal desire for lots of fish
31
15/12/2020 16:31:08 36 4
bbc
The platform providers should be treated as publishers of any content that appears on their platform unless they can show who actually put it there, in which case, publisher's responsibility can be passed on.
912
16/12/2020 08:26:51 0 0
bbc
Joint responsibility?
Why aren't sites checking, taking down reported content?
9
15/12/2020 16:27:17 17 4
bbc
No, the UK has already announced similar measures.
32
15/12/2020 16:31:26 2 1
bbc
A unit in the CMA, not ready until 2022 at the earliest, and that's only if the government gives itself time to legislate at the earliest opportunity. The word "toothless" springs to mind.
33
15/12/2020 16:31:37 68 2
bbc
maybe we could work out a way for them to pay tax? We provide a safe and secure country in which they can trade, this cost money. Its not good enough to say they employ people all business does.
205
15/12/2020 17:04:39 26 3
bbc
Maybe those 'Big Tech' Companies that publish 'proven lies' should be 'sentenced to be Internationally 'audited' and taxed proportionally in the Countries that generate their incomes, if they wish to apologize and continue?
Perhaps with each proven infringement bouncing them up a notch in tax?
275
15/12/2020 17:26:27 1 6
bbc
I mean what services do they actually receive though? If they have a database center in a country then they are paying property taxes, taxes for emergency services, employee-related taxes, salaries for those employees, etc. But if they don't have property what then (aside from digital sales tax). Should they pay a tax to even sell in your country? 1/2
597
15/12/2020 19:48:14 1 1
bbc
"maybe we could work out a way for them to pay tax?"

Which ones don't pay the taxes required by law?
655
15/12/2020 20:20:07 1 0
bbc
Does that apply to this social media? Ahh..... our tax pays for it!
9
15/12/2020 16:27:17 17 4
bbc
No, the UK has already announced similar measures.
34
15/12/2020 16:32:20 1 8
bbc
You're right. Strange isn't it? It's almost like the EU is doing the right thing and we're just copying
21
15/12/2020 16:29:35 8 15
bbc
Survival gasps from a dying institution try to still remain relevant pursuing American tech giants because theres is just nothing else left to do.
35
15/12/2020 16:32:31 6 3
bbc
I'm looking forward to your written apology. (Don't e-mail or WhatsApp it because it will invariably be read - unrestrictively - by Cambridge Analytica or something similar).
3
15/12/2020 16:24:14 7 16
bbc
And what would the idiots in the UK government plan to cover within the UK for the areas called out by the EU? I suspect very little...
36
fos
15/12/2020 16:32:38 3 2
bbc
You have had your little rant now about “idiots” in the U.K. government and it’s very nice of you to let us know what the ‘idiots’ in the U.K. public think.
79
15/12/2020 16:39:41 0 4
bbc
sorry eveyone thinks the UK gov is stuffed to the gills with idiots, only idiots don't think so. We know what category you appear to fall under.
37
15/12/2020 16:32:40 5 12
bbc
What utter nonsense. Makes you glad that we're out of it
75
15/12/2020 16:39:22 4 2
bbc
Yes, an unregulated internet benefits the Tories far more! Imagine if they'd been held to account for their "antics" in the GE & forwarding fake tweets as genuine? They'd have to ask their Russian donors for more cash to pay the fines!!??
273
15/12/2020 17:26:17 1 1
bbc
You don't represent me nor do you speak on my behalf. You might be glad to be out of it but I am not. Hopefully you'll be just as glad to pick up a mop when the time comes to clean up the mess.
38
15/12/2020 16:32:51 5 8
bbc
Muzza. 16:29. "Survival gasps from a dying institution try to still remain relevant pursuing American tech giants because theres is just nothing else left to do."

Or conversely it could be that the EU is actually doing what our own weak, inept Govt won't do, because it uses Social Media to denigrate & abuse political opponents!??
24
15/12/2020 16:30:12 9 19
bbc
Who gives a monkeys on what "the EU" (The Extremely Useless) are doing or not doing - soon it will have no relevance and thank God for that. Roll on 1st Jan 2021!
39
15/12/2020 16:32:52 10 7
bbc
Just another Quitter letting his/her bigotry show through.
40
15/12/2020 16:32:55 10 11
bbc
Remember it is the EU that forces everyone to click yes to cookies, that was worth the billions spent on that law.

And by the time they forced microsoft to uncouple IE from windows we were all using chrome anyway.

It will be too little too late as always.
51
15/12/2020 16:34:38 12 4
bbc
Fake news. It is the EU that gave us MORE CONTROL over cookies. That means more permissions we need to give to websites to access our data. That is a good thing.
71
15/12/2020 16:38:51 3 2
bbc
That cookies thing is a real pain. If you have said "No" then the answer is no to all of them
262
15/12/2020 17:21:03 0 2
bbc
More anti-EU lies.
And you lot banged on and on about project fear.
24
15/12/2020 16:30:12 9 19
bbc
Who gives a monkeys on what "the EU" (The Extremely Useless) are doing or not doing - soon it will have no relevance and thank God for that. Roll on 1st Jan 2021!
41
15/12/2020 16:32:56 1 2
bbc
You still no look at what the competition is doing... competitor analysis...
42
15/12/2020 16:32:56 19 10
bbc
Harmful content = stuff we disagree with.
111
15/12/2020 16:46:51 4 5
bbc
Harmful content - fraudsters and child abusers. At least on this HYS we now know where some people stand on those issues
26
15/12/2020 16:30:24 11 11
bbc
Meanwhile us lot on the Titanic scramble for the last lifeboat
43
15/12/2020 16:33:12 7 11
bbc
No one is stopping you leaving the country
81
15/12/2020 16:40:54 6 6
bbc
You might recall you removed our right to live and work in the world's most successful economic area, grandad.

We're still trying to escape you, and we will achieve it. You pay your own pension. You didn't come even remotely close to earning all the sweeties you voted yourselves, and the rest of us no longer feel like paying your bills.
3
15/12/2020 16:24:14 7 16
bbc
And what would the idiots in the UK government plan to cover within the UK for the areas called out by the EU? I suspect very little...
44
15/12/2020 16:33:15 3 2
bbc
Don't get too excited the EU can't regulate themselves - ask for a copy of their annual accounts - good luck with that.
21
15/12/2020 16:29:35 8 15
bbc
Survival gasps from a dying institution try to still remain relevant pursuing American tech giants because theres is just nothing else left to do.
45
15/12/2020 16:33:17 3 3
bbc
Pathetic nonsense.
19
15/12/2020 16:29:34 11 11
bbc
Yes, we'll enjoy living in Brexit Britain where we will all be at the rapacious mercy of undiluted Big Tech.

Thanks.
46
Vid
15/12/2020 16:33:23 8 8
bbc
You're welcome - To move to Europe if you wish
92
15/12/2020 16:43:56 2 4
bbc
You've done everything you can to stop that though haven't you grandad?

You need to force the young and the yet unborn to stay here and pay off your debts.
146
15/12/2020 16:52:30 4 2
bbc
Why move when we are already in Europe another one that cannot grasp the difference between a geographical area and a Economic area.
326
15/12/2020 17:38:49 1 1
bbc
I already live there. I'm sure you'll be horrified to learn, as it appears you don't realise, that you do to.
28
15/12/2020 16:30:55 4 4
bbc
The EU needs to be careful. Many non-Eu companies simply blocked EU users from their sites when GDPR came in.

If rules are too stringent or the money-grab too greedy, online media companies could simply close to their EU customers.

"The internet was designed to survive a nuclear attack. It treats any form of censorship as damage and tries to find a way around it."
47
15/12/2020 16:33:28 6 8
bbc
Many non-Eu companies simply blocked EU users from their sites when GDPR came in.

So what many EU sites filled the gap...
114
15/12/2020 16:47:23 4 2
bbc
EU citizens lost the ability to see how news is being reported in many publications outside the EU. That gap was filled by EU publishers reporting with an EU perspective.
48
15/12/2020 16:33:45 9 10
bbc
After introducing the GDPR to enable mega-tech to harvest all of our data for free, the EU is now 'regulating' mega-tech? The BBC should investigate how the GDPR came to be and how mega-tech lobbied for it within the EU (or the BBC could just stick with reporting what pizzas EU commissioners eat - much simpler, less controversial and less taxing on the brain).
67
15/12/2020 16:38:34 7 5
bbc
You really dont understand how GDPR legislation works, do you?
101
15/12/2020 16:45:12 2 1
bbc
Mega tech crapped their pants when GDPR was first envisaged. They lobbied hard to soften it, and would gladly have seen it die. I work with data, some of it PII, every day. Your post is factually incorrect.
155
15/12/2020 16:54:04 1 1
bbc
Uhhh, absolutely everything you stated is completely untrue.
164
15/12/2020 16:56:51 1 1
bbc
GDPR allows you to request data is removed abour yourself and for any company that stores your detials electronically to have provide you with a copy of what they are storing on you; that's very valuable.
16
15/12/2020 16:28:48 18 18
bbc
In the meantime we're stuck here, a tiny island, isolated, cold, floating, alone with big tech, and all its money, here, in London, just putting up buildings, creating jobs and being evil. Good for them, good for the EU.
49
15/12/2020 16:33:54 6 13
bbc
Did i mention how tiny and isolated our island is?
59
15/12/2020 16:36:22 3 8
bbc
and did you know we have this blunderbus of an oaf in charge whos about as useful as a carrot stick with no hummus
50
15/12/2020 16:34:01 14 22
bbc
The EU is just bitter that *all* of the modern tech giants are from America. If Apple/Google/Amazon were French and German companies there is no way the EU would be trying to crack down on them like they're threatening to do here. Brussels doesn't have any issue with the industrial giant of Airbus for example... because its 'European'!
116
15/12/2020 16:47:36 0 2
bbc
A fair point.

I’m not sure how much French state money got poured into Bull...but as usual with French intervention it ended with Bull-shit-all. ????????
161
15/12/2020 16:55:53 1 1
bbc
They are their to protect European interests. That's why they went to the WTO about Boeing!
40
15/12/2020 16:32:55 10 11
bbc
Remember it is the EU that forces everyone to click yes to cookies, that was worth the billions spent on that law.

And by the time they forced microsoft to uncouple IE from windows we were all using chrome anyway.

It will be too little too late as always.
51
15/12/2020 16:34:38 12 4
bbc
Fake news. It is the EU that gave us MORE CONTROL over cookies. That means more permissions we need to give to websites to access our data. That is a good thing.
86
15/12/2020 16:42:31 3 1
bbc
But if you do not consent to cookies then you can’t access the sites or the options they give are more than useless. Total waste of time
18
15/12/2020 16:29:17 5 5
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
52
15/12/2020 16:34:41 4 1
bbc
And who do you think Big Tech will pay more attention to: the UK with 66 million users of that tech, or the EU with almost 450 million?
354
15/12/2020 17:47:04 1 0
bbc
Like Big Tech listened last time when they (Apple) were fined €13 billion, appealed to the ECJ and were let off? The EU regulators are as toothless as any others.
28
15/12/2020 16:30:55 4 4
bbc
The EU needs to be careful. Many non-Eu companies simply blocked EU users from their sites when GDPR came in.

If rules are too stringent or the money-grab too greedy, online media companies could simply close to their EU customers.

"The internet was designed to survive a nuclear attack. It treats any form of censorship as damage and tries to find a way around it."
53
15/12/2020 16:34:47 4 2
bbc
You don't just block nearly 450 millions of rich, rich, rich users. Their shareholders wouldn't let them.
104
15/12/2020 16:45:37 1 2
bbc
If it is not going to be profitable you do just that. Shareholders will want companies to cut their losses.

The result is less competition.
123
15/12/2020 16:49:20 3 2
bbc
BTW, the rich users will pay in dollars and use a VPN to 'appear' to be in the USA, thus-by-passing any EU limitations.

The tech companies will allow that because they can profit from inaction.
54
15/12/2020 16:35:08 12 14
bbc
EU - who are they? We left their petty lawmaking last year.
62
15/12/2020 16:36:45 5 6
bbc
Maybe it's another highlight between the EU & the Tory Social Media abusers???
70
15/12/2020 16:38:45 4 4
bbc
How silly to think that defending your consumer and human rights against corporate greed is petty. That you're that pathetically entrenched you're happy to bend over for the corporations? Weak.
100
15/12/2020 16:44:54 4 2
bbc
The EU will here for longer than the U.K. All Brexier bluster about how the EU is failing and the Euro will be gone next year is just Brexiter fantasy. It is already known to the rest of the World that the 3 BIG players are China , The USA and the EU. Their law making has given rise to the largest Market in the World. It is valued for its strength and integrity. Despite the twisted lie of Leave.
135
15/12/2020 16:50:56 1 2
bbc
If you really new anything about them. Not the Sun, the Mail or the Express rubbish. You may not have been so keen to leave!
244
15/12/2020 17:15:05 1 1
bbc
So why, 12 months on, are you still getting all hot under the collar about it?
26
15/12/2020 16:30:24 11 11
bbc
Meanwhile us lot on the Titanic scramble for the last lifeboat
55
15/12/2020 16:35:33 3 5
bbc
Haven't you heard? According to the Brexiteers, the iceberg is sinking. We're fine!
56
15/12/2020 16:35:47 30 2
bbc
tax in the country at the point of sale pre tax haven status regardless of where they shift it to
609
15/12/2020 19:55:23 4 6
bbc
"tax in the country at the point of sale"

What do most people buy on social media?

Let me save you the time. Nothing.
7
15/12/2020 16:26:32 262 21
bbc
Tech companies should be subject to the same rules of publishing and media broadcasting that other media is subject to.
Unacceptable content in an advert on TV or a magazine would result in fines for the distributor and that should be the same for tech.
57
15/12/2020 16:35:48 162 24
bbc
That was Donald Trump's position. That the social media giants should be stripped of their immunity and be made responsible for the content on their platforms, as any other media outlet would be.

They do act as "publishers" rather than hosts as they subject *legal* content to their own editorial control based on their own political views.

Therefore they are now no different to Newspapers.
118
15/12/2020 16:48:41 39 19
bbc
Donald trumps position my a*** he has consistently always subverted every way he can on Twitter, Facebook and Fox News, it’s only recently that some of these started to crack down on the likes of DT.
232
15/12/2020 17:12:35 7 2
bbc
The irony of Trump having that position, given the misinformation he spouts on a daily basis on Twitter.
285
15/12/2020 17:28:13 3 1
bbc
And despite these rules he supposedly came up with, he complains of getting his misinformation tweets removed even though that was a cornerstone of his own law.
319
15/12/2020 17:37:31 3 1
bbc
Hogwash. Utter tripe and Trump never achieved it. He only changed his tune once they started flagging up his content as lies.
421
15/12/2020 18:24:21 3 0
bbc
if so, Trump could not have posted half of his tweets, they were offensive and lies, most of them.
447
15/12/2020 18:39:07 0 0
bbc
Garbage - they take down posts that contain dangerous information or flag fake news when alerted to them - that upset dipshits like yourself and Trumpie pants because their entire credibility rests on lies and detest being called out on them.
470
15/12/2020 18:45:33 1 0
bbc
FYI: djt his own nasty self used Twitter in inappropriate ways and words.
580
15/12/2020 19:51:59 0 0
bbc
But they aren't like newspapers at all. Newspapers only generate their own content. Social media just moderates mostly and provides stuff on the side. People keep trying to force them into either "publishers" or "forums" boxes, but they aren't either at this point. Make legislation for social media platforms rather than force them to follow "publishers" legislation.
700
15/12/2020 20:40:37 0 0
bbc
Difference being, the woke and mainstream media were on Trumps case for everything. But when the EU do it, it's all hunky-dory and legit, eh?
6
15/12/2020 16:26:31 31 57
bbc
This is only applicable in the European Union. We left the EU at the start of this year so we see no benefit from this.
58
fos
15/12/2020 16:35:52 18 3
bbc
Try reading the article we announced our own plans to put limits on last week
175
15/12/2020 16:58:38 8 17
bbc
To fos/UnMewt - I did read the article, this is the EU leading and at sometime in the future the UK will/may follow.
239
15/12/2020 17:13:32 6 12
bbc
I did read the article and I do know that in 2022 we will maybe get a unit in the CMA for the tech companies to ignore. If you choose to believe that anything substantial is going to change you haven't been following the past 20 odd years. Remember the porn ban? Legislated and didn't happen. There's just one example of a government powerless against internet services.
49
15/12/2020 16:33:54 6 13
bbc
Did i mention how tiny and isolated our island is?
59
15/12/2020 16:36:22 3 8
bbc
and did you know we have this blunderbus of an oaf in charge whos about as useful as a carrot stick with no hummus
189
15/12/2020 17:02:42 0 2
bbc
Hey razz these two are on so often I think they might be big tech themselves. Or little tech depending how far away they're plugged in.
60
15/12/2020 16:36:24 77 8
bbc
r'member...the only reason any of the big sites want your details (phone etc) is not for security. it's so they can sell the number. I registered a brand new sim on twitter. no one else knew it. 3 days later, I got a call ffrom a number that a google said was a scam/cold caller etc.

social media sites are run for the company £$, not for the users.

which you already knew....so why are they still?
83
15/12/2020 16:41:00 44 29
bbc
Your fault for using Twitter, besides, you don’t have too
96
15/12/2020 16:44:26 0 1
bbc
(they are still, because there are no companies/governments that have the power to change the "big tech" sites. the only way they'll change, is if the CEO's want them to.)

or possibly it's a generational thing. eg, if the next generation doesn't want to use the site, because ppl who were 20 and used facebook, are now 50 and don't use it anymore
225
15/12/2020 17:10:13 10 3
bbc
No proof Twitter did anything wrong.

The scammers just try every possible number until it rings, takes no effort with a computer
235
15/12/2020 17:12:55 5 3
bbc
Although I don't disagree with your sentiment - These calls are made from computers that attempt all possible phone numbers. Whichever company that rang you was probably ringing your number before you even activated the SIM.
257
15/12/2020 17:20:30 5 3
bbc
You know scam callers are just computers that call every number until something rings, right? It ain't Twitter selling your info, it is scammers being their usual scummy selves.
299
15/12/2020 17:31:10 0 1
bbc
lol. I smell bovine waste. lol
574
15/12/2020 19:45:24 0 0
bbc
"social media sites are run for the company £$, not for the users."

Don't use them then. It really isn't complicated.

But why would you think a commercial enterprise was run for anything other than profit?
592
15/12/2020 19:56:04 1 0
bbc
Tour number could have been. A recycled number. Someone may have owned it before you got annoyed at the number of cold calls and so changed the number. It was then free and the provider passed it on to you. Also scammers have auto number diallers that go through a sequence of numbers and call them. It may be just that you were unlucky however I suspect recycled number is more probable.
707
15/12/2020 20:43:28 1 0
bbc
You are right, I use a PAYG Sim to register for some of these services which require a phone number, more and more demand it, so even then if I tick the options to opt out of marketing, I still get calls.
850
15/12/2020 22:29:24 0 0
bbc
Cold calling software just uses random numbers in the required format.
907
16/12/2020 08:16:24 0 0
bbc
EU put rules in place for cookies. Now in t&cs you have legitimate interests portion.
That mentions using device Id to link / track device and combine with offline data sources.
Seems like a cookie loophole to me.
Also.. Every site offers different combos of opt out.
1) why can't you opt out at browser level
2) Miss by accident now or in past a sites opt out and..
3) Where's proof u opted out?
1
15/12/2020 16:24:00 11 24
bbc
Just a free for all approach in the UK then

And no tax to be paid as long as they let the Tories cheat their way to election wins
61
15/12/2020 16:36:31 2 1
bbc
Thank you for the constructive comment that hasn't come across as bitter at all despite less people agreeing with how you vote.
54
15/12/2020 16:35:08 12 14
bbc
EU - who are they? We left their petty lawmaking last year.
62
15/12/2020 16:36:45 5 6
bbc
Maybe it's another highlight between the EU & the Tory Social Media abusers???
63
15/12/2020 16:30:08 4 6
bbc
Make them pay some tax for all the job losses they have caused on the high street !
19
15/12/2020 16:29:34 11 11
bbc
Yes, we'll enjoy living in Brexit Britain where we will all be at the rapacious mercy of undiluted Big Tech.

Thanks.
64
15/12/2020 16:36:56 3 3
bbc
You could move
18
15/12/2020 16:29:17 5 5
bbc
Read the article : The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
65
15/12/2020 16:37:48 1 1
bbc
What "limits" might they be?

Only 75% of your boards of directors may be ex-Tory party MPs (or one ex-LibDem leader as - laughably - "Head of Global Affairs")?

Only 75% of the supply contracts you issue may be given to "friends of the PM"?

You may only provide user data to anyone rich enough to pay for it on 98% of your users?
7
15/12/2020 16:26:32 262 21
bbc
Tech companies should be subject to the same rules of publishing and media broadcasting that other media is subject to.
Unacceptable content in an advert on TV or a magazine would result in fines for the distributor and that should be the same for tech.
66
15/12/2020 16:37:54 12 7
bbc
Also before you start banging on about EU vs. UK please read paragraph 8 and follow the link. Judging by most of the comments on this HYS people have only read the headline and then posted on how ill informed they are.
168
15/12/2020 16:57:39 6 3
bbc
Oh dear, I did exactly that before reading your post.

Happy to admit I was wrong, thanks for highlighting.
48
15/12/2020 16:33:45 9 10
bbc
After introducing the GDPR to enable mega-tech to harvest all of our data for free, the EU is now 'regulating' mega-tech? The BBC should investigate how the GDPR came to be and how mega-tech lobbied for it within the EU (or the BBC could just stick with reporting what pizzas EU commissioners eat - much simpler, less controversial and less taxing on the brain).
67
15/12/2020 16:38:34 7 5
bbc
You really dont understand how GDPR legislation works, do you?
68
15/12/2020 16:38:39 22 23
bbc
What a surprise - loads of technically illiterate Angry Grandads talking absolute beyond rubbish about technology & the EU.

You know & understand nothing whatsoever about any of this.

Data is knowledge and power - it is fantastically valuable.

Your bent toff Tory govt signs it away to US tech giants for nothing - literally nothing in the case of NHS records - in return for future board seats
165
15/12/2020 16:57:21 3 2
bbc
To be fair the ICO also fined Google 500k for processing NHS data

Big data is increasingly being manipulated for profit by ever more powerful algorithms. The speed of this will always be quicker than legislation. The trick is not too use social media. I’ve not used it for years and really don’t miss it.
69
15/12/2020 16:38:41 15 15
bbc
It's a pity we won't be benefiting from this.
139
15/12/2020 16:51:30 9 3
bbc
Did you not read past the headline you muppet?. We’ve already published our own new set of laws which pretty much mirror what the EU are planning.
54
15/12/2020 16:35:08 12 14
bbc
EU - who are they? We left their petty lawmaking last year.
70
15/12/2020 16:38:45 4 4
bbc
How silly to think that defending your consumer and human rights against corporate greed is petty. That you're that pathetically entrenched you're happy to bend over for the corporations? Weak.
40
15/12/2020 16:32:55 10 11
bbc
Remember it is the EU that forces everyone to click yes to cookies, that was worth the billions spent on that law.

And by the time they forced microsoft to uncouple IE from windows we were all using chrome anyway.

It will be too little too late as always.
71
15/12/2020 16:38:51 3 2
bbc
That cookies thing is a real pain. If you have said "No" then the answer is no to all of them
158
15/12/2020 16:55:00 3 1
bbc
Do you know what a cookie is? believe me, the internet would be a massive pain in the butt without them.
72
15/12/2020 16:39:02 17 2
bbc
Will they leave any loopholes? If they do you can be sure the tech companies will find them.
124
15/12/2020 16:49:21 12 4
bbc
Yep - they will employ a UK tax lawer to search
528
15/12/2020 19:29:50 1 0
bbc
Probaly no; its not tax we are talking about...
5
15/12/2020 16:26:16 198 12
bbc
It's good to see that both the EU and the UK are finally starting to rein in the abuse of our privacy and data by these large corporations.
73
15/12/2020 16:39:03 204 18
bbc
My own opinion is that social media in general is a cancer upon society. I have worked in IT for thirty years and increasingly find it difficult to maintain a healthy privacy level while using basic services on the internet. Unfortunately the UK has never lead the debate on online privacy, from either Labour or Conservative politicians. On past conduct both are happy for the status quo to continue
192
15/12/2020 17:03:10 25 4
bbc
I have the same problem too.

My area has a app for buying bus tickets and every time I open it I get a request to enable "google location services", otherwise know as "give us permission to track you and sell your data to advertisers."

I hate to think how much time I lose saying no twice a day
351
15/12/2020 17:46:27 1 2
bbc
do your home work before you make unsubstantiated commentshttps://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-51446665
775
15/12/2020 21:17:04 0 2
bbc
But you are using social media right now. This is what have your say is. I’m laughing at you as I type this.
25
15/12/2020 16:30:22 134 10
bbc
Has anybody bothered to read the article before posting? The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
74
15/12/2020 16:39:21 140 17
bbc
Don’t be silly. Most read the headlines and spout off from that. Normally it starts off with Brexit then a meltdown follows ?????
37
15/12/2020 16:32:40 5 12
bbc
What utter nonsense. Makes you glad that we're out of it
75
15/12/2020 16:39:22 4 2
bbc
Yes, an unregulated internet benefits the Tories far more! Imagine if they'd been held to account for their "antics" in the GE & forwarding fake tweets as genuine? They'd have to ask their Russian donors for more cash to pay the fines!!??
26
15/12/2020 16:30:24 11 11
bbc
Meanwhile us lot on the Titanic scramble for the last lifeboat
76
15/12/2020 16:39:23 4 4
bbc
off you go
77
15/12/2020 16:39:29 7 9
bbc
Sunaks version of this is far weaker

looks liek brexit deregulationw ill be brilliant for the big tech giants

but leave UK consumers powerless
99
15/12/2020 16:44:39 3 1
bbc
Hands up anyone surprised by this ?? ??
110
15/12/2020 16:46:47 0 1
bbc
120
15/12/2020 16:48:57 1 3
bbc
No - what will happen ids the UK will look at it - rename it - change the odd word then say ooooh look what weve done its shiny n bright in comparison to yours.
78
15/12/2020 16:39:30 4 6
bbc
At least now we won't have to persuade Brussels to give us permission to tax the digital companies making huge profits from the UK.
94
15/12/2020 16:44:15 8 1
bbc
You think the UK Govt is going to properly tax these companies??? Oh dear that's priceless!!!??
97
15/12/2020 16:44:31 2 2
bbc
No but we still need them to pay the Taxes - with all the loop holes our law allows fat chance
115
15/12/2020 16:47:35 0 3
bbc
This is phase 1 - they are consulting on the other too - oh nthey are about to bring in the offsore dodgy tax haven stuff... the real reason why UK left...
125
15/12/2020 16:49:21 4 2
bbc
It was never anything to do with Brussels. Didn't you understand that?
145
15/12/2020 16:52:29 2 3
bbc
we are more likely to reduce tax on them as we clamber for scraps as an outsider. We wont have any defense as they try and strong arm us to be a rogue tax haven. we are weak now.
152
15/12/2020 16:53:51 1 3
bbc
Couple of basic facts, as you don't seem to like them :
(1) "Brussels" never stopped the UK government taxing these companies
(2) The Tory snakes have dropped the planned Digital Services Tax to suck up to the US for a trade deal, so you can enjoy that nice bleached Chicken mmmmm.
191
15/12/2020 17:02:51 0 1
bbc
Brussels is all for taxing them - whether we will succeed all on our own is the real question.
36
fos
15/12/2020 16:32:38 3 2
bbc
You have had your little rant now about “idiots” in the U.K. government and it’s very nice of you to let us know what the ‘idiots’ in the U.K. public think.
79
15/12/2020 16:39:41 0 4
bbc
sorry eveyone thinks the UK gov is stuffed to the gills with idiots, only idiots don't think so. We know what category you appear to fall under.
210
15/12/2020 17:06:43 0 1
bbc
Wow is it that time already ? Andy W is home from school and in his bedroom....guess the spelling homework will have to wait....
7
15/12/2020 16:26:32 262 21
bbc
Tech companies should be subject to the same rules of publishing and media broadcasting that other media is subject to.
Unacceptable content in an advert on TV or a magazine would result in fines for the distributor and that should be the same for tech.
80
15/12/2020 16:40:34 6 13
bbc
the big sites are not even literally, but "actually" impossible to police.

"its government policy to regulate these sites"

it's impossible for governments to regulate them. governments do not have the power to regulate them. because that "power" does not exist.
126
15/12/2020 16:49:23 25 4
bbc
So how does China regulate/censor its media? Clearly the tools do exist.
428
15/12/2020 18:29:31 0 0
bbc
Yes they do they have the ultimate sanction

Do as your told or close down

Possibly include jail time
454
15/12/2020 18:33:50 0 0
bbc
it obviously does because all over the world tech companies censor people, always from the political position their established power wishes. They do it in the UK, Europe and the US.
525
Rob
15/12/2020 19:28:14 0 0
bbc
Though the power to block websites from being available to users in the UK does. So in theory you could block sites that don't adhere to a code of conduct.
43
15/12/2020 16:33:12 7 11
bbc
No one is stopping you leaving the country
81
15/12/2020 16:40:54 6 6
bbc
You might recall you removed our right to live and work in the world's most successful economic area, grandad.

We're still trying to escape you, and we will achieve it. You pay your own pension. You didn't come even remotely close to earning all the sweeties you voted yourselves, and the rest of us no longer feel like paying your bills.
95
15/12/2020 16:44:19 2 2
bbc
I think you will find the EU is the worlds 5th most successful economic area, not bad for 27 counties combined efforts
82
15/12/2020 16:40:58 8 6
bbc
Good luck with that - it will be like trying to nail a blancmange to the ceiling !
88
15/12/2020 16:43:05 6 2
bbc
At least they're trying! ??
107
15/12/2020 16:46:18 1 2
bbc
Easy - you get a bag, box or something and put it in - then nail it up...
60
15/12/2020 16:36:24 77 8
bbc
r'member...the only reason any of the big sites want your details (phone etc) is not for security. it's so they can sell the number. I registered a brand new sim on twitter. no one else knew it. 3 days later, I got a call ffrom a number that a google said was a scam/cold caller etc.

social media sites are run for the company £$, not for the users.

which you already knew....so why are they still?
83
15/12/2020 16:41:00 44 29
bbc
Your fault for using Twitter, besides, you don’t have too
105
15/12/2020 16:45:46 4 1
bbc
lol. kthx
3
15/12/2020 16:24:14 7 16
bbc
And what would the idiots in the UK government plan to cover within the UK for the areas called out by the EU? I suspect very little...
84
15/12/2020 16:41:52 1 1
bbc
Try reading the article properly, there is a link to what the UK announced last week, ahead of the EU announcement.
136
15/12/2020 16:51:26 0 1
bbc
I missed that now reading; devil is in the detial for the Competition and Markets Authority plans & for the Online harms law seems it won't target online scams and other types of internet fraud, sounds like a missed opportunity there.
85
15/12/2020 16:38:14 3 7
bbc
This is just about the only good idea to come from the EU....bring Twitter, FB & Google to heel. Not that I use any of them.
51
15/12/2020 16:34:38 12 4
bbc
Fake news. It is the EU that gave us MORE CONTROL over cookies. That means more permissions we need to give to websites to access our data. That is a good thing.
86
15/12/2020 16:42:31 3 1
bbc
But if you do not consent to cookies then you can’t access the sites or the options they give are more than useless. Total waste of time
119
15/12/2020 16:48:44 1 1
bbc
It allows those of us who care about online privacy the chance to refuse the service and decline to access the site. Previously our privacy was silently raped the moment we entered the site. If the service is free, you must accept that YOU are the product in the transaction.
25
15/12/2020 16:30:22 134 10
bbc
Has anybody bothered to read the article before posting? The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
87
15/12/2020 16:42:56 12 23
bbc
Their track record being somewhere between nothing at all and ABSOLUTLEY nothing at all.

Those of us with careers in IT are astonished at the cynicism of the Tories - though not in any way at your gullibility.

This country will be merely used to launder data the same way it is currently used to launder money.

And that is all teh Tories care about.
287
15/12/2020 17:28:37 6 10
bbc
Ah there it is..... A tory basher bet your a moaner as well
506
15/12/2020 19:15:13 4 1
bbc
Thats why they have started the change. Leave your Left wing narrative out of it and applaud that they are doing something good about this
82
15/12/2020 16:40:58 8 6
bbc
Good luck with that - it will be like trying to nail a blancmange to the ceiling !
88
15/12/2020 16:43:05 6 2
bbc
At least they're trying! ??
280
15/12/2020 17:23:41 0 1
bbc
And the UK :
The UK's own regulator - the Competition and Markets Authority - announced its own plans to place limits on the tech giants last week, and ministers have just detailed how they plan to tackle online harms.
8
15/12/2020 16:27:04 8 11
bbc
Yes, tossing away EU membership is not just about the price of veg
89
15/12/2020 16:43:06 0 1
bbc
The story isn't about leaving EU Membership. As standards and governance don't just disappear.
16
15/12/2020 16:28:48 18 18
bbc
In the meantime we're stuck here, a tiny island, isolated, cold, floating, alone with big tech, and all its money, here, in London, just putting up buildings, creating jobs and being evil. Good for them, good for the EU.
90
15/12/2020 16:43:06 4 3
bbc
Think you missed this paragraph in the above article.

Obviously you are one of the few who've missed the 3 Brexit HYS's today having lost your vote. I think its been a nice rest but hey ho.
91
15/12/2020 16:43:31 6 3
bbc
About time. This has to have real meaning and integrity and not be some sort of image PR stunt with no teeth.
103
15/12/2020 16:45:34 7 6
bbc
No that's the UK Govts version!??
46
Vid
15/12/2020 16:33:23 8 8
bbc
You're welcome - To move to Europe if you wish
92
15/12/2020 16:43:56 2 4
bbc
You've done everything you can to stop that though haven't you grandad?

You need to force the young and the yet unborn to stay here and pay off your debts.
1
15/12/2020 16:24:00 11 24
bbc
Just a free for all approach in the UK then

And no tax to be paid as long as they let the Tories cheat their way to election wins
93
15/12/2020 16:44:10 7 2
bbc
You missed the bit were the UK announced measures last week, ahead of the EU. If you'd taken your remainer glasses off you would have spotted it.
113
15/12/2020 16:47:12 1 4
bbc
As this government just talks and does nothing I would be surprised to see anything happen here
78
15/12/2020 16:39:30 4 6
bbc
At least now we won't have to persuade Brussels to give us permission to tax the digital companies making huge profits from the UK.
94
15/12/2020 16:44:15 8 1
bbc
You think the UK Govt is going to properly tax these companies??? Oh dear that's priceless!!!??
81
15/12/2020 16:40:54 6 6
bbc
You might recall you removed our right to live and work in the world's most successful economic area, grandad.

We're still trying to escape you, and we will achieve it. You pay your own pension. You didn't come even remotely close to earning all the sweeties you voted yourselves, and the rest of us no longer feel like paying your bills.
95
15/12/2020 16:44:19 2 2
bbc
I think you will find the EU is the worlds 5th most successful economic area, not bad for 27 counties combined efforts
142
15/12/2020 16:52:14 3 2
bbc
No its the Second. Only the US is bigger in terms of GDP. The EU has better employment record than every other country so its a trade off if it was number one it would follow the USA , ut then there would be hardly any welfare or employment protection.

The EU comes out best overall because you have extreme Capitalism in America and Extreme Communism in China. The EU is balanced between them.
60
15/12/2020 16:36:24 77 8
bbc
r'member...the only reason any of the big sites want your details (phone etc) is not for security. it's so they can sell the number. I registered a brand new sim on twitter. no one else knew it. 3 days later, I got a call ffrom a number that a google said was a scam/cold caller etc.

social media sites are run for the company £$, not for the users.

which you already knew....so why are they still?
96
15/12/2020 16:44:26 0 1
bbc
(they are still, because there are no companies/governments that have the power to change the "big tech" sites. the only way they'll change, is if the CEO's want them to.)

or possibly it's a generational thing. eg, if the next generation doesn't want to use the site, because ppl who were 20 and used facebook, are now 50 and don't use it anymore
78
15/12/2020 16:39:30 4 6
bbc
At least now we won't have to persuade Brussels to give us permission to tax the digital companies making huge profits from the UK.
97
15/12/2020 16:44:31 2 2
bbc
No but we still need them to pay the Taxes - with all the loop holes our law allows fat chance
98
15/12/2020 16:44:35 2 3
bbc
The Tories would have once been described as the enemy within they are today but it seems we have millions of naive, gullible people who aren't bright enough to grasp the fact.
77
15/12/2020 16:39:29 7 9
bbc
Sunaks version of this is far weaker

looks liek brexit deregulationw ill be brilliant for the big tech giants

but leave UK consumers powerless
99
15/12/2020 16:44:39 3 1
bbc
Hands up anyone surprised by this ?? ??
54
15/12/2020 16:35:08 12 14
bbc
EU - who are they? We left their petty lawmaking last year.
100
15/12/2020 16:44:54 4 2
bbc
The EU will here for longer than the U.K. All Brexier bluster about how the EU is failing and the Euro will be gone next year is just Brexiter fantasy. It is already known to the rest of the World that the 3 BIG players are China , The USA and the EU. Their law making has given rise to the largest Market in the World. It is valued for its strength and integrity. Despite the twisted lie of Leave.