Heathrow to shut Terminal 4 until end of next year
11/12/2020 | news | business | 170
The airport operator says passenger numbers fell sharply following a second lockdown.
1
11/12/2020 09:56:17 9 5
bbc
Do we really need another runway?

The psychology of humanity is such that if someone tells them something they are so ready to believe them (how else could explain some ridiculous view held by a lot of people - we all know examples).

As soon as the green light appears people will flood back - if they have the money

This is the big caveat

And business?

Why would anyone fly again.
31
11/12/2020 12:02:49 9 2
bbc
There are plenty of people who were lucky enough to keep working, and many from home, through the pandemic, earning full wage, but no travel costs & no events/holidays etc.. to spend their money on. There is £billions out there burning holes in peoples pockets just waiting for the green light!
110
11/12/2020 20:48:11 3 1
bbc
Why would anyone fly again - because travel is fun, it broadens the mind, you get to see and experience wonderful things.
159
12/12/2020 15:55:20 0 0
bbc
Gatwick and Southampton are crying out for business
2
11/12/2020 09:58:25 5 1
bbc
The tourist tax is paid by the tourists flying, and few would want to come here, or in the middle of a pandemic should the UK be letting them come in from most countries.
Plus one of the biggest number of tourists were Chinese, and despite China having little virus cases, visitors from there would need to quarantine, even if they wanted to visit infection-high UK.
Rates relief seems good idea.
161
12/12/2020 17:38:40 0 0
bbc
A tourist tax is not paid by tourists flying, this relates to the removal of tax free shopping in the high street. Foreign tourists get their tax back when they leave, but the stupid UK government thinks that the tax they don't give back will end up in the Treasuries coffers.
162
12/12/2020 17:39:14 0 0
bbc
Fact is they have now taken the incentive to tourists to come here and they will go to Milan, Paris etc etc and no money will end up in the treasuries coffers. In short our government have given our economy a kick in the nuts when its already down and sinking
3
MVP
11/12/2020 10:06:12 27 10
bbc
This is good news for the environment.

Maybe we should all take this time to re-consider the damage we are doing to the earth and amend out lifestyles accordingly, and if that means taking fewer flights then so be it.
8
11/12/2020 10:18:30 26 15
bbc
The clothing industry creates way more damage to the environment than flying, have you tried going naked?
109
11/12/2020 20:46:21 4 1
bbc
It's not the flights, it's the excessive procreation that's the problem.
4
11/12/2020 10:12:40 13 2
bbc
I have sympathy for the businesses that are suffering due to the effects of Covid BUT they are deluding themselves if they think the country can recover its economy by reducing taxes. They are going to have to accept much lower profits and mininal dividend distribution - if any dividends at all - for many years to come.
7
11/12/2020 10:18:18 26 2
bbc
That will seriously damage anyone's private Pension plans for quite some time, the effects of this virus will still be being felt in 20 years time by people having reduced pensions.
5
11/12/2020 10:14:10 12 13
bbc
Heathrow, the worst airport ever inflicted on air passengers, knock it down and start again.
47
BZ
11/12/2020 13:49:43 6 0
bbc
Have you been to Luton or Gatwick?
6
11/12/2020 10:17:03 26 2
bbc
As much as vaccines are positive news, the skies will only open up again once rapid testing is in place. If terminals can become almost covid free bubbles, receiving countries will then have confidence to receive tourists again.

As a hotel owner in Thailand, I'm not expecting tourists on my beach until next Christmas.

Merry Christmas to all, hope to see you in the warm next year!
89
11/12/2020 17:09:42 8 2
bbc
I think you may well be right, at least about how the sensible people will behave. There will always be those who think they know better, it's a pity their actions affect the rest of us, not just them.
156
12/12/2020 15:45:14 0 0
bbc
The majority of flights should be banned until at least Spring 2022
4
11/12/2020 10:12:40 13 2
bbc
I have sympathy for the businesses that are suffering due to the effects of Covid BUT they are deluding themselves if they think the country can recover its economy by reducing taxes. They are going to have to accept much lower profits and mininal dividend distribution - if any dividends at all - for many years to come.
7
11/12/2020 10:18:18 26 2
bbc
That will seriously damage anyone's private Pension plans for quite some time, the effects of this virus will still be being felt in 20 years time by people having reduced pensions.
16
11/12/2020 10:57:43 3 1
bbc
I don't disagree with you but the country can't carry these debts indefinitely. Do we want to hand them on to future generations?
3
MVP
11/12/2020 10:06:12 27 10
bbc
This is good news for the environment.

Maybe we should all take this time to re-consider the damage we are doing to the earth and amend out lifestyles accordingly, and if that means taking fewer flights then so be it.
8
11/12/2020 10:18:30 26 15
bbc
The clothing industry creates way more damage to the environment than flying, have you tried going naked?
29
11/12/2020 11:49:22 10 4
bbc
People need to keep warm. They don't need to fly on weekend breaks.
9
11/12/2020 10:18:32 5 7
bbc
Airport terminals are the riskiest part of the flight journey...whilst the aircraft themselves are comparatively safe because of in cabin air circulation.
Smaller more manageable terminals in smaller airports are safer.
14
11/12/2020 10:42:48 14 2
bbc
I agree about terminals (and indeed, any transport hubs!) being a high transmission risk, but what makes you think sitting in an aluminum tube with several hundred people, breathing their shared air, for hours on end is any safer? If the person beside you is infected, that's the problem! Changing the cabin air doesn't change what they're exhaling! Terminal 4 won't be needed until C-19's eradicated
10
11/12/2020 10:26:59 75 8
bbc
No need to build an extra runway now !
12
11/12/2020 10:32:15 54 6
bbc
never was in the first place...
153
12/12/2020 15:40:49 1 0
bbc
I agree and the money can go to Covid-19
11
11/12/2020 10:30:21 28 7
bbc
The pandemic swept around the World, last January, via the close proximity of passengers
They were breathing shared, 'infrequently changed' recycled air in tightly packed flights, for hours on end
Before they'd left, and after they'd landed, they fought through crowded transport hubs at airports, train stations and ports
Why's anyone surprised this practice, and T4, has stopped being popular?
Wow!
30
11/12/2020 12:02:39 23 1
bbc
I returned to the UK from India in March just before lockdown.The hotel in India temperature checked me outside before allowing me to check in.The following day I was temperature checked before being allowed on the transfer bus.At he Airport i was again checked before being allowed into the terminal.Arrived back at Terminal 4 straight of the plane into my hotel with no checks whatsoever.
87
11/12/2020 17:06:18 1 0
bbc
Looking world-wide, it's rather telling that those areas where a lot of travel (not just by air) takes place (Europe, North & South America, West Indies) by a broad population demographic, the rates are highest. Of course there will be exceptions/anomalies, there are obviously other factors too.

Less travel is a good idea, but deciding how a rationing system should work is worth another HYS.
10
11/12/2020 10:26:59 75 8
bbc
No need to build an extra runway now !
12
11/12/2020 10:32:15 54 6
bbc
never was in the first place...
13
11/12/2020 10:39:29 7 7
bbc
Sensible decision. Now why is the government paying billions to keep empty trains running around all over? Some prudent trimming of services would be a good thing, surely?
49
11/12/2020 14:00:16 3 1
bbc
Its just the same with all the empty buses that you see all the time
9
11/12/2020 10:18:32 5 7
bbc
Airport terminals are the riskiest part of the flight journey...whilst the aircraft themselves are comparatively safe because of in cabin air circulation.
Smaller more manageable terminals in smaller airports are safer.
14
11/12/2020 10:42:48 14 2
bbc
I agree about terminals (and indeed, any transport hubs!) being a high transmission risk, but what makes you think sitting in an aluminum tube with several hundred people, breathing their shared air, for hours on end is any safer? If the person beside you is infected, that's the problem! Changing the cabin air doesn't change what they're exhaling! Terminal 4 won't be needed until C-19's eradicated
15
11/12/2020 10:57:28 3 14
bbc
Get that runway built sod the environment
18
11/12/2020 10:59:00 8 0
bbc
Whoops forgot sarcasm B$ people start.
Should still tax frequent flyers and not sarcasm
7
11/12/2020 10:18:18 26 2
bbc
That will seriously damage anyone's private Pension plans for quite some time, the effects of this virus will still be being felt in 20 years time by people having reduced pensions.
16
11/12/2020 10:57:43 3 1
bbc
I don't disagree with you but the country can't carry these debts indefinitely. Do we want to hand them on to future generations?
17
11/12/2020 10:58:23 76 15
bbc
No sympathy for tourists in the Canaries, my understanding of the tier system is that only essential travel is allowed and as much as I would like a holiday it isn't essential.

The advice has been not to book holidays.
154
12/12/2020 15:42:35 1 1
bbc
Everybody who travels abroad should be quarantined and made sure that they do if not £10K fines
15
11/12/2020 10:57:28 3 14
bbc
Get that runway built sod the environment
18
11/12/2020 10:59:00 8 0
bbc
Whoops forgot sarcasm B$ people start.
Should still tax frequent flyers and not sarcasm
19
11/12/2020 10:59:35 32 7
bbc
Our honourable friend John Holland-Kaye continues his PR campaign. He never fails to remind us that only Heathrow can deliver a Global Britain! Heathrow and its bosses do not care a bit about local (London) communities. Heathrow only cares about profit. If it was up to John he would build 6 runways at Heathrow! Heathrow is NOT THE FUTURE OF OUR COUNTRY! We can do better than that!
108
11/12/2020 20:45:28 1 17
bbc
Six runways would be great, we need more connectivity, not less.
20
11/12/2020 11:00:03 61 10
bbc
Fewer planes in the sky is good the for the planet, no?
90
11/12/2020 17:21:01 26 10
bbc
Changes and compromises must happen, if we are to tackle global warming.
A cut in aviation is one of them. If we have learned anything at all from lockdown, it is that MUCH less travel is necessary; most of us have learned how to work in different ways. This must be maintained.
Frequent flyers from now on must be taxed and penalised, certainly not rewarded with points and air miles.
165
12/12/2020 19:46:29 0 0
bbc
Possibly yes, but remember aviation is 6% contribution to CO2, home domestic heating systems in the UK is 40% or more and now we are all at home working with the heating on so carbon outputs this year will be up up up, ironic cos the planes aren't.
21
11/12/2020 11:02:54 6 9
bbc
There needs to be a rethink about cramming passengers into any form of mass transport
There won't be any guaranteed safety from C-19, and it's continued transmission, until some kind of enclosed 'bubble', not dependent on shared air, is developed
No bright person will risk the proximity to random crowds again!
Being inoculated doesn't stop transmission!
T4 closing is a natural consequence of this.
33
11/12/2020 12:22:21 8 6
bbc
Hardly any people aged under 65 die of Covid19. Children don't even get ill.
So let it spread through those under 65 - with life as normal. Economy fixed.
Just shelter the over 65's. Simple.
48
11/12/2020 13:58:56 2 0
bbc
Well said! I've already cancelled my foreign holiday this year and will take 2 seperate weeks in the UK instead
22
11/12/2020 11:05:42 2 2
bbc
No new runway. No HS2. Big savings that wee can use elsewhere. However, a load more job losses is bad news for everyone, and it is not going to stop anytime soon.
25
11/12/2020 11:37:29 11 4
bbc
Cancelling HS2 won't make a single penny available for anything else. Major Investment Projects are not financed by the taxpayer.
The new runway is a private venture, it is not government funded - if it now goes ahead.
77
11/12/2020 16:32:23 1 0
bbc
Where do you hear about no HS2? work on building HS2 is already underway.
23
RM
11/12/2020 11:12:43 12 5
bbc
Global Britain plans collapse before they even started.
New slogan
Stop flying start walking briskly.
24
11/12/2020 11:13:10 37 19
bbc
Typical BBC to focus on a negative story. Why not have that new proposed development at Blyth, Northumberland creating so many jobs given a significantly increased headline. But that’s positive and does not fit with the fear and terror spreading policy of the leftists at the BBC
54
11/12/2020 14:07:32 9 3
bbc
Have you forgotten the jobs Britishvolt was going to create in Wales? Announcing a project is very different to realising one. This will require vast investment in a company with no track record so it would be naive to assume it will go ahead
61
11/12/2020 15:16:07 1 0
bbc
You could have posted a link.
121
11/12/2020 22:24:33 1 0
bbc
135
12/12/2020 11:24:09 1 0
bbc
Why are you here? Seriously why? If you know in advance you won’t like the stories, because of your idea of “bias”etc, are you happy being unhappy?
That’s masochism.
Your choice but whining from people like you is not everyone else’s taste.
22
11/12/2020 11:05:42 2 2
bbc
No new runway. No HS2. Big savings that wee can use elsewhere. However, a load more job losses is bad news for everyone, and it is not going to stop anytime soon.
25
11/12/2020 11:37:29 11 4
bbc
Cancelling HS2 won't make a single penny available for anything else. Major Investment Projects are not financed by the taxpayer.
The new runway is a private venture, it is not government funded - if it now goes ahead.
46
BZ
11/12/2020 13:47:49 2 0
bbc
we always end up paying
78
11/12/2020 16:33:43 1 0
bbc
So why is the Chancellor allocating £100 Billion for HS2 in the coming years ?
26
11/12/2020 11:32:29 15 14
bbc
Aircraft travel has proven more and more “surplus to requirements”.
28
11/12/2020 11:52:16 21 5
bbc
But it isn’t though, there is a pent up demand, and many will travel when the health situation improves. It isn’t just people going on holidays, millions of people have family in different countries and are desperate to see them
63
11/12/2020 15:20:20 2 0
bbc
I have been flying regularly in lockdown my kids live in NI how else am I meant to see them unless Boris builds a bridge? Many families have had to travel i.e. sick parents in other countries such as India. The world keeps turning and people still need to get on and do things! At some point people will just get on with living rather than festering at home!
27
11/12/2020 11:51:56 1 5
bbc
what about my miles
26
11/12/2020 11:32:29 15 14
bbc
Aircraft travel has proven more and more “surplus to requirements”.
28
11/12/2020 11:52:16 21 5
bbc
But it isn’t though, there is a pent up demand, and many will travel when the health situation improves. It isn’t just people going on holidays, millions of people have family in different countries and are desperate to see them
41
11/12/2020 12:48:05 2 0
bbc
They will, but its not like they'll do 4 holidays each to make up for lost time, they'll maybe do one (if they can afford it)
75
11/12/2020 16:27:29 0 0
bbc
No Air travel peaked in 2016 and their was a very small decline until the pandemic.
Industry experts agree that the growth in air travel between 1950 and 2015 is over.
8
11/12/2020 10:18:30 26 15
bbc
The clothing industry creates way more damage to the environment than flying, have you tried going naked?
29
11/12/2020 11:49:22 10 4
bbc
People need to keep warm. They don't need to fly on weekend breaks.
Removed
11
11/12/2020 10:30:21 28 7
bbc
The pandemic swept around the World, last January, via the close proximity of passengers
They were breathing shared, 'infrequently changed' recycled air in tightly packed flights, for hours on end
Before they'd left, and after they'd landed, they fought through crowded transport hubs at airports, train stations and ports
Why's anyone surprised this practice, and T4, has stopped being popular?
Wow!
30
11/12/2020 12:02:39 23 1
bbc
I returned to the UK from India in March just before lockdown.The hotel in India temperature checked me outside before allowing me to check in.The following day I was temperature checked before being allowed on the transfer bus.At he Airport i was again checked before being allowed into the terminal.Arrived back at Terminal 4 straight of the plane into my hotel with no checks whatsoever.
142
12/12/2020 14:18:55 1 0
bbc
You are assuming a useless temperature check actually does anything. Even some high tech corvid tests are 50/50, useless! Trivial temperature checks are a scam presentation of doing something. To let the stupid think it is ok to travel about pointlessly, trivially.
1
11/12/2020 09:56:17 9 5
bbc
Do we really need another runway?

The psychology of humanity is such that if someone tells them something they are so ready to believe them (how else could explain some ridiculous view held by a lot of people - we all know examples).

As soon as the green light appears people will flood back - if they have the money

This is the big caveat

And business?

Why would anyone fly again.
31
11/12/2020 12:02:49 9 2
bbc
There are plenty of people who were lucky enough to keep working, and many from home, through the pandemic, earning full wage, but no travel costs & no events/holidays etc.. to spend their money on. There is £billions out there burning holes in peoples pockets just waiting for the green light!
34
11/12/2020 12:24:14 4 1
bbc
We've all spent it on our homes - the building work around here is unbelievable
102
11/12/2020 19:33:45 3 0
bbc
Exactly , most people are like this . Has anyone tried booking a builder ? There will be a massive pent up demand and then inflation will become the issue as all that money tries to get spent.
32
11/12/2020 12:21:09 0 0
bbc
So close a terminal and create social distance issues again . Give us space don’t reduce it!
21
11/12/2020 11:02:54 6 9
bbc
There needs to be a rethink about cramming passengers into any form of mass transport
There won't be any guaranteed safety from C-19, and it's continued transmission, until some kind of enclosed 'bubble', not dependent on shared air, is developed
No bright person will risk the proximity to random crowds again!
Being inoculated doesn't stop transmission!
T4 closing is a natural consequence of this.
33
11/12/2020 12:22:21 8 6
bbc
Hardly any people aged under 65 die of Covid19. Children don't even get ill.
So let it spread through those under 65 - with life as normal. Economy fixed.
Just shelter the over 65's. Simple.
37
11/12/2020 12:42:12 2 2
bbc
Wow! I must've missed your research paper, and these 'facts'
The recent papers I've been following are speculating on the long term health implications for those who've survived C-19 infection. Read any? Thought not!
T4 closing is long term
C-19 should be regarded as debilitating, in the same way that 'foot and mouth' doesn't actually kill livestock, they just 'fail to thrive', C-19 will weaken us
39
11/12/2020 12:51:51 2 2
bbc
Cousin, no health issues, aged 52, dead OF Covid, wife 51 on and off a ventilator, with Covid.

Most over 60's I know are already being very careful.

Relax restrictions and the lower age groups will have more deaths!
67
11/12/2020 15:34:00 2 0
bbc
Most of the group you describe have been isolating since last Feb. We are all going crackers, and many would rather die of Covid if they can't cuddle new grandchildren. It is hell on earth, please think before making throw-away remarks.
31
11/12/2020 12:02:49 9 2
bbc
There are plenty of people who were lucky enough to keep working, and many from home, through the pandemic, earning full wage, but no travel costs & no events/holidays etc.. to spend their money on. There is £billions out there burning holes in peoples pockets just waiting for the green light!
34
11/12/2020 12:24:14 4 1
bbc
We've all spent it on our homes - the building work around here is unbelievable
53
11/12/2020 14:05:03 4 1
bbc
This is very true - try getting a tradesman for any kind of work and you are quoted a 3 to 4 week wait minimum
29
11/12/2020 11:49:22 10 4
bbc
People need to keep warm. They don't need to fly on weekend breaks.
Removed
36
11/12/2020 12:38:56 49 18
bbc
Why do we have stories like this, and "I can't get my wine delivered from Europe" as headline stories on the BBC page, yet no mention of the announcement of a £3.6bn factory in Blyth, Northumberland to build Britain's first battery gigaplant?

Is it because the BBC can't put a negative spin on it?
40
11/12/2020 12:53:05 28 10
bbc
No mention of the fact Heathrow will be back to using both runways from Monday due to increased demand.A positive for the staff working for the airlines and airport but not for the BBC.
42
11/12/2020 13:15:51 10 2
bbc
If you look, you will find that they did report it. 2 clicks was all it took me. Honestly, do people in this country do any diligence before they rant these days....?
50
11/12/2020 14:02:49 5 1
bbc
Hmm. Firstly, it is mentioned https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-55263255 But a £3.6bn start up that's allegedly going to take on already established players despite having no obvious unique technological advantage (and that has already shelved one proposed investment location) does make some a little sceptical
66
11/12/2020 15:30:19 3 0
bbc
Where's the money for that factory? where are the designs, the plans, the technology?
The company behind the scam, sorry scheme, has £250K and is run by a couple of wannabe financiers with no relevant experience. But Johson will be quite happy to spend billions of taxpayers money on it to bribe his read wall voters.
76
11/12/2020 16:28:57 2 3
bbc
Wait until January when the BBC Photo Library will dig out those 2018 wagon queues at Dover for the mischievous hacks to continue pressing their lost causes.
120
11/12/2020 22:23:45 1 0
bbc
122
11/12/2020 22:34:47 1 1
bbc
how about the raw materials mined by children....that negative enough for you, electric cars are another expensive lie.
Idiot comment. Removed
155
12/12/2020 15:44:14 0 0
bbc
All the new correspondents on BBC are rubbish and anti what ever is said by the Government
33
11/12/2020 12:22:21 8 6
bbc
Hardly any people aged under 65 die of Covid19. Children don't even get ill.
So let it spread through those under 65 - with life as normal. Economy fixed.
Just shelter the over 65's. Simple.
37
11/12/2020 12:42:12 2 2
bbc
Wow! I must've missed your research paper, and these 'facts'
The recent papers I've been following are speculating on the long term health implications for those who've survived C-19 infection. Read any? Thought not!
T4 closing is long term
C-19 should be regarded as debilitating, in the same way that 'foot and mouth' doesn't actually kill livestock, they just 'fail to thrive', C-19 will weaken us
65
11/12/2020 15:24:56 1 1
bbc
Hmm. I suspect you only read newspapers / online news and only if they reinforce your view. If you were to read science papers you’d see that many media views on Covid do not have a scientific basis
38
11/12/2020 12:40:10 6 6
bbc
I wonder how many people on these comments moaning about this voted leave....
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
44
11/12/2020 13:28:33 5 1
bbc
Nothing to do with a global pandemic resulting in massive travel restrictions?
33
11/12/2020 12:22:21 8 6
bbc
Hardly any people aged under 65 die of Covid19. Children don't even get ill.
So let it spread through those under 65 - with life as normal. Economy fixed.
Just shelter the over 65's. Simple.
39
11/12/2020 12:51:51 2 2
bbc
Cousin, no health issues, aged 52, dead OF Covid, wife 51 on and off a ventilator, with Covid.

Most over 60's I know are already being very careful.

Relax restrictions and the lower age groups will have more deaths!
36
11/12/2020 12:38:56 49 18
bbc
Why do we have stories like this, and "I can't get my wine delivered from Europe" as headline stories on the BBC page, yet no mention of the announcement of a £3.6bn factory in Blyth, Northumberland to build Britain's first battery gigaplant?

Is it because the BBC can't put a negative spin on it?
40
11/12/2020 12:53:05 28 10
bbc
No mention of the fact Heathrow will be back to using both runways from Monday due to increased demand.A positive for the staff working for the airlines and airport but not for the BBC.
28
11/12/2020 11:52:16 21 5
bbc
But it isn’t though, there is a pent up demand, and many will travel when the health situation improves. It isn’t just people going on holidays, millions of people have family in different countries and are desperate to see them
41
11/12/2020 12:48:05 2 0
bbc
They will, but its not like they'll do 4 holidays each to make up for lost time, they'll maybe do one (if they can afford it)
59
11/12/2020 14:58:13 6 0
bbc
I, for one, will be having a minimum of 4 holidays next year to make up for the ones I missed this year.
Additionally, I look forward to visiting my European clients on numerous occasions throughout 2021 to secure work which will pay for those holidays.

Aircraft travel isn't 'surplus to requirements', far from it - it is essential in the modern world
62
11/12/2020 15:17:31 3 0
bbc
I have three trips rolled over to 2021. Plus at least one more.
114
11/12/2020 20:53:07 0 0
bbc
I have three trips lined up - Namibia, West Coast USA, Spain. Hoping I can get the vaccine before the first!
36
11/12/2020 12:38:56 49 18
bbc
Why do we have stories like this, and "I can't get my wine delivered from Europe" as headline stories on the BBC page, yet no mention of the announcement of a £3.6bn factory in Blyth, Northumberland to build Britain's first battery gigaplant?

Is it because the BBC can't put a negative spin on it?
42
11/12/2020 13:15:51 10 2
bbc
If you look, you will find that they did report it. 2 clicks was all it took me. Honestly, do people in this country do any diligence before they rant these days....?
38
11/12/2020 12:40:10 6 6
bbc
I wonder how many people on these comments moaning about this voted leave....
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
51
11/12/2020 14:03:37 7 1
bbc
Because Corbyn was not acceptable to a very large proportion of the electorate.
56
11/12/2020 14:32:16 4 1
bbc
Because you only vote Communist ONCE!
70
mjp
11/12/2020 16:03:02 0 0
bbc
Because the choices were a bullet in the head for a quick bye-bye or being boiled alive.
73
no
11/12/2020 16:22:37 1 4
bbc
Fact: over 50% of the COUNTRY voted AGAINST the Conservatives.

The voting system in the UK is rigged to disenfranchise the majority, which is why the country is divided.
74
11/12/2020 16:22:54 1 0
bbc
No we don't, we have loads of different voting systems, the House of Commons is elected by the FPTP system.
In London they use the instant run off system to elect their mayor.
In Scotland they use the additional member system for the Scottish Parliament and their councils use the dHondt system.
English councils use the multi member system, Northern Ireland Assembly has PR and uses the STV system.
38
11/12/2020 12:40:10 6 6
bbc
I wonder how many people on these comments moaning about this voted leave....
44
11/12/2020 13:28:33 5 1
bbc
Nothing to do with a global pandemic resulting in massive travel restrictions?
45
11/12/2020 13:32:32 19 4
bbc
From building another runway to closing down a terminal. I'm no economist, but I think it is safe to say we've dark days ahead.
72
11/12/2020 16:11:58 9 5
bbc
Airline travel has peaked that's all, it's been going on all over the world and it started five years ago.
The world changes all the time, Covid has caused a rapid acceleration of what was already happening.
25
11/12/2020 11:37:29 11 4
bbc
Cancelling HS2 won't make a single penny available for anything else. Major Investment Projects are not financed by the taxpayer.
The new runway is a private venture, it is not government funded - if it now goes ahead.
46
BZ
11/12/2020 13:47:49 2 0
bbc
we always end up paying
5
11/12/2020 10:14:10 12 13
bbc
Heathrow, the worst airport ever inflicted on air passengers, knock it down and start again.
47
BZ
11/12/2020 13:49:43 6 0
bbc
Have you been to Luton or Gatwick?
117
11/12/2020 20:57:22 0 0
bbc
Or CDG
131
12/12/2020 09:34:27 0 0
bbc
Luton is actually not too bad. New DART connection will be opening soon and the terminal is much better than it used to be.
21
11/12/2020 11:02:54 6 9
bbc
There needs to be a rethink about cramming passengers into any form of mass transport
There won't be any guaranteed safety from C-19, and it's continued transmission, until some kind of enclosed 'bubble', not dependent on shared air, is developed
No bright person will risk the proximity to random crowds again!
Being inoculated doesn't stop transmission!
T4 closing is a natural consequence of this.
48
11/12/2020 13:58:56 2 0
bbc
Well said! I've already cancelled my foreign holiday this year and will take 2 seperate weeks in the UK instead
60
11/12/2020 15:14:04 1 0
bbc
Presumably not travelling by bus/train. Also not visiting any indoor attractions.
13
11/12/2020 10:39:29 7 7
bbc
Sensible decision. Now why is the government paying billions to keep empty trains running around all over? Some prudent trimming of services would be a good thing, surely?
49
11/12/2020 14:00:16 3 1
bbc
Its just the same with all the empty buses that you see all the time
36
11/12/2020 12:38:56 49 18
bbc
Why do we have stories like this, and "I can't get my wine delivered from Europe" as headline stories on the BBC page, yet no mention of the announcement of a £3.6bn factory in Blyth, Northumberland to build Britain's first battery gigaplant?

Is it because the BBC can't put a negative spin on it?
50
11/12/2020 14:02:49 5 1
bbc
Hmm. Firstly, it is mentioned https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-55263255 But a £3.6bn start up that's allegedly going to take on already established players despite having no obvious unique technological advantage (and that has already shelved one proposed investment location) does make some a little sceptical
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
51
11/12/2020 14:03:37 7 1
bbc
Because Corbyn was not acceptable to a very large proportion of the electorate.
52
11/12/2020 14:00:38 7 5
bbc
Well, that's a goodly number of jobs down the toilet, and maybe a few business closures.

Can't help wondering how many terminals Sweden will be closing. I expect it will be a round number.
34
11/12/2020 12:24:14 4 1
bbc
We've all spent it on our homes - the building work around here is unbelievable
53
11/12/2020 14:05:03 4 1
bbc
This is very true - try getting a tradesman for any kind of work and you are quoted a 3 to 4 week wait minimum
24
11/12/2020 11:13:10 37 19
bbc
Typical BBC to focus on a negative story. Why not have that new proposed development at Blyth, Northumberland creating so many jobs given a significantly increased headline. But that’s positive and does not fit with the fear and terror spreading policy of the leftists at the BBC
54
11/12/2020 14:07:32 9 3
bbc
Have you forgotten the jobs Britishvolt was going to create in Wales? Announcing a project is very different to realising one. This will require vast investment in a company with no track record so it would be naive to assume it will go ahead
55
11/12/2020 14:07:40 11 6
bbc
Cant see you really ever needing it again after Sunday...
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
56
11/12/2020 14:32:16 4 1
bbc
Because you only vote Communist ONCE!
57
11/12/2020 14:33:36 0 0
bbc
At least with terminal 4 closing, thiefrow will be less vulnerable to internal scams, cons and other dodgy things that are carried out.
58
11/12/2020 14:46:29 8 3
bbc
Why are they shutting it? Is Boris lying in front of it?
81
11/12/2020 16:45:47 5 0
bbc
No news. Been shut for months. T5 was empty last week as Govt tried to isolate British people from the world.
41
11/12/2020 12:48:05 2 0
bbc
They will, but its not like they'll do 4 holidays each to make up for lost time, they'll maybe do one (if they can afford it)
59
11/12/2020 14:58:13 6 0
bbc
I, for one, will be having a minimum of 4 holidays next year to make up for the ones I missed this year.
Additionally, I look forward to visiting my European clients on numerous occasions throughout 2021 to secure work which will pay for those holidays.

Aircraft travel isn't 'surplus to requirements', far from it - it is essential in the modern world
48
11/12/2020 13:58:56 2 0
bbc
Well said! I've already cancelled my foreign holiday this year and will take 2 seperate weeks in the UK instead
60
11/12/2020 15:14:04 1 0
bbc
Presumably not travelling by bus/train. Also not visiting any indoor attractions.
24
11/12/2020 11:13:10 37 19
bbc
Typical BBC to focus on a negative story. Why not have that new proposed development at Blyth, Northumberland creating so many jobs given a significantly increased headline. But that’s positive and does not fit with the fear and terror spreading policy of the leftists at the BBC
61
11/12/2020 15:16:07 1 0
bbc
You could have posted a link.
41
11/12/2020 12:48:05 2 0
bbc
They will, but its not like they'll do 4 holidays each to make up for lost time, they'll maybe do one (if they can afford it)
62
11/12/2020 15:17:31 3 0
bbc
I have three trips rolled over to 2021. Plus at least one more.
26
11/12/2020 11:32:29 15 14
bbc
Aircraft travel has proven more and more “surplus to requirements”.
63
11/12/2020 15:20:20 2 0
bbc
I have been flying regularly in lockdown my kids live in NI how else am I meant to see them unless Boris builds a bridge? Many families have had to travel i.e. sick parents in other countries such as India. The world keeps turning and people still need to get on and do things! At some point people will just get on with living rather than festering at home!
64
11/12/2020 15:21:03 5 0
bbc
Great photo at the top with plane and signboard. It's an Air Serbia 737.
37
11/12/2020 12:42:12 2 2
bbc
Wow! I must've missed your research paper, and these 'facts'
The recent papers I've been following are speculating on the long term health implications for those who've survived C-19 infection. Read any? Thought not!
T4 closing is long term
C-19 should be regarded as debilitating, in the same way that 'foot and mouth' doesn't actually kill livestock, they just 'fail to thrive', C-19 will weaken us
65
11/12/2020 15:24:56 1 1
bbc
Hmm. I suspect you only read newspapers / online news and only if they reinforce your view. If you were to read science papers you’d see that many media views on Covid do not have a scientific basis
116
11/12/2020 20:55:46 1 0
bbc
Never judge others by your own standards, it shows you for what you are! Couldn't be further from the mark anyway, I abhor echo chambers, unlike many here & took a break for 7 months to read more. A few months ago I returned to discover that the 'deluded' are still in thrall to the billionaires who conned them into wanting brexit. They'll mostly be dead before they can acknowledge they were duped!
36
11/12/2020 12:38:56 49 18
bbc
Why do we have stories like this, and "I can't get my wine delivered from Europe" as headline stories on the BBC page, yet no mention of the announcement of a £3.6bn factory in Blyth, Northumberland to build Britain's first battery gigaplant?

Is it because the BBC can't put a negative spin on it?
66
11/12/2020 15:30:19 3 0
bbc
Where's the money for that factory? where are the designs, the plans, the technology?
The company behind the scam, sorry scheme, has £250K and is run by a couple of wannabe financiers with no relevant experience. But Johson will be quite happy to spend billions of taxpayers money on it to bribe his read wall voters.
33
11/12/2020 12:22:21 8 6
bbc
Hardly any people aged under 65 die of Covid19. Children don't even get ill.
So let it spread through those under 65 - with life as normal. Economy fixed.
Just shelter the over 65's. Simple.
67
11/12/2020 15:34:00 2 0
bbc
Most of the group you describe have been isolating since last Feb. We are all going crackers, and many would rather die of Covid if they can't cuddle new grandchildren. It is hell on earth, please think before making throw-away remarks.
68
11/12/2020 15:38:36 4 5
bbc
A third world country won't be needing that 3rd runway either.
113
11/12/2020 20:50:50 1 2
bbc
Luckily the UK is not and will not be a 3rd world country.
69
11/12/2020 15:47:18 0 0
bbc
thought this was what the green brigade wanted
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
70
mjp
11/12/2020 16:03:02 0 0
bbc
Because the choices were a bullet in the head for a quick bye-bye or being boiled alive.
71
11/12/2020 16:07:23 2 2
bbc
no need for second runway at Heathrow then, should revert to expanding regional airports with links into HS2
112
11/12/2020 20:50:21 0 0
bbc
Hub
45
11/12/2020 13:32:32 19 4
bbc
From building another runway to closing down a terminal. I'm no economist, but I think it is safe to say we've dark days ahead.
72
11/12/2020 16:11:58 9 5
bbc
Airline travel has peaked that's all, it's been going on all over the world and it started five years ago.
The world changes all the time, Covid has caused a rapid acceleration of what was already happening.
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
73
no
11/12/2020 16:22:37 1 4
bbc
Fact: over 50% of the COUNTRY voted AGAINST the Conservatives.

The voting system in the UK is rigged to disenfranchise the majority, which is why the country is divided.
79
11/12/2020 16:42:50 1 1
bbc
You mean that over 50% of the people that voted, voted for parties that were not the Conservatives.
But the Conservatives got the highest number of seats in the House of Commons and they got more than all the others put together so they govern even though only got 43.6% of the votes.
What's the alternative? a PR system would satisfy nobody.
43
11/12/2020 13:25:39 5 3
bbc
Why did the COUNTRY then vote Conservative at the General Election? We only have one voting system in the UK.
74
11/12/2020 16:22:54 1 0
bbc
No we don't, we have loads of different voting systems, the House of Commons is elected by the FPTP system.
In London they use the instant run off system to elect their mayor.
In Scotland they use the additional member system for the Scottish Parliament and their councils use the dHondt system.
English councils use the multi member system, Northern Ireland Assembly has PR and uses the STV system.
28
11/12/2020 11:52:16 21 5
bbc
But it isn’t though, there is a pent up demand, and many will travel when the health situation improves. It isn’t just people going on holidays, millions of people have family in different countries and are desperate to see them
75
11/12/2020 16:27:29 0 0
bbc
No Air travel peaked in 2016 and their was a very small decline until the pandemic.
Industry experts agree that the growth in air travel between 1950 and 2015 is over.
36
11/12/2020 12:38:56 49 18
bbc
Why do we have stories like this, and "I can't get my wine delivered from Europe" as headline stories on the BBC page, yet no mention of the announcement of a £3.6bn factory in Blyth, Northumberland to build Britain's first battery gigaplant?

Is it because the BBC can't put a negative spin on it?
76
11/12/2020 16:28:57 2 3
bbc
Wait until January when the BBC Photo Library will dig out those 2018 wagon queues at Dover for the mischievous hacks to continue pressing their lost causes.
22
11/12/2020 11:05:42 2 2
bbc
No new runway. No HS2. Big savings that wee can use elsewhere. However, a load more job losses is bad news for everyone, and it is not going to stop anytime soon.
77
11/12/2020 16:32:23 1 0
bbc
Where do you hear about no HS2? work on building HS2 is already underway.
25
11/12/2020 11:37:29 11 4
bbc
Cancelling HS2 won't make a single penny available for anything else. Major Investment Projects are not financed by the taxpayer.
The new runway is a private venture, it is not government funded - if it now goes ahead.
78
11/12/2020 16:33:43 1 0
bbc
So why is the Chancellor allocating £100 Billion for HS2 in the coming years ?
100
11/12/2020 19:26:48 0 0
bbc
It does not come from the taxpayer. That is the point. All Major Investment Projects - not just HS2 - are funded by borrowing financed, mainly, by selling government bonds, not by the taxpayer.
73
no
11/12/2020 16:22:37 1 4
bbc
Fact: over 50% of the COUNTRY voted AGAINST the Conservatives.

The voting system in the UK is rigged to disenfranchise the majority, which is why the country is divided.
79
11/12/2020 16:42:50 1 1
bbc
You mean that over 50% of the people that voted, voted for parties that were not the Conservatives.
But the Conservatives got the highest number of seats in the House of Commons and they got more than all the others put together so they govern even though only got 43.6% of the votes.
What's the alternative? a PR system would satisfy nobody.
80
11/12/2020 16:44:17 1 2
bbc
No Tourist tax, drop the UK APD and start working with other countries to open up travel. Heaven alone knows why Shapps was told to refuse the US request to start up air travel. Funny the UK government has never come out in the open and admitted that. Then poor old Rishi has to sort out the mess, the pandemic policies of UK isolationism have caused.
58
11/12/2020 14:46:29 8 3
bbc
Why are they shutting it? Is Boris lying in front of it?
81
11/12/2020 16:45:47 5 0
bbc
No news. Been shut for months. T5 was empty last week as Govt tried to isolate British people from the world.
82
11/12/2020 16:48:35 13 0
bbc
Shopping at airports is a rip off anyway, duty free drinks etc at much more than duty paid prices. Don't even mention the luxury goods. I'm fine with Cafes, restaurants and pubs but the rest just make the trudge to the departure gates endless.
83
11/12/2020 16:53:35 8 2
bbc
If Heathrow is to have a third runway, now is the time to build it while it's not needed at the moment. Southampton Airport is struggling to get a 164m runway extension at the northern end due to environmental issues, so something tells me a third runway at Heathrow isn't going to happen in my lifetime
94
11/12/2020 18:13:02 7 3
bbc
It was first proposed in 1947. We have been dithering while the Middle East has taken over international travel
157
12/12/2020 15:51:06 0 0
bbc
Southampton does need an extension otherwise you will see a massive estate being built on it.
84
11/12/2020 17:00:21 2 3
bbc
About time we got back to normal and saved our economy now, https://liberty2019.org
88
11/12/2020 17:08:40 6 1
bbc
The usual conspiracy cobblers. Why are 'Machiavellian mastermind' plots so popular? Look at the Muppets in power!
85
11/12/2020 17:05:40 1 4
bbc
In 1993 there were apprx 300m passenger numbers flying across Europe
Just pre pandemic, that had risen to around 1,000m due to changes to flying regs, reduced prices subsidised aviation fuel etc

Fly got to cheap & too easy

Business trips will never go back to what they were, business's have found they save a fortune with video tech instead of sending folk all over the world for 'meetings'.
104
11/12/2020 19:37:09 5 0
bbc
Aviation fuel is not subsidised . It is just not taxed, that is a rather important difference.
115
11/12/2020 20:54:31 0 0
bbc
Why is transport and connectivity too cheap? Cheaper the better for humanity.
86
11/12/2020 17:00:17 5 4
bbc
‘Global Britain’ ?
Now there IS an Oxymoron.
11
11/12/2020 10:30:21 28 7
bbc
The pandemic swept around the World, last January, via the close proximity of passengers
They were breathing shared, 'infrequently changed' recycled air in tightly packed flights, for hours on end
Before they'd left, and after they'd landed, they fought through crowded transport hubs at airports, train stations and ports
Why's anyone surprised this practice, and T4, has stopped being popular?
Wow!
87
11/12/2020 17:06:18 1 0
bbc
Looking world-wide, it's rather telling that those areas where a lot of travel (not just by air) takes place (Europe, North & South America, West Indies) by a broad population demographic, the rates are highest. Of course there will be exceptions/anomalies, there are obviously other factors too.

Less travel is a good idea, but deciding how a rationing system should work is worth another HYS.
143
12/12/2020 14:24:32 0 0
bbc
The simplest 'rationing' is by price. Tax travel very highly. There is no excuse for almost all of it these days. The bigger problems got going due to 'cheap flights'.

That said if you wish to create a non money rationing system it will be complicated. Issue a 'milage by air' ration book? Could then be tradeable, help the poor, sell ration to the rich. Issue decreasing ration every year.
84
11/12/2020 17:00:21 2 3
bbc
About time we got back to normal and saved our economy now, https://liberty2019.org
88
11/12/2020 17:08:40 6 1
bbc
The usual conspiracy cobblers. Why are 'Machiavellian mastermind' plots so popular? Look at the Muppets in power!
6
11/12/2020 10:17:03 26 2
bbc
As much as vaccines are positive news, the skies will only open up again once rapid testing is in place. If terminals can become almost covid free bubbles, receiving countries will then have confidence to receive tourists again.

As a hotel owner in Thailand, I'm not expecting tourists on my beach until next Christmas.

Merry Christmas to all, hope to see you in the warm next year!
89
11/12/2020 17:09:42 8 2
bbc
I think you may well be right, at least about how the sensible people will behave. There will always be those who think they know better, it's a pity their actions affect the rest of us, not just them.
20
11/12/2020 11:00:03 61 10
bbc
Fewer planes in the sky is good the for the planet, no?
90
11/12/2020 17:21:01 26 10
bbc
Changes and compromises must happen, if we are to tackle global warming.
A cut in aviation is one of them. If we have learned anything at all from lockdown, it is that MUCH less travel is necessary; most of us have learned how to work in different ways. This must be maintained.
Frequent flyers from now on must be taxed and penalised, certainly not rewarded with points and air miles.
107
11/12/2020 20:41:36 5 2
bbc
No need for a cut in aviation, just changes in technology and suitable offsetting.

I'm a frequent flyer, but even if I flew LHR to NYC & back every week I wouldn't emit as much CO2 as others who, for instance, have chosen to have more than two children.

In fact, as I chose to have no children I can never emit as much CO2 as those who have even chosen to have one. Choices, choices.
150
12/12/2020 15:06:16 1 0
bbc
There were certainly a lot of companies who were stuck in the past with respect to working practices. However some people have to travel (by air) for work, and just taxing them to oblivion is not the answer. There needs to be a better alternative.
152
12/12/2020 15:15:28 1 0
bbc
Also worth bearing in mind that civil aviation CO2 only makes up about 1.4% of man made CO2.
91
11/12/2020 17:25:48 4 3
bbc
When is Boris laying down in front of the bulldozer?
95
11/12/2020 18:35:39 1 0
bbc
roughly 3 mths after no deal is confirmed. When we say 'lay down' I think its more likely he will be 'tied down'
92
11/12/2020 17:41:04 1 1
bbc
closing down t4 a Big Mistake good transport links and not all packed in to the centre big mistake for a other year yet an other screw up.
93
11/12/2020 18:04:17 8 1
bbc
Is this a case of terminal decline?
99
11/12/2020 18:49:40 0 1
bbc
o_o
83
11/12/2020 16:53:35 8 2
bbc
If Heathrow is to have a third runway, now is the time to build it while it's not needed at the moment. Southampton Airport is struggling to get a 164m runway extension at the northern end due to environmental issues, so something tells me a third runway at Heathrow isn't going to happen in my lifetime
94
11/12/2020 18:13:02 7 3
bbc
It was first proposed in 1947. We have been dithering while the Middle East has taken over international travel
105
11/12/2020 20:03:37 1 0
bbc
1947 ??? I didn't know that. I know T5 took an eternity to get built
106
11/12/2020 20:13:52 2 0
bbc
Good; its not needed - add a 2nd to gatwick - restore some competition and spread flights out over very congested areas. Only thick rich tories who think the flights won't bother me in my 2nd/3rd/4th house think its a good idea. Could we export thick tories? we certainly have more of them than we need...
167
12/12/2020 21:56:48 0 0
bbc
I remember Dubai without any tarmac roads. The state is now a completely artificial entity with diminishing oil reserves, a gas field it has sold. Th cost of living is very high and regretfully the Emirates are going to have to live off Abu Dhabi.
91
11/12/2020 17:25:48 4 3
bbc
When is Boris laying down in front of the bulldozer?
95
11/12/2020 18:35:39 1 0
bbc
roughly 3 mths after no deal is confirmed. When we say 'lay down' I think its more likely he will be 'tied down'
96
AMc
11/12/2020 18:40:49 1 0
bbc
There are major challenges at the ports, indeed not just the UK but others too. So.....let's close down one of the options to help relieve that congestion.

Seems sensible.
97
11/12/2020 18:49:18 1 1
bbc
Heathrow have been treating us like cattle for years because we kept on coming however bad the experience was. It’s payback time for LHR.
98
11/12/2020 18:49:23 0 0
bbc
bad. good. bad. good. pollution. things that aren't pollution (like tax revenue)
93
11/12/2020 18:04:17 8 1
bbc
Is this a case of terminal decline?
99
11/12/2020 18:49:40 0 1
bbc
o_o
78
11/12/2020 16:33:43 1 0
bbc
So why is the Chancellor allocating £100 Billion for HS2 in the coming years ?
100
11/12/2020 19:26:48 0 0
bbc
It does not come from the taxpayer. That is the point. All Major Investment Projects - not just HS2 - are funded by borrowing financed, mainly, by selling government bonds, not by the taxpayer.