Covid testing of students finds few positive cases
11/12/2020 | news | education | 358
First results of mass Covid testing of students report "low numbers" of positive cases.
1
11/12/2020 09:56:30 89 14
bbc
"there was no link between the pattern of student infections and cases in the wider local population"

Good, so maybe now we can stop trying to blame all the ills of society on the young and start looking at our own behaviour. And we can let them go home for Christmas and get a bit of normality back into their lives.
11
11/12/2020 10:02:20 45 5
bbc
Exeter had like 5 cases in 3 months.

It had 400 the week after Freshers. It didn't have a large spike when the college students went back: they already lived here.

Was literally the students bringing it with them from other areas that caused the spike, and also being locked up together etc. Very different pattern to the local population at the time.
13
11/12/2020 10:03:25 4 7
bbc
This message appears to be missing an apology for the BBC's many previous divisive articles on the subject.
31
11/12/2020 10:12:31 6 4
bbc
To be fair, the study WAS also done by people who have an economic reason to claim there's no link; it was also done using data from 2 months after the spike, revolving around the fact that infections in the community were -still- high rather than how those high rates got there.

That said, it's correct that the young aren't to blame for idiotic policies, nor the reckless behaviour of people since
265
Bob
11/12/2020 12:32:31 4 1
bbc
The professor is being very misleading.

These tests are taking place months after the blame was given. Test data shows quite clearly that during September when the 2nd wave began it was student ages that caused the spread.

It cannot be disputed.

Just because today they've got it under control doesn't change the past.

It is also ignorant to the countless breaches and parties held in residences.
2
11/12/2020 09:56:30 107 24
bbc
Good news.

It's time to stop vilifying students.
96
11/12/2020 10:36:33 46 3
bbc
Yes, that was a disgraceful episode.

So who are the people that are dying? Serious question. The vast majority are over 70, but who are they? Who do they catch it off? I've seen 1 in 6 cases are caught in hospital (which is bad) but where do the other 5 get it?
109
11/12/2020 10:45:09 9 6
bbc
i agree although now Hancock has moved onto blaming the secondary school children .
154
BTJ
11/12/2020 11:11:25 12 1
bbc
A few weeks ago the average age for Covid deaths was 82 years old, according to ONS.
181
11/12/2020 11:29:43 5 0
bbc
We absolutely shouldn't vilify all students..

However we know there was massive case numbers at the start of the term and we know that many students broke the rules. These are facts.

If there is a period of time where you are immune to getting it again then that could also explain why none of them have it now. They've all had Covid already & come out the otherside due to being young & healthy.
189
11/12/2020 11:33:09 6 2
bbc
Absolutely, they should be applauded for demonstrating the Herd Immunity hypothesis.
320
11/12/2020 13:07:30 0 0
bbc
OK, try telling the ones in places like Nottingham to grow up and act like responsible adults instead of seeing "Uni" as a licence to continue to behave like naughty children.
3
W 6
11/12/2020 09:56:40 10 9
bbc
Presumably because they've all had it? Every single year at university you'd get 'Fresher's Flu' and I guess it'd be no different for covid.
8
11/12/2020 10:00:06 9 1
bbc
where I work, far fewer cases than in local community. and almost no freshers' flu due to all the precautions for covid.
16
11/12/2020 10:03:51 3 2
bbc
Or, possibly, the students were smart enough to learn from the problems at the start - they are supposed to be some of the cleverest folks their age, after all!
4
11/12/2020 09:57:10 13 16
bbc
You can can test negative for Covid-19 and be infected an hour later. So what's the point of mass testing? Huge expense to achieve what exactly? Or is it just a PR excercise?
14
11/12/2020 10:03:33 6 2
bbc
The testing can show a 'snapshot' of the virus at a moment in time,otherwise it is just guesswork..
Yes you can get it later but this shows it is not as bad as we have thought at universities.
Possibly most students have now had the virus,my niece and 5 housemates had it but with no ill effects several weeks ago.
26
11/12/2020 10:08:32 5 1
bbc
Finding out about the prevalence and spread of the virus is never a waste of money. This virus obviously spreads via human contact in waves whenever we drop our guard. Any rise in cases in a local area or adjacent to it, however small, is a warning for each of us to be careful right away rather than waiting for official measures.
132
11/12/2020 10:58:17 1 1
bbc
A response to the propaganda campaign blaming students for being primary vectors. Plenty of arguments that students should essentially be in solitary confinement over christmas, after having been isolated for the entire autumn term.
Testing of students was to identify the infected so they wouldn't go home and 'kill granny'
It turns out cases in the student population are low and safe to go home.
5
11/12/2020 09:57:59 9 8
bbc
So who are people going to blame now, when the infection rate rockets over Christmas? Probably still be the students!
64
11/12/2020 10:24:05 10 2
bbc
Students, northerners, the poor, they're the usual punching bags
6
11/12/2020 09:56:34 61 7
bbc
The low rate now is probably because many students already contracted the virus in the weeks after returning in the autumn.

Not blaming students by the way.
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
66
11/12/2020 10:22:47 7 3
bbc
wonder how many of these so called infections of students OVERWHELMED the NHS to the point of locking everyone up?
273
Bob
11/12/2020 12:35:30 0 0
bbc
Exactly right.

The quotes from the university people here saying that it was all a lie based on testing now and ignoring all the data from months ago, which is when people were blaming students is completely ignorant and misleading.

You'd expect better from the people who are meant to be the best educators in the land.
328
11/12/2020 13:53:31 1 1
bbc
....or they had immunity, as do 30-50% of the population, from corona virus infections from previous years.
7
Ian
11/12/2020 09:58:59 12 14
bbc
??????? Students have had a raw deal ... but lecturers have worked extremely hard, to the point of exhaustion ... to provide the best ever experience ???????
28
11/12/2020 10:10:09 5 4
bbc
I'm assuming you're being sarcastic.
Level of experience is abysmal... 3 weeks behind as the lecturers haven't got their lessons loaded online yet.
50
11/12/2020 10:19:56 1 3
bbc
Lecturers have worked extremely hard, delivered lectures online which have been of high quality. There just hasn't been the physical interaction.

Yes, students should appreciate the efforts rather than just complain about me, me, me.
3
W 6
11/12/2020 09:56:40 10 9
bbc
Presumably because they've all had it? Every single year at university you'd get 'Fresher's Flu' and I guess it'd be no different for covid.
8
11/12/2020 10:00:06 9 1
bbc
where I work, far fewer cases than in local community. and almost no freshers' flu due to all the precautions for covid.
23
11/12/2020 10:06:44 5 1
bbc
That's the same at my institution and expect at most others, even if it doesn't fit narrative people want to follow
92
11/12/2020 10:34:14 1 1
bbc
Ditto
9
11/12/2020 10:01:58 5 5
bbc
possible that they have all had it already?
6
11/12/2020 09:56:34 61 7
bbc
The low rate now is probably because many students already contracted the virus in the weeks after returning in the autumn.

Not blaming students by the way.
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
35
11/12/2020 10:15:44 19 7
bbc
Have you any evidence to challenge Billy? doubt it, go back to your basement
45
11/12/2020 10:12:45 29 0
bbc
Yes, here's one example from Sheffield Uni

www.sheffield.ac.uk/coronavirus/covid-19-statistics

Go down to the "View daily reported cases in table format" and look through the weeks. You can see in late Sept / early Oct there were around 60-100 new cases per day (904 in total over 2 weeks). In the last couple of weeks it's been 1-6 per day (36 in total)

It's the same at other universities
47
11/12/2020 10:14:42 8 8
bbc
"Probably" indicates an opinion or conjecture, its not an indicative claim, so "evidence" is irrelevant.
52
11/12/2020 10:20:45 19 0
bbc
Well you could take Nottingham university's mass testing following their enormous outbreak as a bit of evidence - which was over 1,500 cases at the start of October. In fact, most of the universities capable of doing their own testing enacted their own track and trace systems, and pretty much all of them had high case loads early on, and relatively low caseloads now.
54
11/12/2020 10:18:32 24 1
bbc
Another example: https://www.manchester.ac.uk/coronavirus/cases/

First two weeks back = 1,280 cases. Most recent two weeks = 67 cases.

Let me know if you require any more evidence.
140
11/12/2020 11:01:17 9 1
bbc
Yes - As anyone who has been to uni knows, freeshers flu is real.
262
11/12/2020 12:32:13 0 0
bbc
dont need evidence when you got 70% of the vote behind you.
264
11/12/2020 12:32:28 0 0
bbc
and I still prefer a flan
1
11/12/2020 09:56:30 89 14
bbc
"there was no link between the pattern of student infections and cases in the wider local population"

Good, so maybe now we can stop trying to blame all the ills of society on the young and start looking at our own behaviour. And we can let them go home for Christmas and get a bit of normality back into their lives.
11
11/12/2020 10:02:20 45 5
bbc
Exeter had like 5 cases in 3 months.

It had 400 the week after Freshers. It didn't have a large spike when the college students went back: they already lived here.

Was literally the students bringing it with them from other areas that caused the spike, and also being locked up together etc. Very different pattern to the local population at the time.
18
11/12/2020 10:05:02 15 0
bbc
To clarify the above - I'm not blaming students. I'm just pointing out that mass movements of people who are less likely to even know they have the virus are gonna be a bad idea to areas which have low levels - returning to normality is just gonna cause the same issue when they come back.
37
11/12/2020 10:15:57 4 7
bbc
? like 5 cases?...so do you mean 4 or 6 maybe?...i take it you mean 5!, not like 5!
253
11/12/2020 12:26:09 2 0
bbc
And to be clear, not one of the Exeter students was hospitalised, and cases in the wider community were absolutely miniscule for almost 2 months after the students returned.

When cases began to rise more recently it was nothing to do with the students. The biggest single source of infections was (and still is) the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital.
338
11/12/2020 20:23:52 0 0
bbc
yes the rise of cases in Devon was definitely linked to university students as timmystwin said hardly any cases for weeks than Freshers week and the cases raised out from university area, perhaps one huge coincidence!!
12
11/12/2020 10:03:10 4 5
bbc
Because Portsmouth is so representative of the big urban sprawls where the problem is...
Why not Manchester or one of the London unis?
25
11/12/2020 10:06:52 6 0
bbc
From the maps at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/ it looks like the student areas in Manchester have lower numbers of cases than the surrounding areas...
1
11/12/2020 09:56:30 89 14
bbc
"there was no link between the pattern of student infections and cases in the wider local population"

Good, so maybe now we can stop trying to blame all the ills of society on the young and start looking at our own behaviour. And we can let them go home for Christmas and get a bit of normality back into their lives.
13
11/12/2020 10:03:25 4 7
bbc
This message appears to be missing an apology for the BBC's many previous divisive articles on the subject.
4
11/12/2020 09:57:10 13 16
bbc
You can can test negative for Covid-19 and be infected an hour later. So what's the point of mass testing? Huge expense to achieve what exactly? Or is it just a PR excercise?
14
11/12/2020 10:03:33 6 2
bbc
The testing can show a 'snapshot' of the virus at a moment in time,otherwise it is just guesswork..
Yes you can get it later but this shows it is not as bad as we have thought at universities.
Possibly most students have now had the virus,my niece and 5 housemates had it but with no ill effects several weeks ago.
71
11/12/2020 10:26:00 0 0
bbc
Some universities have had very few cases throughout others have been less lucky but it has been a steep learning curve
15
Lee
11/12/2020 10:03:51 3 11
bbc
Depends if it’s the 30min test as they are useless, my sister had the 30min test came back negative, she also had the proper one that takes a day or so and was positive AND she knows she has covid before the test as she feels so ill like nothing she’s had before
46
11/12/2020 10:13:12 1 1
bbc
I had a test back in September, never got the result. Its all a load of pish.
91
11/12/2020 10:34:03 2 0
bbc
Could be flu, could be anything.
3
W 6
11/12/2020 09:56:40 10 9
bbc
Presumably because they've all had it? Every single year at university you'd get 'Fresher's Flu' and I guess it'd be no different for covid.
16
11/12/2020 10:03:51 3 2
bbc
Or, possibly, the students were smart enough to learn from the problems at the start - they are supposed to be some of the cleverest folks their age, after all!
48
11/12/2020 10:16:03 2 2
bbc
Pah ha ha! Yeah, ok.....LOL!
17
11/12/2020 10:04:12 18 15
bbc
So can the old codgers now stop blaming young people for all ills.
22
11/12/2020 10:06:44 9 7
bbc
I'll correct that for you : grumpy old codgers.

i.e. much of HYS :)
33
11/12/2020 10:14:26 4 8
bbc
That's ageism, you also a racist?
11
11/12/2020 10:02:20 45 5
bbc
Exeter had like 5 cases in 3 months.

It had 400 the week after Freshers. It didn't have a large spike when the college students went back: they already lived here.

Was literally the students bringing it with them from other areas that caused the spike, and also being locked up together etc. Very different pattern to the local population at the time.
18
11/12/2020 10:05:02 15 0
bbc
To clarify the above - I'm not blaming students. I'm just pointing out that mass movements of people who are less likely to even know they have the virus are gonna be a bad idea to areas which have low levels - returning to normality is just gonna cause the same issue when they come back.
19
11/12/2020 10:05:09 12 8
bbc
Lateral flow test is only 50% correct most of the time. Our test and trace record is laughable. The outsource companies are making a fortune though
185
11/12/2020 11:30:42 2 1
bbc
*And Tory donors
351
12/12/2020 10:05:32 0 0
bbc
Propaganda. Please read the 3rd party validation report. Note that PCR doesn’t have one.
20
11/12/2020 10:05:11 16 15
bbc
ProjectFear has blamed Students & Hospitality so who's next for them to shift the blame onto, maybe the people they are still allowing to fly around the world spreading this 'deadly' pandemic that 99% of people under 70 survive! I wish cancer patients had a survival rate that high. ProjectFear running out of reasons to keep controlling our lives whilst they get rich from 'vaccines'
21
11/12/2020 10:05:45 2 4
bbc
It’s probably low because not all uni’s are providing tests, my daughter says her uni has none and only the bigger ones are providing tests.
17
11/12/2020 10:04:12 18 15
bbc
So can the old codgers now stop blaming young people for all ills.
22
11/12/2020 10:06:44 9 7
bbc
I'll correct that for you : grumpy old codgers.

i.e. much of HYS :)
8
11/12/2020 10:00:06 9 1
bbc
where I work, far fewer cases than in local community. and almost no freshers' flu due to all the precautions for covid.
23
11/12/2020 10:06:44 5 1
bbc
That's the same at my institution and expect at most others, even if it doesn't fit narrative people want to follow
24
11/12/2020 10:06:51 15 3
bbc
So that isn't quite the numbers Cambridge initially said via my daughters college where 3 of the 6 (which is now 9) were asymptomatic.

She had a hall lockdown early in the term when about 1/4 of the hall tested positive (almost all 1st years - bit over excited - too much socialising - not enough maturity)

Why didn't the other 75% get it given such a massive local viral load and everyone kept in?
344
11/12/2020 23:05:42 0 0
bbc
A. The testing was unreliable & it’s likely most were false positives.
B. Younger people have not needed to have avoided infection all year & anecdotal evidence suggests they did a good job in attaining herd immunity early on.
C. I’m incredulous that a large chunk of the population believe a respiratory virus which is more contagious than flu has been held at bay for upwards of eight months.
347
12/12/2020 00:23:19 0 0
bbc
The first figure you quote was for the week before - the email the university gave was misleading. There were also a few false positives on the final week so some of the early data was also misleading. Households were locked down within such colleges (this was limited so I'm assuming Homerton?) so that is likely a factor in how the spread was limited.
12
11/12/2020 10:03:10 4 5
bbc
Because Portsmouth is so representative of the big urban sprawls where the problem is...
Why not Manchester or one of the London unis?
25
11/12/2020 10:06:52 6 0
bbc
From the maps at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/ it looks like the student areas in Manchester have lower numbers of cases than the surrounding areas...
58
11/12/2020 10:21:54 0 0
bbc
That data doesn't support my opinion so it's obviously irrelevant!
4
11/12/2020 09:57:10 13 16
bbc
You can can test negative for Covid-19 and be infected an hour later. So what's the point of mass testing? Huge expense to achieve what exactly? Or is it just a PR excercise?
26
11/12/2020 10:08:32 5 1
bbc
Finding out about the prevalence and spread of the virus is never a waste of money. This virus obviously spreads via human contact in waves whenever we drop our guard. Any rise in cases in a local area or adjacent to it, however small, is a warning for each of us to be careful right away rather than waiting for official measures.
27
11/12/2020 10:09:08 24 14
bbc
Students went to University in August and cases in local areas skyrocketed by this is can be hypothesized that students were to blame. To test them 2 months later to see if they are infected now does not disprove this it merely says they are not the current cause of cases, unless they also do antibody tests that shows they have had a low incidence of infection then these statements are incorrect
44
11/12/2020 10:11:51 5 3
bbc
What? Oh and August was 4 months ago not 2.
49
11/12/2020 10:19:23 7 1
bbc
And when students travel home and then return to universities in the Ne Year there it’s highly likely that infection rates will increase as a consequence of people from across the country mixing
It’s not the fault of students or their lifestyle but inevitable when people travel and mix with others
63
11/12/2020 10:23:55 7 5
bbc
Students were not to blame. Cases went up after the bank holiday and August eat out to help out scheme. However, bringing lots of people from across the country into close proximity in halls of residence it was inevitable that many students would become infected. The vast majority followed all the rules and still got infected similar to the rest of the population.
80
11/12/2020 10:30:34 3 1
bbc
Autumn term & semester 1 started 28 September 2020.
138
11/12/2020 11:01:05 4 4
bbc
As students went back, so did schools and we had eat out scheme. Students were not major carriers, no more than the rest of the population. They are easy to blame though aren't they?
236
11/12/2020 12:15:20 0 0
bbc
You can hypothesise all you like Damien, but you would make a rubbish scientist, cases in my area went up quite slowly until late Oct / early November and much of that was probably associated with the winter bug season and people moving inside to socialise.
331
11/12/2020 14:20:22 0 0
bbc
Cambridge's data set includes asymptomatic testing each week (approximately 80% of all eligible) and is probably a good way to test your hypothesis. There wasn't a massive outbreak week 1 although week two and three saw a peak, however the largest level recorded was during the start of the November lockdown. Throughout this period Cambridge remained average/below the nation even with more testing.
7
Ian
11/12/2020 09:58:59 12 14
bbc
??????? Students have had a raw deal ... but lecturers have worked extremely hard, to the point of exhaustion ... to provide the best ever experience ???????
28
11/12/2020 10:10:09 5 4
bbc
I'm assuming you're being sarcastic.
Level of experience is abysmal... 3 weeks behind as the lecturers haven't got their lessons loaded online yet.
41
11/12/2020 10:18:14 1 0
bbc
Depends on the university, and probably the course being taken. There are some universities that through innovation have possibly made the course better than it was previously.
29
11/12/2020 10:11:03 15 14
bbc
This whole project fear,lockdowns and economy wrecking has to stop now Politicians have to realise no one is listening anymore if anyone is scared of the virus it is their own personal responsibility to shield themselves everybody else needs to be allowed to get on with a normal life
79
11/12/2020 10:30:25 7 2
bbc
It is impossible to only shield high risk people. You should look into why that is to understand it more. It's always been hard for high risk people, even before covid came along. Most people have no idea how lucky they are to have full health, they take it all for granted every day
30
11/12/2020 10:11:23 41 12
bbc
Disappointing for some HYS posters who seem to like to blame our young people for everything.
113
11/12/2020 10:47:26 17 5
bbc
it's ok they will now blame the secondary school kids.............
114
11/12/2020 10:47:52 5 1
bbc
Im not blaming anyone I am just saying that this article does not remove the fact that some students and young people are to blame, along with people from all walks of life and ages who havent been careful and pretended the rules didnt apply to them. Society as a whole is to blame from every age upwards
206
11/12/2020 11:45:24 5 0
bbc
Sadly it's a 2 way street with the young blaming the old for all the things they view as bad about the world.
Wouldn't it be nice to see a problem and focus on the fix instead of the blame, but it's seems to be a deeply ingrained cultural norm fed largely by a negative press built on the Murdock model.
278
Bob
11/12/2020 12:37:29 1 0
bbc
Go look at the official data for August, September and October.

It shows a huge - and I mean huge spike among student age group, very disproportionate to any other age group.

Then, as you expect, this fades away. As it fades away the other age groups start to grow and catch up.

The situation in December does not change was factually occurred 3 months ago.
1
11/12/2020 09:56:30 89 14
bbc
"there was no link between the pattern of student infections and cases in the wider local population"

Good, so maybe now we can stop trying to blame all the ills of society on the young and start looking at our own behaviour. And we can let them go home for Christmas and get a bit of normality back into their lives.
31
11/12/2020 10:12:31 6 4
bbc
To be fair, the study WAS also done by people who have an economic reason to claim there's no link; it was also done using data from 2 months after the spike, revolving around the fact that infections in the community were -still- high rather than how those high rates got there.

That said, it's correct that the young aren't to blame for idiotic policies, nor the reckless behaviour of people since
271
11/12/2020 12:34:24 0 0
bbc
verbal gbh....no thanks...next
32
11/12/2020 10:12:56 23 10
bbc
Congratulations to the student population for their achievements.
Following the scientific advice really does work.
40
11/12/2020 10:17:32 35 34
bbc
This has nothing to do with scientific advice. It says to me locking students up was totally unnecessary as they aren't major carriers. Just like shutting down the economy for something that adversely effect less than 2% of the population.
170
11/12/2020 11:19:37 2 4
bbc
Condescending much?
17
11/12/2020 10:04:12 18 15
bbc
So can the old codgers now stop blaming young people for all ills.
33
11/12/2020 10:14:26 4 8
bbc
That's ageism, you also a racist?
186
11/12/2020 11:31:06 0 1
bbc
Can’t say anything anymore can you? Even when it’s true
34
11/12/2020 10:15:13 18 11
bbc
Hopefully this will shut up all those people who want to wreck my grandchildrens future by closing schools and wrecking their education and future job prospects
39
11/12/2020 10:17:24 17 5
bbc
Try thanking the people that kept you safe so you could continue to see your grandchildren
74
11/12/2020 10:26:30 4 2
bbc
Young people are all behaving exceptionally well in the college where I work. They really need schools, colleges and universities to stay open
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
35
11/12/2020 10:15:44 19 7
bbc
Have you any evidence to challenge Billy? doubt it, go back to your basement
36
11/12/2020 10:15:51 3 13
bbc
Boomers are to blame for Covid and Brexit
56
11/12/2020 10:21:21 2 1
bbc
Tell me, what have you contributed to society?
11
11/12/2020 10:02:20 45 5
bbc
Exeter had like 5 cases in 3 months.

It had 400 the week after Freshers. It didn't have a large spike when the college students went back: they already lived here.

Was literally the students bringing it with them from other areas that caused the spike, and also being locked up together etc. Very different pattern to the local population at the time.
37
11/12/2020 10:15:57 4 7
bbc
? like 5 cases?...so do you mean 4 or 6 maybe?...i take it you mean 5!, not like 5!
280
11/12/2020 12:39:32 0 0
bbc
And the grammer police are out again...

It's a "Have Your Say", not a "Have Your Say, Provided You Use Exactly The Same English I Do"...

And I presume they -don't- mean 5!, because 5 factorial is 120, which is nothing like 5.

If you are going to snipe at the language, at least get your maths right.
38
11/12/2020 10:10:33 5 9
bbc
This is all nonsense. What's the point of testing people under 40 if its already been said they won't get the vaccine unless they have a severe underlying health condition?
53
Lee
11/12/2020 10:20:50 11 2
bbc
Because they are going home and could pass it on to a family member who could become very ill I guess. It's a way of identifying cases and enabling them to self isolate before xmas.
57
11/12/2020 10:21:24 3 0
bbc
students have vulnerable relatives and don't want to take infection home to them plus we also want to reduce transmission and the only way to do that successfully is test everyone you can. Canada plans to vaccinate every adult by September.
69
11/12/2020 10:25:21 4 0
bbc
Because they can infect others in the community
34
11/12/2020 10:15:13 18 11
bbc
Hopefully this will shut up all those people who want to wreck my grandchildrens future by closing schools and wrecking their education and future job prospects
39
11/12/2020 10:17:24 17 5
bbc
Try thanking the people that kept you safe so you could continue to see your grandchildren
32
11/12/2020 10:12:56 23 10
bbc
Congratulations to the student population for their achievements.
Following the scientific advice really does work.
40
11/12/2020 10:17:32 35 34
bbc
This has nothing to do with scientific advice. It says to me locking students up was totally unnecessary as they aren't major carriers. Just like shutting down the economy for something that adversely effect less than 2% of the population.
77
11/12/2020 10:27:54 10 1
bbc
20 students have lost a parent to covid in the college where I work. That's not normal in any year.
94
11/12/2020 10:35:56 9 5
bbc
Yes, but you are a muppet.
343
11/12/2020 23:02:03 0 0
bbc
Correct. The evidence suggests herd immunity was reached by June. It’s just SAGE being cute / stupid ever since. That and the abysmal Lighthouse Labs procedures, which have no hope of producing reliable results.
Try this: https://lockdownsceptics.org/the-pcr-false-positive-pseudo-epidemic/
28
11/12/2020 10:10:09 5 4
bbc
I'm assuming you're being sarcastic.
Level of experience is abysmal... 3 weeks behind as the lecturers haven't got their lessons loaded online yet.
41
11/12/2020 10:18:14 1 0
bbc
Depends on the university, and probably the course being taken. There are some universities that through innovation have possibly made the course better than it was previously.
42
11/12/2020 10:18:36 10 3
bbc
"Students 'not driving local infections'"

Maybe not but they're an easy target so people will blame them anyway.
43
11/12/2020 10:18:39 1 8
bbc
Testing finds more cases... shock! ??
67
11/12/2020 10:24:45 3 0
bbc
I think they were saying the testing has found fewer cases, in universities
27
11/12/2020 10:09:08 24 14
bbc
Students went to University in August and cases in local areas skyrocketed by this is can be hypothesized that students were to blame. To test them 2 months later to see if they are infected now does not disprove this it merely says they are not the current cause of cases, unless they also do antibody tests that shows they have had a low incidence of infection then these statements are incorrect
44
11/12/2020 10:11:51 5 3
bbc
What? Oh and August was 4 months ago not 2.
85
11/12/2020 10:31:37 1 2
bbc
September, October, November, December. 4 months ago.
97
11/12/2020 10:36:37 6 2
bbc
You are actually just reinforcing my point that test them and find they arent infected months later does not disprove the idea they contributed to the spread when they returned to university.

Without doing antibody tests to show if they had the virus and recovered or not does not allow you to say they were not a factor in increased cases in certain local areas.
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
45
11/12/2020 10:12:45 29 0
bbc
Yes, here's one example from Sheffield Uni

www.sheffield.ac.uk/coronavirus/covid-19-statistics

Go down to the "View daily reported cases in table format" and look through the weeks. You can see in late Sept / early Oct there were around 60-100 new cases per day (904 in total over 2 weeks). In the last couple of weeks it's been 1-6 per day (36 in total)

It's the same at other universities
15
Lee
11/12/2020 10:03:51 3 11
bbc
Depends if it’s the 30min test as they are useless, my sister had the 30min test came back negative, she also had the proper one that takes a day or so and was positive AND she knows she has covid before the test as she feels so ill like nothing she’s had before
46
11/12/2020 10:13:12 1 1
bbc
I had a test back in September, never got the result. Its all a load of pish.
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
47
11/12/2020 10:14:42 8 8
bbc
"Probably" indicates an opinion or conjecture, its not an indicative claim, so "evidence" is irrelevant.
65
11/12/2020 10:20:09 10 1
bbc
See my two evidence based examples Peter.
166
11/12/2020 11:17:36 1 1
bbc
Probably means more than a 50% chance so it should have some evidence base I would think.
16
11/12/2020 10:03:51 3 2
bbc
Or, possibly, the students were smart enough to learn from the problems at the start - they are supposed to be some of the cleverest folks their age, after all!
48
11/12/2020 10:16:03 2 2
bbc
Pah ha ha! Yeah, ok.....LOL!
203
11/12/2020 11:43:30 0 1
bbc
So presumably you are a graduate of the University of Hard Knocks then?

It is amazing the number of folks who hate students, but love the stuff those students go on to produce...

Virtually everyone working on Covid Vaccines at the moment will have been a student in the past.
27
11/12/2020 10:09:08 24 14
bbc
Students went to University in August and cases in local areas skyrocketed by this is can be hypothesized that students were to blame. To test them 2 months later to see if they are infected now does not disprove this it merely says they are not the current cause of cases, unless they also do antibody tests that shows they have had a low incidence of infection then these statements are incorrect
49
11/12/2020 10:19:23 7 1
bbc
And when students travel home and then return to universities in the Ne Year there it’s highly likely that infection rates will increase as a consequence of people from across the country mixing
It’s not the fault of students or their lifestyle but inevitable when people travel and mix with others
100
11/12/2020 10:38:19 10 1
bbc
I agree, but people on here are implying that students were not a factor in any way when they are, along with all the rule breakers, selfish people who don't wear a mask and people who demanded a holiday then brought back a new strain with them when they couldnt be bothered to isolate.
7
Ian
11/12/2020 09:58:59 12 14
bbc
??????? Students have had a raw deal ... but lecturers have worked extremely hard, to the point of exhaustion ... to provide the best ever experience ???????
50
11/12/2020 10:19:56 1 3
bbc
Lecturers have worked extremely hard, delivered lectures online which have been of high quality. There just hasn't been the physical interaction.

Yes, students should appreciate the efforts rather than just complain about me, me, me.
210
11/12/2020 11:47:55 0 1
bbc
£9,000 for a virtual experience. I think they’ve every right to complain if they feel corners have been cut.
51
11/12/2020 10:20:34 77 8
bbc
Doh! My daughter is a student. Did all the correct things, didn't go out, didn't do lots of socialising etc.. However, the virus was in the halls and inevitably she caught it. So by Christmas most students have already had it and recovered. They are now one of the best protected groups out there with a high herd immunity. Like the entire pandemic the government are just behind the times.
76
11/12/2020 10:27:23 32 17
bbc
I'm glad that she recovered, hopefully no long term effects.

However, what is not fully understood is how long the antibodies generated from infection last and what the effect of different strains are.

A colleague of my son has been infected twice. Upon the second infection, his whole family were infected and unfortunately he lost his father to the disease.

Tell you daughter to stay safe.
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
52
11/12/2020 10:20:45 19 0
bbc
Well you could take Nottingham university's mass testing following their enormous outbreak as a bit of evidence - which was over 1,500 cases at the start of October. In fact, most of the universities capable of doing their own testing enacted their own track and trace systems, and pretty much all of them had high case loads early on, and relatively low caseloads now.
38
11/12/2020 10:10:33 5 9
bbc
This is all nonsense. What's the point of testing people under 40 if its already been said they won't get the vaccine unless they have a severe underlying health condition?
53
Lee
11/12/2020 10:20:50 11 2
bbc
Because they are going home and could pass it on to a family member who could become very ill I guess. It's a way of identifying cases and enabling them to self isolate before xmas.
10
11/12/2020 10:02:08 10 40
bbc
Got any evidence?
54
11/12/2020 10:18:32 24 1
bbc
Another example: https://www.manchester.ac.uk/coronavirus/cases/

First two weeks back = 1,280 cases. Most recent two weeks = 67 cases.

Let me know if you require any more evidence.
183
11/12/2020 11:30:05 2 1
bbc
Have you come across any stats on antibody testing? It would be interesting to know whether a university or even an individual hall that had a bad outbreak at the start of term ended up with sufficient rates of infection to provide a significant brake on further spread.
55
11/12/2020 10:21:13 9 4
bbc
But do not forget. 'A few cases' ultimately became a world pandemic!!
36
11/12/2020 10:15:51 3 13
bbc
Boomers are to blame for Covid and Brexit
56
11/12/2020 10:21:21 2 1
bbc
Tell me, what have you contributed to society?
38
11/12/2020 10:10:33 5 9
bbc
This is all nonsense. What's the point of testing people under 40 if its already been said they won't get the vaccine unless they have a severe underlying health condition?
57
11/12/2020 10:21:24 3 0
bbc
students have vulnerable relatives and don't want to take infection home to them plus we also want to reduce transmission and the only way to do that successfully is test everyone you can. Canada plans to vaccinate every adult by September.
Removed
25
11/12/2020 10:06:52 6 0
bbc
From the maps at https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/ it looks like the student areas in Manchester have lower numbers of cases than the surrounding areas...
58
11/12/2020 10:21:54 0 0
bbc
That data doesn't support my opinion so it's obviously irrelevant!
59
11/12/2020 10:22:01 3 0
bbc
So what's driving the case numbers? If England has just been in lockdown, now most in Tier 3, hospitality shut, hospital admissions disproportionately low compared to "community testing", where are the numbers coming from?
60
11/12/2020 10:23:13 10 3
bbc
People break the rules
72
11/12/2020 10:26:20 3 8
bbc
It is because the virus is endemic and there is absolutely nothing we can do about it. It is why no measures work. There is no point crippling our economy any more. Vaccine or no vaccine.
Fat old boomers who can't wear masks properly and have no regard for rules. Truly the entitled generation. Removed
275
11/12/2020 12:36:44 0 1
bbc
Older people out and about with their noses uncovered.
59
11/12/2020 10:22:01 3 0
bbc
So what's driving the case numbers? If England has just been in lockdown, now most in Tier 3, hospitality shut, hospital admissions disproportionately low compared to "community testing", where are the numbers coming from?
60
11/12/2020 10:23:13 10 3
bbc
People break the rules
105
11/12/2020 10:41:53 3 4
bbc
The "rules" are unnecessary as this virus will have to be lived with and we cannot go on with the conditions laid out by so called science based models which have proved inaccurate on many occasions...into lockdown out of lockdown is the road to insanity.
61
11/12/2020 10:23:26 11 3
bbc
"there have been warnings that the lateral flow tests can miss some positive cases."

The warnings have suggested that the tests can produce 50% false negatives - not sure I'd class this as "some"!
346
11/12/2020 23:11:32 0 0
bbc
Such comments are propaganda. I’ve read the 3rd party validation report from end to end: performance is similar to PCR, except at the subclinical level, where PCR positives are irrelevant.
Unlike PCR, lateral flow tests have a full external “test MOT”. With PCR mass testing, Govt has conceded they don’t know the operational false positive rate & as a result it’s reckless it’s still in use.
62
11/12/2020 10:23:37 29 1
bbc
I work with post 16 in education. I have to say, since coming back in September they have all been really respectful and well behaved. I honestly think they're just all grateful for their education right now and being able to see their friends.
211
11/12/2020 11:48:41 3 4
bbc
As an adult working full time, I'm envious.

For some reason education has to be running at full capacity with virtually no measures in place whatsoever, yet people like me are shut behind our doors until probably April because offices are apparently hellish superspreader petri dishes.

Let the kids bring the virus home, sure, but don't let the parents go out under any circumstances.
27
11/12/2020 10:09:08 24 14
bbc
Students went to University in August and cases in local areas skyrocketed by this is can be hypothesized that students were to blame. To test them 2 months later to see if they are infected now does not disprove this it merely says they are not the current cause of cases, unless they also do antibody tests that shows they have had a low incidence of infection then these statements are incorrect
63
11/12/2020 10:23:55 7 5
bbc
Students were not to blame. Cases went up after the bank holiday and August eat out to help out scheme. However, bringing lots of people from across the country into close proximity in halls of residence it was inevitable that many students would become infected. The vast majority followed all the rules and still got infected similar to the rest of the population.
5
11/12/2020 09:57:59 9 8
bbc
So who are people going to blame now, when the infection rate rockets over Christmas? Probably still be the students!
64
11/12/2020 10:24:05 10 2
bbc
Students, northerners, the poor, they're the usual punching bags
173
11/12/2020 11:25:33 3 1
bbc
Constant blame game, when most of us know it is society as a whole!
47
11/12/2020 10:14:42 8 8
bbc
"Probably" indicates an opinion or conjecture, its not an indicative claim, so "evidence" is irrelevant.
65
11/12/2020 10:20:09 10 1
bbc
See my two evidence based examples Peter.
6
11/12/2020 09:56:34 61 7
bbc
The low rate now is probably because many students already contracted the virus in the weeks after returning in the autumn.

Not blaming students by the way.
66
11/12/2020 10:22:47 7 3
bbc
wonder how many of these so called infections of students OVERWHELMED the NHS to the point of locking everyone up?
43
11/12/2020 10:18:39 1 8
bbc
Testing finds more cases... shock! ??
67
11/12/2020 10:24:45 3 0
bbc
I think they were saying the testing has found fewer cases, in universities
68
11/12/2020 10:25:17 55 6
bbc
Can the BBC please start publishing daily the number of people vaccinated? They’ve been more than happy to keep the fear up with death figures, let’s have a regular “good news” bulletin please
86
11/12/2020 10:32:04 32 33
bbc
But that would spoil it for the remoaners, who assured us that the roll out would be a shambles due to Boris being in charge.
88
11/12/2020 10:32:26 10 0
bbc
Not sure that this would even be a figure that the government would know (let alone the BBC), the NHS systems do not reliably interlink, death figures come from death certificates; which is more reliably recorded.

The entire UK public statistics system needs a serious overhaul - something this pandemic has shown to be a substantial issue.
128
11/12/2020 10:55:09 1 16
bbc
no the government don't want us to know that! That would mean people stop being scared out of their wits and actually do some rational thinking. It may also show that the all singing all dancing vaccine is actually not very good.
179
11/12/2020 11:28:18 5 2
bbc
You assume the government are sharing this number. Don’t always go straight for the messenger
38
11/12/2020 10:10:33 5 9
bbc
This is all nonsense. What's the point of testing people under 40 if its already been said they won't get the vaccine unless they have a severe underlying health condition?
69
11/12/2020 10:25:21 4 0
bbc
Because they can infect others in the community
Covid: A mild illness slightly less bad than a cold that does sometimes affect already seriously ill people. Human immune system 99.9997% effective with no side effects.

The Pfizer vaccine, so far:

8+ PEOPLE DEAD
1 WOMEN WHO CANT WALK
4 FACES PARALYZED
2 ANAPHYLACTIC REACTIONS
1 LIFE THREATENING FEVER
1 ACUTE ENCEPHALOPATHY

All about money, and not into the hands of the good and honest.
Removed
81
11/12/2020 10:30:44 2 4
bbc
I think you're telling a few porkies there. Are you a remoaner by any chance, swapping project fear's attention from Brexit to vaccines?
83
11/12/2020 10:31:21 2 0
bbc
We know about the 2 nurses allergic reaction. What is your source for the others you mention?
87
11/12/2020 10:32:09 2 0
bbc
can you reference your figures please
99
11/12/2020 10:38:13 1 0
bbc
Evidence please.
101
11/12/2020 10:39:25 5 0
bbc
What is the weather like today in Moscow?
104
11/12/2020 10:41:25 2 0
bbc
You and your like will be the death of us all.
GMB did a survey and 43% of respondants do not want the vaccine.

I speak as a father of an Autistic child who had the MMR. That study was a lie and so is what you are saying.

Yes a lot of big pharma is about money but that is not any proof for your BS.
14
11/12/2020 10:03:33 6 2
bbc
The testing can show a 'snapshot' of the virus at a moment in time,otherwise it is just guesswork..
Yes you can get it later but this shows it is not as bad as we have thought at universities.
Possibly most students have now had the virus,my niece and 5 housemates had it but with no ill effects several weeks ago.
71
11/12/2020 10:26:00 0 0
bbc
Some universities have had very few cases throughout others have been less lucky but it has been a steep learning curve
59
11/12/2020 10:22:01 3 0
bbc
So what's driving the case numbers? If England has just been in lockdown, now most in Tier 3, hospitality shut, hospital admissions disproportionately low compared to "community testing", where are the numbers coming from?
72
11/12/2020 10:26:20 3 8
bbc
It is because the virus is endemic and there is absolutely nothing we can do about it. It is why no measures work. There is no point crippling our economy any more. Vaccine or no vaccine.
93
11/12/2020 10:35:23 7 0
bbc
So what you are saying is, there was no enormous decline in the rate of cases following measures.

We've eliminated numerous infectious diseases over the years (Smallpox even on a global scale). Claiming we can't eliminate an endemic virus is incorrect.
59
11/12/2020 10:22:01 3 0
bbc
So what's driving the case numbers? If England has just been in lockdown, now most in Tier 3, hospitality shut, hospital admissions disproportionately low compared to "community testing", where are the numbers coming from?
Fat old boomers who can't wear masks properly and have no regard for rules. Truly the entitled generation. Removed
89
11/12/2020 10:33:08 3 0
bbc
I think you will find people of all generations, backgrounds, and sizes are to blame, stop being a hypocritical bigot.
34
11/12/2020 10:15:13 18 11
bbc
Hopefully this will shut up all those people who want to wreck my grandchildrens future by closing schools and wrecking their education and future job prospects
74
11/12/2020 10:26:30 4 2
bbc
Young people are all behaving exceptionally well in the college where I work. They really need schools, colleges and universities to stay open
75
11/12/2020 10:26:34 19 7
bbc
There are people who need to be taken to account when this is done. Students are NOT amongst them.

For me it is the short term panic coverage employed by the media followed by the government short term thinking and action. In particular the way every other illness has suffered under the NHS. Yes individual doctors, nurses etc have been heroes, but the NHS as an organisation is a shambles.
143
11/12/2020 11:04:50 11 3
bbc
Here, here. Stop clapping and reorganise the NHS non medical. The management of the organisation is hopeless and over paid and has let down everyone.
51
11/12/2020 10:20:34 77 8
bbc
Doh! My daughter is a student. Did all the correct things, didn't go out, didn't do lots of socialising etc.. However, the virus was in the halls and inevitably she caught it. So by Christmas most students have already had it and recovered. They are now one of the best protected groups out there with a high herd immunity. Like the entire pandemic the government are just behind the times.
76
11/12/2020 10:27:23 32 17
bbc
I'm glad that she recovered, hopefully no long term effects.

However, what is not fully understood is how long the antibodies generated from infection last and what the effect of different strains are.

A colleague of my son has been infected twice. Upon the second infection, his whole family were infected and unfortunately he lost his father to the disease.

Tell you daughter to stay safe.
90
11/12/2020 10:33:46 11 16
bbc
“Stay safe”. The most sinister phrase of 2020.
133
11/12/2020 10:58:30 17 5
bbc
If he has been infected twice he is one of about 5 people in 50 million infections. Perhaps he was not infected the first time, but had similar symptoms and assumed he was, or else had a false positive test..
240
11/12/2020 12:09:04 4 1
bbc
You need to ask this person to call the WHO, there have only been a handful of confirmed reinfections globally (https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/11/more-people-are-getting-covid-19-twice-suggesting-immunity-wanes-quickly-some) getting it twice is astronomically rare and is worthy of scientific study.
327
11/12/2020 13:52:08 2 0
bbc
Antibodies have little to do with viral infections; it is the CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells that are important.
40
11/12/2020 10:17:32 35 34
bbc
This has nothing to do with scientific advice. It says to me locking students up was totally unnecessary as they aren't major carriers. Just like shutting down the economy for something that adversely effect less than 2% of the population.
77
11/12/2020 10:27:54 10 1
bbc
20 students have lost a parent to covid in the college where I work. That's not normal in any year.
110
11/12/2020 10:46:25 2 7
bbc
i actually do not believe you.
78
11/12/2020 10:29:05 14 15
bbc
Strange. I'm sure I can remember mask fanatics blaming "irresponsible, selfish" students for spreading the virus.
So much moralising, so little science from the maskies.
102
11/12/2020 10:40:19 4 3
bbc
Students have obviously worked hard to change their behaviour since September and and I have no problem congratulating them and thanking them for their efforts.
131
Zig
11/12/2020 10:58:04 5 0
bbc
So I guess you blame the "maskies". Well I suppose it makes it easy for you to identify them. Same old blame game.
29
11/12/2020 10:11:03 15 14
bbc
This whole project fear,lockdowns and economy wrecking has to stop now Politicians have to realise no one is listening anymore if anyone is scared of the virus it is their own personal responsibility to shield themselves everybody else needs to be allowed to get on with a normal life
79
11/12/2020 10:30:25 7 2
bbc
It is impossible to only shield high risk people. You should look into why that is to understand it more. It's always been hard for high risk people, even before covid came along. Most people have no idea how lucky they are to have full health, they take it all for granted every day
27
11/12/2020 10:09:08 24 14
bbc
Students went to University in August and cases in local areas skyrocketed by this is can be hypothesized that students were to blame. To test them 2 months later to see if they are infected now does not disprove this it merely says they are not the current cause of cases, unless they also do antibody tests that shows they have had a low incidence of infection then these statements are incorrect
80
11/12/2020 10:30:34 3 1
bbc
Autumn term & semester 1 started 28 September 2020.
Covid: A mild illness slightly less bad than a cold that does sometimes affect already seriously ill people. Human immune system 99.9997% effective with no side effects.

The Pfizer vaccine, so far:

8+ PEOPLE DEAD
1 WOMEN WHO CANT WALK
4 FACES PARALYZED
2 ANAPHYLACTIC REACTIONS
1 LIFE THREATENING FEVER
1 ACUTE ENCEPHALOPATHY

All about money, and not into the hands of the good and honest.
Removed
81
11/12/2020 10:30:44 2 4
bbc
I think you're telling a few porkies there. Are you a remoaner by any chance, swapping project fear's attention from Brexit to vaccines?
82
11/12/2020 10:30:46 33 2
bbc
It is pleasing the rate of infection amongst students is now so low. The more informed comments on here are correct. In my Northern university city there was an explosion of cases in late September - all centred on the areas of the city where students live. This wave spread out like ripples in a pond to outer suburbs over a period of months. Now the student areas have hardly any cases at all.
103
11/12/2020 10:40:44 9 22
bbc
I'd like to see your evidence. The surge in cases as students returned would have been too early given the min 2 week incubation period. Recent data suggests that the second surge was more to do with "ordinary people" just not doing the right things, again and again. Students being young and slightly foolish were always a convenient scapegoat for the jealous old.
122
11/12/2020 10:52:28 2 4
bbc
Autumn term and Semester One both started on Monday 28 September, so given its 2 week incubation period you need to look closer to home for virus spreading causes (eat-out, pubs, parties etc).
188
11/12/2020 11:32:34 0 7
bbc
I do love a good anecdote
269
11/12/2020 12:33:32 0 0
bbc
verbal gbh....no thanks...next
Covid: A mild illness slightly less bad than a cold that does sometimes affect already seriously ill people. Human immune system 99.9997% effective with no side effects.

The Pfizer vaccine, so far:

8+ PEOPLE DEAD
1 WOMEN WHO CANT WALK
4 FACES PARALYZED
2 ANAPHYLACTIC REACTIONS
1 LIFE THREATENING FEVER
1 ACUTE ENCEPHALOPATHY

All about money, and not into the hands of the good and honest.
Removed
83
11/12/2020 10:31:21 2 0
bbc
We know about the 2 nurses allergic reaction. What is your source for the others you mention?
84
11/12/2020 10:31:31 1 2
bbc
ssshhhh the paper's rhetoric doesn't want to know
44
11/12/2020 10:11:51 5 3
bbc
What? Oh and August was 4 months ago not 2.
85
11/12/2020 10:31:37 1 2
bbc
September, October, November, December. 4 months ago.
68
11/12/2020 10:25:17 55 6
bbc
Can the BBC please start publishing daily the number of people vaccinated? They’ve been more than happy to keep the fear up with death figures, let’s have a regular “good news” bulletin please
86
11/12/2020 10:32:04 32 33
bbc
But that would spoil it for the remoaners, who assured us that the roll out would be a shambles due to Boris being in charge.
115
11/12/2020 10:49:04 13 7
bbc
your response is laughable . must be hard to see clearly with such tunnel vision
182
11/12/2020 11:29:51 4 3
bbc
Worse economic slump in g7, some of the highest rates in the world. Remind me why we didn’t test foreign visitors flying in from China, US, Europe?

Test and trace costs 12bn and barely works, telegraph (Boris ex boss) reported today that gvnmnt sprayed 20bn away, throwing at wall to see what sticks.

So yeah.
205
VoR
11/12/2020 11:44:56 1 2
bbc
It is kind of a shambles. The problems with getting vaccinations, which we knew might well require (extreme) refrigeration, to care homes, where we knew they would be sorely needed, are but one example.

It is being sorted out, but it is an example of poor planning.
267
11/12/2020 12:32:59 0 0
bbc
a good idea is a good idea forever...
Covid: A mild illness slightly less bad than a cold that does sometimes affect already seriously ill people. Human immune system 99.9997% effective with no side effects.

The Pfizer vaccine, so far:

8+ PEOPLE DEAD
1 WOMEN WHO CANT WALK
4 FACES PARALYZED
2 ANAPHYLACTIC REACTIONS
1 LIFE THREATENING FEVER
1 ACUTE ENCEPHALOPATHY

All about money, and not into the hands of the good and honest.
Removed
87
11/12/2020 10:32:09 2 0
bbc
can you reference your figures please
68
11/12/2020 10:25:17 55 6
bbc
Can the BBC please start publishing daily the number of people vaccinated? They’ve been more than happy to keep the fear up with death figures, let’s have a regular “good news” bulletin please
88
11/12/2020 10:32:26 10 0
bbc
Not sure that this would even be a figure that the government would know (let alone the BBC), the NHS systems do not reliably interlink, death figures come from death certificates; which is more reliably recorded.

The entire UK public statistics system needs a serious overhaul - something this pandemic has shown to be a substantial issue.
Fat old boomers who can't wear masks properly and have no regard for rules. Truly the entitled generation. Removed
89
11/12/2020 10:33:08 3 0
bbc
I think you will find people of all generations, backgrounds, and sizes are to blame, stop being a hypocritical bigot.
76
11/12/2020 10:27:23 32 17
bbc
I'm glad that she recovered, hopefully no long term effects.

However, what is not fully understood is how long the antibodies generated from infection last and what the effect of different strains are.

A colleague of my son has been infected twice. Upon the second infection, his whole family were infected and unfortunately he lost his father to the disease.

Tell you daughter to stay safe.
90
11/12/2020 10:33:46 11 16
bbc
“Stay safe”. The most sinister phrase of 2020.
153
11/12/2020 11:11:25 7 10
bbc
Indeed! The speed in which society has given up significant freedoms is startling. But as long as everyone is perfectly safe at all times everywhere, totally worth it....
294
11/12/2020 12:49:45 1 1
bbc
Nope

"No need for a mask!" is worse...
15
Lee
11/12/2020 10:03:51 3 11
bbc
Depends if it’s the 30min test as they are useless, my sister had the 30min test came back negative, she also had the proper one that takes a day or so and was positive AND she knows she has covid before the test as she feels so ill like nothing she’s had before
91
11/12/2020 10:34:03 2 0
bbc
Could be flu, could be anything.
8
11/12/2020 10:00:06 9 1
bbc
where I work, far fewer cases than in local community. and almost no freshers' flu due to all the precautions for covid.
92
11/12/2020 10:34:14 1 1
bbc
Ditto
72
11/12/2020 10:26:20 3 8
bbc
It is because the virus is endemic and there is absolutely nothing we can do about it. It is why no measures work. There is no point crippling our economy any more. Vaccine or no vaccine.
93
11/12/2020 10:35:23 7 0
bbc
So what you are saying is, there was no enormous decline in the rate of cases following measures.

We've eliminated numerous infectious diseases over the years (Smallpox even on a global scale). Claiming we can't eliminate an endemic virus is incorrect.
40
11/12/2020 10:17:32 35 34
bbc
This has nothing to do with scientific advice. It says to me locking students up was totally unnecessary as they aren't major carriers. Just like shutting down the economy for something that adversely effect less than 2% of the population.
94
11/12/2020 10:35:56 9 5
bbc
Yes, but you are a muppet.
111
11/12/2020 10:46:52 1 5
bbc
such an intelligent response
95
11/12/2020 10:36:12 1 5
bbc
Probably because you got rid of alcohol in your student Union you boring muppets
2
11/12/2020 09:56:30 107 24
bbc
Good news.

It's time to stop vilifying students.
96
11/12/2020 10:36:33 46 3
bbc
Yes, that was a disgraceful episode.

So who are the people that are dying? Serious question. The vast majority are over 70, but who are they? Who do they catch it off? I've seen 1 in 6 cases are caught in hospital (which is bad) but where do the other 5 get it?
123
11/12/2020 10:52:55 21 8
bbc
I agree . I would also like to know how many positive cases result in hospitalisation, and the ages of the hospitalised. If you look at the BBC 'deathtoll' graph on the news it says 'dies for any reason after testing positive ' . which translates into 'not all of these people died from covid but we will give you the impression that they did'
174
11/12/2020 11:26:34 2 0
bbc
Other people.
239
11/12/2020 12:19:05 2 0
bbc
In the community off family and friends. I've seen several cases who we know and lo and behold they were mixing with family, wondered why they got it! Ppl think it won't happen to them ??
326
11/12/2020 13:50:38 1 0
bbc
The average age of a covid death is 82, so as a man, with an average age of death of 79.4 years, I am hoping to die of covid.
44
11/12/2020 10:11:51 5 3
bbc
What? Oh and August was 4 months ago not 2.
97
11/12/2020 10:36:37 6 2
bbc
You are actually just reinforcing my point that test them and find they arent infected months later does not disprove the idea they contributed to the spread when they returned to university.

Without doing antibody tests to show if they had the virus and recovered or not does not allow you to say they were not a factor in increased cases in certain local areas.
98
11/12/2020 10:37:06 3 4
bbc
One university in the south-west of England is hardly a representative sample, let's see the same figures for Universities in large metropolitan areas.
106
11/12/2020 10:42:37 2 3
bbc
From what I've heard about Scottish Universities the same is true. The biggest risk is that the students will go home, meet with the real culprits and bring covid back to the Unis in the new year.
108
11/12/2020 10:43:55 2 0
bbc
Portsmouth, Reading and Cambridge - three universities, none of which are in the south-west.
Covid: A mild illness slightly less bad than a cold that does sometimes affect already seriously ill people. Human immune system 99.9997% effective with no side effects.

The Pfizer vaccine, so far:

8+ PEOPLE DEAD
1 WOMEN WHO CANT WALK
4 FACES PARALYZED
2 ANAPHYLACTIC REACTIONS
1 LIFE THREATENING FEVER
1 ACUTE ENCEPHALOPATHY

All about money, and not into the hands of the good and honest.
Removed
99
11/12/2020 10:38:13 1 0
bbc
Evidence please.
49
11/12/2020 10:19:23 7 1
bbc
And when students travel home and then return to universities in the Ne Year there it’s highly likely that infection rates will increase as a consequence of people from across the country mixing
It’s not the fault of students or their lifestyle but inevitable when people travel and mix with others
100
11/12/2020 10:38:19 10 1
bbc
I agree, but people on here are implying that students were not a factor in any way when they are, along with all the rule breakers, selfish people who don't wear a mask and people who demanded a holiday then brought back a new strain with them when they couldnt be bothered to isolate.