'Mix-and-match' coronavirus vaccines to be tested
08/12/2020 | news | health | 679
Trials are being planned in the UK to see if combining Covid vaccines might give the best protection.
1
08/12/2020 11:47:54 5 28
bbc
More vaccines, more profits for the drug companies.
4
08/12/2020 11:49:55 22 3
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is being distributed at cost, they don't make any profit on it.
187
RPH
08/12/2020 13:10:00 2 0
bbc
More cars sold; more profit for the car companies. More sweets sold, more profit for the sweet companies. What's the problem?
2
08/12/2020 11:49:14 7 5
bbc
"It's not being done because of supplies."
No, it's being done because the government has bet so much on the Oxford vaccine with it's lower effectiveness rate and they want to push that up.

It's a good idea though - it could potentially increase the effective rate of vaccination because of the ease of distribution of the oxford vaccine and it's local production.
27
08/12/2020 12:01:13 10 1
bbc
I think you will find HM Government have placed their eggs in several baskets. They have ordered from 4 different Pharmaceutical Companies. You also need to look into the logistics surrounding the Pfizer vacc.
3
08/12/2020 11:49:19 18 6
bbc
Sounds like a sensible idea to look. However I can't not believe it is anything other than worries about bringing a vaccine that requires such specific storage facilities into the community that is troubling them.
We need to Oxford vaccine, even if the results seem slightly less impressive. 65% is the glass more than half full.
1
08/12/2020 11:47:54 5 28
bbc
More vaccines, more profits for the drug companies.
4
08/12/2020 11:49:55 22 3
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is being distributed at cost, they don't make any profit on it.
5
08/12/2020 11:49:59 2 8
bbc
1 for £10, two for £15?

there is nothing that could go wrong
6
08/12/2020 11:50:15 55 11
bbc
Provided it has gone through the science assessment process then any options should be of benefit, the sooner we get more numbers immunised the sooner we can have a more normal life.
12
08/12/2020 11:55:10 23 66
bbc
I think you might be in for a surprise.
20
08/12/2020 11:58:46 12 20
bbc
I don't want a so called normal life if it means returning to the hellish rat race of commuting and overall clamour that occurred before March
140
08/12/2020 12:49:50 11 19
bbc
Lol. You think life will return to normal? Hahahahahahah
369
08/12/2020 14:21:28 2 1
bbc
Just to make you aware neither the Pfizer nor OxfordAZ vaccine have shown any efficacy in reducing infection rates
So, unless the Government decides that the vulnerable are safe, the vaccines do not show any reduction in infection rates
What they show, is a reduction in symptomatic cases
630
08/12/2020 16:12:46 1 0
bbc
If you think this means an end to wearing masks and social distancing I'm afraid you're going to be disappointed
7
08/12/2020 11:50:22 2 12
bbc
*Sarcasm meter at 11*

"Oh no not the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, made in collaboration with the Germans, well known for being a bit slapdash..."
8
08/12/2020 11:50:55 1 3
bbc
BOGOF?
87
08/12/2020 12:23:35 1 2
bbc
Yeah BOGOF BORIS
9
08/12/2020 11:52:02 5 4
bbc
It makes sense to vaccinate everybody with the vaccine available first and then revaccinate with another type say a year laterals a further booster.
13
08/12/2020 11:55:36 6 6
bbc
this isn't like updating windows
10
08/12/2020 11:54:49 3 8
bbc
The precautionary principle emphasizes caution, pausing and review before leaping into new innovations that may prove disastrous. Just a thought.
11
Dan
08/12/2020 11:55:03 6 17
bbc
Nooooooo, ... a poor idea.
If something goes wrong, how do the scientists know which vaccine is to blame?
16
08/12/2020 11:56:19 3 9
bbc
see

see

now. there's some logical thought.
17
08/12/2020 11:56:33 6 2
bbc
the idea is to test it so that it doesn't go wrong.................
19
08/12/2020 11:57:11 0 9
bbc
'If', dont you mean 'when'..
25
08/12/2020 12:00:49 4 3
bbc
That’s why this is a trial
37
08/12/2020 12:06:35 5 3
bbc
Thousands of people have been tested with both vaccines individually already though, so we have a good idea of the effects of each individual vaccine.
127
08/12/2020 12:20:48 2 0
bbc
That will be irrelevant. They know both work by themselves. So they don't need to blame one if they are taken at the same time. Maybe that will give 99/100% success rate, until we try we won't know.
211
08/12/2020 13:20:31 1 0
bbc
Because they are extremely good at what they do, and understand what adverse events might occur with which drug? Or maybe because they have systems in place to analyse safety data and understand what that data means?
Just because you don't understand something doesn't mean it's bad.
6
08/12/2020 11:50:15 55 11
bbc
Provided it has gone through the science assessment process then any options should be of benefit, the sooner we get more numbers immunised the sooner we can have a more normal life.
12
08/12/2020 11:55:10 23 66
bbc
I think you might be in for a surprise.
186
08/12/2020 13:09:30 8 0
bbc
There is always a naysayer!
622
08/12/2020 16:06:08 1 1
bbc
What surprise? Supported by what evidence?
Or an anti-vaccine, anti-science conspiracy theory, based on a uneducated gut-feeling - like flat-earthers and QAnon?
9
08/12/2020 11:52:02 5 4
bbc
It makes sense to vaccinate everybody with the vaccine available first and then revaccinate with another type say a year laterals a further booster.
13
08/12/2020 11:55:36 6 6
bbc
this isn't like updating windows
14
08/12/2020 11:55:45 31 9
bbc
Big bad capitalism. Oh yes? Companies make profits from investing and researching in order to produce what people might want. Sometimes the investment produces a loss sometimes a profit. It is called business and the people have the choice to buy or not to buy; sometimes their governments buy on their behalf, like now. Often the products save lives and feed people. Thats Bad???
What is bad is the mass roll out of a vaccine for a cold virus that is not lethal to the general population.
A cold virus that has been retreating since the spring unless you fall for the manipulated statistics.
Removed
625
08/12/2020 16:06:24 2 2
bbc
When governments give them legal immunity and the threshold for disability is so unrealistically high, yes I would say so. And Pfizer have form for malpractice and cover ups. But hey, carry on, take my place in the queue
15
08/12/2020 11:56:09 116 16
bbc
Probably has more to do with the fact the UK has ordered 350 million + doses from the different companies and they all look like they are coming good than an actual need. I bet they will be lambasted for "wasting tax payer money". But hedging their bets on a vaccine was probably sensible.
28
Jay
08/12/2020 12:01:31 56 3
bbc
350 million doses = 175 million people. So assuming they all work and delivered it's around twice as many as we need. So it may even just be enough by the time they are delivered to be just in time for an annual booster.

Given the worldwide demand I doubt that the suppliers will be too upset if we scaled back our orders.
29
08/12/2020 12:02:23 25 2
bbc
Yes and any excess vaccine supplies could either be sold on or donated to other countries so it would not be wasted.
64
AMc
08/12/2020 12:16:10 19 0
bbc
Yep, The UK gov' did the right thing. We need to remember that whilst they committed to that total number from various sources, some of those may or will not succeed

Better still getting variations of a vaccine is also good, as we may find in the long run some are more effective than others or worst case (but very unlikely) some have notable side effects that cannot possibly be seen at this time
65
08/12/2020 12:16:18 2 26
bbc
Share prices more like
83
08/12/2020 12:23:06 21 1
bbc
Nothing stopping the uk government donating the excess supplies to the third world after everyone in UK has been vaccinated. It could form part of the UKs generous foriegn aid.
215
08/12/2020 13:21:11 3 1
bbc
To quote the article: "Kate Bingham, who chairs the vaccine task force, said: "It's an established process."

So probably more to do with what Kate Bingham says.
274
08/12/2020 13:42:47 7 0
bbc
350 million doses may seem excessive but nobody knows how for long the vaccine gives protection.
677
09/12/2020 14:14:26 0 0
bbc
VERY keen to take Pfizer vaccine ASAP for me & to contribute to herd immunity

BUT

Brexit-govt announced enforcing MIX-AND-MATCH vaccines for ALL without performing appropriate scientific trials for health safety approval as was required for the individual vaccines

Mentioned in news yesterday then abruptly pulled from BBC website - POTENTIAL GOVERNMENT PANDEMIC CENSORSHIP ON VACCINE INFORMATION?
11
Dan
08/12/2020 11:55:03 6 17
bbc
Nooooooo, ... a poor idea.
If something goes wrong, how do the scientists know which vaccine is to blame?
16
08/12/2020 11:56:19 3 9
bbc
see

see

now. there's some logical thought.
11
Dan
08/12/2020 11:55:03 6 17
bbc
Nooooooo, ... a poor idea.
If something goes wrong, how do the scientists know which vaccine is to blame?
17
08/12/2020 11:56:33 6 2
bbc
the idea is to test it so that it doesn't go wrong.................
22
08/12/2020 11:59:06 0 6
bbc
I have an idea about hoverboards
18
08/12/2020 11:56:36 9 5
bbc
This is a good cost saving opportunity if it works to:
a) give an effective alternative to having to pay for two doses of the expensive Pfizer vaccine, and
b) allow us to use up the doses of the Oxford vaccine we have pre ordered, the effectiveness of which is not as high as it ideally needs to be.
31
08/12/2020 12:05:40 18 4
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is purported to be more effective if given in a half-dose first time and a full dose the second time....up to 95%.
108
08/12/2020 12:17:49 2 0
bbc
We've already bought the other vaccines regardless. I don't think they give out refunds just because we use a different one...
11
Dan
08/12/2020 11:55:03 6 17
bbc
Nooooooo, ... a poor idea.
If something goes wrong, how do the scientists know which vaccine is to blame?
19
08/12/2020 11:57:11 0 9
bbc
'If', dont you mean 'when'..
6
08/12/2020 11:50:15 55 11
bbc
Provided it has gone through the science assessment process then any options should be of benefit, the sooner we get more numbers immunised the sooner we can have a more normal life.
20
08/12/2020 11:58:46 12 20
bbc
I don't want a so called normal life if it means returning to the hellish rat race of commuting and overall clamour that occurred before March
39
08/12/2020 12:07:41 23 1
bbc
OK, that sounds bad but most people want some form of 'normality' surely?
67
08/12/2020 12:17:51 2 13
bbc
must

preserve

income tax and VAT

said M Hancock
96
OwO
08/12/2020 12:29:00 24 6
bbc
Move closer to work, or work closer to home. The commute is something you bring on yourself specifically to run the rat race, do something about it instead of whining.
220
08/12/2020 13:23:17 3 14
bbc
So basically you're lazy and hate driving.
485
08/12/2020 15:08:25 1 0
bbc
I think I would quite like not to be arrested for having a picnic though
560
08/12/2020 15:39:56 0 0
bbc
Well move on and do something different with your life.
668
08/12/2020 22:06:04 0 0
bbc
A very selfish thought. Look at the bigger picture, at those that are still on furlough and unable to return to work, at businesses that probably won't ever reopen if this goes on much longer, at the people struggling mentally and financially. If you're biggest problem in life is having to commute to work then be bloody grateful.
21
08/12/2020 11:52:14 28 20
bbc
Are the BBC going to investigate how many thousands of EU citizens are going to die while they wait the extra month for their regulators to approve the vaccine?
45
08/12/2020 12:10:25 3 5
bbc
It’s pure sociology to create demand. You can this and you can have this other one, but you can’t have any ...
384
08/12/2020 14:26:02 0 2
bbc
Ivor Cummins has already investigated this. Check out his videos. Can't say any more or the comment gets deleted.
17
08/12/2020 11:56:33 6 2
bbc
the idea is to test it so that it doesn't go wrong.................
22
08/12/2020 11:59:06 0 6
bbc
I have an idea about hoverboards
23
08/12/2020 11:59:59 36 11
bbc
Given that Trump is about to sign an order making it illegal to supply other countries with “their” vaccines before the Americans are vaccinated because his administration didn’t buy when offered, I suggest we keep on very good terms with the Belgians and Germans, even after the Oxford vaccine comes on stream, if we want to go multi vaccine or keep with a single one.
30
08/12/2020 12:03:22 40 19
bbc
If true, this thing (can’t be human) deserves nothing but contempt. He has zero humanity or compassion.
72
08/12/2020 12:18:43 8 3
bbc
Well as it is made in Belgium not a lot trump can do about. If he is unhappy just nationalise the company and let trump take as to court . By the time the court is ready to do anything trump will be history.
90
08/12/2020 12:27:21 14 1
bbc
They were stopping and nicking plane loads of protective equipment made for other countries a few months ago so it wouldn’t be a surprise, would it.

It’s a special kind of special relationship - the kind where you ask your friend for help and on a good day, they’ll offer a helping hand and on a bad day they knock you down and drive over you
184
08/12/2020 13:09:20 1 9
bbc
Screw adulf Merkel
269
08/12/2020 13:41:04 4 2
bbc
He is fu**ing cheat and criminal.
24
08/12/2020 12:00:05 70 2
bbc
Presumably, most people will end up receiving the Oxford one, due to its comparative ease of storage and lowest cost.
107
08/12/2020 12:16:25 26 0
bbc
Anyone under 50 will have that one i'm sure.

Cost probably doesnt come into it too much, the UK has bought and paid for many millions either way, but its the one that will be more readily available and easy to transport than the others, by the time they do all the over 50's, there will be drive through's where you pull up get your jab, and drive away
117
08/12/2020 12:38:20 5 21
bbc
It also has the least favourable protection. 50-90% depending on which dose you use. Averaging out protection to give 70% when you've miss-run the trail isn't good practice.
147
08/12/2020 12:55:04 7 5
bbc
What's wrong with that? Or are you saying we should think ourselves 'inferior' when compared to the Americans and Germans? You can... if you like. It's sad to think some people see the world revolving around the USA, really sad. There's a whole world outdoors, not just the 'jingoistic' USA.
338
08/12/2020 14:07:03 1 0
bbc
Have the government confirmed that people not currently covered by the priority list are even going to be vaccinated? Will be interesting to see what the international consensus will be for travel in terms of providing vaccination confirmation, and whether younger people will need to pay for a vaccination in order to travel.
413
08/12/2020 14:36:48 1 0
bbc
Cost will not be a factor, the cost of administering the most expensive vaccine is miniscule compared to the economic losses of supporting the workforce if it remains unvaccinated...
559
08/12/2020 15:39:42 0 0
bbc
The problem with the oxford vaccine is it is claimed to be only 75% effective.
594
08/12/2020 15:49:40 0 0
bbc
yes - and halve their chance of catching it
11
Dan
08/12/2020 11:55:03 6 17
bbc
Nooooooo, ... a poor idea.
If something goes wrong, how do the scientists know which vaccine is to blame?
25
08/12/2020 12:00:49 4 3
bbc
That’s why this is a trial
105
08/12/2020 12:31:54 0 2
bbc
a public trial... with the full shout of the media

who are under careful orders to bury any bad news following it
26
08/12/2020 12:00:59 2 9
bbc
Here in North Yorkshire we have no access to any vaccine at all. York Hospital is excluded from supplies.
32
08/12/2020 12:06:03 11 1
bbc
There are many hospitals excluded all over the country, this is only the first 800,000 of a vaccine that has a challenging distribution chain, as more vaccine comes in more hospitals and other centres will become part of the chain. With this patience is not only a virtue but required.
78
08/12/2020 12:20:54 0 1
bbc
All about political sociology isn’t it? Same with the co-op baked in store sausage rolls. They do 4 packs a day and deliberately put them on the shelves when it’s vulnerable people only shopping. Of course by the time the general public are allowed entry again, they’re all gone
226
08/12/2020 13:26:01 0 0
bbc
Bill - no Uk person is excluded from supplies. The PBT vaccine is being delivered to the population out of a limited number of centres because of the refrigeration facilities required. You will be called (and recalled) in order of your need, based on age and vulnerability. It’s not to do with where you live.
2
08/12/2020 11:49:14 7 5
bbc
"It's not being done because of supplies."
No, it's being done because the government has bet so much on the Oxford vaccine with it's lower effectiveness rate and they want to push that up.

It's a good idea though - it could potentially increase the effective rate of vaccination because of the ease of distribution of the oxford vaccine and it's local production.
27
08/12/2020 12:01:13 10 1
bbc
I think you will find HM Government have placed their eggs in several baskets. They have ordered from 4 different Pharmaceutical Companies. You also need to look into the logistics surrounding the Pfizer vacc.
54
08/12/2020 12:13:57 0 1
bbc
but crucially not enough doses of the Pfxer to even treat the vulnerable population, and the other vaccines they've ordered don't come until spring, so effectively much is resting on the Oxford Vaccine which should be ready in January.
15
08/12/2020 11:56:09 116 16
bbc
Probably has more to do with the fact the UK has ordered 350 million + doses from the different companies and they all look like they are coming good than an actual need. I bet they will be lambasted for "wasting tax payer money". But hedging their bets on a vaccine was probably sensible.
28
Jay
08/12/2020 12:01:31 56 3
bbc
350 million doses = 175 million people. So assuming they all work and delivered it's around twice as many as we need. So it may even just be enough by the time they are delivered to be just in time for an annual booster.

Given the worldwide demand I doubt that the suppliers will be too upset if we scaled back our orders.
258
08/12/2020 13:37:36 3 0
bbc
Agreed Jason. We could give it the third world to stop another flare up or, depending on use by date, keep it for the next iteration of vaccines. It will be like painting the Forth bridge. I'd prefer we gave it away myself
427
08/12/2020 14:42:40 4 0
bbc
I recollect that the reason for ordering such large numbers, was to also consider the Commonwealth and Third World countries......this may have been lost somewhere in the ether
454
08/12/2020 14:54:50 0 1
bbc
I believe the 350 doses account for the fact the each person requires 2 doses of the vaccine for it to work. I may be wrong though.
464
08/12/2020 14:57:05 0 0
bbc
What about Year 2 when re-vaccination will likely be necessary? We'll need all the vaccine we can get hold of.
15
08/12/2020 11:56:09 116 16
bbc
Probably has more to do with the fact the UK has ordered 350 million + doses from the different companies and they all look like they are coming good than an actual need. I bet they will be lambasted for "wasting tax payer money". But hedging their bets on a vaccine was probably sensible.
29
08/12/2020 12:02:23 25 2
bbc
Yes and any excess vaccine supplies could either be sold on or donated to other countries so it would not be wasted.
36
08/12/2020 12:06:34 16 1
bbc
Yes, I worry about the third world countries without a vaccine...
40
08/12/2020 12:08:57 18 8
bbc
With the amount of travel all across the world (as shown by how fast it spread) the whole world will need to be vaccinated. I think we should be encouraging sharing resources if there's excess ordered. The world will remember who helps in this crises. Particularly important how we Brits are viewed globally with Brexit Looming. Trump's stance will not be forgotten
553
08/12/2020 15:37:12 0 1
bbc
why? the vaccine will not give you permanent protection
23
08/12/2020 11:59:59 36 11
bbc
Given that Trump is about to sign an order making it illegal to supply other countries with “their” vaccines before the Americans are vaccinated because his administration didn’t buy when offered, I suggest we keep on very good terms with the Belgians and Germans, even after the Oxford vaccine comes on stream, if we want to go multi vaccine or keep with a single one.
30
08/12/2020 12:03:22 40 19
bbc
If true, this thing (can’t be human) deserves nothing but contempt. He has zero humanity or compassion.
38
08/12/2020 12:07:13 5 2
bbc
It’s true, see cnn, Washington post, nytimes, the hill
363
08/12/2020 14:17:49 2 0
bbc
That's why the Americans have fired him from office.
18
08/12/2020 11:56:36 9 5
bbc
This is a good cost saving opportunity if it works to:
a) give an effective alternative to having to pay for two doses of the expensive Pfizer vaccine, and
b) allow us to use up the doses of the Oxford vaccine we have pre ordered, the effectiveness of which is not as high as it ideally needs to be.
31
08/12/2020 12:05:40 18 4
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is purported to be more effective if given in a half-dose first time and a full dose the second time....up to 95%.
49
08/12/2020 12:11:46 2 4
bbc
1) that was an accidental finding because some does were incorrectly measured
2) the small cohort who got that reduced second dose didn't have anyone from any vulnerable groups in it (over 65, or at risk conditions) so the actual effectiveness is debatable.
52
08/12/2020 12:12:36 2 5
bbc
It doesn’t make logical sense to me that those doses should improve effectiveness. It’s more likely that dosage regime was more effective because it was only the under 55s who received it, whereas the full dosage regime was given to trial volunteers of all ages (vaccines usually being less effective in older people).
73
08/12/2020 12:19:17 2 0
bbc
it's actually 94.2257%, but 95% sounds a lot, lot better.
26
08/12/2020 12:00:59 2 9
bbc
Here in North Yorkshire we have no access to any vaccine at all. York Hospital is excluded from supplies.
32
08/12/2020 12:06:03 11 1
bbc
There are many hospitals excluded all over the country, this is only the first 800,000 of a vaccine that has a challenging distribution chain, as more vaccine comes in more hospitals and other centres will become part of the chain. With this patience is not only a virtue but required.
33
08/12/2020 12:06:14 6 22
bbc
First patient received Covid vaccine aged 91!!!!!

There are literally 10s thousands of folk in UK sitting about that need urgent life threatening illnesses treated but have been put on the back burner for this.

Plus they are a bloody sight younger too.

Priorities NHS priorities!
62
08/12/2020 12:15:56 16 0
bbc
The most likely people to die are being vaccinated first. Well done the uk.
84
08/12/2020 12:23:10 4 0
bbc
Until hospitals not at risk re-filling with severe covid (mostly elderly) then beds aren't free & staff are diverted away. 1st due are nursing home residents, then decreasing from age 80. Wont eliminate what seems endemic vs pandemic as not tested/licensed yet for under 18's, and if continuing child reservoir then adults may require boosters at some, yet to be determined, frequency.
100
08/12/2020 12:14:45 3 0
bbc
So because people are old, they are not deserving treatment. What an awful human being you are.
34
08/12/2020 12:06:24 4 18
bbc
Mix and match or trial and error? It's a bit concerning how quickly this has been pushed through with politics taking precedent over safety. How do the Russians feel about Sputnik V? I might wait a couple of months and see how it goes. I have quite low trust levels at the moment.
44
08/12/2020 12:10:25 13 0
bbc
Nothing unsafe about trialing different vaccines. 1st injection vaccine A second injection vaccine B. Both have been shown to be safe.
I am more than willing to be a volunteer
99
08/12/2020 12:13:20 2 0
bbc
I love how people who have no idea about the process of vaccines, seemed worried about how the speed of one.

Its as if normally there isn't a world wide pandemic going on, and other factors (economic etc) are also involved in why it usually takes so long.

I think its disrespectful to doubt the independent regulators who have been working 24/7 throughout the pandemic because of your ignorance
113
08/12/2020 12:35:12 0 0
bbc
Unless you are over 80 or in a vulnerable group you won't be offered it yet anyway.
35
08/12/2020 12:06:26 5 17
bbc
Getting proper dodgy now
29
08/12/2020 12:02:23 25 2
bbc
Yes and any excess vaccine supplies could either be sold on or donated to other countries so it would not be wasted.
36
08/12/2020 12:06:34 16 1
bbc
Yes, I worry about the third world countries without a vaccine...
11
Dan
08/12/2020 11:55:03 6 17
bbc
Nooooooo, ... a poor idea.
If something goes wrong, how do the scientists know which vaccine is to blame?
37
08/12/2020 12:06:35 5 3
bbc
Thousands of people have been tested with both vaccines individually already though, so we have a good idea of the effects of each individual vaccine.
63
08/12/2020 12:15:59 0 1
bbc
I have no idea why some people don't take the information from forums seriously

from zombie pizza
30
08/12/2020 12:03:22 40 19
bbc
If true, this thing (can’t be human) deserves nothing but contempt. He has zero humanity or compassion.
38
08/12/2020 12:07:13 5 2
bbc
It’s true, see cnn, Washington post, nytimes, the hill
20
08/12/2020 11:58:46 12 20
bbc
I don't want a so called normal life if it means returning to the hellish rat race of commuting and overall clamour that occurred before March
39
08/12/2020 12:07:41 23 1
bbc
OK, that sounds bad but most people want some form of 'normality' surely?
29
08/12/2020 12:02:23 25 2
bbc
Yes and any excess vaccine supplies could either be sold on or donated to other countries so it would not be wasted.
40
08/12/2020 12:08:57 18 8
bbc
With the amount of travel all across the world (as shown by how fast it spread) the whole world will need to be vaccinated. I think we should be encouraging sharing resources if there's excess ordered. The world will remember who helps in this crises. Particularly important how we Brits are viewed globally with Brexit Looming. Trump's stance will not be forgotten
41
08/12/2020 12:09:11 20 10
bbc
It's going to be hard enough to persuade the sceptical to take a single type of vaccine.

The flat earthers are a lost cause, there's nothing that will persuade them that the vaccine isn't full of nanoprobes or whatever.

But there are others with genuine concerns about how quickly the vaccine has been produced and news that different vaccines are being combined is only going to alarm them more.
57
08/12/2020 12:14:34 5 9
bbc
Reasonable stance tbh.

No reason to introduce wildcards at this stage.

The cynic in me suspects this is because the vaccines becoming available are much much cheaper and easy to use.

I’d hope that they are ensuring that the second dose is already being put aside from this batch for the people receiving this vaccine now to ensure they can receive the same second dose in a timely fashion.
164
08/12/2020 13:02:34 4 2
bbc
Got to agree, most are not anti-vax (though Gvt is desperately trying to label them that)

But they are concerned that
Its a rushed vax
Its a type of vax that has never been licenced for humans
That the truth from the Gvt has been in short supply since March so why believe what they say about vax safety
That they arent at a great risk from Covid (<65, no comorbidities)

So why rush to take vax
526
08/12/2020 15:28:39 1 0
bbc
Because they get there news off of YouTube. Any reputable news source will confirm the possible benefits of mix and match. The CLINICAL TRIAL will establish if the concept works or not.
42
08/12/2020 12:09:34 5 0
bbc
one question I have not seen is how many persosn are in each of the groups, so at least we can plan our lives better. This has to play part in the desicion on how to get the vaccine into people. Many persons take a different flu vaccine a year made by different companaies and no one bothers. Lets hope the clinical trials can get this done ASAP
554
08/12/2020 15:37:15 0 0
bbc
The composition of the trial arms are established in the protocol, which will receive scientific and ethical review. Why are you bothered either way?
43
08/12/2020 12:09:48 2 13
bbc
Mix and match vaccines eh.. so when did the testing of that happen then... lol
50
AMc
08/12/2020 12:11:57 17 0
bbc
Since Edward Jenner's discovery in 1796
51
08/12/2020 12:12:13 4 0
bbc
that's what the trial they are suggesting will do - test it (lol)
34
08/12/2020 12:06:24 4 18
bbc
Mix and match or trial and error? It's a bit concerning how quickly this has been pushed through with politics taking precedent over safety. How do the Russians feel about Sputnik V? I might wait a couple of months and see how it goes. I have quite low trust levels at the moment.
44
08/12/2020 12:10:25 13 0
bbc
Nothing unsafe about trialing different vaccines. 1st injection vaccine A second injection vaccine B. Both have been shown to be safe.
I am more than willing to be a volunteer
59
08/12/2020 12:15:10 0 3
bbc
Fine, you go for it. It usually takes 10 to 15 years to develop a vaccine over several phases.

https://www.historyofvaccines.org/content/articles/vaccine-development-testing-and-regulation
21
08/12/2020 11:52:14 28 20
bbc
Are the BBC going to investigate how many thousands of EU citizens are going to die while they wait the extra month for their regulators to approve the vaccine?
45
08/12/2020 12:10:25 3 5
bbc
It’s pure sociology to create demand. You can this and you can have this other one, but you can’t have any ...
145
08/12/2020 12:30:27 2 0
bbc
That is illogical Captain.
46
08/12/2020 12:10:31 11 10
bbc
A vaccine is a medicine to do good. A jab, according to the OED, is "a quick, sharp blow, especially with the fist." Will the BBC please call the vaccine a vaccine and not use a slang term.
79
08/12/2020 12:21:04 10 2
bbc
Also OED... a hypodermic injection, especially a vaccination. "an anti-tetanus jab".

Perfectly understandable to the BBC's audience.
213
08/12/2020 13:20:46 1 0
bbc
Could be worse, we could have the god-awful Kay Burley from Sky News asking how many quid it costs.

Yes, she actually uses that term in serious news stories.
230
08/12/2020 13:27:16 3 0
bbc
‘Jab’ is a generally accepted term for an injection. Has been throughout my life - never heard of flu jab? Far better to use language that people are comfortable with.

BTW all medicines are intended to do good by definition
288
08/12/2020 13:48:00 1 0
bbc
Did you actually have to go and look that up because you were confused, or are you just moaning because BBC?
47
08/12/2020 12:10:48 3 15
bbc
Ah, the multi-vaccine approach; how to shift a UK vaccine with 70% efficacy, give it as a booster to a more efficacious vaccine (95% Pfizer's/Moderna's, anyone else's). Scientifically a valid approach, but amusing all the same.
53
08/12/2020 12:13:52 16 2
bbc
Nothing amusing about a scientific trial. Grow up.
48
08/12/2020 12:11:24 10 9
bbc
What genius thought it was a good idea to give the first vaccine to a 90 year old woman? If, God forbid, she were to die of natural causes within the next couple of months, the anti-vaccers would have a field day.
56
08/12/2020 12:14:27 15 3
bbc
The flat earthers will be making up their nonsense stories about what the vaccine has done to people for years after the pandemic is over.

There's nothing can stop that, best thing is just to ignore them.
58
08/12/2020 12:14:48 1 0
bbc
I was sort of wondering this.....

"whats the worst that could happen" they are saying? she's 91.....

quite a lot, I'm sure..
61
08/12/2020 12:15:47 5 6
bbc
I think you'll find that there is no such thing as natural causes, or any other cause but Covid!
69
08/12/2020 12:17:52 0 0
bbc
My thoughts entirely.
31
08/12/2020 12:05:40 18 4
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is purported to be more effective if given in a half-dose first time and a full dose the second time....up to 95%.
49
08/12/2020 12:11:46 2 4
bbc
1) that was an accidental finding because some does were incorrectly measured
2) the small cohort who got that reduced second dose didn't have anyone from any vulnerable groups in it (over 65, or at risk conditions) so the actual effectiveness is debatable.
295
08/12/2020 13:49:47 0 0
bbc
But isn't that why they are testing the low/ high dose regime?
43
08/12/2020 12:09:48 2 13
bbc
Mix and match vaccines eh.. so when did the testing of that happen then... lol
50
AMc
08/12/2020 12:11:57 17 0
bbc
Since Edward Jenner's discovery in 1796
43
08/12/2020 12:09:48 2 13
bbc
Mix and match vaccines eh.. so when did the testing of that happen then... lol
51
08/12/2020 12:12:13 4 0
bbc
that's what the trial they are suggesting will do - test it (lol)
31
08/12/2020 12:05:40 18 4
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is purported to be more effective if given in a half-dose first time and a full dose the second time....up to 95%.
52
08/12/2020 12:12:36 2 5
bbc
It doesn’t make logical sense to me that those doses should improve effectiveness. It’s more likely that dosage regime was more effective because it was only the under 55s who received it, whereas the full dosage regime was given to trial volunteers of all ages (vaccines usually being less effective in older people).
76
08/12/2020 12:20:38 8 2
bbc
That is because you are not a scientist so yours is just an uneducated guess or opion.
172
08/12/2020 13:04:42 3 0
bbc
I read (from person who helped create the vaccine) that the Oxford - Astra-Zenica vaccine is equally good in all age groups. As with many medicines, a use of more than one vaccine can give a better result - even though these drugs are being rolled out over the next few months, there will be continued monotoring, and testing for many more months, even years to come for improvements for the future.
47
08/12/2020 12:10:48 3 15
bbc
Ah, the multi-vaccine approach; how to shift a UK vaccine with 70% efficacy, give it as a booster to a more efficacious vaccine (95% Pfizer's/Moderna's, anyone else's). Scientifically a valid approach, but amusing all the same.
53
08/12/2020 12:13:52 16 2
bbc
Nothing amusing about a scientific trial. Grow up.
27
08/12/2020 12:01:13 10 1
bbc
I think you will find HM Government have placed their eggs in several baskets. They have ordered from 4 different Pharmaceutical Companies. You also need to look into the logistics surrounding the Pfizer vacc.
54
08/12/2020 12:13:57 0 1
bbc
but crucially not enough doses of the Pfxer to even treat the vulnerable population, and the other vaccines they've ordered don't come until spring, so effectively much is resting on the Oxford Vaccine which should be ready in January.
55
08/12/2020 12:14:02 2 16
bbc
So it’s basically the flu jab then? No, the flu jab is for a certain strain of flu ,that’s why it doesn’t always work. No wait, covid 19 is a novel coronavirus a one-off. So one vaccine will do the job? No wait, we need two types of the vaccine from different companies??? Is this true or a snare value issue? I think we should be told
93
08/12/2020 12:28:22 4 0
bbc
You are being told. One thing that nobody can complain about is lack of news stories, featuring scientists, doctors, patients and just about everybody else involved.

We don't NEED two vaccines from different companies. Either works on its own, but the scientists are keen to find out if the vaccines are even more effective when combined (for obvious reasons).
48
08/12/2020 12:11:24 10 9
bbc
What genius thought it was a good idea to give the first vaccine to a 90 year old woman? If, God forbid, she were to die of natural causes within the next couple of months, the anti-vaccers would have a field day.
56
08/12/2020 12:14:27 15 3
bbc
The flat earthers will be making up their nonsense stories about what the vaccine has done to people for years after the pandemic is over.

There's nothing can stop that, best thing is just to ignore them.
41
08/12/2020 12:09:11 20 10
bbc
It's going to be hard enough to persuade the sceptical to take a single type of vaccine.

The flat earthers are a lost cause, there's nothing that will persuade them that the vaccine isn't full of nanoprobes or whatever.

But there are others with genuine concerns about how quickly the vaccine has been produced and news that different vaccines are being combined is only going to alarm them more.
57
08/12/2020 12:14:34 5 9
bbc
Reasonable stance tbh.

No reason to introduce wildcards at this stage.

The cynic in me suspects this is because the vaccines becoming available are much much cheaper and easy to use.

I’d hope that they are ensuring that the second dose is already being put aside from this batch for the people receiving this vaccine now to ensure they can receive the same second dose in a timely fashion.
532
08/12/2020 15:30:40 2 0
bbc
That's the whole point of the process - to get the two required doses administered in a timely fashion. Casting doubts on this after the first people have had their first jab is scaremongering of the worst order.
48
08/12/2020 12:11:24 10 9
bbc
What genius thought it was a good idea to give the first vaccine to a 90 year old woman? If, God forbid, she were to die of natural causes within the next couple of months, the anti-vaccers would have a field day.
58
08/12/2020 12:14:48 1 0
bbc
I was sort of wondering this.....

"whats the worst that could happen" they are saying? she's 91.....

quite a lot, I'm sure..
44
08/12/2020 12:10:25 13 0
bbc
Nothing unsafe about trialing different vaccines. 1st injection vaccine A second injection vaccine B. Both have been shown to be safe.
I am more than willing to be a volunteer
59
08/12/2020 12:15:10 0 3
bbc
Fine, you go for it. It usually takes 10 to 15 years to develop a vaccine over several phases.

https://www.historyofvaccines.org/content/articles/vaccine-development-testing-and-regulation
60
08/12/2020 12:15:39 14 8
bbc
Unlike many on here I dont profess to be a scientist or medical expert ...but is it safe to mix vaccines , especially ones as new as these are ?
70
08/12/2020 12:18:13 29 2
bbc
The article says 'one after the other', like a booster. We already mix MMR and other vaccines. Trials will tell. Sounds promising
71
08/12/2020 12:18:26 6 0
bbc
Potentially it could be better.
77
08/12/2020 12:20:49 14 0
bbc
Mixing them is done all the time, but the point of the proposed trial is to test it on a number of volunteers, just to make sure that it's safe and also to see if it gives better protection than a single vaccine.
86
08/12/2020 12:23:16 11 0
bbc
There was a q&a on the beeb about this, apparently this is not a new idea and is used with vaccinating other diseases, remember this approach is only going to be a trial for Covid initially, you have to volunteer for it and then it will go through the same licensing and vetting procedure as the single vaccine has. If it’s approved it will be as safe as any approved vaccine is.
131
08/12/2020 12:44:46 4 0
bbc
A website link to one vaccine producer. The page has a good description of mRNA.

https://www.modernatx.com/mrna-technology/science-and-fundamentals-mrna-technology

"...mRNA is a single-stranded molecule that carries genetic code from DNA in a cell’s nucleus to ribosomes, the cell’s protein-making machinery."

Not a fan of these companies, but small risks, are outweighed by the risk of Covid19.
479
al
08/12/2020 15:06:08 2 0
bbc
I think that's why they're going to test it.
538
08/12/2020 15:32:18 1 0
bbc
That is what the trial is going to find out, so wait and see before passing un-informed comment.
48
08/12/2020 12:11:24 10 9
bbc
What genius thought it was a good idea to give the first vaccine to a 90 year old woman? If, God forbid, she were to die of natural causes within the next couple of months, the anti-vaccers would have a field day.
61
08/12/2020 12:15:47 5 6
bbc
I think you'll find that there is no such thing as natural causes, or any other cause but Covid!
33
08/12/2020 12:06:14 6 22
bbc
First patient received Covid vaccine aged 91!!!!!

There are literally 10s thousands of folk in UK sitting about that need urgent life threatening illnesses treated but have been put on the back burner for this.

Plus they are a bloody sight younger too.

Priorities NHS priorities!
62
08/12/2020 12:15:56 16 0
bbc
The most likely people to die are being vaccinated first. Well done the uk.
37
08/12/2020 12:06:35 5 3
bbc
Thousands of people have been tested with both vaccines individually already though, so we have a good idea of the effects of each individual vaccine.
63
08/12/2020 12:15:59 0 1
bbc
I have no idea why some people don't take the information from forums seriously

from zombie pizza
109
08/12/2020 12:33:20 2 0
bbc
U1000571. - I’m a little confused as to the point you’re trying to make about me. Personally I have far more confidence in info from scientists than random people on forums. Some people do seem more influenced by forums and social media, so it’s worthwhile trying to convey the scientific position into such areas.
15
08/12/2020 11:56:09 116 16
bbc
Probably has more to do with the fact the UK has ordered 350 million + doses from the different companies and they all look like they are coming good than an actual need. I bet they will be lambasted for "wasting tax payer money". But hedging their bets on a vaccine was probably sensible.
64
AMc
08/12/2020 12:16:10 19 0
bbc
Yep, The UK gov' did the right thing. We need to remember that whilst they committed to that total number from various sources, some of those may or will not succeed

Better still getting variations of a vaccine is also good, as we may find in the long run some are more effective than others or worst case (but very unlikely) some have notable side effects that cannot possibly be seen at this time
15
08/12/2020 11:56:09 116 16
bbc
Probably has more to do with the fact the UK has ordered 350 million + doses from the different companies and they all look like they are coming good than an actual need. I bet they will be lambasted for "wasting tax payer money". But hedging their bets on a vaccine was probably sensible.
65
08/12/2020 12:16:18 2 26
bbc
Share prices more like
424
08/12/2020 14:42:08 1 1
bbc
Cynics like you probably should be a castaway take it your not a half glass full type of person
66
08/12/2020 12:16:52 24 19
bbc
Friendly word of caution - can the beeb dial down the propaganda to eleven please? On TV this morning it was so bad it would almost cause a thinking person to question whether or not to have it?!
88
08/12/2020 12:24:52 33 16
bbc
Reporting news is not propaganda. There is a difference.
20
08/12/2020 11:58:46 12 20
bbc
I don't want a so called normal life if it means returning to the hellish rat race of commuting and overall clamour that occurred before March
67
08/12/2020 12:17:51 2 13
bbc
must

preserve

income tax and VAT

said M Hancock
68
08/12/2020 12:17:52 2 8
bbc
How many NHS staff does it take to give an injection?
75
08/12/2020 12:20:02 8 10
bbc
100..........1 to give it and 99 to applaud.
103
08/12/2020 12:31:38 6 0
bbc
Fair play. I did wonder. That lady won’t have developed immunity for several weeks yet...was parading her down a corridor surrounded by cheering staff with a high risk of exposure to Covid really a great idea?

Nice photos though eh
48
08/12/2020 12:11:24 10 9
bbc
What genius thought it was a good idea to give the first vaccine to a 90 year old woman? If, God forbid, she were to die of natural causes within the next couple of months, the anti-vaccers would have a field day.
69
08/12/2020 12:17:52 0 0
bbc
My thoughts entirely.
60
08/12/2020 12:15:39 14 8
bbc
Unlike many on here I dont profess to be a scientist or medical expert ...but is it safe to mix vaccines , especially ones as new as these are ?
70
08/12/2020 12:18:13 29 2
bbc
The article says 'one after the other', like a booster. We already mix MMR and other vaccines. Trials will tell. Sounds promising
60
08/12/2020 12:15:39 14 8
bbc
Unlike many on here I dont profess to be a scientist or medical expert ...but is it safe to mix vaccines , especially ones as new as these are ?
71
08/12/2020 12:18:26 6 0
bbc
Potentially it could be better.
23
08/12/2020 11:59:59 36 11
bbc
Given that Trump is about to sign an order making it illegal to supply other countries with “their” vaccines before the Americans are vaccinated because his administration didn’t buy when offered, I suggest we keep on very good terms with the Belgians and Germans, even after the Oxford vaccine comes on stream, if we want to go multi vaccine or keep with a single one.
72
08/12/2020 12:18:43 8 3
bbc
Well as it is made in Belgium not a lot trump can do about. If he is unhappy just nationalise the company and let trump take as to court . By the time the court is ready to do anything trump will be history.
31
08/12/2020 12:05:40 18 4
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is purported to be more effective if given in a half-dose first time and a full dose the second time....up to 95%.
73
08/12/2020 12:19:17 2 0
bbc
it's actually 94.2257%, but 95% sounds a lot, lot better.
74
08/12/2020 12:19:24 35 5
bbc
Jab it up jab it in, let me begin...
80
08/12/2020 12:21:09 21 1
bbc
and jump arround...
68
08/12/2020 12:17:52 2 8
bbc
How many NHS staff does it take to give an injection?
75
08/12/2020 12:20:02 8 10
bbc
100..........1 to give it and 99 to applaud.
82
08/12/2020 12:22:23 8 7
bbc
Shame on you.
92
RPH
08/12/2020 12:28:12 4 5
bbc
Hoe many thoughtless posts does it take to look like a brainless troll? Just 1.
52
08/12/2020 12:12:36 2 5
bbc
It doesn’t make logical sense to me that those doses should improve effectiveness. It’s more likely that dosage regime was more effective because it was only the under 55s who received it, whereas the full dosage regime was given to trial volunteers of all ages (vaccines usually being less effective in older people).
76
08/12/2020 12:20:38 8 2
bbc
That is because you are not a scientist so yours is just an uneducated guess or opion.
297
08/12/2020 13:50:38 0 1
bbc
As is your reply? Not rocket science
60
08/12/2020 12:15:39 14 8
bbc
Unlike many on here I dont profess to be a scientist or medical expert ...but is it safe to mix vaccines , especially ones as new as these are ?
77
08/12/2020 12:20:49 14 0
bbc
Mixing them is done all the time, but the point of the proposed trial is to test it on a number of volunteers, just to make sure that it's safe and also to see if it gives better protection than a single vaccine.
26
08/12/2020 12:00:59 2 9
bbc
Here in North Yorkshire we have no access to any vaccine at all. York Hospital is excluded from supplies.
78
08/12/2020 12:20:54 0 1
bbc
All about political sociology isn’t it? Same with the co-op baked in store sausage rolls. They do 4 packs a day and deliberately put them on the shelves when it’s vulnerable people only shopping. Of course by the time the general public are allowed entry again, they’re all gone
46
08/12/2020 12:10:31 11 10
bbc
A vaccine is a medicine to do good. A jab, according to the OED, is "a quick, sharp blow, especially with the fist." Will the BBC please call the vaccine a vaccine and not use a slang term.
79
08/12/2020 12:21:04 10 2
bbc
Also OED... a hypodermic injection, especially a vaccination. "an anti-tetanus jab".

Perfectly understandable to the BBC's audience.
74
08/12/2020 12:19:24 35 5
bbc
Jab it up jab it in, let me begin...
80
08/12/2020 12:21:09 21 1
bbc
and jump arround...
197
08/12/2020 13:15:42 7 3
bbc
... but if you get a nasty reaction, you might end up in a House of Pain!
267
08/12/2020 13:40:20 1 0
bbc
Then they all fall down.
81
08/12/2020 12:22:14 8 4
bbc
If I get the 70% one, then get the 95% one, that should give me 165% protection.
137
08/12/2020 12:47:39 1 1
bbc
Maths not your strong subject then?
75
08/12/2020 12:20:02 8 10
bbc
100..........1 to give it and 99 to applaud.
82
08/12/2020 12:22:23 8 7
bbc
Shame on you.
15
08/12/2020 11:56:09 116 16
bbc
Probably has more to do with the fact the UK has ordered 350 million + doses from the different companies and they all look like they are coming good than an actual need. I bet they will be lambasted for "wasting tax payer money". But hedging their bets on a vaccine was probably sensible.
83
08/12/2020 12:23:06 21 1
bbc
Nothing stopping the uk government donating the excess supplies to the third world after everyone in UK has been vaccinated. It could form part of the UKs generous foriegn aid.
33
08/12/2020 12:06:14 6 22
bbc
First patient received Covid vaccine aged 91!!!!!

There are literally 10s thousands of folk in UK sitting about that need urgent life threatening illnesses treated but have been put on the back burner for this.

Plus they are a bloody sight younger too.

Priorities NHS priorities!
84
08/12/2020 12:23:10 4 0
bbc
Until hospitals not at risk re-filling with severe covid (mostly elderly) then beds aren't free & staff are diverted away. 1st due are nursing home residents, then decreasing from age 80. Wont eliminate what seems endemic vs pandemic as not tested/licensed yet for under 18's, and if continuing child reservoir then adults may require boosters at some, yet to be determined, frequency.
85
08/12/2020 12:23:14 53 3
bbc
For some science sanity. For those that want to just learn and understand how much has gone on since January.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen

Over a thousand papers, from every corner of the Earth, from mortal political enemies to friendly states. No one has escaped, and all have contributed to the science... without borders.
89
OwO
08/12/2020 12:26:50 36 10
bbc
Conveniently ignoring, of course, Russian & Chinese state attempts to steal, damage and obfuscate virus research.

Most of the world has played along (especially individuals) and that's great, but don't pretend this has brought on an age of benevolence.
91
08/12/2020 12:27:53 2 1
bbc
Great link, GGRF!

I just hope that the scientific papers on the various vaccines coming on stream aren't hidden behind expensive paywalls.
101
08/12/2020 12:30:07 0 0
bbc
lots of links and a few adverts

what's the relevent info?
60
08/12/2020 12:15:39 14 8
bbc
Unlike many on here I dont profess to be a scientist or medical expert ...but is it safe to mix vaccines , especially ones as new as these are ?
86
08/12/2020 12:23:16 11 0
bbc
There was a q&a on the beeb about this, apparently this is not a new idea and is used with vaccinating other diseases, remember this approach is only going to be a trial for Covid initially, you have to volunteer for it and then it will go through the same licensing and vetting procedure as the single vaccine has. If it’s approved it will be as safe as any approved vaccine is.
8
08/12/2020 11:50:55 1 3
bbc
BOGOF?
87
08/12/2020 12:23:35 1 2
bbc
Yeah BOGOF BORIS
66
08/12/2020 12:16:52 24 19
bbc
Friendly word of caution - can the beeb dial down the propaganda to eleven please? On TV this morning it was so bad it would almost cause a thinking person to question whether or not to have it?!
88
08/12/2020 12:24:52 33 16
bbc
Reporting news is not propaganda. There is a difference.
110
PJ
08/12/2020 12:34:42 10 3
bbc
News or pushing an agenda?
111
08/12/2020 12:35:01 14 7
bbc
Trouble is the BBC are not good at reporting factual news, they like to put their ideological slant on what they report!
151
08/12/2020 12:55:46 7 10
bbc
BBC (&other MSM), at the request of OFCOM (& you must ask why this is), has only reported on the Govt Covid narrative, no coverage of the other side of the argument, no debate, no coverage of the mass protests all around Europe

There is an information war, but the BBC is spectularly only one one side

It used to be an impartial voice reporting facts, no longer, it now shamelessly pushes an agenda
85
08/12/2020 12:23:14 53 3
bbc
For some science sanity. For those that want to just learn and understand how much has gone on since January.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen

Over a thousand papers, from every corner of the Earth, from mortal political enemies to friendly states. No one has escaped, and all have contributed to the science... without borders.
89
OwO
08/12/2020 12:26:50 36 10
bbc
Conveniently ignoring, of course, Russian & Chinese state attempts to steal, damage and obfuscate virus research.

Most of the world has played along (especially individuals) and that's great, but don't pretend this has brought on an age of benevolence.
153
08/12/2020 12:56:42 8 1
bbc
China and Russia ... those two words and benevolence just do not go together well at all.
181
08/12/2020 13:07:50 1 4
bbc
Proof?
260
08/12/2020 13:38:03 5 5
bbc
That is fake news from Mr Trump. Same as all Chinese companies have military connection and non of the US companies support American army, navy etc.
313
08/12/2020 13:57:24 2 3
bbc
You’ve got a lot of faith in our benevolent western media bubble.
23
08/12/2020 11:59:59 36 11
bbc
Given that Trump is about to sign an order making it illegal to supply other countries with “their” vaccines before the Americans are vaccinated because his administration didn’t buy when offered, I suggest we keep on very good terms with the Belgians and Germans, even after the Oxford vaccine comes on stream, if we want to go multi vaccine or keep with a single one.
90
08/12/2020 12:27:21 14 1
bbc
They were stopping and nicking plane loads of protective equipment made for other countries a few months ago so it wouldn’t be a surprise, would it.

It’s a special kind of special relationship - the kind where you ask your friend for help and on a good day, they’ll offer a helping hand and on a bad day they knock you down and drive over you
148
08/12/2020 12:55:13 16 2
bbc
We don't need to be friends with idiots and crooks like Trump, he's rapidly becoming old news anyway - we need to be friends with Biden. Trump is a nasty piece of work, selfish, ignorant, bullying and quite happy to ignore the constitution and the law for his own personal ends, he's proven that umpteen times over the last 4 years. His behaviour over the last two months has been disgusting.
85
08/12/2020 12:23:14 53 3
bbc
For some science sanity. For those that want to just learn and understand how much has gone on since January.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen

Over a thousand papers, from every corner of the Earth, from mortal political enemies to friendly states. No one has escaped, and all have contributed to the science... without borders.
91
08/12/2020 12:27:53 2 1
bbc
Great link, GGRF!

I just hope that the scientific papers on the various vaccines coming on stream aren't hidden behind expensive paywalls.
75
08/12/2020 12:20:02 8 10
bbc
100..........1 to give it and 99 to applaud.
92
RPH
08/12/2020 12:28:12 4 5
bbc
Hoe many thoughtless posts does it take to look like a brainless troll? Just 1.
118
08/12/2020 12:38:23 2 1
bbc
Sticks and stones........but i never direct nasty comments to anyone.......
55
08/12/2020 12:14:02 2 16
bbc
So it’s basically the flu jab then? No, the flu jab is for a certain strain of flu ,that’s why it doesn’t always work. No wait, covid 19 is a novel coronavirus a one-off. So one vaccine will do the job? No wait, we need two types of the vaccine from different companies??? Is this true or a snare value issue? I think we should be told
93
08/12/2020 12:28:22 4 0
bbc
You are being told. One thing that nobody can complain about is lack of news stories, featuring scientists, doctors, patients and just about everybody else involved.

We don't NEED two vaccines from different companies. Either works on its own, but the scientists are keen to find out if the vaccines are even more effective when combined (for obvious reasons).
94
08/12/2020 12:28:38 2 9
bbc
Shouldn't the priority for distribution of any vaccine be to the workers who are furloughed, can't work from home, established self employed etc. They have been bleating on about the economy for so long it seems that should be the focus of priorities. Or is there method in the madness of starting with the over 80's... they are considered expendable guinea pigs??
124
08/12/2020 12:41:20 4 0
bbc
The over 80s are being vaccinated because they are the most likely to die from Covid-19. Workers are being furloughed ultimately so they don't pass it on to the people most likely to die.
165
08/12/2020 13:03:15 0 0
bbc
I smell envy in the air... Furlough doesn't just pay for workers to "sit at home", it also means these people can keep spending, keep the economy moving and ultimately keep more of us from more redundancies. Bigger picture etc.
95
08/12/2020 12:28:48 3 6
bbc
Why is it taking so long to do the vaccinations??
The first person was done at 0630.
By 1200, they were boasting of having done 50.....yes 50 !!!!
I'll be dead from old age before I get mine.

Surely they can have multiple people doing the vaccinations?
It should be one person per minute as a minimum.
123
08/12/2020 12:40:54 4 0
bbc
Another arm chair expert.
125
08/12/2020 12:41:24 1 1
bbc
Probably having to listen to the old people witter on about their day....
132
08/12/2020 12:45:19 0 0
bbc
Considering they are dealing with frail elderly patients 6.5 mins per patient doesn't seem to bad.
20
08/12/2020 11:58:46 12 20
bbc
I don't want a so called normal life if it means returning to the hellish rat race of commuting and overall clamour that occurred before March
96
OwO
08/12/2020 12:29:00 24 6
bbc
Move closer to work, or work closer to home. The commute is something you bring on yourself specifically to run the rat race, do something about it instead of whining.
135
08/12/2020 12:46:50 13 2
bbc
Not always that straightforward. My company is 8 miles from home (so ok but still sometimes 45 mins). It's the nearest one in my field. Next nearest 50 miles away. V hard to change career in yr 40s without substantial pay cut
241
08/12/2020 13:31:14 11 0
bbc
"Move closer to work, or work closer to home. "

Easy to say, not always easy to do...
97
08/12/2020 12:29:33 1 1
bbc
I assume Rita Ora is at the front of the queue ?

Surely her £10k fine will be enough to pay for it !!!!!!!!
98
08/12/2020 12:13:15 3 8
bbc
Because all this has been rushed through dare I ask if the elderly are first to receive the Vaccine to be used as Guinee pigs. because it laughable when some elderly people go into hospital for treatment and not get it because they are deemed too old and basically just made comfortable to Die peacefully.
the biggest priority should really of been the NHS staff get the jabs first
They were offered it but all refused.... insider knowledge goes a long way. Removed
34
08/12/2020 12:06:24 4 18
bbc
Mix and match or trial and error? It's a bit concerning how quickly this has been pushed through with politics taking precedent over safety. How do the Russians feel about Sputnik V? I might wait a couple of months and see how it goes. I have quite low trust levels at the moment.
99
08/12/2020 12:13:20 2 0
bbc
I love how people who have no idea about the process of vaccines, seemed worried about how the speed of one.

Its as if normally there isn't a world wide pandemic going on, and other factors (economic etc) are also involved in why it usually takes so long.

I think its disrespectful to doubt the independent regulators who have been working 24/7 throughout the pandemic because of your ignorance
33
08/12/2020 12:06:14 6 22
bbc
First patient received Covid vaccine aged 91!!!!!

There are literally 10s thousands of folk in UK sitting about that need urgent life threatening illnesses treated but have been put on the back burner for this.

Plus they are a bloody sight younger too.

Priorities NHS priorities!
100
08/12/2020 12:14:45 3 0
bbc
So because people are old, they are not deserving treatment. What an awful human being you are.