Beer and crisps used to help tackle climate change
07/12/2020 | news | science | 348
Crisps firm Walkers will make fertiliser by mixing potato waste with CO2 from beer fermentation.
1
07/12/2020 10:29:02 73 7
bbc
Walkers should make a start by using recyclable materials for their crisp packets.

And, stop using bags that are usually only filled by 1/3rd!
24
07/12/2020 10:43:28 13 25
bbc
I'm sure that if competitively priced recyclable packaging was available then they would use it.
70
07/12/2020 11:18:35 7 0
bbc
You get he net weight as specified on the packet. The extra space in the bag is there to project the crisps and is filled with nitrogen to keep the crisps fresh.
121
07/12/2020 12:23:49 2 0
bbc
Aparently crisp packets can be recycled, but it seems to be rather complex.
The same material when used for other products cannot be recycled.

You might try a web search on the subject. It confuses me!
137
07/12/2020 13:12:10 0 0
bbc
The empty space in bags is necessary. The 1/3rd is filled with Nitrogen to stop the crisps breaking during transport.
174
07/12/2020 15:10:25 0 0
bbc
its all a con. packaging is always made bigger to make you feel you get more. you actual get a lot less
272
08/12/2020 00:10:09 0 0
bbc
I think you will find that the reason the bags are only partly filled is not to "cheat" you but to allow them to pressure the bags with gas so protecting the crisps from being crushed and you only getting a handful of crumbs. If you notice when you next buy crisps, the bags are under pressure.
280
08/12/2020 08:38:51 0 0
bbc
Trying to fill irregular shaped light wight materials isnt easy because they spread out as they drop. Hence bags have to be able to cope with that at the point of filling in order to make weight. They settle during transit and subsequent breakage.
2
07/12/2020 10:29:22 9 7
bbc
Good news for the environment, Walkers and that nice Mr. Lineker who does their adverts.
57
07/12/2020 11:02:59 1 2
bbc
Lineker is the reason I don't buy their crisps.

Ill-informed, opinionated twit that he is.
3
07/12/2020 10:29:43 26 4
bbc
Wahey..First comment!!
Well, good to see innovative technologies being used, not gonna solve climate change by itself, but every little helps. I'll drink to that (may as well have some crisps on the side too !)
290
08/12/2020 11:05:42 0 1
bbc
Sorry mate you took a wrong turn, youtube is that a way.
4
S
07/12/2020 10:30:44 7 0
bbc
For a minute, I thought this was a randomly generated news headline!

How wrong was I!
5
07/12/2020 10:32:11 65 4
bbc
Does this mean it's now my responsibility to drink more beer? I can deal with that. I'm now a radical environmentalist.
9
07/12/2020 10:34:09 13 15
bbc
Do you have the beard and crusty sandals, too?
6
07/12/2020 10:32:21 51 5
bbc
While we're at it, can we make sure post Brexit all of our Marmite/yeast extract is manufactured in the UK?

It's not as if we're short of breweries to provide the necessary yeast residue, after all. Importing it from the Netherlands was needless, unnecessary extra travel miles.
140
07/12/2020 13:21:05 10 1
bbc
I don't know where the Marmite factory is, but if it is on or near our East cost then it might involve fewer carbon emmissions to ship across the North Sea than truck yeast across England.

Not saying it is, just thinking things sometimes don't turn out the way you expect.
7
07/12/2020 10:33:14 4 2
bbc
Great idea, but all the pubs are shut.
15
07/12/2020 10:37:08 7 0
bbc
Shops aren't. Have a beer and some crisps at home ??
8
07/12/2020 10:33:57 58 6
bbc
Absolute genius. It's joined up thinking like this that'll make a real impact. A 70% reduction is not to be sniffed at.

Hopefully the same philosophy of looking for where waste and byproducts from one industry can be put to good use in other industries will become more common in the future.

Brilliant, congrats to CCm and also credit to Walkers for investing in and implementing new technology.
14
07/12/2020 10:36:29 36 1
bbc
And congrats to the Government for giving out the grant.
38
07/12/2020 10:55:18 4 0
bbc
If you ever do any gardening, you know the value of composting... all your food and cardboard waste in a bin, aerate and in a few weeks or months you have what is referred to as 'Black Gold'.

I can not believe that the food industry is just rediscovering this practice!
5
07/12/2020 10:32:11 65 4
bbc
Does this mean it's now my responsibility to drink more beer? I can deal with that. I'm now a radical environmentalist.
9
07/12/2020 10:34:09 13 15
bbc
Do you have the beard and crusty sandals, too?
48
07/12/2020 11:00:25 5 0
bbc
Years ago beards were compulsory for members of the real ale fraternity. Though not for the women!
10
07/12/2020 10:34:37 6 6
bbc
makes you wonder why multi-million pound companies wait until they are legally obliged to do what is right by people and the environment - no ethics at play here clearly
13
07/12/2020 10:35:59 7 1
bbc
Because if these things cost money they will lose out to their competitors who don't spend money doing it.
11
07/12/2020 10:35:13 3 1
bbc
Do Scotch eggs count? Asking for a friend who doesn't actually know what they are.
12
07/12/2020 10:35:48 4 4
bbc
Oversized bags that litter the countryside are a bigger problem.
22
07/12/2020 10:40:00 16 0
bbc
No, people who litter the countryside are a bigger problem.
10
07/12/2020 10:34:37 6 6
bbc
makes you wonder why multi-million pound companies wait until they are legally obliged to do what is right by people and the environment - no ethics at play here clearly
13
07/12/2020 10:35:59 7 1
bbc
Because if these things cost money they will lose out to their competitors who don't spend money doing it.
8
07/12/2020 10:33:57 58 6
bbc
Absolute genius. It's joined up thinking like this that'll make a real impact. A 70% reduction is not to be sniffed at.

Hopefully the same philosophy of looking for where waste and byproducts from one industry can be put to good use in other industries will become more common in the future.

Brilliant, congrats to CCm and also credit to Walkers for investing in and implementing new technology.
14
07/12/2020 10:36:29 36 1
bbc
And congrats to the Government for giving out the grant.
78
07/12/2020 11:28:11 4 6
bbc
As if Pepsi need a grant for a tiny research problem like this. It shows how useless capitalism is if they won’t do a thing until they get tax payers money.
It’s a pity the grant didn’t go to an all UK company and keep the profits and the bragging rights in the UK.
7
07/12/2020 10:33:14 4 2
bbc
Great idea, but all the pubs are shut.
15
07/12/2020 10:37:08 7 0
bbc
Shops aren't. Have a beer and some crisps at home ??
16
07/12/2020 10:38:13 8 4
bbc
Wonderful news. Now, perhaps we can ban brussels sprouts because of emissions being unfriendly to the environment!
17
07/12/2020 10:35:40 64 14
bbc
If Walkers want to reduce unwanted emissions then ditching Linker should be priority number one.
56
07/12/2020 10:59:53 7 1
bbc
Nah - that would just move the emission of hot air somewhere else, like the westmanufacturing moving to China. ;-)
152
07/12/2020 13:53:19 0 4
bbc
That is the funniest thing I have read in years!
267
07/12/2020 21:30:11 0 2
bbc
Its 'Lineker' you ignoramus.
18
07/12/2020 10:39:09 21 2
bbc
So just need the pubs to be re-opened for me to do my bit for the environment. Come on that vaccine.
19
07/12/2020 10:39:47 25 2
bbc
This is part of the green revolution that is talked about, new jobs in innovative companies. The UK has the university and research facilities to back up these startups and entrepreneurs in new green technology, and the will and the workforce to match!
55
07/12/2020 11:06:39 6 3
bbc
Often forgotten how much of daily life comes from backroom research and development.
After all, what would Xmas be like without the blue LED?
20
07/12/2020 10:39:56 15 15
bbc
More drivel from the BBC! Totally ignoring the FACT that atmospheric Co2 levels have not deviated 1 ppm from their natural cycles after lockdowns began in a year ago China and abruptly the entire world in March, yet zero footprint in the data. Proving that 96% is from natural sources and pathetic vertue signalling - Ignore the BBC here are the FACTS:
https://sioweb.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/
35
07/12/2020 10:50:54 8 8
bbc
You going to upset the resident trolls who demand that only the worst possible outcome should be considered. This is despite the IPCC themselves saying that the these scenarios although possible are not probable.

So much for the eco-trolls who demand that people listen the scientists, while ignore the scientists statements themselves. Remember they claim that the sun has no effect whatsoever??
67
RDB
07/12/2020 11:17:03 4 2
bbc
Do you honestly think that after years of pollution, that all the harm would be undone in a few months of slowed economic activity?!
95
07/12/2020 11:57:52 3 2
bbc
Huh? The BBC have posted dozens of articles saying CO2 levels haven't changed much during the covid year, eg. most recently:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-55018581

And they have hardly changed because human CO2 output has only gone down by 10-20% percent, and only for a few months. Exactly as everyone has been patiently explaining to you all year.
118
07/12/2020 12:18:56 4 2
bbc
It has been explained to you countless times that a less than 20% reduction in CO2 emissions for a few months will have no significant effect on the CO2 in the atmosphere which has accumulated for the last 2 centuries and has a long residence time. However you appear to be too lacking in brain cells to understand this.
136
07/12/2020 13:09:39 1 2
bbc
I've just been watching YT videos by flat Earthers - you climate change deniers sound just like them.
21
07/12/2020 10:39:59 7 0
bbc
Oversized bags with a few crisps that taste like fertiliser!
12
07/12/2020 10:35:48 4 4
bbc
Oversized bags that litter the countryside are a bigger problem.
22
07/12/2020 10:40:00 16 0
bbc
No, people who litter the countryside are a bigger problem.
66
07/12/2020 11:16:27 0 0
bbc
People are the cause of many of the problems affecting the planet.
On a walk yesterday, almost all the litter was food and drink related.
It's rare to see someone making an active effort to dispose of a sandwich packet responsibly, and vehicle users are some of the worst offenders.
Also, funny how masks are worn to prevent cross infection then casually dropped on the pavements.
23
07/12/2020 10:40:01 4 5
bbc
"Beer and crisps used to help tackle climate change"

Hallelujah! The world will be saved!

Great to know the EBC has that covered!
1
07/12/2020 10:29:02 73 7
bbc
Walkers should make a start by using recyclable materials for their crisp packets.

And, stop using bags that are usually only filled by 1/3rd!
24
07/12/2020 10:43:28 13 25
bbc
I'm sure that if competitively priced recyclable packaging was available then they would use it.
47
07/12/2020 11:00:07 2 5
bbc
And that's the rub, anything green costs twice the price.
76
07/12/2020 11:23:56 6 1
bbc
Keith. I think the scientific projections and the evidence of the weather makes the excuse that what you do to make a profit is only about price of supplies a bit out of date.
Complacency like this will kill the world.
Crisps used to be sold in paper bags, and they are an extremely profitable way to sell a few grams of oily potatoes. Most of the cost to the consumer goes on the advertising.
25
07/12/2020 10:43:44 2 7
bbc
Well of course, why didn't I think of that of course crisps have more of an effect on the planet than the sun, der!!!!
So the fact that the sun has expanded 0.001 % in the last few years has got absolutely nothing to with it, the Loony's have really excelled this time.
71
RDB
07/12/2020 11:19:52 1 1
bbc
The point is about innovative thinking to find different ways of doing things while maintaining economic activity (rather than whinging).
79
07/12/2020 11:32:10 2 0
bbc
Where did you get that figure from? The sun has expanded about 20 % in the last 4 billion years so that equates to about 0,001 % in the last 200,000 years. Strange use of the word "few"? There is no scientific evidence whatsoever that the steady increase in the Earth's average surface temperature is caused by an increase in solar output. There is a cyclical change throughout the sunspot cycle.
155
07/12/2020 14:21:43 0 0
bbc
Don't know where you get this nonsense. The sun is currently in the most stable phase of its life cycle.
26
Ken
07/12/2020 10:44:38 1 12
bbc
There would not be any emmisions if the dreadfull drug alcohol was not produce and everone would have much better health if we banned Crisps.
29
07/12/2020 10:46:53 2 0
bbc
That's a bit miserable :/
34
07/12/2020 10:50:30 4 0
bbc
Get some ale down you.
37
07/12/2020 10:53:01 5 0
bbc
Blimey! All round to Ken's for Christmas for a lump of coal and tails of woe.

Mood hoover!
39
07/12/2020 10:56:28 4 0
bbc
Not everyone who drinks alcohol abuses it!

Not everyone who eats crisps is overweight!

However, most people who abstain from all pleasures are boring.
49
07/12/2020 10:57:46 1 0
bbc
You sound somewhat morose.

What you need is a good stiff drin...

...oh, wait...

;-)
27
07/12/2020 10:44:58 13 4
bbc
Would be better if they explained the process. Fertiliser usually contains a source of nitrogen and essential minerals. Plants can aquire all the CO2 they need from the atmosphere. Composting the potato waste and spreading it on the fields would probably be as effective.
Cannot help thinking this is a bit of greenwashing.
50
07/12/2020 11:02:20 5 0
bbc
Yes
Probably best described as a soil conditioner.
Breweries have been selling off spent hops for years to local farmers.
Digesting the potato waste is like digesting sewage sludge to kill off harmful micro-organisms and make it nicer to handle. Methane is the by-product.
I too suspect it won't be long before Walkers are adding a new Eco flavoured crisp to the line-up. Another "Eco" product
199
07/12/2020 16:23:21 0 0
bbc
Bacon flavoured to be renamed Hogwash Crisps
28
07/12/2020 10:45:55 1 10
bbc
Be better if they didnt produce crisps in the 1st place.
26
Ken
07/12/2020 10:44:38 1 12
bbc
There would not be any emmisions if the dreadfull drug alcohol was not produce and everone would have much better health if we banned Crisps.
29
07/12/2020 10:46:53 2 0
bbc
That's a bit miserable :/
30
07/12/2020 10:46:56 5 1
bbc
I have a great idea of how to cut C02. I'll stop driving. Can I now have a government grant?
31
07/12/2020 10:48:05 13 6
bbc
Gradually changing the way we do things, along with new technology, is the way to deal with climate change. Not stick waving at ordinary people living their lives.

I'd also like to see an aim for world population to have peaked before 2050, measures to encourage all to have no more than 2 children.
32
07/12/2020 10:49:36 5 5
bbc
Garbage

End of

BBC, next topic !
46
07/12/2020 10:55:58 0 1
bbc
An unsurprising post, as you're a supporter of everything Chinese, presumably including their ever increasing CO2 output.
33
07/12/2020 10:50:26 9 1
bbc
Note : They don't mention the increase in methane emissions from the consumption of beer and crisps
26
Ken
07/12/2020 10:44:38 1 12
bbc
There would not be any emmisions if the dreadfull drug alcohol was not produce and everone would have much better health if we banned Crisps.
34
07/12/2020 10:50:30 4 0
bbc
Get some ale down you.
20
07/12/2020 10:39:56 15 15
bbc
More drivel from the BBC! Totally ignoring the FACT that atmospheric Co2 levels have not deviated 1 ppm from their natural cycles after lockdowns began in a year ago China and abruptly the entire world in March, yet zero footprint in the data. Proving that 96% is from natural sources and pathetic vertue signalling - Ignore the BBC here are the FACTS:
https://sioweb.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/
35
07/12/2020 10:50:54 8 8
bbc
You going to upset the resident trolls who demand that only the worst possible outcome should be considered. This is despite the IPCC themselves saying that the these scenarios although possible are not probable.

So much for the eco-trolls who demand that people listen the scientists, while ignore the scientists statements themselves. Remember they claim that the sun has no effect whatsoever??
52
07/12/2020 11:02:54 3 3
bbc
The BBC and EcoLoons are caught in a runaway lie when it comes to Co2 - They have an irrational, absurd, perverted obsession with it and in previous years were busy telling us how atmospheric levels were linked to increased economic output, GDP's, excessive flying, road, sea transport, blah blah... Yet after a year of lockdowns the levels have not deviated at all:
https://www.co2.earth/daily-co2
114
07/12/2020 12:16:20 1 1
bbc
And you will be able to point us to a scientific paper that says the rises in global temperatures over the last 50 years or so have been because of the changing output from the sun will you?
36
07/12/2020 10:52:09 15 3
bbc
So, they have actually 'discovered' composting. Amazing.

Now all we need to do is put all food waste into giant composters, and hey presto, better soil, better agriculture, healthier system.

A bit like what was done traditionally. Genius.
161
07/12/2020 14:26:56 6 4
bbc
I take it you didn't understand what was written. I'll recap: they are using bacteria to produce methane from the potato waste. They use the methane to produce electricity . The waste from the anaerobic digester is mixed with CO2 captured from another process to produce fertilizer.
A little more complicated than composting.
26
Ken
07/12/2020 10:44:38 1 12
bbc
There would not be any emmisions if the dreadfull drug alcohol was not produce and everone would have much better health if we banned Crisps.
37
07/12/2020 10:53:01 5 0
bbc
Blimey! All round to Ken's for Christmas for a lump of coal and tails of woe.

Mood hoover!
8
07/12/2020 10:33:57 58 6
bbc
Absolute genius. It's joined up thinking like this that'll make a real impact. A 70% reduction is not to be sniffed at.

Hopefully the same philosophy of looking for where waste and byproducts from one industry can be put to good use in other industries will become more common in the future.

Brilliant, congrats to CCm and also credit to Walkers for investing in and implementing new technology.
38
07/12/2020 10:55:18 4 0
bbc
If you ever do any gardening, you know the value of composting... all your food and cardboard waste in a bin, aerate and in a few weeks or months you have what is referred to as 'Black Gold'.

I can not believe that the food industry is just rediscovering this practice!
60
07/12/2020 11:12:54 4 0
bbc
Capturing waste gas from one process then moving it offsite to be put to good use in an entirely separate industry is a lot more complex than composting... The principles may be similar, but safe, efficient execution is where the technology is revolutionary.

It's like saying a bus is the same as an airliner: both move large numbers of people, but the technical challenges are entirely different.
111
07/12/2020 12:13:51 6 0
bbc
"I cannot believe that the food industry is just rediscovering this practice!" That's because it isn't! Anaerobic digestion is not composting and the CO2 plus potato waste fertiliser is pretty novel.
26
Ken
07/12/2020 10:44:38 1 12
bbc
There would not be any emmisions if the dreadfull drug alcohol was not produce and everone would have much better health if we banned Crisps.
39
07/12/2020 10:56:28 4 0
bbc
Not everyone who drinks alcohol abuses it!

Not everyone who eats crisps is overweight!

However, most people who abstain from all pleasures are boring.
40
07/12/2020 10:58:29 14 0
bbc
Solid edible waste from left over from beer and cider brewing has been recycled for animal feed for years. I can remember when Admans brewery in Suffolk started feeding pigs decades ago. The only drawback was if they fed them too much they fell over drunk!
162
07/12/2020 14:24:34 4 0
bbc
We used to use spent hops as a soil conditioner on nurseries.
41
07/12/2020 10:53:22 5 4
bbc
The BBC incessantly pushes these articles to the fore, often without considering either their worth or for that matter the claims made.
Take yesterday's article regarding the Thames Tunnel.
Environmentalists are now after ALL cars, including EV's.
What they really want is humanity to revert to a pre industrial age.
105
QED
07/12/2020 12:03:06 2 3
bbc
If we don’t want to lose our nice advanced society due to the effects of CC then we need to get our emissions down to pre industrial levels. If we are smart and act now it doesn’t mean we have go back to in other ways. If we follow your head in the sand mentality then we may be forced to that and worse.
42
07/12/2020 10:53:29 4 6
bbc
More climate cobblers.
43
07/12/2020 10:59:08 8 5
bbc
Climate change is increased by a lot of what we do, but it will happen anyway. Going back through centuries and further there are periods of extreme climatic conditions that will continue to happen regardless of what happens to crisps, beer and anything else. What we do or don't do in the UK is largely irelevant , it's the USA and China who are the high contributors.
98
QED
07/12/2020 11:59:17 3 0
bbc
China has high contributions because they produce the goods we love to buy. If you take that into account we make a large contribution.
44
07/12/2020 10:59:42 1 3
bbc
I REMEMBER IT WELL,THERE WAS A CRISP FACTORY IN READING CALLED ( CRIMPY CRISPS) AND DAILY ALL THE SET STARCH WAS COLLECTED TO FEED PIGS AND CATTLE IN BERKSHIRE SO THERE IS NOTHING NEW ABOUT THIS JUST LINAKER SPIN.
103
07/12/2020 12:00:54 1 0
bbc
I think you've eaten too much salt.
45
07/12/2020 10:55:24 3 7
bbc
It’s called climate change nowadays, the name was changed from global warming... because there isn’t any.

As far as I’ve managed to see back in time with research scientists have been saying that the ice caps will melt within a decade due to irreversible changes since at least the 1920s... for over 100 years!
96
QED
07/12/2020 11:57:52 2 2
bbc
Another cc denier. Global warming is a subset of climate change. The term climate change was coined Republican political strategist Frank Luntz in a controversial memo advising conservative politicians on communicating about CC.
‘It’s time for us to start talking about “climate change” instead of global warming’
“Climate change” is less frightening than “global warming”.
106
07/12/2020 12:04:41 1 0
bbc
Not quite, in the seventies they were predicting a mini ice age!
32
07/12/2020 10:49:36 5 5
bbc
Garbage

End of

BBC, next topic !
46
07/12/2020 10:55:58 0 1
bbc
An unsurprising post, as you're a supporter of everything Chinese, presumably including their ever increasing CO2 output.
24
07/12/2020 10:43:28 13 25
bbc
I'm sure that if competitively priced recyclable packaging was available then they would use it.
47
07/12/2020 11:00:07 2 5
bbc
And that's the rub, anything green costs twice the price.
168
07/12/2020 14:50:06 4 0
bbc
No, those things that aren't green cost more in the long run, but that long run cost is left for those in the future to pay.
9
07/12/2020 10:34:09 13 15
bbc
Do you have the beard and crusty sandals, too?
48
07/12/2020 11:00:25 5 0
bbc
Years ago beards were compulsory for members of the real ale fraternity. Though not for the women!
26
Ken
07/12/2020 10:44:38 1 12
bbc
There would not be any emmisions if the dreadfull drug alcohol was not produce and everone would have much better health if we banned Crisps.
49
07/12/2020 10:57:46 1 0
bbc
You sound somewhat morose.

What you need is a good stiff drin...

...oh, wait...

;-)
27
07/12/2020 10:44:58 13 4
bbc
Would be better if they explained the process. Fertiliser usually contains a source of nitrogen and essential minerals. Plants can aquire all the CO2 they need from the atmosphere. Composting the potato waste and spreading it on the fields would probably be as effective.
Cannot help thinking this is a bit of greenwashing.
50
07/12/2020 11:02:20 5 0
bbc
Yes
Probably best described as a soil conditioner.
Breweries have been selling off spent hops for years to local farmers.
Digesting the potato waste is like digesting sewage sludge to kill off harmful micro-organisms and make it nicer to handle. Methane is the by-product.
I too suspect it won't be long before Walkers are adding a new Eco flavoured crisp to the line-up. Another "Eco" product
51
07/12/2020 11:02:33 3 1
bbc
What about all the bubbles in Pesi? CO2 is actually the prime product. Fizzy drinks are just water with CO2 and flavouring added.
Green washing?
125
07/12/2020 12:30:54 0 0
bbc
CO2 used for carbonated drinks and other uses is a byproduct of ammonia production, a good deal of which is used to make fertilisers. There was a shortage of CO2 last year, because the ammonia market was oversupplied, so production was reduced. Nitrogen can be used instead of CO2 in fizzy drinks. I believe Guinness do this to create a smoother beer.
35
07/12/2020 10:50:54 8 8
bbc
You going to upset the resident trolls who demand that only the worst possible outcome should be considered. This is despite the IPCC themselves saying that the these scenarios although possible are not probable.

So much for the eco-trolls who demand that people listen the scientists, while ignore the scientists statements themselves. Remember they claim that the sun has no effect whatsoever??
52
07/12/2020 11:02:54 3 3
bbc
The BBC and EcoLoons are caught in a runaway lie when it comes to Co2 - They have an irrational, absurd, perverted obsession with it and in previous years were busy telling us how atmospheric levels were linked to increased economic output, GDP's, excessive flying, road, sea transport, blah blah... Yet after a year of lockdowns the levels have not deviated at all:
https://www.co2.earth/daily-co2
64
07/12/2020 11:15:22 3 1
bbc
Not totally surprised that little impact has been noticed. The lockdown was in name only for the majority. For the rest they still cooked, washed (hopefully) & consumed a lot of streaming.

Bigger impact than the lockdown will be the continuous destruction of all the carbon sinks that will release recently sequestered CO2. Since 1800s these have been reduced at an ever increasing rate.
74
07/12/2020 11:20:54 4 3
bbc
"telling us how atmospheric levels were linked to increased economic output, GDP's..."

Yep sounds like the leader of XR who is politically driven to change society to some socialist outcome. He is just using the "eco" movement as a weapon.

Ban flying & cars regardless to how much pollution they generate is proof enough its political. Electric planes exists yet still evil!!
53
07/12/2020 11:04:04 1 1
bbc
Cannot help thinking that this is a way of using a byproduct from brewing rather than a way of making fertiliser.
58
07/12/2020 11:09:14 1 1
bbc
Thats exactly what it is. Some farmers think they are getting a good deal when they get the spent grains as feed, but in reality it saves breweries from the disposal costs.
54
07/12/2020 11:06:14 1 1
bbc
Some good news for once!

It would be more convincing if they had multiple sources for the CO2 though.

Right now we have a reduction in Marmite production because the yeast they use comes from the breweries which are not running to the same levels due to reduced sales of beer.

Presumably those same breweries are not producing the CO2 in similar proportion.
19
07/12/2020 10:39:47 25 2
bbc
This is part of the green revolution that is talked about, new jobs in innovative companies. The UK has the university and research facilities to back up these startups and entrepreneurs in new green technology, and the will and the workforce to match!
55
07/12/2020 11:06:39 6 3
bbc
Often forgotten how much of daily life comes from backroom research and development.
After all, what would Xmas be like without the blue LED?
228
07/12/2020 17:50:10 1 0
bbc
lit better
17
07/12/2020 10:35:40 64 14
bbc
If Walkers want to reduce unwanted emissions then ditching Linker should be priority number one.
56
07/12/2020 10:59:53 7 1
bbc
Nah - that would just move the emission of hot air somewhere else, like the westmanufacturing moving to China. ;-)
2
07/12/2020 10:29:22 9 7
bbc
Good news for the environment, Walkers and that nice Mr. Lineker who does their adverts.
57
07/12/2020 11:02:59 1 2
bbc
Lineker is the reason I don't buy their crisps.

Ill-informed, opinionated twit that he is.
100
07/12/2020 11:59:56 1 1
bbc
Whereas you sound like the voice of reason, balance and informed choice? Where have you been hiding?
53
07/12/2020 11:04:04 1 1
bbc
Cannot help thinking that this is a way of using a byproduct from brewing rather than a way of making fertiliser.
58
07/12/2020 11:09:14 1 1
bbc
Thats exactly what it is. Some farmers think they are getting a good deal when they get the spent grains as feed, but in reality it saves breweries from the disposal costs.
59
07/12/2020 11:11:31 1 2
bbc
But it is all theoretical because crisp sales are down. They are not a substantial meal so we are not allowed to buy them with a beer. The NHS want us to lose weight by controlling portion size. The government want us to eat a substantial meal every day. Try doing that and keeping within 2000 cals. 4 pints (800 cal) and a cheese roll is fine (£13 is a cheap evening out). £30 main meal is too much.
65
07/12/2020 11:15:44 2 0
bbc
True, but potatoes are also processed into other things and the same general principle will apply.
38
07/12/2020 10:55:18 4 0
bbc
If you ever do any gardening, you know the value of composting... all your food and cardboard waste in a bin, aerate and in a few weeks or months you have what is referred to as 'Black Gold'.

I can not believe that the food industry is just rediscovering this practice!
60
07/12/2020 11:12:54 4 0
bbc
Capturing waste gas from one process then moving it offsite to be put to good use in an entirely separate industry is a lot more complex than composting... The principles may be similar, but safe, efficient execution is where the technology is revolutionary.

It's like saying a bus is the same as an airliner: both move large numbers of people, but the technical challenges are entirely different.
61
07/12/2020 11:13:27 1 0
bbc
If this process really takes off we could reach a point where beer and marmite become byproducts of the carbon-fixing fertiliser business.

That feels fundamentally wrong, but I can't quite explain why.
62
07/12/2020 11:13:48 5 6
bbc
Glorified advert for Walkers. Junk food and booze! Make you sick.
63
07/12/2020 11:14:56 3 1
bbc
OK, if Sir David approves, or is it just his photo again.................................................................
52
07/12/2020 11:02:54 3 3
bbc
The BBC and EcoLoons are caught in a runaway lie when it comes to Co2 - They have an irrational, absurd, perverted obsession with it and in previous years were busy telling us how atmospheric levels were linked to increased economic output, GDP's, excessive flying, road, sea transport, blah blah... Yet after a year of lockdowns the levels have not deviated at all:
https://www.co2.earth/daily-co2
64
07/12/2020 11:15:22 3 1
bbc
Not totally surprised that little impact has been noticed. The lockdown was in name only for the majority. For the rest they still cooked, washed (hopefully) & consumed a lot of streaming.

Bigger impact than the lockdown will be the continuous destruction of all the carbon sinks that will release recently sequestered CO2. Since 1800s these have been reduced at an ever increasing rate.
59
07/12/2020 11:11:31 1 2
bbc
But it is all theoretical because crisp sales are down. They are not a substantial meal so we are not allowed to buy them with a beer. The NHS want us to lose weight by controlling portion size. The government want us to eat a substantial meal every day. Try doing that and keeping within 2000 cals. 4 pints (800 cal) and a cheese roll is fine (£13 is a cheap evening out). £30 main meal is too much.
65
07/12/2020 11:15:44 2 0
bbc
True, but potatoes are also processed into other things and the same general principle will apply.
22
07/12/2020 10:40:00 16 0
bbc
No, people who litter the countryside are a bigger problem.
66
07/12/2020 11:16:27 0 0
bbc
People are the cause of many of the problems affecting the planet.
On a walk yesterday, almost all the litter was food and drink related.
It's rare to see someone making an active effort to dispose of a sandwich packet responsibly, and vehicle users are some of the worst offenders.
Also, funny how masks are worn to prevent cross infection then casually dropped on the pavements.
20
07/12/2020 10:39:56 15 15
bbc
More drivel from the BBC! Totally ignoring the FACT that atmospheric Co2 levels have not deviated 1 ppm from their natural cycles after lockdowns began in a year ago China and abruptly the entire world in March, yet zero footprint in the data. Proving that 96% is from natural sources and pathetic vertue signalling - Ignore the BBC here are the FACTS:
https://sioweb.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/
67
RDB
07/12/2020 11:17:03 4 2
bbc
Do you honestly think that after years of pollution, that all the harm would be undone in a few months of slowed economic activity?!
89
07/12/2020 11:51:38 3 3
bbc
Yes if nature can add or take between 6 to 10 ppm in and out of the atmosphere every single year in the carbon cycle and it’s clearly seen in the Data and Keeling cycling through plant photosynthesis and ocean out gassing, the fact that the lockdowns never showed in the data proves its naturally regulated and we have no control - BBC are ignoring these facts and very latest data!!!!
115
07/12/2020 12:16:22 3 0
bbc
Tim, nice but dim.
68
07/12/2020 11:17:15 7 8
bbc
You have got to laugh at these green activists masquerading as journalists.
They know that increased atmospheric CO2 is good for crop yields yet demonize this wonderful " gas of life".
The fact that CO2 has never driven the climate in all of geological history doesn't appear to to have registered with them either.
Clueless.
86
QED
07/12/2020 11:45:51 5 2
bbc
Wrong and wrong. Some plants grow more with a SMALL rise in co2, but pump it up further and they suffer. Co2 mechanism for driving climate is understood, and when volcanic eruptions in the past raised co2 they caused climate change. Do you think this won’t happen just because we are raising co2 rather than volcanic action?
104
07/12/2020 12:01:03 4 3
bbc
That's strange, why does the Geological Society of London believe that CO2 has been important for driving climate throughout Earth history and that the recent rise in global temperatures is due to humans increasing CO2 in the atmosphere. Could it be they know something about geological history and you know SFA?
107
07/12/2020 12:05:03 3 2
bbc
There is an appropriate level of CO2 in the amosphere. Nobody is asking for zero CO2, but, right now, we have a bit too much.

Since you admit to being clueless, here's one: it has been shown that CO2 has been making a contribution to climate change since the industrial revolution.

There are other gasses which drive global warming. CO2 is just one that needs to be fixed.
69
07/12/2020 11:17:24 6 1
bbc
No way would I buy a pint from the place that poured the one used in your lead photo!
1
07/12/2020 10:29:02 73 7
bbc
Walkers should make a start by using recyclable materials for their crisp packets.

And, stop using bags that are usually only filled by 1/3rd!
70
07/12/2020 11:18:35 7 0
bbc
You get he net weight as specified on the packet. The extra space in the bag is there to project the crisps and is filled with nitrogen to keep the crisps fresh.
25
07/12/2020 10:43:44 2 7
bbc
Well of course, why didn't I think of that of course crisps have more of an effect on the planet than the sun, der!!!!
So the fact that the sun has expanded 0.001 % in the last few years has got absolutely nothing to with it, the Loony's have really excelled this time.
71
RDB
07/12/2020 11:19:52 1 1
bbc
The point is about innovative thinking to find different ways of doing things while maintaining economic activity (rather than whinging).
72
07/12/2020 11:20:19 2 4
bbc
Tackling climate change seems futile. On the one hand, we cannot do nothing. We have to make an effort to reverse climate change. But will we ultimately succeed? I believe not. The Sahara desert was once a sea. Climate change caused that before humans polluted the planet, so such processes will continue. Planets change - with or without us.
Then there are asteroids, super-volacnoes.
81
07/12/2020 11:34:42 3 4
bbc
The Sahara used to be lush and had lakes larger than the UK. Occurred during the Egyptian empire when it was 4C warmer than today.
The Sahara is large enough to absorb all the possible sea level rises from melting ice & thermal expansion. Only issue is to pump all of that water far enough inland for it to be absorbed by the porous rock & sediments. Big ask, but not unfeasible given 200 years.
82
07/12/2020 11:37:54 0 3
bbc
"Then there are asteroids, super-volcanoes."
Interestingly the eco-worriers demand that we listen to improbable forecasts as if they were a certainty and change every aspect of society. Yet they dont demand we take any precautions about other risks, if anything they encourage more death & destruction because of the what they refuse to even discuss.
119
07/12/2020 12:21:54 1 1
bbc
I think there is a big difference between "futile" and "difficult". The fatalism you appear to be proposing looks like "Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die." I think these various measures which you call "futile" could, taken together, make life better than it would have been without them. Not perfect, but maybe good enough.
258
07/12/2020 20:26:49 0 0
bbc
Just like Covid .... don't worry, if you wear your knickers on your face, both will (NOT) go away.
73
07/12/2020 11:20:33 2 8
bbc
Once we leave the EU we could have zero vat / tax rated alcohol production. This would breach the EU level playing field but would be a great way to get us consuming home grown British beer and marmite crisps instead of imported Peroni and Corona Extra with brioche buns and cheesy nachos. We could become a food independent nation.
83
QED
07/12/2020 11:40:43 5 1
bbc
We haven’t been a food independent nation since before the 2nd world war, what an earth makes you think this is going to change now? Oh sorry leave voter so no relation to reality, all pie in the sky.
148
07/12/2020 13:46:14 0 0
bbc
Rubbish, Nothing to do with the EU. I drink locally produced beer people like you drinking peroni and many so-called foreign lagers choose to do so instead of supporting local brewers
52
07/12/2020 11:02:54 3 3
bbc
The BBC and EcoLoons are caught in a runaway lie when it comes to Co2 - They have an irrational, absurd, perverted obsession with it and in previous years were busy telling us how atmospheric levels were linked to increased economic output, GDP's, excessive flying, road, sea transport, blah blah... Yet after a year of lockdowns the levels have not deviated at all:
https://www.co2.earth/daily-co2
74
07/12/2020 11:20:54 4 3
bbc
"telling us how atmospheric levels were linked to increased economic output, GDP's..."

Yep sounds like the leader of XR who is politically driven to change society to some socialist outcome. He is just using the "eco" movement as a weapon.

Ban flying & cars regardless to how much pollution they generate is proof enough its political. Electric planes exists yet still evil!!
75
07/12/2020 11:22:20 21 18
bbc
I refuse to buy any Walkers product whilst they sponsor Linekar.

His vapid Liberal posturing and BBC style virtue signalling are vomit inducing.

He is the very worst of the BBC cabal, simply full of it.
80
07/12/2020 11:34:28 13 14
bbc
Totally irrelevent.
185
07/12/2020 15:45:52 1 1
bbc
It's 'Lineker' you ignoramus. That explains your ignorant post.
24
07/12/2020 10:43:28 13 25
bbc
I'm sure that if competitively priced recyclable packaging was available then they would use it.
76
07/12/2020 11:23:56 6 1
bbc
Keith. I think the scientific projections and the evidence of the weather makes the excuse that what you do to make a profit is only about price of supplies a bit out of date.
Complacency like this will kill the world.
Crisps used to be sold in paper bags, and they are an extremely profitable way to sell a few grams of oily potatoes. Most of the cost to the consumer goes on the advertising.
77
07/12/2020 11:26:03 1 0
bbc
Sounds like an excellent new technology. If you've ever been in a brew room you can't be in there a long time as the level of co2 will do for you. It's this excess co2 that goes into the atmosphere which is sequestered into the waste which will then jolly off to the farm. Interesting technology or does the resulting fertiliser release it out to atmosphere. I'd like to know more
97
07/12/2020 11:58:54 1 0
bbc
I would like to know what biochemistry is going on to react organic waste with CO2. As you say, if using the fertiliser releases the CO2, then you have not gained anything.
14
07/12/2020 10:36:29 36 1
bbc
And congrats to the Government for giving out the grant.
78
07/12/2020 11:28:11 4 6
bbc
As if Pepsi need a grant for a tiny research problem like this. It shows how useless capitalism is if they won’t do a thing until they get tax payers money.
It’s a pity the grant didn’t go to an all UK company and keep the profits and the bragging rights in the UK.
191
07/12/2020 16:11:24 3 0
bbc
CCm look like they are a UK company, so you can sleep soundly.
25
07/12/2020 10:43:44 2 7
bbc
Well of course, why didn't I think of that of course crisps have more of an effect on the planet than the sun, der!!!!
So the fact that the sun has expanded 0.001 % in the last few years has got absolutely nothing to with it, the Loony's have really excelled this time.
79
07/12/2020 11:32:10 2 0
bbc
Where did you get that figure from? The sun has expanded about 20 % in the last 4 billion years so that equates to about 0,001 % in the last 200,000 years. Strange use of the word "few"? There is no scientific evidence whatsoever that the steady increase in the Earth's average surface temperature is caused by an increase in solar output. There is a cyclical change throughout the sunspot cycle.
75
07/12/2020 11:22:20 21 18
bbc
I refuse to buy any Walkers product whilst they sponsor Linekar.

His vapid Liberal posturing and BBC style virtue signalling are vomit inducing.

He is the very worst of the BBC cabal, simply full of it.
80
07/12/2020 11:34:28 13 14
bbc
Totally irrelevent.
88
07/12/2020 11:51:26 8 1
bbc
But true.
101
07/12/2020 12:00:08 7 3
bbc
He is, Mr Lineker. Totally irrelevant, massively overpaid, and rich. Why do those that have loads of cash already feel the need to take jobs and opportunities from everyone else. He has got more money than he could ever spend and could retire now and volunteer at food banks and refugee centres, if those causes are so close to his heart.
72
07/12/2020 11:20:19 2 4
bbc
Tackling climate change seems futile. On the one hand, we cannot do nothing. We have to make an effort to reverse climate change. But will we ultimately succeed? I believe not. The Sahara desert was once a sea. Climate change caused that before humans polluted the planet, so such processes will continue. Planets change - with or without us.
Then there are asteroids, super-volacnoes.
81
07/12/2020 11:34:42 3 4
bbc
The Sahara used to be lush and had lakes larger than the UK. Occurred during the Egyptian empire when it was 4C warmer than today.
The Sahara is large enough to absorb all the possible sea level rises from melting ice & thermal expansion. Only issue is to pump all of that water far enough inland for it to be absorbed by the porous rock & sediments. Big ask, but not unfeasible given 200 years.
85
QED
07/12/2020 11:42:10 1 0
bbc
And where do you think that water will flow to once it’s inland, why back down to sea...
108
07/12/2020 12:08:59 2 3
bbc
Or indeed to get the countries in which the Sahara lies agreeing to have billions of tonnes of salty water pumped onto their land to contaminate the ground water supplies! When the Sahara was lush, it was because of higher precipitation not because of higher sea level, but I guess you don't realise that! Then there are other questions - who is going to organise and pay for all this pumping!
72
07/12/2020 11:20:19 2 4
bbc
Tackling climate change seems futile. On the one hand, we cannot do nothing. We have to make an effort to reverse climate change. But will we ultimately succeed? I believe not. The Sahara desert was once a sea. Climate change caused that before humans polluted the planet, so such processes will continue. Planets change - with or without us.
Then there are asteroids, super-volacnoes.
82
07/12/2020 11:37:54 0 3
bbc
"Then there are asteroids, super-volcanoes."
Interestingly the eco-worriers demand that we listen to improbable forecasts as if they were a certainty and change every aspect of society. Yet they dont demand we take any precautions about other risks, if anything they encourage more death & destruction because of the what they refuse to even discuss.
73
07/12/2020 11:20:33 2 8
bbc
Once we leave the EU we could have zero vat / tax rated alcohol production. This would breach the EU level playing field but would be a great way to get us consuming home grown British beer and marmite crisps instead of imported Peroni and Corona Extra with brioche buns and cheesy nachos. We could become a food independent nation.
83
QED
07/12/2020 11:40:43 5 1
bbc
We haven’t been a food independent nation since before the 2nd world war, what an earth makes you think this is going to change now? Oh sorry leave voter so no relation to reality, all pie in the sky.
91
07/12/2020 11:54:20 0 2
bbc
Why not become Independent?
A market is out there if it can be produced at a price, thats the only drawback.
84
07/12/2020 11:40:46 6 8
bbc
climate change compared to what ? and the other article on this propaganda website says no snow on UK by 2040 , I suggest asking Tony Blair about those claims , he believed them and got caught with his pants down when it snowed and there was no grit
93
07/12/2020 11:57:17 0 1
bbc
Dont get me onto grit, the last time we had 5mm of snow here the town was in gridlock and it took me 4 hrs to do 2 mile.
94
07/12/2020 11:57:44 2 2
bbc
From the same article: "It suggests by the 2040s most of southern England could no longer see sub-zero days"

Sounds quite nice, doesn't it, is what we all said in the 80's when it was first put out there, so some bright spark came up with the idea the gulf stream would be switched off and we'd be as cold as Iceland.

It seems we've flip-flopped again and undermined climate science further
99
07/12/2020 11:59:21 3 4
bbc
Yep, had noticed todays drive by the BBC to have farcical articles. All of which when you read them in depth are based on the IPCC rcp8.5 forecast. Which the IPCC themselves say is improbable as it is based on zero action from years ago when it was 1st created.

So the BBC is aggressively promoting bad science.
81
07/12/2020 11:34:42 3 4
bbc
The Sahara used to be lush and had lakes larger than the UK. Occurred during the Egyptian empire when it was 4C warmer than today.
The Sahara is large enough to absorb all the possible sea level rises from melting ice & thermal expansion. Only issue is to pump all of that water far enough inland for it to be absorbed by the porous rock & sediments. Big ask, but not unfeasible given 200 years.
85
QED
07/12/2020 11:42:10 1 0
bbc
And where do you think that water will flow to once it’s inland, why back down to sea...
90
07/12/2020 11:52:40 1 2
bbc
Suggest you reread what I posted, that way you may understand why your comment is trite.

Do you know how large the lakes were in the Sahara?

Do you know what porous rock & sediments are, and what happens to the water if you pour it onto a porous surface?

Do you comprehend that this state existed before in the Sahara. Something even Rewilder should celebrate as there were no sheep.
68
07/12/2020 11:17:15 7 8
bbc
You have got to laugh at these green activists masquerading as journalists.
They know that increased atmospheric CO2 is good for crop yields yet demonize this wonderful " gas of life".
The fact that CO2 has never driven the climate in all of geological history doesn't appear to to have registered with them either.
Clueless.
86
QED
07/12/2020 11:45:51 5 2
bbc
Wrong and wrong. Some plants grow more with a SMALL rise in co2, but pump it up further and they suffer. Co2 mechanism for driving climate is understood, and when volcanic eruptions in the past raised co2 they caused climate change. Do you think this won’t happen just because we are raising co2 rather than volcanic action?
102
07/12/2020 12:00:46 2 3
bbc
All plants grow better with more CO2. That's why commercial greenhouses pump in 3 times more than normal levels to promote bigger yields.
117
07/12/2020 12:18:45 1 2
bbc
Yep tried that with my greenhouse and the temperature did not go up. But then again the worlds climate is so much simpler to model & run experiments on than my greenhouse.
87
07/12/2020 11:50:49 0 2
bbc
When people say they like crisps, is it just the flavouring and SALT?
80
07/12/2020 11:34:28 13 14
bbc
Totally irrelevent.
88
07/12/2020 11:51:26 8 1
bbc
But true.
67
RDB
07/12/2020 11:17:03 4 2
bbc
Do you honestly think that after years of pollution, that all the harm would be undone in a few months of slowed economic activity?!
89
07/12/2020 11:51:38 3 3
bbc
Yes if nature can add or take between 6 to 10 ppm in and out of the atmosphere every single year in the carbon cycle and it’s clearly seen in the Data and Keeling cycling through plant photosynthesis and ocean out gassing, the fact that the lockdowns never showed in the data proves its naturally regulated and we have no control - BBC are ignoring these facts and very latest data!!!!
85
QED
07/12/2020 11:42:10 1 0
bbc
And where do you think that water will flow to once it’s inland, why back down to sea...
90
07/12/2020 11:52:40 1 2
bbc
Suggest you reread what I posted, that way you may understand why your comment is trite.

Do you know how large the lakes were in the Sahara?

Do you know what porous rock & sediments are, and what happens to the water if you pour it onto a porous surface?

Do you comprehend that this state existed before in the Sahara. Something even Rewilder should celebrate as there were no sheep.
144
07/12/2020 13:35:56 0 0
bbc
The lakes weren't saline though - and you clearly have no clue about the concept of infiltration capacity but then why would you as you have no environmental expertise.
83
QED
07/12/2020 11:40:43 5 1
bbc
We haven’t been a food independent nation since before the 2nd world war, what an earth makes you think this is going to change now? Oh sorry leave voter so no relation to reality, all pie in the sky.
91
07/12/2020 11:54:20 0 2
bbc
Why not become Independent?
A market is out there if it can be produced at a price, thats the only drawback.
92
07/12/2020 11:44:43 2 2
bbc
Are you they haven't just invented a problem so they can say they solved it?
84
07/12/2020 11:40:46 6 8
bbc
climate change compared to what ? and the other article on this propaganda website says no snow on UK by 2040 , I suggest asking Tony Blair about those claims , he believed them and got caught with his pants down when it snowed and there was no grit
93
07/12/2020 11:57:17 0 1
bbc
Dont get me onto grit, the last time we had 5mm of snow here the town was in gridlock and it took me 4 hrs to do 2 mile.
84
07/12/2020 11:40:46 6 8
bbc
climate change compared to what ? and the other article on this propaganda website says no snow on UK by 2040 , I suggest asking Tony Blair about those claims , he believed them and got caught with his pants down when it snowed and there was no grit
94
07/12/2020 11:57:44 2 2
bbc
From the same article: "It suggests by the 2040s most of southern England could no longer see sub-zero days"

Sounds quite nice, doesn't it, is what we all said in the 80's when it was first put out there, so some bright spark came up with the idea the gulf stream would be switched off and we'd be as cold as Iceland.

It seems we've flip-flopped again and undermined climate science further
198
07/12/2020 16:22:41 0 0
bbc
I thought "gulf stream switch off" is more to do with major melting of the Greenland ice sheet & that's probably not a real issue until the end of the century (& when Greenland does melt, for much of Britain, 7m of sea level rise is a far worse issue than temperature changes in either direction)
20
07/12/2020 10:39:56 15 15
bbc
More drivel from the BBC! Totally ignoring the FACT that atmospheric Co2 levels have not deviated 1 ppm from their natural cycles after lockdowns began in a year ago China and abruptly the entire world in March, yet zero footprint in the data. Proving that 96% is from natural sources and pathetic vertue signalling - Ignore the BBC here are the FACTS:
https://sioweb.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/
95
07/12/2020 11:57:52 3 2
bbc
Huh? The BBC have posted dozens of articles saying CO2 levels haven't changed much during the covid year, eg. most recently:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-55018581

And they have hardly changed because human CO2 output has only gone down by 10-20% percent, and only for a few months. Exactly as everyone has been patiently explaining to you all year.
112
07/12/2020 12:14:05 2 1
bbc
Utter rubbish!!!!
OK please explain just exactly how we achieve the Co2 atmospheric concentration to not rise? (ie Carbon Nuetral) As it has uniformly in the data set stretching back to 1958 despite how much human Co2 emitted, or not!
It’s fantasy to suggest we can control this and you know it!
View the latest data and a little less BBC lies on Co2
https://sioweb.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/
116
07/12/2020 12:16:49 0 0
bbc
So even if we take your 10 to 20% reduction at face value - it would mean we would have to lockdown 5 to 10 times more extreme to become carbon neutral!
You still haven’t explained why your % reduction hasn’t registered in atmospheric co2 readings ?!!
45
07/12/2020 10:55:24 3 7
bbc
It’s called climate change nowadays, the name was changed from global warming... because there isn’t any.

As far as I’ve managed to see back in time with research scientists have been saying that the ice caps will melt within a decade due to irreversible changes since at least the 1920s... for over 100 years!
96
QED
07/12/2020 11:57:52 2 2
bbc
Another cc denier. Global warming is a subset of climate change. The term climate change was coined Republican political strategist Frank Luntz in a controversial memo advising conservative politicians on communicating about CC.
‘It’s time for us to start talking about “climate change” instead of global warming’
“Climate change” is less frightening than “global warming”.
77
07/12/2020 11:26:03 1 0
bbc
Sounds like an excellent new technology. If you've ever been in a brew room you can't be in there a long time as the level of co2 will do for you. It's this excess co2 that goes into the atmosphere which is sequestered into the waste which will then jolly off to the farm. Interesting technology or does the resulting fertiliser release it out to atmosphere. I'd like to know more
97
07/12/2020 11:58:54 1 0
bbc
I would like to know what biochemistry is going on to react organic waste with CO2. As you say, if using the fertiliser releases the CO2, then you have not gained anything.
202
07/12/2020 16:26:19 0 0
bbc
Depends on the time scale of the release. What trees do is to store CO2 for a few decades or centuries whilst they're growing then release (almost all of) it back when they die & rot. Nevertheless trees are a useful carbon sink. Even fossil fuels are derived from CO2 that was in the atmosphere hundreds of millios of years ago.
43
07/12/2020 10:59:08 8 5
bbc
Climate change is increased by a lot of what we do, but it will happen anyway. Going back through centuries and further there are periods of extreme climatic conditions that will continue to happen regardless of what happens to crisps, beer and anything else. What we do or don't do in the UK is largely irelevant , it's the USA and China who are the high contributors.
98
QED
07/12/2020 11:59:17 3 0
bbc
China has high contributions because they produce the goods we love to buy. If you take that into account we make a large contribution.
220
07/12/2020 17:29:48 0 1
bbc
So the UK is solely to blame what energy another country uses.
Think you need a more appropriate use name, how about: horse apples? or just HA for short?
84
07/12/2020 11:40:46 6 8
bbc
climate change compared to what ? and the other article on this propaganda website says no snow on UK by 2040 , I suggest asking Tony Blair about those claims , he believed them and got caught with his pants down when it snowed and there was no grit
99
07/12/2020 11:59:21 3 4
bbc
Yep, had noticed todays drive by the BBC to have farcical articles. All of which when you read them in depth are based on the IPCC rcp8.5 forecast. Which the IPCC themselves say is improbable as it is based on zero action from years ago when it was 1st created.

So the BBC is aggressively promoting bad science.
57
07/12/2020 11:02:59 1 2
bbc
Lineker is the reason I don't buy their crisps.

Ill-informed, opinionated twit that he is.
100
07/12/2020 11:59:56 1 1
bbc
Whereas you sound like the voice of reason, balance and informed choice? Where have you been hiding?
138
07/12/2020 13:17:27 1 1
bbc
Dont you know? Trolls live under bridges. :D