Coronavirus: NHS Covid-19 app starts offering self-isolate payments
10/12/2020 | news | technology | 380
Users of the app in England and Wales can now apply for £500 if eligible.
1
Why
10/12/2020 15:21:24 6 2
bbc
Kerching!
3
10/12/2020 15:26:07 5 1
bbc
This could lead to many more people testing positive
2
10/12/2020 15:25:35 8 5
bbc
Give it three weeks for the Protect Scotland app to offer £400 and it'll be the best thing since sliced bread's grandparents. Jacinda Ardern and Tsai Ing-wen will be phoning Sturgeon seeking guidance.
33
10/12/2020 15:53:47 2 1
bbc
Implementation date: Burns night Jan 2021..

Got to max out the tartan points (PS I'm Scottish..)
1
Why
10/12/2020 15:21:24 6 2
bbc
Kerching!
3
10/12/2020 15:26:07 5 1
bbc
This could lead to many more people testing positive
38
10/12/2020 15:56:20 1 1
bbc
Kerching!
4
10/12/2020 15:28:13 83 16
bbc
people that work who have to self isolate get nothing even though it is them losing pay and then struggle, and the people who are on benefits that wont be affected by getting less get £500 extra. it doesn't make sense to me.
36
10/12/2020 15:55:18 38 31
bbc
It's bribery of the poor, to increase case numbers.
152
10/12/2020 17:27:17 15 2
bbc
It's to be paid to those who work but are on low incomes and claim tax credits to top up. A lot of these people are on zero hours contracts or other tenuous emplyment terms and are likely to earn zero money if they self isolate.
191
10/12/2020 17:55:32 4 1
bbc
It's a curious anomoly. You should always defer to your Local Council when National knocks you back.

An acute hospital admission costs at around £4,600 per day and is averaged at 11 days for Covid.

I'm not saying everyone should get help but it might be an idea if Govt. are serious.
211
10/12/2020 18:19:42 1 3
bbc
people who work and are on Universal Credits may get the payment if they meet the conditions. Then at the end of their monthly assessment period when the Universal credit is assessed again they will get more due to having lower wages the £500 is fully disregarded. Bonkers who thought this one through!
277
10/12/2020 19:11:18 1 5
bbc
“People that work”
It’s no surprise to me it doesn’t make sense to you. Like your opinion you’re probably limited.
5
10/12/2020 15:28:13 50 23
bbc
Nope, I'm still not going to download it.
18
10/12/2020 15:43:53 25 20
bbc
But you use the internet ?
154
10/12/2020 17:27:31 6 6
bbc
I hadn't even considered it.

the only thing that the BBC reports on that I have a connection with, are solar eclipses. because I can see them. other than that, I live in the world, not the BBC world.
332
10/12/2020 21:10:44 0 0
bbc
Another one who sees doing as they like as far more important than possibly causing the deaths of others.
6
10/12/2020 15:32:12 57 25
bbc
Simple don't use the app, don't lose 2 weeks pay.
317
10/12/2020 20:54:19 3 2
bbc
You clearly don’t worry about spreading the virus to your family or friends
327
10/12/2020 21:08:06 0 1
bbc
...infect your granny & kill her, then blame the government for not being informed by Track & Trace .
7
jay
10/12/2020 15:33:17 22 10
bbc
sorry this app is incompatible with your device , apple and android didn't realise we cant all afford 500 quid phones
23
10/12/2020 15:47:21 14 2
bbc
The problem is that the app feature specifications require technology that is only in newer phones.
While I’m sure Apple and Android are quite happy at the incentive for people to upgrade - the option was never there to make the app work on older models.
66
10/12/2020 16:12:57 5 2
bbc
I have a 5 year old, £100 phone running it just fine
262
me
10/12/2020 19:01:37 0 1
bbc
Yes, I and many of my friends use older iPhones so cannot download the app. We are in the main older people, who’ve decided not to buy in to these ever increasing phone prices when the phones are very flimsy and clearly not worth their costs. We also understand our phones and so like to stick with what we know. I’m sure the government could lean on apple if they really wanted to make this work.
Buy a £20 Nokia1 on ebay you cretin Removed
8
10/12/2020 15:33:49 0 1
bbc
Every little, helps.
9
10/12/2020 15:34:14 41 4
bbc
This will be hacked to within an inch of its existence.
11
10/12/2020 15:38:48 40 29
bbc
And there in lies the reason why there have been so many deaths here in the UK.

People would rather hack the system than use its ability to protect others.

The selfishness of people is relentless.
10
10/12/2020 15:35:59 4 4
bbc
With no national ID card scheme (unlike nearly every single developed country), organising payments like this without there being any fraud is basically impossible. And who was it that scrapped the ID card scheme idea? The Tories!
13
10/12/2020 15:39:21 11 1
bbc
Your national insurance number is equally as effective. Literally everyone in the country above the age of 18 has one except for tourists. That's income identification for every eligible person without exception.
22
10/12/2020 15:46:04 0 1
bbc
Nice try.
55
10/12/2020 16:05:10 1 2
bbc
I wonder how many anti vaxxers, XR proponents, BLM, and general Jeremy Corbyn followers would actually have got their card even if it were compulsory!
250
Ade
10/12/2020 18:54:17 0 1
bbc
One of the better things they did, we do not want an I.D card, we are already getting to be a police state.
9
10/12/2020 15:34:14 41 4
bbc
This will be hacked to within an inch of its existence.
11
10/12/2020 15:38:48 40 29
bbc
And there in lies the reason why there have been so many deaths here in the UK.

People would rather hack the system than use its ability to protect others.

The selfishness of people is relentless.
15
10/12/2020 15:41:06 12 1
bbc
To think it's only UK citizens attempting to hack/attack is naive.
151
10/12/2020 17:25:12 1 3
bbc
don't blame the player
230
TC
10/12/2020 18:43:11 1 3
bbc
It has no ability to protect others. Engage with diligent hand hygiene and if at risk of serious ill-effects from Covid avoid contact with others as much as practicable.

Responsibility rests upon the individual to minimise personal risk. Only people with symptoms possibly attributable to Covid have moral obligation to self-isolate as they might for ordinary 'flu.
242
10/12/2020 18:52:19 1 4
bbc
hows the back of the settee looking son?
12
10/12/2020 15:39:02 18 6
bbc
Why has it taken nine months to set up something as simple as a one use code system for payment. Done properly it wouldn't even need a smart phone.
Because it's been designed by an upper class over privileged idiot with connections Removed
10
10/12/2020 15:35:59 4 4
bbc
With no national ID card scheme (unlike nearly every single developed country), organising payments like this without there being any fraud is basically impossible. And who was it that scrapped the ID card scheme idea? The Tories!
13
10/12/2020 15:39:21 11 1
bbc
Your national insurance number is equally as effective. Literally everyone in the country above the age of 18 has one except for tourists. That's income identification for every eligible person without exception.
19
10/12/2020 15:44:37 1 6
bbc
And on Bluetooth, literally anyone in the country (including tourists) can hack your NI number.........
20
10/12/2020 15:44:49 3 1
bbc
Sorry, I mean age 16 not 18.
14
10/12/2020 15:40:40 14 5
bbc
Sign me up

If it works as well as expected I might get £12bn
77
10/12/2020 16:24:47 10 6
bbc
Only if your are a shareholder of Serco
285
10/12/2020 19:19:01 0 1
bbc
Shame that £1 billion will be the price of a loaf of bread.
11
10/12/2020 15:38:48 40 29
bbc
And there in lies the reason why there have been so many deaths here in the UK.

People would rather hack the system than use its ability to protect others.

The selfishness of people is relentless.
15
10/12/2020 15:41:06 12 1
bbc
To think it's only UK citizens attempting to hack/attack is naive.
59
10/12/2020 16:07:10 3 5
bbc
Nigerians and Dutch...
16
10/12/2020 15:42:10 0 8
bbc
And don't tell me, all they will need to give you the £500 grant if you are eligable is your bank details! Secure, this NHS Track and Trace is it WHEN IT RELIES ON BLUETOOTH, the least secure method of data transfer?................................
31
10/12/2020 15:52:38 4 2
bbc
It really is true, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing!
71
10/12/2020 16:16:54 0 1
bbc
The app uses Bluetooth to listen for and assess the strength of signals all phones broadcast so it can estimate distances from other phones. Each phone has a unique identifier (it's how bt works so you can pair speakers and hands free kits) and the app knows how long you've been in the presence of that other signal. No personal info is shared and your bank details aren't being transmitted on it.
17
10/12/2020 15:42:30 61 33
bbc
Remember the "Covid parties" that students had a few months back? Now people on benefits will be able to hold them and make a fortune.
Stench by name and stench by comment - exactly how will they make a fortune?

Hardly in the same league as Tory cronyism. Please vent your anger to the right people.
Removed
325
10/12/2020 21:08:44 0 0
bbc
Please remove this far right wing post. The evidence shows the rich are responsible for superspreading not the poor, from Sky News parties to Trump events.
5
10/12/2020 15:28:13 50 23
bbc
Nope, I'm still not going to download it.
18
10/12/2020 15:43:53 25 20
bbc
But you use the internet ?
45
10/12/2020 15:59:12 19 4
bbc
The internet doesn’t order you to stay at home or impose a £1000 fine for going out based on you being in the same place as an infected perso or your phone connecting to another phone by Bluetooth
104
10/12/2020 16:46:07 15 2
bbc
You are able to use the internet without a smart phone you know!
13
10/12/2020 15:39:21 11 1
bbc
Your national insurance number is equally as effective. Literally everyone in the country above the age of 18 has one except for tourists. That's income identification for every eligible person without exception.
19
10/12/2020 15:44:37 1 6
bbc
And on Bluetooth, literally anyone in the country (including tourists) can hack your NI number.........
27
10/12/2020 15:49:41 5 1
bbc
You really have no idea how this technology, or in fact NI numbers work. No, they cannot be "hacked" over Bluetooth if the developers are worth even half their salt. Why would Bluetooth even come into an online application? It wouldn't.

We have identity checks, you can't just put someone else's NI number on your application, it would just get rejected.
35
10/12/2020 15:55:12 1 1
bbc
Once again;

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing
13
10/12/2020 15:39:21 11 1
bbc
Your national insurance number is equally as effective. Literally everyone in the country above the age of 18 has one except for tourists. That's income identification for every eligible person without exception.
20
10/12/2020 15:44:49 3 1
bbc
Sorry, I mean age 16 not 18.
21
pTc
10/12/2020 15:44:49 0 11
bbc
£500 for two weeks is nothing. I need £900 a month for my SHARE of the bills. Working the other two weeks is likely £400 after taxes, of paid in the same month. So I can live, but not eat, drink or fill up the car to get to work. Smashing.
24
10/12/2020 15:47:29 13 2
bbc
You won't need to fill; up the car to get to work, you'll be isolating! ??
29
10/12/2020 15:51:11 4 1
bbc
By your own reckoning, you would earn £800, if you worked the full month.
63
10/12/2020 16:10:46 3 1
bbc
If your net income is £400 for two weeks work, then you're not paying income taxes at all as you're not earning enough to breach the personal allowance. As for NI, at that same rate you'd be paying £10.05 per month. A £500 grant for two weeks of not working is therefore profitable for you.
87
10/12/2020 16:32:23 2 1
bbc
Well just do a Tebbit then and get on your bike and go and live somewhere you can afford.
Not my view, just a typical Tories. Because it's your fault if you can't live within your means
10
10/12/2020 15:35:59 4 4
bbc
With no national ID card scheme (unlike nearly every single developed country), organising payments like this without there being any fraud is basically impossible. And who was it that scrapped the ID card scheme idea? The Tories!
22
10/12/2020 15:46:04 0 1
bbc
Nice try.
7
jay
10/12/2020 15:33:17 22 10
bbc
sorry this app is incompatible with your device , apple and android didn't realise we cant all afford 500 quid phones
23
10/12/2020 15:47:21 14 2
bbc
The problem is that the app feature specifications require technology that is only in newer phones.
While I’m sure Apple and Android are quite happy at the incentive for people to upgrade - the option was never there to make the app work on older models.
21
pTc
10/12/2020 15:44:49 0 11
bbc
£500 for two weeks is nothing. I need £900 a month for my SHARE of the bills. Working the other two weeks is likely £400 after taxes, of paid in the same month. So I can live, but not eat, drink or fill up the car to get to work. Smashing.
24
10/12/2020 15:47:29 13 2
bbc
You won't need to fill; up the car to get to work, you'll be isolating! ??
34
10/12/2020 15:54:37 1 8
bbc
still needs to fill up the car after isolation and with less/no money coming in how do you think he will do that? With magic beans?
25
10/12/2020 15:48:15 0 4
bbc
or a spoons voucher if preferred
26
10/12/2020 15:48:43 3 5
bbc
If people followed the rules, this app wouldn't be needed - now the people who don't follow them get a £500 incentive?
30
10/12/2020 15:52:21 3 1
bbc
The people following rules get a £500 incentive too. Potentially the people breaking the rules get an extra £1000 fine (if caught)
58
10/12/2020 16:06:58 1 2
bbc
I've read this statment so many times. but its horse radish.

at some point people became entangled in the phrase "if we follow the rules"

what rules? the rules that are being made up as they go along?

it isn't "rules=good", "not rules=bad"
73
10/12/2020 16:17:53 1 1
bbc
To follow the rules people need to be able to support themelves!!!!!!
19
10/12/2020 15:44:37 1 6
bbc
And on Bluetooth, literally anyone in the country (including tourists) can hack your NI number.........
27
10/12/2020 15:49:41 5 1
bbc
You really have no idea how this technology, or in fact NI numbers work. No, they cannot be "hacked" over Bluetooth if the developers are worth even half their salt. Why would Bluetooth even come into an online application? It wouldn't.

We have identity checks, you can't just put someone else's NI number on your application, it would just get rejected.
28
10/12/2020 15:50:21 6 5
bbc
I don’t know when the penny is going to drop with some people. I have had to isolate twice, the 2nd time as I had Covid-19, not very nice. 2nd day back to work and I’m shouted at by a person as I was wearing a mask. I’m doing it to protect others.
46
10/12/2020 15:59:45 4 12
bbc
Not entirely true, you are wearing a mask to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed, and thus giving our political leaders something to crow about when it's all over.
117
10/12/2020 17:00:51 0 1
bbc
21
pTc
10/12/2020 15:44:49 0 11
bbc
£500 for two weeks is nothing. I need £900 a month for my SHARE of the bills. Working the other two weeks is likely £400 after taxes, of paid in the same month. So I can live, but not eat, drink or fill up the car to get to work. Smashing.
29
10/12/2020 15:51:11 4 1
bbc
By your own reckoning, you would earn £800, if you worked the full month.
26
10/12/2020 15:48:43 3 5
bbc
If people followed the rules, this app wouldn't be needed - now the people who don't follow them get a £500 incentive?
30
10/12/2020 15:52:21 3 1
bbc
The people following rules get a £500 incentive too. Potentially the people breaking the rules get an extra £1000 fine (if caught)
16
10/12/2020 15:42:10 0 8
bbc
And don't tell me, all they will need to give you the £500 grant if you are eligable is your bank details! Secure, this NHS Track and Trace is it WHEN IT RELIES ON BLUETOOTH, the least secure method of data transfer?................................
31
10/12/2020 15:52:38 4 2
bbc
It really is true, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing!
32
10/12/2020 15:53:40 19 4
bbc
Some People will see this and wantonly breach social distancing rules, in an attempt to get the self-isolation notification and cash in!
101
10/12/2020 16:40:39 14 1
bbc
And not subsequently self isolate . . . . .
335
10/12/2020 21:13:00 0 0
bbc
One can but hope they also get something else...
2
10/12/2020 15:25:35 8 5
bbc
Give it three weeks for the Protect Scotland app to offer £400 and it'll be the best thing since sliced bread's grandparents. Jacinda Ardern and Tsai Ing-wen will be phoning Sturgeon seeking guidance.
33
10/12/2020 15:53:47 2 1
bbc
Implementation date: Burns night Jan 2021..

Got to max out the tartan points (PS I'm Scottish..)
24
10/12/2020 15:47:29 13 2
bbc
You won't need to fill; up the car to get to work, you'll be isolating! ??
34
10/12/2020 15:54:37 1 8
bbc
still needs to fill up the car after isolation and with less/no money coming in how do you think he will do that? With magic beans?
19
10/12/2020 15:44:37 1 6
bbc
And on Bluetooth, literally anyone in the country (including tourists) can hack your NI number.........
35
10/12/2020 15:55:12 1 1
bbc
Once again;

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing
4
10/12/2020 15:28:13 83 16
bbc
people that work who have to self isolate get nothing even though it is them losing pay and then struggle, and the people who are on benefits that wont be affected by getting less get £500 extra. it doesn't make sense to me.
36
10/12/2020 15:55:18 38 31
bbc
It's bribery of the poor, to increase case numbers.
37
10/12/2020 15:55:59 7 6
bbc
The career unemployed have had no change to there financial situation and will not have to be part of the repayment squeeze. If we have to pay more tax they should get less benefits. All in it together!
82
10/12/2020 16:30:06 3 2
bbc
As one of what you call "The career unemployed", I have to say that your tar-brush does not apply to all. Excluded from the workforce when I had chemo for cancer, exclusion extended when I relapsed and had a stem cell transplant, and despite remission since then I've been holed up in iso at home for what's now 270 consecutive days due to C-19. I don't qualify for a single penny of financial help.
3
10/12/2020 15:26:07 5 1
bbc
This could lead to many more people testing positive
38
10/12/2020 15:56:20 1 1
bbc
Kerching!
39
10/12/2020 15:56:30 19 9
bbc
I was under the impression that self isolation is compulsory: it's the law that you do it... Why the hell are we paying people to simply not break the law?

If you're self isolating, you're essentially off work sick, whether it's precautionary or due to actual illness is immaterial. Sick pay is already available.

Absolutely shocking. The 'grant' should be not getting fined.
54
10/12/2020 16:05:05 1 3
bbc
in soviet russia, you infect covid
69
10/12/2020 16:15:54 6 2
bbc
It is so they can still pay for things when they can't work and not covered under a sickness absence scheme. SSP does not cover much, go and do some research. Mortgages, rent, food, fuel and light. Mow much money do you think SSP provides? And if you aren't on UC already it takes 5 weeks minimum for anything to come through. In the meantime........?
79
10/12/2020 16:27:25 3 1
bbc
As someone training to be union rep - Self isolation is not the same as being infected. You are essentially still classed as being able still to work. You'll get paid by statutory sick pay but not what by the company offers in it's sick pay policy.
237
TC
10/12/2020 18:48:23 0 1
bbc
Bad law is circumvented by people with greater sense than those who legislated it.
40
10/12/2020 15:56:55 2 1
bbc
We seem to have come a long way from the previous quarantine rules during the black death, where the authorities nailed up your doors and painted a red cross on the door to tell others to stay away.
52
10/12/2020 16:04:32 1 2
bbc
we've progressed...

the authorities used to block up your door

now they break it down
41
10/12/2020 15:57:34 4 4
bbc
Scotland falls behind again - Devo is such a mess
68
10/12/2020 16:13:36 0 1
bbc
eh? What are you talking about? That money has to come from HM Treasury!!!!!! Think about it!
103
10/12/2020 16:45:59 0 1
bbc
So Scottish taxpayers money won't be used to prop up this mess ?
42
10/12/2020 15:57:42 38 7
bbc
Please tell me that this payment of £500 actually requires a positive Covid test by the recipient of the money? If not it's going to be massively, massively abused.
49
10/12/2020 16:03:27 27 8
bbc
no

there is a very secure method in place with two-factor authentication when you apply

it says

"do you want to apply yes/no"

two factor authentication is in place with the message "are you sure?"
50
10/12/2020 16:03:35 7 3
bbc
Like everything in this pandemic. Makes me laugh how some people (self employed) and businesses reporting being very busy, yet claiming SE grant (almost £30k for the year!) or still furloughing staff!!! Fishing obviously to blame for all of this ridiculous giveaway to some whilst some earning nothing can’t claim!!
244
Jb
10/12/2020 18:52:44 2 1
bbc
If it's simply anyone who has been in proximity then every train journey could deliver a £500 bonus - as long as you stay close to other people! Complete madness. 80% of people will take the cash and not self isolate.
43
Why
10/12/2020 15:58:35 4 4
bbc
If I climb this magic money tree will I see Boris in his white Y fronts cooking his ready made turkey meal?
138
10/12/2020 17:16:01 2 1
bbc
Ugh that's an image I don't want to see
44
10/12/2020 15:58:44 13 9
bbc
Bbc should stop reporting government propaganda as fact regardless of allegiances of a series of director generals.

Stop calling it the nhs app when it’s the serco test, track and trace app. This is important as the nhs are having their reputation ruined by awful contractors grabbing huge sums for no product
18
10/12/2020 15:43:53 25 20
bbc
But you use the internet ?
45
10/12/2020 15:59:12 19 4
bbc
The internet doesn’t order you to stay at home or impose a £1000 fine for going out based on you being in the same place as an infected perso or your phone connecting to another phone by Bluetooth
376
11/12/2020 11:57:51 0 0
bbc
You clearly missed the point about the internet, also how can an App which doesn't know who you are tell you what to do or fine you? I for one would like to be informed if I been near someone with Covid so I can do my part in getting this pandemic under control.
28
10/12/2020 15:50:21 6 5
bbc
I don’t know when the penny is going to drop with some people. I have had to isolate twice, the 2nd time as I had Covid-19, not very nice. 2nd day back to work and I’m shouted at by a person as I was wearing a mask. I’m doing it to protect others.
46
10/12/2020 15:59:45 4 12
bbc
Not entirely true, you are wearing a mask to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed, and thus giving our political leaders something to crow about when it's all over.
72
10/12/2020 16:17:07 3 1
bbc
Not forgetting at the beginning they were telling us masks were useless!!!!!
Protecting others is what prevents the NHS from getting overwhelmed.
47
10/12/2020 16:02:04 1 3
bbc
there is absolutely no backdoors or s/w vulnerabilities, or ways that this could be exploited

my nose just broke my monitor.
48
10/12/2020 16:03:24 3 3
bbc
Can I apply for the £500 on each occasion that I am told to self isolate? Asking for a friend.....
42
10/12/2020 15:57:42 38 7
bbc
Please tell me that this payment of £500 actually requires a positive Covid test by the recipient of the money? If not it's going to be massively, massively abused.
49
10/12/2020 16:03:27 27 8
bbc
no

there is a very secure method in place with two-factor authentication when you apply

it says

"do you want to apply yes/no"

two factor authentication is in place with the message "are you sure?"
114
10/12/2020 16:57:52 1 2
bbc
I don't know if I should of but you comment made me laugh!

But also see your point!
131
37p
10/12/2020 17:12:24 3 3
bbc
I'm not sure you know what two factor authentication is.

It is granting access to computer sites by validating information only the user knows or possesses or is such as text to a user's phone or a date of birth

It's not a drop-down that has yes or no!
42
10/12/2020 15:57:42 38 7
bbc
Please tell me that this payment of £500 actually requires a positive Covid test by the recipient of the money? If not it's going to be massively, massively abused.
50
10/12/2020 16:03:35 7 3
bbc
Like everything in this pandemic. Makes me laugh how some people (self employed) and businesses reporting being very busy, yet claiming SE grant (almost £30k for the year!) or still furloughing staff!!! Fishing obviously to blame for all of this ridiculous giveaway to some whilst some earning nothing can’t claim!!
252
Jb
10/12/2020 18:54:42 1 2
bbc
Yes many people eg tradesmen are busier than ever, but claiming the cash on top. Double bubble!
51
Bob
10/12/2020 16:03:41 5 4
bbc
Will they send me a phone that it works on then?
40
10/12/2020 15:56:55 2 1
bbc
We seem to have come a long way from the previous quarantine rules during the black death, where the authorities nailed up your doors and painted a red cross on the door to tell others to stay away.
52
10/12/2020 16:04:32 1 2
bbc
we've progressed...

the authorities used to block up your door

now they break it down
53
10/12/2020 16:04:34 131 21
bbc
OMG, Pick me up off the floor. My daughter who works in care had to isolate, she applied for the grant so she could pay her rent, she got turned down because she wasn't on benefits. I have had to bail her out. She works in care, she is a key worker, yet they can't even support her when she is put at risk through her job.

Just do me a favour, bog off with the propaganda, it doesn't cut it no more.
159
10/12/2020 17:30:21 31 14
bbc
More government rubbish
186
10/12/2020 17:48:32 15 1
bbc
There's something not quite right here. You're on benefits whether you are claiming or not or working or not working. Crazy isn't it but the excuse for a turn down is not correct. She is entitked and should go at it again. Little else to do. Talk to the Council. They know what's what. It just frustrating on the phone for initial contact.

Your daughter is entitled to help if not getting sick pay.
282
xlr
10/12/2020 19:15:30 1 4
bbc
If your daughter had been Scottish she'd just have gotten £500 for being a care worker. No need to apply and be refused.
316
10/12/2020 20:50:35 1 6
bbc
Exactly the same thing happened with my son. So annoying, the government are blatantly pro benefits and anti work to look after yourself and others. Sick of this country.
352
11/12/2020 02:11:54 0 2
bbc
"Just do me a favour, bog off with the propaganda, it doesn't cut it no more"

You'd be very surprised just how stoopid people are, I don't see advertisers stopping with their propaganda any time soon, as it works as intended. Let's face it, people are thick, the UK population especially so, too much booze I think.

If you want to see propaganda, cast your mind back to September 2001
367
11/12/2020 08:53:43 0 0
bbc
That's ridiculously unfair.
372
Jay
11/12/2020 09:22:46 1 0
bbc
They should have just paid everyone the flat rate regardless of their financial situation. It would have been cheaper than extending furlough and lock downs.

This idea that anyone who isn't on benefits can afford not to work for two weeks is ridiculous.
39
10/12/2020 15:56:30 19 9
bbc
I was under the impression that self isolation is compulsory: it's the law that you do it... Why the hell are we paying people to simply not break the law?

If you're self isolating, you're essentially off work sick, whether it's precautionary or due to actual illness is immaterial. Sick pay is already available.

Absolutely shocking. The 'grant' should be not getting fined.
54
10/12/2020 16:05:05 1 3
bbc
in soviet russia, you infect covid
10
10/12/2020 15:35:59 4 4
bbc
With no national ID card scheme (unlike nearly every single developed country), organising payments like this without there being any fraud is basically impossible. And who was it that scrapped the ID card scheme idea? The Tories!
55
10/12/2020 16:05:10 1 2
bbc
I wonder how many anti vaxxers, XR proponents, BLM, and general Jeremy Corbyn followers would actually have got their card even if it were compulsory!
And right wing idiots like you Removed
56
10/12/2020 16:05:40 4 2
bbc
Rishi Sunak giving me nothing to isolate or at anytime, so have no option at present.....
57
Bob
10/12/2020 16:06:26 8 8
bbc
I would catch Covid again for £500, well worth it.
26
10/12/2020 15:48:43 3 5
bbc
If people followed the rules, this app wouldn't be needed - now the people who don't follow them get a £500 incentive?
58
10/12/2020 16:06:58 1 2
bbc
I've read this statment so many times. but its horse radish.

at some point people became entangled in the phrase "if we follow the rules"

what rules? the rules that are being made up as they go along?

it isn't "rules=good", "not rules=bad"
75
10/12/2020 16:20:22 1 1
bbc
Yes rules are being made up as we go along. How on earth do you think it can be anything else? New pandemic, long non-symptomatic incubation period, unknown extent of illness till too late. Of course the rules have to change to suit different circumstances. The problem is balancing the risk and infection consequences to the public and NHS, with that of the economy. So fine tuning is needed.
15
10/12/2020 15:41:06 12 1
bbc
To think it's only UK citizens attempting to hack/attack is naive.
59
10/12/2020 16:07:10 3 5
bbc
Nigerians and Dutch...
96
10/12/2020 16:37:21 8 4
bbc
FBI data states 90% of hacking is done in west Africa.
60
10/12/2020 16:08:43 8 4
bbc
An assumption that those on benefits can afford the later smart phones?
61
10/12/2020 16:08:58 2 2
bbc
I wonder how many will pocket that £500 quid and be off to work anyway having got themselves a nice little bonus?
67
10/12/2020 16:13:29 3 1
bbc
Almost nobody who is "off to work" is eligible for the £500 anyway.
62
10/12/2020 16:10:34 16 11
bbc
If you are not claiming some form of benefit you have no chance. I'll tell you what the best course of action is. Delete the App so you don't get caught up in this trap. £894 million for 'eat out spread it about' and all care workers get is a clap. The virus spreads because there has been little support for those who need it.

The Tory bots on here won't like the truth, they never do.
21
pTc
10/12/2020 15:44:49 0 11
bbc
£500 for two weeks is nothing. I need £900 a month for my SHARE of the bills. Working the other two weeks is likely £400 after taxes, of paid in the same month. So I can live, but not eat, drink or fill up the car to get to work. Smashing.
63
10/12/2020 16:10:46 3 1
bbc
If your net income is £400 for two weeks work, then you're not paying income taxes at all as you're not earning enough to breach the personal allowance. As for NI, at that same rate you'd be paying £10.05 per month. A £500 grant for two weeks of not working is therefore profitable for you.
64
10/12/2020 16:11:33 3 1
bbc
Why wasn't this done waaaayyyy back nearer the beginning?

It would need some quality control.
65
10/12/2020 16:12:05 2 3
bbc
If it was the government's own money . Maybe not as quick to give it away
7
jay
10/12/2020 15:33:17 22 10
bbc
sorry this app is incompatible with your device , apple and android didn't realise we cant all afford 500 quid phones
66
10/12/2020 16:12:57 5 2
bbc
I have a 5 year old, £100 phone running it just fine
61
10/12/2020 16:08:58 2 2
bbc
I wonder how many will pocket that £500 quid and be off to work anyway having got themselves a nice little bonus?
67
10/12/2020 16:13:29 3 1
bbc
Almost nobody who is "off to work" is eligible for the £500 anyway.
93
10/12/2020 16:34:33 1 1
bbc
Unless it's cash work, which is rife as it happens.
98
10/12/2020 16:37:46 0 1
bbc
So people who already stay at home, will get paid to stay at home. Okay that makes sense!! (face palm).
41
10/12/2020 15:57:34 4 4
bbc
Scotland falls behind again - Devo is such a mess
68
10/12/2020 16:13:36 0 1
bbc
eh? What are you talking about? That money has to come from HM Treasury!!!!!! Think about it!
39
10/12/2020 15:56:30 19 9
bbc
I was under the impression that self isolation is compulsory: it's the law that you do it... Why the hell are we paying people to simply not break the law?

If you're self isolating, you're essentially off work sick, whether it's precautionary or due to actual illness is immaterial. Sick pay is already available.

Absolutely shocking. The 'grant' should be not getting fined.
69
10/12/2020 16:15:54 6 2
bbc
It is so they can still pay for things when they can't work and not covered under a sickness absence scheme. SSP does not cover much, go and do some research. Mortgages, rent, food, fuel and light. Mow much money do you think SSP provides? And if you aren't on UC already it takes 5 weeks minimum for anything to come through. In the meantime........?
70
10/12/2020 16:16:15 6 8
bbc
There goes another billion or so of our money to fraudsters (mainly in the EU)
16
10/12/2020 15:42:10 0 8
bbc
And don't tell me, all they will need to give you the £500 grant if you are eligable is your bank details! Secure, this NHS Track and Trace is it WHEN IT RELIES ON BLUETOOTH, the least secure method of data transfer?................................
71
10/12/2020 16:16:54 0 1
bbc
The app uses Bluetooth to listen for and assess the strength of signals all phones broadcast so it can estimate distances from other phones. Each phone has a unique identifier (it's how bt works so you can pair speakers and hands free kits) and the app knows how long you've been in the presence of that other signal. No personal info is shared and your bank details aren't being transmitted on it.
46
10/12/2020 15:59:45 4 12
bbc
Not entirely true, you are wearing a mask to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed, and thus giving our political leaders something to crow about when it's all over.
72
10/12/2020 16:17:07 3 1
bbc
Not forgetting at the beginning they were telling us masks were useless!!!!!
Protecting others is what prevents the NHS from getting overwhelmed.
26
10/12/2020 15:48:43 3 5
bbc
If people followed the rules, this app wouldn't be needed - now the people who don't follow them get a £500 incentive?
73
10/12/2020 16:17:53 1 1
bbc
To follow the rules people need to be able to support themelves!!!!!!
74
10/12/2020 16:20:05 3 3
bbc
The Test track and trace system has cost billions never worked and outsource to Tory mates to make a fortune
58
10/12/2020 16:06:58 1 2
bbc
I've read this statment so many times. but its horse radish.

at some point people became entangled in the phrase "if we follow the rules"

what rules? the rules that are being made up as they go along?

it isn't "rules=good", "not rules=bad"
75
10/12/2020 16:20:22 1 1
bbc
Yes rules are being made up as we go along. How on earth do you think it can be anything else? New pandemic, long non-symptomatic incubation period, unknown extent of illness till too late. Of course the rules have to change to suit different circumstances. The problem is balancing the risk and infection consequences to the public and NHS, with that of the economy. So fine tuning is needed.
76
10/12/2020 16:20:33 66 2
bbc
Have they ever thought perhaps some people aren't downloading it because they don't need it?
I work from home, only see my husband, and only place I go is Tesco but that wouldn't trigger an alert anyway because you need to spend more than 15 mins with someone.
It's feasible lots of people who are retired, poorly, or just able to work from home don't feel there's any need for the app.
89
10/12/2020 16:33:07 25 2
bbc
Totally agree.
170
10/12/2020 17:35:21 4 2
bbc
Also it won't work on earlier phones, and I expect some people aren't going to buy a new phone just to run the app
210
10/12/2020 18:19:17 2 6
bbc
I think you need to consider all the millions of people who do go out. Sadly they're spreading still. My son sits on a train for over an hour a day and there's not enough distance. When he comes home we're all at risk of exposure and so on. Technology is another tool in the box (for pox).
218
TC
10/12/2020 18:33:36 4 5
bbc
The 'app' serves no useful purpose for anybody. It is best avoided. Thereby one cannot be enmeshed in an ill-considered contact tracing and isolation regimen. Covid-19 is not smallpox.
227
10/12/2020 18:40:48 3 2
bbc
Totally agree plus what about the many who cannot download the app as our phones are just too old!
271
10/12/2020 19:07:27 1 4
bbc
Unless you are on deaths door is this a situation you are happy with? We are all different but this seems like a very extreme way to live.
280
10/12/2020 19:11:46 2 2
bbc
My smartphone is too old to support the app. I am NOT going to pay for a newer one. Bog off.
293
10/12/2020 19:57:13 2 1
bbc
Another totally agree. I work from home, get shopping delivered. Live in a small village in a low Covid area (1 suspected case I've heard about all year, not confirmed)
I installed it for a trip to hospital just after the app was launched. Sat in a nearly empty train for 20 mins Moved twice. Used gel. Got 2 false alarms. (Flashed up then disappeared - known bug)

Don't trust it. Don't need it.
323
10/12/2020 21:05:44 0 1
bbc
Thats nonsense I was in Tesco and got the alert exactly there.
Sign me up

If it works as well as expected I might get £12bn
77
10/12/2020 16:24:47 10 6
bbc
Only if your are a shareholder of Serco
78
10/12/2020 16:24:55 36 14
bbc
Yet another loophole provided for the criminals to fleece more money from the Treasury and from British taxpayers.
Before that dimwit Chancellor grabs more taxpayers money, he should first recover the Billions already stolen through his carelessly created schemes.
105
10/12/2020 16:46:34 19 3
bbc
No political agenda here then!
I know three self employed people who are full of praise for their "dimwit Chancellor" for providing a life line and keeping their businesses
afloat.
Find the fraudsters, yes, but at least people who would have gone under didn't thanks to swift action.
132
10/12/2020 17:11:04 9 2
bbc
Our business would have gone under without Sunak's "carelessly created schemes". He's a dimwit, eh? "He read PPE at Lincoln College, Oxford, and later gained an MBA from Stanford University as a Fulbright Scholar." I presume you've surpassed those achievements and are therefore well qualified to determine what constitutes a 'dimwit'.
284
10/12/2020 19:17:33 0 1
bbc
I suppose if our Chancellor decides to tax the global corporates or British execs we will be closer to avoiding anarchy. History and common sense says this is unlikely.
39
10/12/2020 15:56:30 19 9
bbc
I was under the impression that self isolation is compulsory: it's the law that you do it... Why the hell are we paying people to simply not break the law?

If you're self isolating, you're essentially off work sick, whether it's precautionary or due to actual illness is immaterial. Sick pay is already available.

Absolutely shocking. The 'grant' should be not getting fined.
79
10/12/2020 16:27:25 3 1
bbc
As someone training to be union rep - Self isolation is not the same as being infected. You are essentially still classed as being able still to work. You'll get paid by statutory sick pay but not what by the company offers in it's sick pay policy.
80
10/12/2020 16:29:01 1 2
bbc
So what's the criteria, and who will police it to deter fraud, for example will pensioners on low income be able to apply ?
100
10/12/2020 16:40:02 2 2
bbc
Less than minute! I hadn't a clue but a quick Google and there it all is.
Come on do you really need your nose wiping before you go out or have you just arrived home from primary school?
81
10/12/2020 16:29:54 2 5
bbc
Wonderful. All the people in the south who are going to bars and restaurants and catching covid can get paid for their troubles.

Cases on the increase again. Not in the north in tier 3 areas (cases still falling even after opening shops), but pretty much every area they re-opened bars and restaurants are now seeing cases increase, after only a week. Keep them closed!
37
10/12/2020 15:55:59 7 6
bbc
The career unemployed have had no change to there financial situation and will not have to be part of the repayment squeeze. If we have to pay more tax they should get less benefits. All in it together!
82
10/12/2020 16:30:06 3 2
bbc
As one of what you call "The career unemployed", I have to say that your tar-brush does not apply to all. Excluded from the workforce when I had chemo for cancer, exclusion extended when I relapsed and had a stem cell transplant, and despite remission since then I've been holed up in iso at home for what's now 270 consecutive days due to C-19. I don't qualify for a single penny of financial help.
135
10/12/2020 17:14:49 0 2
bbc
You are obviously not what I meant by career unemployed. Career unemployed are those who never have any intention to work and whose ambition is to claim as much as they can with no plan to ever contribute to the system. It’s a disgrace that you can not get any financial aid. The welfare system should be there to help people like you when they need support. Good luck in your recovery.
83
10/12/2020 16:30:57 4 2
bbc
No good if your employer instructs you (with PHE backing) to come into work anyway. Apparently the app is only advisory, you need a phone call or email for the self isolation to be legally required. Farcical. And I assure you this is absolutely true.
241
10/12/2020 18:51:21 0 2
bbc
The app is anonymous so how can you be legally forced to isolate if they don't know who you are. If your employer instructs you to come to work when you have been asked to isolate then you should report them.
84
10/12/2020 16:31:16 28 7
bbc
FYI Folks, only people who are already claiming benefits would get the extra 500 quid. This really is a stupid scheme for people who can't work due to having to self isolate, they won't earn any thing at all.
328
10/12/2020 21:12:33 1 0
bbc
Out of touch from reality that post - please remove for factual incorrectness. Various hard workers on several jobs still get working tax credits due to the covid hit they have suffered, same for UC clients many who are suffering loss of business and now have to actually sign on despite working which will soon be JR'ed and overruled by the judge duly.
Removed
86
10/12/2020 16:31:40 2 2
bbc
It really makes you wonder if anyone in Government understands the psyche of its citizens.
88
10/12/2020 16:33:07 0 1
bbc
doesn't care

what are we going to do about it?
21
pTc
10/12/2020 15:44:49 0 11
bbc
£500 for two weeks is nothing. I need £900 a month for my SHARE of the bills. Working the other two weeks is likely £400 after taxes, of paid in the same month. So I can live, but not eat, drink or fill up the car to get to work. Smashing.
87
10/12/2020 16:32:23 2 1
bbc
Well just do a Tebbit then and get on your bike and go and live somewhere you can afford.
Not my view, just a typical Tories. Because it's your fault if you can't live within your means
86
10/12/2020 16:31:40 2 2
bbc
It really makes you wonder if anyone in Government understands the psyche of its citizens.
88
10/12/2020 16:33:07 0 1
bbc
doesn't care

what are we going to do about it?
95
10/12/2020 16:35:48 0 1
bbc
Well if everybody complained to their MP's, who knows, a vote of no confidence in Boris' government ?
76
10/12/2020 16:20:33 66 2
bbc
Have they ever thought perhaps some people aren't downloading it because they don't need it?
I work from home, only see my husband, and only place I go is Tesco but that wouldn't trigger an alert anyway because you need to spend more than 15 mins with someone.
It's feasible lots of people who are retired, poorly, or just able to work from home don't feel there's any need for the app.
89
10/12/2020 16:33:07 25 2
bbc
Totally agree.
90
10/12/2020 16:31:50 19 9
bbc
tony
16:08
"An assumption that those on benefits can afford the later smart phones?"

The ones around here seem to want for nothing. And there I was thinking benefit bums would be sorted out.
99
10/12/2020 16:38:12 8 6
bbc
You don't quite understand the requirements of a digital by default benefits system do you.
333
10/12/2020 21:15:37 0 0
bbc
A £20 ebay smartphone works the android perfectly
91
10/12/2020 16:33:42 2 5
bbc
My. Intern is signing out of venues. I believe you remain signed into a venue until you sign into another. That means if you go to the hairdressers at 0900 and go directly home at 1000, the someone who tests positive goes there at 1700, then you are told to self isolate as you are still signed into the hairdressers
143
10/12/2020 17:17:17 1 3
bbc
Cobblers, go back to your daily express, liar.
149
37p
10/12/2020 17:24:47 0 1
bbc
It's a good question.

Is this true?

Is there a way to sign out from a venue?
12
10/12/2020 15:39:02 18 6
bbc
Why has it taken nine months to set up something as simple as a one use code system for payment. Done properly it wouldn't even need a smart phone.
Because it's been designed by an upper class over privileged idiot with connections Removed
67
10/12/2020 16:13:29 3 1
bbc
Almost nobody who is "off to work" is eligible for the £500 anyway.
93
10/12/2020 16:34:33 1 1
bbc
Unless it's cash work, which is rife as it happens.
55
10/12/2020 16:05:10 1 2
bbc
I wonder how many anti vaxxers, XR proponents, BLM, and general Jeremy Corbyn followers would actually have got their card even if it were compulsory!
And right wing idiots like you Removed
88
10/12/2020 16:33:07 0 1
bbc
doesn't care

what are we going to do about it?
95
10/12/2020 16:35:48 0 1
bbc
Well if everybody complained to their MP's, who knows, a vote of no confidence in Boris' government ?
196
10/12/2020 18:03:05 0 1
bbc
depends whether losing your job as an MP (from the vote of no confidence to your boss), is greater or worse risk than "whatever action your constituents might take against you" (which will, lets be honest, be nothing)
59
10/12/2020 16:07:10 3 5
bbc
Nigerians and Dutch...
96
10/12/2020 16:37:21 8 4
bbc
FBI data states 90% of hacking is done in west Africa.
97
10/12/2020 16:34:03 4 7
bbc
I will never get the app, nor the vaccine.
140
10/12/2020 17:14:01 1 3
bbc
That's fine. Just self-isolate so you're no risk to the rest of us and wait for Mr Darwin to do his work.
187
10/12/2020 17:49:45 1 2
bbc
My brain hurts
67
10/12/2020 16:13:29 3 1
bbc
Almost nobody who is "off to work" is eligible for the £500 anyway.
98
10/12/2020 16:37:46 0 1
bbc
So people who already stay at home, will get paid to stay at home. Okay that makes sense!! (face palm).
90
10/12/2020 16:31:50 19 9
bbc
tony
16:08
"An assumption that those on benefits can afford the later smart phones?"

The ones around here seem to want for nothing. And there I was thinking benefit bums would be sorted out.
99
10/12/2020 16:38:12 8 6
bbc
You don't quite understand the requirements of a digital by default benefits system do you.
119
37p
10/12/2020 17:02:07 4 2
bbc
I don't understand what "digital by default benefits system" means. Please explain.
80
10/12/2020 16:29:01 1 2
bbc
So what's the criteria, and who will police it to deter fraud, for example will pensioners on low income be able to apply ?
100
10/12/2020 16:40:02 2 2
bbc
Less than minute! I hadn't a clue but a quick Google and there it all is.
Come on do you really need your nose wiping before you go out or have you just arrived home from primary school?