Hospitality worst-hit as unemployment rises again
15/12/2020 | news | business | 137
UK loses 819,000 paid jobs since start of pandemic, with a third of the cuts in hospitality.
1
15/12/2020 16:23:01 17 8
bbc
Anneliese Dodds complaining about timing again. Does she honestly have nothing better to contribute? Some different ideas of how it may have been handled for instance?
117
eL
16/12/2020 10:29:52 0 0
bbc
Maybe you should look at, oh I dunno, 'timing' perhaps.
2
15/12/2020 16:24:09 10 7
bbc
Some pubs have been ok, however most just cannot and do not control their patrons at all, sorry but you must close, end of.
3
15/12/2020 16:26:54 17 4
bbc
My thoughts and prayers go to anyone who has lost a loved one and/or their job due to covid

Please keep your chins up; life will get better again

Thank you to all front line NHS staff and supermarket staff; we wouldn't have managed this far, with out you. Especially the pickers and drivers in my case.

Merry Christmas

Here's hoping for a brighter 2021
36
15/12/2020 18:52:57 6 0
bbc
Keep being optimistic - it might come true
4
15/12/2020 16:38:36 14 4
bbc
Unfortunately it will be a race to the bottom especially in the tech sector as even those who upskill in those areas will find their work done cheaper abroad. A solution which has been lacking for decades is to invest more in manufacturing !!!
16
15/12/2020 17:09:48 8 13
bbc
In principle yes but we’re about to suffer tarriffs on our exports due to some political stupidity
21
15/12/2020 17:45:00 2 0
bbc
Which manufacturing exactly?
And I assume you are aware we are still the 9th largest manufacturing country in the world?
Also, modern manufacturing is machinery intensive and employs fewer people..
5
15/12/2020 16:39:38 8 5
bbc
Pubs & restaurants have been made a scapegoat in the pandemic there is absolutely no proof of that the virus is spread from there. No matter where you go everybody breaths so you can pick up the virus anywhere. Obviously, sunak should pick up the tab if people are losing their jobs.
35
15/12/2020 18:52:17 1 1
bbc
It's called UC
6
15/12/2020 16:40:37 8 5
bbc
If lockdown and tiers do not work, not because of the rules they impose but rather people's ignorance of them, then what is the solution?

Now they're beginning to roll out the vaccine is there an argument to just not bother, because the rules are being ignored, infections are rising and hospitality is being battered in any event?

Those who want to take the risk can.
37
15/12/2020 18:57:20 4 1
bbc
Agreed, a pragmatic response that partially saves the hospitality industry and some jobs, and an assumption that many people are going to break some of the rules anyway.
7
15/12/2020 16:32:20 3 13
bbc
good news - maybe these people can get more productive meaningful work rather than just taking ppl's money to give them food n drinks

fun rides/theme parks - total waste of money and human capital

massage parlours - they are ok bcos a good massage can help reduce DVT
38
15/12/2020 18:57:54 5 0
bbc
well, you're fun aren't you...
8
15/12/2020 16:44:37 31 5
bbc
Annelise Dodds is wrong to say Rishi Sunak's decisions have caused major job losses - its our economy's skew to the retail and hospitality sectors, an issue successive governments have overseen.
28
15/12/2020 18:27:28 13 12
bbc
Especially new Labour who ignored kids who didn’t want to go to university.
136
16/12/2020 11:53:42 0 0
bbc
Your pretty much correct. Hospitality takes many forms. For example hotels and tourist attractions will largely fully recover, and make money for Britain. But there is an excess of cheap food and drink outlets and shops whose trade has been taken by supermarkets, online and the poor pay of consumers. Some are a form of underemployment since they attract people who can’t get a safe job in a factory
9
15/12/2020 16:45:47 12 6
bbc
The furlough scheme needs to end. Much as its laudable to try to save every job, a lot of these jobs aren't coming back. In the pub trade a large proportion of these bars would be shut in 12 months anyway as new concepts come in and out of fashion. Trying to save each and every one of them is nonsense. End the furlough scheme at the end of March and let us get on with paying off the debt
17
15/12/2020 17:13:07 7 5
bbc
Pubs in many places were not going out of “fashion” prior to covid
33
15/12/2020 18:51:05 1 3
bbc
End furlough? - No, I won't have it. Why stop something that will cost the taxpayer 4x the cost of benefits?
86
15/12/2020 23:41:31 2 0
bbc
I would suggest many of these businesses are viable or the owners would have already thrown in the towel. The night time industry in the country for example is worth over 13 billion, do we throw that away and put all employees on universal credit?
111
16/12/2020 10:11:08 1 0
bbc
No!..........
I've got used to the Govt kicking cans down the road
10
15/12/2020 16:46:28 23 12
bbc
When you build an economy on the EU cafe model its hardly surprising those are the first jobs to go ... our local council (Labour) still follows this ideal ... restricting parking to extend pavements to create more outside eating. It ignores the businesses who have been resident for decades providing jobs but don't fit the local councillors vision of a cafe culture ... in Birmingham for gods sake
14
Pip
15/12/2020 17:04:33 5 9
bbc
When I've come back up the M5, Brums Cafe Culture is the first thing I see, vibrant pulling folks in from all over. It's the last thing you want to see go........?
68
15/12/2020 20:57:26 2 0
bbc
Have you ever made an HYS comment that doesn’t whine about the EU?

In your indecent haste to blame anything you can on the EU, you’re missing a very important fact.

Most jobs in hospitality are in our Great British pubs, nothing to do with “EU cafe culture”.

Perhaps you can consider them before you make yet another cheap jibe.
11
15/12/2020 16:51:10 4 5
bbc
Wait until the big lockdown which is coming, possibly the whole of January, would not surprise if February gets included, winter is the big danger period for the NHS, interment of the population is the live option for most of the season.
12
15/12/2020 16:58:37 8 5
bbc
By all means extend the furlough scheme, but only for viable jobs. If the job is not still in place at the end of 2021, all money should be paid back.
52
15/12/2020 20:26:13 2 0
bbc
Some jobs are viable by the end of 2021 and some by 2025 when everything returns to pre-pandemic conditions. Too many chiefs offload the braves without a care for the skills lost. It is hard in the race to the bottom without much af a safety net (JSA/UC/ESA) and the automation of many things coming rapidly over the hill as cost savings to large corporations.
13
15/12/2020 17:02:32 5 3
bbc
In Germany they closed hospitality for 2 months bars restaurants clubs hotels and the infections went up and so did the death rate

And they now have hard lockdown as it did not work.

But lot people in hospitality who worked 40 Christmas days new years eves every weekend bank holiday won't be 2nd class citizens now they be able spend Christmas with there family for once instead working.
19
15/12/2020 17:27:14 11 0
bbc
2nd class citizen my foot. If you take a job in hospitality, you know full well it comes with poor working hours.

It's also not easy to have a great Christmas if you get laid off in October and there's no realistic chance of you finding alternative employment.
10
15/12/2020 16:46:28 23 12
bbc
When you build an economy on the EU cafe model its hardly surprising those are the first jobs to go ... our local council (Labour) still follows this ideal ... restricting parking to extend pavements to create more outside eating. It ignores the businesses who have been resident for decades providing jobs but don't fit the local councillors vision of a cafe culture ... in Birmingham for gods sake
14
Pip
15/12/2020 17:04:33 5 9
bbc
When I've come back up the M5, Brums Cafe Culture is the first thing I see, vibrant pulling folks in from all over. It's the last thing you want to see go........?
15
15/12/2020 17:06:23 6 3
bbc
Back in May, I attended a presentation by the Bank of England that said unemployment would hit 9%; unfortunately, that is looking like an under-estimate. January is traditionally bad for bricks and mortar shops and when furlough ends on March 31st...sadly, things are going to get worse before they get better.
32
15/12/2020 18:48:46 5 0
bbc
Furlough is kicking the can....may as well be on UC, except you can fraud the system on furlough
4
15/12/2020 16:38:36 14 4
bbc
Unfortunately it will be a race to the bottom especially in the tech sector as even those who upskill in those areas will find their work done cheaper abroad. A solution which has been lacking for decades is to invest more in manufacturing !!!
16
15/12/2020 17:09:48 8 13
bbc
In principle yes but we’re about to suffer tarriffs on our exports due to some political stupidity
9
15/12/2020 16:45:47 12 6
bbc
The furlough scheme needs to end. Much as its laudable to try to save every job, a lot of these jobs aren't coming back. In the pub trade a large proportion of these bars would be shut in 12 months anyway as new concepts come in and out of fashion. Trying to save each and every one of them is nonsense. End the furlough scheme at the end of March and let us get on with paying off the debt
17
15/12/2020 17:13:07 7 5
bbc
Pubs in many places were not going out of “fashion” prior to covid
18
Bob
15/12/2020 17:18:04 11 9
bbc
A few weeks ago in Australia, they had a rise in Corona Virus
By the evening they had a full lockdown for 6 days
Back up and running and getting on with life

Here the government sat on their hands for 5 weeks, waffled some rubbish, made a rule about scotch eggs, waited until the virus had spread beyond control and ruined everything.

It's simple stuff.
13
15/12/2020 17:02:32 5 3
bbc
In Germany they closed hospitality for 2 months bars restaurants clubs hotels and the infections went up and so did the death rate

And they now have hard lockdown as it did not work.

But lot people in hospitality who worked 40 Christmas days new years eves every weekend bank holiday won't be 2nd class citizens now they be able spend Christmas with there family for once instead working.
19
15/12/2020 17:27:14 11 0
bbc
2nd class citizen my foot. If you take a job in hospitality, you know full well it comes with poor working hours.

It's also not easy to have a great Christmas if you get laid off in October and there's no realistic chance of you finding alternative employment.
24
15/12/2020 18:03:10 1 0
bbc
No workhouses?
20
15/12/2020 17:41:37 5 2
bbc
So when it peaks it will be just above France's current rate (ie France rate has been that high forever, whereas we might just peak around their normal rate...).
4
15/12/2020 16:38:36 14 4
bbc
Unfortunately it will be a race to the bottom especially in the tech sector as even those who upskill in those areas will find their work done cheaper abroad. A solution which has been lacking for decades is to invest more in manufacturing !!!
21
15/12/2020 17:45:00 2 0
bbc
Which manufacturing exactly?
And I assume you are aware we are still the 9th largest manufacturing country in the world?
Also, modern manufacturing is machinery intensive and employs fewer people..
22
15/12/2020 17:46:06 8 7
bbc
The effect this industry has been catastrophic. It will be almost wiped out, many will not survive or come back. Get a grip Boris. Stop just listening to scientists. When the dust settles, this way the health academics caused this reaction/the lockdowns will be proven to be a major error. Never let them near the tiller or power again. They are scientists with no business/economic sense. Disaster!
26
15/12/2020 18:05:41 4 4
bbc
agreed completely
31
15/12/2020 18:47:25 3 1
bbc
Don't be stupid - as long as people need to eat the industry will survive - whoever's name is above the entrance
41
15/12/2020 19:07:50 3 2
bbc
Hopefully. People might stop the stupid behavoir eating and drinking out at silly prices. The useless sector is always replacing itself, every fool sees it as a easy business. Loads close, plenty replace them.
42
15/12/2020 19:18:18 2 1
bbc
I hope none of your family die of Covid.
57
15/12/2020 20:41:45 0 3
bbc
Since when has hospitality been a "industry", over-inflated view of its importance in the larger world, a nice to have, but never a must have.
23
15/12/2020 18:01:52 7 4
bbc
If anyone is finding this surprising, WHY?
It’s sad, but that’s the system, no customers, no business. No business no employment.
The model is broken, a new model will be made, adapt and survive, don’t and .........
25
15/12/2020 18:04:28 5 9
bbc
Model only broken due to overzealous overreacting lockdowns
27
15/12/2020 18:05:46 1 1
bbc
Good advice - its a bit like plonking you on Mars and saying adapt and survive, don't and........
19
15/12/2020 17:27:14 11 0
bbc
2nd class citizen my foot. If you take a job in hospitality, you know full well it comes with poor working hours.

It's also not easy to have a great Christmas if you get laid off in October and there's no realistic chance of you finding alternative employment.
24
15/12/2020 18:03:10 1 0
bbc
No workhouses?
23
15/12/2020 18:01:52 7 4
bbc
If anyone is finding this surprising, WHY?
It’s sad, but that’s the system, no customers, no business. No business no employment.
The model is broken, a new model will be made, adapt and survive, don’t and .........
25
15/12/2020 18:04:28 5 9
bbc
Model only broken due to overzealous overreacting lockdowns
22
15/12/2020 17:46:06 8 7
bbc
The effect this industry has been catastrophic. It will be almost wiped out, many will not survive or come back. Get a grip Boris. Stop just listening to scientists. When the dust settles, this way the health academics caused this reaction/the lockdowns will be proven to be a major error. Never let them near the tiller or power again. They are scientists with no business/economic sense. Disaster!
26
15/12/2020 18:05:41 4 4
bbc
agreed completely
23
15/12/2020 18:01:52 7 4
bbc
If anyone is finding this surprising, WHY?
It’s sad, but that’s the system, no customers, no business. No business no employment.
The model is broken, a new model will be made, adapt and survive, don’t and .........
27
15/12/2020 18:05:46 1 1
bbc
Good advice - its a bit like plonking you on Mars and saying adapt and survive, don't and........
8
15/12/2020 16:44:37 31 5
bbc
Annelise Dodds is wrong to say Rishi Sunak's decisions have caused major job losses - its our economy's skew to the retail and hospitality sectors, an issue successive governments have overseen.
28
15/12/2020 18:27:28 13 12
bbc
Especially new Labour who ignored kids who didn’t want to go to university.
72
15/12/2020 21:10:30 2 3
bbc
Labour need ppl to be poor to get votes whereas the tories need ppl to be working and home owning
126
16/12/2020 10:38:42 0 0
bbc
How long did it take before the Tories cut the EMA across England?
And what about all the extra social structures that disappeared under austerity?

While I agree with Robinhood09, I'm also certain that you're being more than a little selective when it comes to whether Labour or the Tories supported youngsters the most, heck I'd go as far as to say that you're deliberately talking tosh??
29
15/12/2020 18:30:22 5 2
bbc
These businesses are also responsible for fuelling millions of zero-hours contracts, meaning they can just let people go at the drop of a hat instead of having the normal rights of full-time employees.
30
15/12/2020 18:43:41 4 2
bbc
I haven't had a single penny of assistance from any source since this all started. Me and millions of others. The inequality in the treatment of the unemployed will no doubt be the subject of an enquiry in the future. You can't eat and enquiry though can you?
40
15/12/2020 19:04:12 7 6
bbc
Why would the unemployed get more hand outs? They take various benefits anyway. Sat pretty though corvid.
22
15/12/2020 17:46:06 8 7
bbc
The effect this industry has been catastrophic. It will be almost wiped out, many will not survive or come back. Get a grip Boris. Stop just listening to scientists. When the dust settles, this way the health academics caused this reaction/the lockdowns will be proven to be a major error. Never let them near the tiller or power again. They are scientists with no business/economic sense. Disaster!
31
15/12/2020 18:47:25 3 1
bbc
Don't be stupid - as long as people need to eat the industry will survive - whoever's name is above the entrance
15
15/12/2020 17:06:23 6 3
bbc
Back in May, I attended a presentation by the Bank of England that said unemployment would hit 9%; unfortunately, that is looking like an under-estimate. January is traditionally bad for bricks and mortar shops and when furlough ends on March 31st...sadly, things are going to get worse before they get better.
32
15/12/2020 18:48:46 5 0
bbc
Furlough is kicking the can....may as well be on UC, except you can fraud the system on furlough
9
15/12/2020 16:45:47 12 6
bbc
The furlough scheme needs to end. Much as its laudable to try to save every job, a lot of these jobs aren't coming back. In the pub trade a large proportion of these bars would be shut in 12 months anyway as new concepts come in and out of fashion. Trying to save each and every one of them is nonsense. End the furlough scheme at the end of March and let us get on with paying off the debt
33
15/12/2020 18:51:05 1 3
bbc
End furlough? - No, I won't have it. Why stop something that will cost the taxpayer 4x the cost of benefits?
34
bbc
Perhaps the funds generated by fining that scum Bank Barclays could be used where they are desperately needed. Removed
5
15/12/2020 16:39:38 8 5
bbc
Pubs & restaurants have been made a scapegoat in the pandemic there is absolutely no proof of that the virus is spread from there. No matter where you go everybody breaths so you can pick up the virus anywhere. Obviously, sunak should pick up the tab if people are losing their jobs.
35
15/12/2020 18:52:17 1 1
bbc
It's called UC
3
15/12/2020 16:26:54 17 4
bbc
My thoughts and prayers go to anyone who has lost a loved one and/or their job due to covid

Please keep your chins up; life will get better again

Thank you to all front line NHS staff and supermarket staff; we wouldn't have managed this far, with out you. Especially the pickers and drivers in my case.

Merry Christmas

Here's hoping for a brighter 2021
36
15/12/2020 18:52:57 6 0
bbc
Keep being optimistic - it might come true
6
15/12/2020 16:40:37 8 5
bbc
If lockdown and tiers do not work, not because of the rules they impose but rather people's ignorance of them, then what is the solution?

Now they're beginning to roll out the vaccine is there an argument to just not bother, because the rules are being ignored, infections are rising and hospitality is being battered in any event?

Those who want to take the risk can.
37
15/12/2020 18:57:20 4 1
bbc
Agreed, a pragmatic response that partially saves the hospitality industry and some jobs, and an assumption that many people are going to break some of the rules anyway.
7
15/12/2020 16:32:20 3 13
bbc
good news - maybe these people can get more productive meaningful work rather than just taking ppl's money to give them food n drinks

fun rides/theme parks - total waste of money and human capital

massage parlours - they are ok bcos a good massage can help reduce DVT
38
15/12/2020 18:57:54 5 0
bbc
well, you're fun aren't you...
39
15/12/2020 19:02:16 4 9
bbc
Sooner machines take over the tough task of pouring a drink or warming a bit of food the better. Daft people that eat and drink out paying through the nose will still be ripped off for their stupidity. Time people found more worthwhile occupations.
71
15/12/2020 21:02:08 8 0
bbc
You don’t get out much do you?

Thank goodness.
30
15/12/2020 18:43:41 4 2
bbc
I haven't had a single penny of assistance from any source since this all started. Me and millions of others. The inequality in the treatment of the unemployed will no doubt be the subject of an enquiry in the future. You can't eat and enquiry though can you?
40
15/12/2020 19:04:12 7 6
bbc
Why would the unemployed get more hand outs? They take various benefits anyway. Sat pretty though corvid.
47
15/12/2020 19:42:49 3 0
bbc
As have pensioners
22
15/12/2020 17:46:06 8 7
bbc
The effect this industry has been catastrophic. It will be almost wiped out, many will not survive or come back. Get a grip Boris. Stop just listening to scientists. When the dust settles, this way the health academics caused this reaction/the lockdowns will be proven to be a major error. Never let them near the tiller or power again. They are scientists with no business/economic sense. Disaster!
41
15/12/2020 19:07:50 3 2
bbc
Hopefully. People might stop the stupid behavoir eating and drinking out at silly prices. The useless sector is always replacing itself, every fool sees it as a easy business. Loads close, plenty replace them.
22
15/12/2020 17:46:06 8 7
bbc
The effect this industry has been catastrophic. It will be almost wiped out, many will not survive or come back. Get a grip Boris. Stop just listening to scientists. When the dust settles, this way the health academics caused this reaction/the lockdowns will be proven to be a major error. Never let them near the tiller or power again. They are scientists with no business/economic sense. Disaster!
42
15/12/2020 19:18:18 2 1
bbc
I hope none of your family die of Covid.
43
15/12/2020 19:17:29 9 6
bbc
Unemployment 4.9% to Oct.

Given what’s happened I’d say that’s amazing.

It will get worse but tbh it’s nowhere near as bad as doom mongers are predicting so far.
44
15/12/2020 19:19:51 12 7
bbc
Top rated comment ....

Annaleise Dodds blame sunak decisions for unemployment.

I think there might be another reason......Google what’s happened this year...

And they wonder why they can’t get elected.....
50
15/12/2020 20:11:52 8 5
bbc
While it would be fair to say the actual cabinet's performance could have been much better, can anyone honestly say the shadow cabinet have been better than the lamentably low bar that has been set?
45
15/12/2020 19:27:15 2 4
bbc
1 pub = X lives. Find X.
46
15/12/2020 19:35:47 2 2
bbc
30 restaurants/pubs open in the high street. High fixed costs (rent) and income subject to footfall.

So amongst these 30; what are the differentiators, business model, and USP?
40
15/12/2020 19:04:12 7 6
bbc
Why would the unemployed get more hand outs? They take various benefits anyway. Sat pretty though corvid.
47
15/12/2020 19:42:49 3 0
bbc
As have pensioners
56
15/12/2020 20:40:45 4 3
bbc
I have worked for over 50 years, payed all my taxes and NI. My state pension is a RIGHT not a benefit. It's not my fault your unemployed get off your butt and do something about it. Stop complaining and blaming everyone else.
48
15/12/2020 19:53:10 14 4
bbc
So the government pilloried the hospitality sector, blaming it for the ever increasing rates of infection, yet the infection rate erupted once the schools, colleges & universities were reopened. It doesn’t take a Sage scientific advisor to work this out, but still the government insists on hammering more nails into the hospitality coffin lid, now they’re thinking of cancelling Christmas.
49
15/12/2020 20:04:12 1 2
bbc
This story would be greatly illuminated by a graph of the unemployment rate over the last 10-15 years.......

If the predicted rate will peak at 9.7%, how does that compare to the financial crash?
44
15/12/2020 19:19:51 12 7
bbc
Top rated comment ....

Annaleise Dodds blame sunak decisions for unemployment.

I think there might be another reason......Google what’s happened this year...

And they wonder why they can’t get elected.....
50
15/12/2020 20:11:52 8 5
bbc
While it would be fair to say the actual cabinet's performance could have been much better, can anyone honestly say the shadow cabinet have been better than the lamentably low bar that has been set?
65
15/12/2020 20:51:40 3 3
bbc
I think most people would struggle to name more than a couple of members of the shadow cabinet, they have been so invisible
76
15/12/2020 21:38:07 2 1
bbc
Well you can’t say, no one can, so just concentrate on what is really happening and comment on that not shouldwouldacoulda.
107
16/12/2020 09:54:25 0 0
bbc
Even with the benefit of hindsight, they've been nothing but useless.
119
eL
16/12/2020 10:32:10 0 0
bbc
A brick would do better.
51
15/12/2020 20:16:07 15 6
bbc
Main cause of the rise in infections and deaths have little to no relation with the hospitality industry who have done eveything they could have been expected to in order to provide safer environments for their customers.The way they have been treated (and the public) is a disgrace.The Government is a disgrace.Hopefully the voters will remember at the next GE. BoJo will of course be gone already.
Removed
12
15/12/2020 16:58:37 8 5
bbc
By all means extend the furlough scheme, but only for viable jobs. If the job is not still in place at the end of 2021, all money should be paid back.
52
15/12/2020 20:26:13 2 0
bbc
Some jobs are viable by the end of 2021 and some by 2025 when everything returns to pre-pandemic conditions. Too many chiefs offload the braves without a care for the skills lost. It is hard in the race to the bottom without much af a safety net (JSA/UC/ESA) and the automation of many things coming rapidly over the hill as cost savings to large corporations.
51
15/12/2020 20:16:07 15 6
bbc
Main cause of the rise in infections and deaths have little to no relation with the hospitality industry who have done eveything they could have been expected to in order to provide safer environments for their customers.The way they have been treated (and the public) is a disgrace.The Government is a disgrace.Hopefully the voters will remember at the next GE. BoJo will of course be gone already.
53
bbc
Removed
54
15/12/2020 20:36:09 7 5
bbc
Tony Blair's cafe society,
70
15/12/2020 21:00:32 7 1
bbc
Good name for a band.
55
15/12/2020 20:37:19 5 2
bbc
Since the 80s our dobernam3nts labour or Tory have transformed this country in a big shopping centre and restaurant... completely unbalanced economy that rely on massive imports from east Europe and China. Anybody surprised why we had one if the worse recessions when china prosper using forced labour? We are asked to play fair when seem the other have been playing dirty for years. Time to change
69
15/12/2020 21:00:07 5 0
bbc
Yes, those dobernam3nts have got a lot of questions to answer.

If only we knew what they actually are.
47
15/12/2020 19:42:49 3 0
bbc
As have pensioners
56
15/12/2020 20:40:45 4 3
bbc
I have worked for over 50 years, payed all my taxes and NI. My state pension is a RIGHT not a benefit. It's not my fault your unemployed get off your butt and do something about it. Stop complaining and blaming everyone else.
60
15/12/2020 20:47:30 3 3
bbc
Nah, it’s treated as a benefit. Doesn’t matter what you say you’ve paid in, it’s not a right it’s a benefit.
22
15/12/2020 17:46:06 8 7
bbc
The effect this industry has been catastrophic. It will be almost wiped out, many will not survive or come back. Get a grip Boris. Stop just listening to scientists. When the dust settles, this way the health academics caused this reaction/the lockdowns will be proven to be a major error. Never let them near the tiller or power again. They are scientists with no business/economic sense. Disaster!
57
15/12/2020 20:41:45 0 3
bbc
Since when has hospitality been a "industry", over-inflated view of its importance in the larger world, a nice to have, but never a must have.
108
CH
16/12/2020 09:58:19 0 0
bbc
Yet hospitality adds about 100 x that of the fishing "industry" to the economy which we are now sacrificing the future of the UK over.
58
15/12/2020 20:44:35 2 7
bbc
@Hatanaka Hacker
"how does that compare to the financial crash?"

Unemployment caused by this global pandemic that is hitting all major economies badly, is just a little worse than the Labour-induced crash under Brown.

However, unlike Brown's incompetence, the forecasters are predicting we will bounce back pretty quickly.

Really hard luck that some are out of work, but briefly at least this time
66
15/12/2020 20:53:31 13 4
bbc
“Labour induced crash”

Haha - you’re not flogging that old completely-debunked horse?

Using your infantile logic, let’s talk about the Tory-induced coronavirus pandemic.
95
16/12/2020 08:50:45 3 0
bbc
If only there was a law banning people from peddling easily proven lies, you'd never be allowed online again

Every international financial institution on earth stated that Brown's plan for recovery was the best of any world leader

The unfortunate thing was that millions of people fell for the barefaced lie you and others continue to peddle, with Tory austerity stagnating the nation ever since
105
CH
16/12/2020 09:49:07 0 0
bbc
Liar.
59
15/12/2020 20:44:43 14 9
bbc
Utter madness to destroy the economy, put hundreds of thousands on the dole, thousands more dying of untreated cancers etc for a virus which has an average mortality age of 82.4. The UK’s average life expectancy is only 81.5 for god’s sake.
62
15/12/2020 20:48:45 10 11
bbc
Shame you’re not in your 80s then
56
15/12/2020 20:40:45 4 3
bbc
I have worked for over 50 years, payed all my taxes and NI. My state pension is a RIGHT not a benefit. It's not my fault your unemployed get off your butt and do something about it. Stop complaining and blaming everyone else.
60
15/12/2020 20:47:30 3 3
bbc
Nah, it’s treated as a benefit. Doesn’t matter what you say you’ve paid in, it’s not a right it’s a benefit.
61
15/12/2020 20:48:11 13 3
bbc
Party line jingoistic nonsense on these comments

Let’s face facts
We did worse than majority during financial crash because our economy has that bias
We will do worse in the covid crisis because we are a service/hospitality bias

But please let’s not forget Bozzo and Cummins - payrise whilst Rome burnt
59
15/12/2020 20:44:43 14 9
bbc
Utter madness to destroy the economy, put hundreds of thousands on the dole, thousands more dying of untreated cancers etc for a virus which has an average mortality age of 82.4. The UK’s average life expectancy is only 81.5 for god’s sake.
62
15/12/2020 20:48:45 10 11
bbc
Shame you’re not in your 80s then
64
15/12/2020 20:51:01 2 3
bbc
Like you?
63
15/12/2020 20:48:51 4 0
bbc
I spoke to a friend at a company I used to work for and they have made several people redundant despite the fact that the company has done well this year and has exceeded its budget. They were let go due to furlough and the fact that it identified that the company was able to perfectly function well without them.
67
15/12/2020 20:55:58 7 8
bbc
"identified that the company was able to perfectly function well without them"

Great, then.

Oh, I see you think that the co. must employ people it doesn't actually need, because .....

... nope, still don't understand

Besides, if not needed, probably deadwood, anyway. Kinder in the long run, they can get a job where they can actually do something useful.
62
15/12/2020 20:48:45 10 11
bbc
Shame you’re not in your 80s then
64
15/12/2020 20:51:01 2 3
bbc
Like you?
120
eL
16/12/2020 10:33:23 0 0
bbc
Good comeback. For an octogenarian.
50
15/12/2020 20:11:52 8 5
bbc
While it would be fair to say the actual cabinet's performance could have been much better, can anyone honestly say the shadow cabinet have been better than the lamentably low bar that has been set?
65
15/12/2020 20:51:40 3 3
bbc
I think most people would struggle to name more than a couple of members of the shadow cabinet, they have been so invisible
58
15/12/2020 20:44:35 2 7
bbc
@Hatanaka Hacker
"how does that compare to the financial crash?"

Unemployment caused by this global pandemic that is hitting all major economies badly, is just a little worse than the Labour-induced crash under Brown.

However, unlike Brown's incompetence, the forecasters are predicting we will bounce back pretty quickly.

Really hard luck that some are out of work, but briefly at least this time
66
15/12/2020 20:53:31 13 4
bbc
“Labour induced crash”

Haha - you’re not flogging that old completely-debunked horse?

Using your infantile logic, let’s talk about the Tory-induced coronavirus pandemic.
63
15/12/2020 20:48:51 4 0
bbc
I spoke to a friend at a company I used to work for and they have made several people redundant despite the fact that the company has done well this year and has exceeded its budget. They were let go due to furlough and the fact that it identified that the company was able to perfectly function well without them.
67
15/12/2020 20:55:58 7 8
bbc
"identified that the company was able to perfectly function well without them"

Great, then.

Oh, I see you think that the co. must employ people it doesn't actually need, because .....

... nope, still don't understand

Besides, if not needed, probably deadwood, anyway. Kinder in the long run, they can get a job where they can actually do something useful.
75
15/12/2020 21:33:30 2 0
bbc
You’re all heart??
77
15/12/2020 21:45:39 3 1
bbc
The point is that without the pandemic and the furlough scheme they wouldn’t have lost their jobs.
123
eL
16/12/2020 10:36:08 0 0
bbc
Creating tat to sell to other tat-producers.
10
15/12/2020 16:46:28 23 12
bbc
When you build an economy on the EU cafe model its hardly surprising those are the first jobs to go ... our local council (Labour) still follows this ideal ... restricting parking to extend pavements to create more outside eating. It ignores the businesses who have been resident for decades providing jobs but don't fit the local councillors vision of a cafe culture ... in Birmingham for gods sake
68
15/12/2020 20:57:26 2 0
bbc
Have you ever made an HYS comment that doesn’t whine about the EU?

In your indecent haste to blame anything you can on the EU, you’re missing a very important fact.

Most jobs in hospitality are in our Great British pubs, nothing to do with “EU cafe culture”.

Perhaps you can consider them before you make yet another cheap jibe.
55
15/12/2020 20:37:19 5 2
bbc
Since the 80s our dobernam3nts labour or Tory have transformed this country in a big shopping centre and restaurant... completely unbalanced economy that rely on massive imports from east Europe and China. Anybody surprised why we had one if the worse recessions when china prosper using forced labour? We are asked to play fair when seem the other have been playing dirty for years. Time to change
69
15/12/2020 21:00:07 5 0
bbc
Yes, those dobernam3nts have got a lot of questions to answer.

If only we knew what they actually are.
54
15/12/2020 20:36:09 7 5
bbc
Tony Blair's cafe society,
70
15/12/2020 21:00:32 7 1
bbc
Good name for a band.
39
15/12/2020 19:02:16 4 9
bbc
Sooner machines take over the tough task of pouring a drink or warming a bit of food the better. Daft people that eat and drink out paying through the nose will still be ripped off for their stupidity. Time people found more worthwhile occupations.
71
15/12/2020 21:02:08 8 0
bbc
You don’t get out much do you?

Thank goodness.
28
15/12/2020 18:27:28 13 12
bbc
Especially new Labour who ignored kids who didn’t want to go to university.
72
15/12/2020 21:10:30 2 3
bbc
Labour need ppl to be poor to get votes whereas the tories need ppl to be working and home owning
73
15/12/2020 21:20:19 6 6
bbc
People can live for a few months without Pubs and Restaurants but may not live with Covid
80
15/12/2020 22:18:13 1 4
bbc
Rubbish.
74
15/12/2020 21:28:58 6 7
bbc
A pub is the last thing I need right now. What? Sitting there furtively casting around to see who might infect me and worrying about visiting the toilet. You’d need to be pissed to enter.
82
15/12/2020 22:25:08 5 0
bbc
If you don't want to go jut stay away - and allow those who so to get on with their lives.
67
15/12/2020 20:55:58 7 8
bbc
"identified that the company was able to perfectly function well without them"

Great, then.

Oh, I see you think that the co. must employ people it doesn't actually need, because .....

... nope, still don't understand

Besides, if not needed, probably deadwood, anyway. Kinder in the long run, they can get a job where they can actually do something useful.
75
15/12/2020 21:33:30 2 0
bbc
You’re all heart??
50
15/12/2020 20:11:52 8 5
bbc
While it would be fair to say the actual cabinet's performance could have been much better, can anyone honestly say the shadow cabinet have been better than the lamentably low bar that has been set?
76
15/12/2020 21:38:07 2 1
bbc
Well you can’t say, no one can, so just concentrate on what is really happening and comment on that not shouldwouldacoulda.
67
15/12/2020 20:55:58 7 8
bbc
"identified that the company was able to perfectly function well without them"

Great, then.

Oh, I see you think that the co. must employ people it doesn't actually need, because .....

... nope, still don't understand

Besides, if not needed, probably deadwood, anyway. Kinder in the long run, they can get a job where they can actually do something useful.
77
15/12/2020 21:45:39 3 1
bbc
The point is that without the pandemic and the furlough scheme they wouldn’t have lost their jobs.
78
15/12/2020 21:48:44 5 4
bbc
I would say considering the year we had, 800K is not as bad as it could have been. I will say as a businessman, that many companies have looked at how they operate and many have become much more efficient. Many businesses were overstaffed, many employees did not make a contribution. Once vaccinated, hospitality will start coming back.
79
15/12/2020 22:11:17 1 1
bbc
The industry that relies on socialising.
81
15/12/2020 22:24:18 4 1
bbc
There is nothing wrong with socialising, virus or no virus.
73
15/12/2020 21:20:19 6 6
bbc
People can live for a few months without Pubs and Restaurants but may not live with Covid
80
15/12/2020 22:18:13 1 4
bbc
Rubbish.
79
15/12/2020 22:11:17 1 1
bbc
The industry that relies on socialising.
81
15/12/2020 22:24:18 4 1
bbc
There is nothing wrong with socialising, virus or no virus.
74
15/12/2020 21:28:58 6 7
bbc
A pub is the last thing I need right now. What? Sitting there furtively casting around to see who might infect me and worrying about visiting the toilet. You’d need to be pissed to enter.
82
15/12/2020 22:25:08 5 0
bbc
If you don't want to go jut stay away - and allow those who so to get on with their lives.
83
15/12/2020 22:40:42 3 3
bbc
This should be seen as an opportunity, not a disaster. It's an opportunity to give the elderly, adult and disabled care sectors (not to mention agriculture) the much needed injection of manpower they've been crying out for for decades through retraining schemes.

If even half the effort we use in bemoaning the unjust plight of minorities was put into useful work then what a nation we could be!
84
15/12/2020 23:24:56 4 4
bbc
The worst is yet to come, we have never before shut down the country for a flu virus, we now have a debt larger than GDP, blaming the hospitality sector for everything, when it's patently obvious that the drivers for infection, are schools, universities et al and hospitals; to all of you hiding under the bed, your future is written; jobless, homeless and futureless shouldn't have believed the lies
85
DSA
15/12/2020 23:39:52 2 7
bbc
They opened the bars after the lockdown and it resulted in a massive increase in cases and deaths.

What we are seeing here is greedy companies happy to see a lot more people die as long as they can sell their beer.

Crazy
9
15/12/2020 16:45:47 12 6
bbc
The furlough scheme needs to end. Much as its laudable to try to save every job, a lot of these jobs aren't coming back. In the pub trade a large proportion of these bars would be shut in 12 months anyway as new concepts come in and out of fashion. Trying to save each and every one of them is nonsense. End the furlough scheme at the end of March and let us get on with paying off the debt
86
15/12/2020 23:41:31 2 0
bbc
I would suggest many of these businesses are viable or the owners would have already thrown in the towel. The night time industry in the country for example is worth over 13 billion, do we throw that away and put all employees on universal credit?
87
15/12/2020 23:56:15 2 0
bbc
History UK Wool industry gone,biggest world ship building gone,motocycles/car manufacturing,coal mining, tin mining gone,electro magnetics sold to Japan trains now running on it,Steel,textiles,all lost because of change.As for hospitality it will go the same way,sandwich makers, tea/coffee servers,pubs thousands have shut.Look at Tesco's Extra stores just dead ducks,convenient stores the in thing
88
15/12/2020 23:57:47 4 2
bbc
The UK government has no plans to manage the economy with COVID and the inconsistent approach with no direct action means the economic impact will be longer and harsher then elsewhere. Simple solution is harsh lockdown 8 weeks with solid support for business/people. Followed by pump funded capital investment and borders controlled to re-establish local economy and prevent an extra COVID wave
89
16/12/2020 00:14:11 1 9
bbc
Unemployment is about who you talk to ,1982 was 14% unemployed,1984 11.9%,unemployed,far off from todays numbers of 4.9%,1990 house mortgage 17.5% and they got it hard what laugh ,propaganda by the buckets full
90
16/12/2020 01:40:42 10 0
bbc
I'm on Zero Hours and haven't had a shift in months yet I'm still classed as "Employed", there are a lot of "Employed" people in insecure jobs. House prices were also a lot cheaper in 1990.
89
16/12/2020 00:14:11 1 9
bbc
Unemployment is about who you talk to ,1982 was 14% unemployed,1984 11.9%,unemployed,far off from todays numbers of 4.9%,1990 house mortgage 17.5% and they got it hard what laugh ,propaganda by the buckets full
90
16/12/2020 01:40:42 10 0
bbc
I'm on Zero Hours and haven't had a shift in months yet I'm still classed as "Employed", there are a lot of "Employed" people in insecure jobs. House prices were also a lot cheaper in 1990.
96
16/12/2020 08:50:47 2 1
bbc
Prices were cheaper but wages were lower. Over 50% of my income went on paying for the mortgage. In other words I was broke and struggling to buy food and pay for other necessities.
91
16/12/2020 07:10:56 2 2
bbc
The government won a massive mandate to make these decisions.

They are making the call that the hospitality sector will recover once the Brexit bonus kicks in.
92
16/12/2020 07:35:37 6 0
bbc
If (and it is a BIG IF) Boris and his government had locked the country down at the start of things, and like NZ, stopped all flights in and out of the country unless you went into a controlled location for isolation, the UK and the economy wouldn't be in the pickle it is in now.
94
16/12/2020 08:48:15 1 2
bbc
Perhaps in less of a pickle but it would still be in trouble. The sick joke in all this is that the only country not suffering badly is China. Life sucks.
93
16/12/2020 08:44:37 9 0
bbc
The worst of the pandemic hasn't hit us yet where employment is concerned, there are 10s of 1000s of businesses, including massive employers, who have been on the brink of closure for some time

If/when the country goes back into one form of lockdown or another after Christmas, they'll start to close permanently, it's highly likely that by Easter we'll see the number of jobs lost this year, double
92
16/12/2020 07:35:37 6 0
bbc
If (and it is a BIG IF) Boris and his government had locked the country down at the start of things, and like NZ, stopped all flights in and out of the country unless you went into a controlled location for isolation, the UK and the economy wouldn't be in the pickle it is in now.
94
16/12/2020 08:48:15 1 2
bbc
Perhaps in less of a pickle but it would still be in trouble. The sick joke in all this is that the only country not suffering badly is China. Life sucks.
58
15/12/2020 20:44:35 2 7
bbc
@Hatanaka Hacker
"how does that compare to the financial crash?"

Unemployment caused by this global pandemic that is hitting all major economies badly, is just a little worse than the Labour-induced crash under Brown.

However, unlike Brown's incompetence, the forecasters are predicting we will bounce back pretty quickly.

Really hard luck that some are out of work, but briefly at least this time
95
16/12/2020 08:50:45 3 0
bbc
If only there was a law banning people from peddling easily proven lies, you'd never be allowed online again

Every international financial institution on earth stated that Brown's plan for recovery was the best of any world leader

The unfortunate thing was that millions of people fell for the barefaced lie you and others continue to peddle, with Tory austerity stagnating the nation ever since
90
16/12/2020 01:40:42 10 0
bbc
I'm on Zero Hours and haven't had a shift in months yet I'm still classed as "Employed", there are a lot of "Employed" people in insecure jobs. House prices were also a lot cheaper in 1990.
96
16/12/2020 08:50:47 2 1
bbc
Prices were cheaper but wages were lower. Over 50% of my income went on paying for the mortgage. In other words I was broke and struggling to buy food and pay for other necessities.
99
16/12/2020 09:07:19 1 1
bbc
Housing costs have rocketed compared to wages, this is known by everyone.....
Except apparently, you??
97
16/12/2020 08:56:47 2 1
bbc
The gov want us to use our own judgment. Good luck with that one. They did not need us to use our own judgment before and millions lost their jobs.
98
16/12/2020 08:58:44 9 1
bbc
Simple choice for the electorate.
Decide is our Economy for the generation of wealth for the elite?
Or
Is our Economy for the well being of society as a whole?
We elected dishonest greedy hypocritical BrexitSpivs.........

Clearly those questions weren’t at the forefront of peoples’ minds.....

Corbyn and the fishies, take a bow.
96
16/12/2020 08:50:47 2 1
bbc
Prices were cheaper but wages were lower. Over 50% of my income went on paying for the mortgage. In other words I was broke and struggling to buy food and pay for other necessities.
99
16/12/2020 09:07:19 1 1
bbc
Housing costs have rocketed compared to wages, this is known by everyone.....
Except apparently, you??
101
NGB
16/12/2020 09:23:46 1 0
bbc
Not really very accurate. Whilst house prices were much lower relative to wages, as Caleb points out, interest rates were far higher, so housing costs did indeed take a very large proportion of income. And remember, tax rates were also much higher.
100
16/12/2020 09:19:25 10 1
bbc
Maggie liked to run with 4 million out of work, Norman told us get on your bike and look for work. Smashing lot..... its in the DNA.