Lidl joins shops in repaying Covid rates relief
04/12/2020 | news | business | 273
Retailers have so far committed to handing back £1.9bn after some faced criticism from MPs.
1
04/12/2020 13:03:46 8 2
bbc
Good news that Lidl have joined the other major supermarkets and repaid the business rate relief. In fairness to Tesco they started the ball rolling and that put pressure on Sainsbury and Asda to follow. Good to see big business have a moral compass.
3
04/12/2020 13:08:43 13 1
bbc
Iceland needs to hand back their cash too.
8
04/12/2020 13:13:05 1 0
bbc
The graphic appears to show that Asda and Sainsbury have done so.,
14
04/12/2020 13:19:23 2 1
bbc
Tesco allegedly only did it as they have had a £10 billion windfall from the sale of their Asia business and are duty bound to pass that on to their shareholders and did not want the publicity that would cause if they held onto the money.Whilst the other supermarkets have morally done the right thing, they will all be out of pocket by doing so which may well result in higher prices down the line.
2
04/12/2020 13:01:29 44 8
bbc
They were a Lidl slow to return this I think
18
04/12/2020 13:20:13 20 9
bbc
a bit like their checkout queues
1
04/12/2020 13:03:46 8 2
bbc
Good news that Lidl have joined the other major supermarkets and repaid the business rate relief. In fairness to Tesco they started the ball rolling and that put pressure on Sainsbury and Asda to follow. Good to see big business have a moral compass.
3
04/12/2020 13:08:43 13 1
bbc
Iceland needs to hand back their cash too.
46
04/12/2020 13:28:19 2 0
bbc
I think their account has been frozen!
4
MVP
04/12/2020 13:09:22 9 3
bbc
This is a good PR move by Lidl and hopefully the other grocery retailers will follow.

The supermarkets have benefited from the lockdowns and it is morally wrong that they should receive government support while other retailers are prohibited from trading.
32
04/12/2020 13:30:55 3 0
bbc
Do try and keep up. Lidl is the last of the big six to do this.
Granted there's still Co-op, Waitrose and M&S to go but they're not major players.
5
04/12/2020 13:09:44 5 0
bbc
Why do you think this is a return? The government never gave the money in the first place.
This is business rate relief.
Let's face it and Gordon Brown did it - governments can retrospectively tax
6
04/12/2020 13:10:12 58 25
bbc
"In October, Tesco's chairman John Allan said he would "defend to the death" the board's decision to pay a dividend and that he didn't 'remotely feel any sort of guilt over it'."

Pretty much says it all, doesn't it?
12
04/12/2020 13:17:53 59 5
bbc
Public company dividends help pay pensions through our pension schemes, as long as they have paid their fair share of tax as well as repaying covid help, this is all good news. John Allen's job is to generate dividends.
27
04/12/2020 13:26:50 15 2
bbc
I hope that you and people who think like you will be happy with no companies paying dividends and therefore killing your pension savings stone dead and effectively valueless by the time you retire.

I despair that anyone can still think in such an illogical blinkered way.
Removed
84
04/12/2020 13:57:48 12 4
bbc
Says it all that John Allen is doing his job right. His job, as chairman, is to ensure that the business generates profits so that the people who have invested huge sums of money (a lot is our pensions) in the business see a return on that investment.

You surely can't be criticising the board of a big business for delivering returns to their investors? To do so would be the politics of envy.
130
04/12/2020 14:37:04 3 6
bbc
They should be ashamed
133
04/12/2020 14:41:12 10 0
bbc
They can pay all the dividends they want as long as they pay back any state handouts first.
147
04/12/2020 14:52:21 4 1
bbc
That is the only reason they paid the rates back so they can't be pressurised in anyway not to pay dividends and directors bonuses. no other reason.
233
04/12/2020 18:07:55 1 0
bbc
Dividend NO!, Staff, shop floor staff only, Bonus yes. I have never worked in the retail sector or have any link, unbiased, BUT they stayed open, the workers, they deserve a bonus NOT Shareholders and NOT Senior\Management.
240
04/12/2020 18:59:20 1 0
bbc
they still paid a dividend, as well, most of which goes in to a lot of peoples pensions for the future.
7
04/12/2020 13:07:26 6 6
bbc
Waitrose and the Co-op can't ignore other retailers are handing the money back. M&S should also hand back for all of their food retail stores and a proportion of their larger stores which stayed open as food reatilers.
17
04/12/2020 13:20:02 14 2
bbc
Waitrose and the Co-op are partnerships where the employees 'own' the company, not shareholders.
It's previously been in the news that Waitrose have not paid their employees a bonus this year, so the govt money has not been used to "reward" shareholders or staff, not sure about the Co-ops position.
44
04/12/2020 13:35:10 0 2
bbc
Totally agree
1
04/12/2020 13:03:46 8 2
bbc
Good news that Lidl have joined the other major supermarkets and repaid the business rate relief. In fairness to Tesco they started the ball rolling and that put pressure on Sainsbury and Asda to follow. Good to see big business have a moral compass.
8
04/12/2020 13:13:05 1 0
bbc
The graphic appears to show that Asda and Sainsbury have done so.,
9
04/12/2020 13:14:25 35 4
bbc
I stop short of applauding this as at the end of the day it is the right thing to do.
What do we think the chances of big tech donating x% of their increased profits for 2020 to each country they operate in to aid economic recoveries? Sorry, forgot it’s Christmas we’re approaching not April Fools Day...
13
04/12/2020 13:18:59 16 7
bbc
The only way they will do so is if enough of us speak up and make a real noise.
112
04/12/2020 14:15:34 3 0
bbc
the big tech companies are all registered in overseas tax havens, so while it's a nice thought, it ain't ever going to happen.
114
04/12/2020 14:16:57 2 0
bbc
Bumper profits people had nowhere else to go for food!
10
04/12/2020 13:16:40 7 14
bbc
Food shops didn't close in the lockdown's and continued trading as they were essential, so why were they given these tax breaks in the first place?

Fair play to these businesses as they are repaying the money of their own accord.

It just shows the lack of planning and sloppy thinking by this government.
11
04/12/2020 13:17:01 4 14
bbc
BIG DEAL...
All supermarkets have made huge profits in 2020.
The GOV should hit them with windfall taxes to pay for the COVID crisis.
19
04/12/2020 13:21:06 8 2
bbc
So have Amazon, ebay, facebook, et al. Also apple. Especially as they all hide behind tax shelters. Windfall taxes are absolutely needed there.
33
04/12/2020 13:23:13 3 1
bbc
Better getting Amazon to cough up 10b or so.
54
04/12/2020 13:40:31 1 1
bbc
I agree, my Tesco shop has gone up by at least 25% for less items - someone is making lots of money out of this tragedy
55
04/12/2020 13:40:48 3 1
bbc
Why should supermarkets be hit with a windfall tax.
They have invested in extra staff,screens,sanitiser stations,home deliveries etc.
They have provided the nation with food for the entire pandemic.
Every business has times when they can take advantage of current situations.
Can you imagine what scorn would have been placed on them if they had decided not to open?
56
04/12/2020 13:41:04 2 1
bbc
Yeah because the Covid crisis was their fault and they should bear the brunt. Maybe if we try really hard, we can pin this on the Mars Rover and and bill NASA while we're at it
6
04/12/2020 13:10:12 58 25
bbc
"In October, Tesco's chairman John Allan said he would "defend to the death" the board's decision to pay a dividend and that he didn't 'remotely feel any sort of guilt over it'."

Pretty much says it all, doesn't it?
12
04/12/2020 13:17:53 59 5
bbc
Public company dividends help pay pensions through our pension schemes, as long as they have paid their fair share of tax as well as repaying covid help, this is all good news. John Allen's job is to generate dividends.
22
04/12/2020 13:21:26 6 8
bbc
Think you summed up big business quite nicely there - customers come last on the list, way below shareholders and executives making as much money as possible...
189
04/12/2020 15:29:42 1 0
bbc
Our pension schemes hold government & corporate bonds, not shares.

Only 2.4% of UK shares are held by UK pension funds

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/investmentspensionsandtrusts/bulletins/ownershipofukquotedshares/2018#beneficial-owners
203
04/12/2020 15:56:03 1 1
bbc
Standard response to justify such debased behaviour. Not forgetting he too would have benefited financially as a share holder too.
250
04/12/2020 21:06:12 0 1
bbc
With taxpayer relief money. No thanks
9
04/12/2020 13:14:25 35 4
bbc
I stop short of applauding this as at the end of the day it is the right thing to do.
What do we think the chances of big tech donating x% of their increased profits for 2020 to each country they operate in to aid economic recoveries? Sorry, forgot it’s Christmas we’re approaching not April Fools Day...
13
04/12/2020 13:18:59 16 7
bbc
The only way they will do so is if enough of us speak up and make a real noise.
40
04/12/2020 13:33:42 6 0
bbc
All big tech will understand is a big hit on their revenue. Real noise or speak up won't do it. Are you willing to stop "paying"?
60
04/12/2020 13:44:56 0 6
bbc
I won't be doing that. I like my shopping to be as cheap as possible. If the government decided to tax them more, I'd end up paying more... That would be OK if my tax bill went down as a result, but there's literally zero chance that my tax bill would be cut, so I'd end up worse off. Be careful what you wish for.
1
04/12/2020 13:03:46 8 2
bbc
Good news that Lidl have joined the other major supermarkets and repaid the business rate relief. In fairness to Tesco they started the ball rolling and that put pressure on Sainsbury and Asda to follow. Good to see big business have a moral compass.
14
04/12/2020 13:19:23 2 1
bbc
Tesco allegedly only did it as they have had a £10 billion windfall from the sale of their Asia business and are duty bound to pass that on to their shareholders and did not want the publicity that would cause if they held onto the money.Whilst the other supermarkets have morally done the right thing, they will all be out of pocket by doing so which may well result in higher prices down the line.
15
04/12/2020 13:10:21 14 5
bbc
Stop reporting this inaccurately. None of them have paid back anything. All they have done is not take a rates holiday they were offered.
16
daz
04/12/2020 13:19:50 93 9
bbc
Good on Mr Pritchard for shutting the doors on 26th December, Pity other shops don't follow suit, it should be made compulsory to close Boxing Day! Essential workers do need that rest
51
04/12/2020 13:38:58 24 4
bbc
It actually was compulsory in the past for shops to remain closed on Boxing Day, and Bank Holidays, and for them to only be able to trade for 8/9 hours for most days of the week (need to check the times here), and the pubs to only open for 8 hours on Saturday and 6 on Sunday but then-
67
DrR
04/12/2020 13:48:16 5 2
bbc
It makes no difference to me I don't go in a shop on Christmas Day or Boxing Day.
168
04/12/2020 15:09:07 2 8
bbc
What rubbish you write.I have been in retail nearly all my life and it is imperative for the high street ton survive that shops are open at these times
177
04/12/2020 15:14:51 4 5
bbc
We should go back to normal hours, no late opening and no Sunday opening at all
179
04/12/2020 15:17:01 4 7
bbc
shops should be able to open 24hrs a day, 365 days a year if they choose and they can get staff to work. Plenty out there need the work, so should be plenty of staff available at minimum wages too.
185
04/12/2020 15:23:04 8 2
bbc
Some of the population aren't interested in Christmas - I have worked in a shop for the last 18 years and am more than happy to work for double time on Christmas Day and Boxing Day and have time off when I want it, not when I'm forced to thank you!
191
04/12/2020 15:33:09 0 1
bbc
If everyone take these days off, then there is no electricity, gas, TV, hospitals, transport etc. You just sleep the wholetime as no fuel to cook the lunch.
235
04/12/2020 18:31:06 2 1
bbc
I agree, retail staff work late on Christmas Eve putting sale stock/tickets and back in early on Boxing Day. Retail need time off as well.
267
05/12/2020 12:05:08 1 0
bbc
So which is it? Many peoples' livelihoods have been terribly affected by Covid and (of course [yawn]) this 'tory' government's handling of it, or shops should be forced (by the government) to close on whatever days, so denying people the chance to work, earn and support the economy?
7
04/12/2020 13:07:26 6 6
bbc
Waitrose and the Co-op can't ignore other retailers are handing the money back. M&S should also hand back for all of their food retail stores and a proportion of their larger stores which stayed open as food reatilers.
17
04/12/2020 13:20:02 14 2
bbc
Waitrose and the Co-op are partnerships where the employees 'own' the company, not shareholders.
It's previously been in the news that Waitrose have not paid their employees a bonus this year, so the govt money has not been used to "reward" shareholders or staff, not sure about the Co-ops position.
118
04/12/2020 14:13:08 2 0
bbc
Sorry Pete but the Co-op is a Cooperative, not a partnership. The Co-op is owned by it's members, joe public, ordinary people like you and me. No big fat shareholders or directors awarding themselves bonuses.
They may have a lot of stores but their sales will smaller compared to the big boys. Costs incurred supplying hand sanitizer etc and making stores covid safe will be high in comparison.
2
04/12/2020 13:01:29 44 8
bbc
They were a Lidl slow to return this I think
18
04/12/2020 13:20:13 20 9
bbc
a bit like their checkout queues
149
04/12/2020 14:54:24 6 2
bbc
Odd that, I've always found Lidl checkouts to be the fastest around- it's down to their staff training. You could almost fall asleep at M&S tills though.
160
04/12/2020 15:03:13 0 2
bbc
Lidl's ok because they introduced self-checkouts.
Please please please someone tell Aldi to do the same...
11
04/12/2020 13:17:01 4 14
bbc
BIG DEAL...
All supermarkets have made huge profits in 2020.
The GOV should hit them with windfall taxes to pay for the COVID crisis.
19
04/12/2020 13:21:06 8 2
bbc
So have Amazon, ebay, facebook, et al. Also apple. Especially as they all hide behind tax shelters. Windfall taxes are absolutely needed there.
49
04/12/2020 13:36:29 3 0
bbc
Taxes, yes. Stop using their "services", it's all they will understand.
58
04/12/2020 13:34:50 4 0
bbc
Yawn! Change the record. Latest UK Tax Gap figure is roughly £31billion. Of that, roughly £1.7billion is down to avoidance by folks like Amazon and so on, just 5.48% of the total. This, as well as the fact lawyers are really expensive, is why HMG concentrate their tax raising efforts elsewhere.
20
Lee
04/12/2020 13:14:56 9 3
bbc
After banging on for years about how ethical they are have the Co-op taken an unethical stance on this and trousered the cash?
36
04/12/2020 13:33:06 5 5
bbc
Co op are not the pile it high and sell it cheap kind of shop so may j not have benefitted as much.
21
01
04/12/2020 13:15:25 13 6
bbc
Has Jeff Bezos paid anything? I thought not!
34
04/12/2020 13:23:16 19 9
bbc
Why would he? Is he a supermarket? Or just a person?
12
04/12/2020 13:17:53 59 5
bbc
Public company dividends help pay pensions through our pension schemes, as long as they have paid their fair share of tax as well as repaying covid help, this is all good news. John Allen's job is to generate dividends.
22
04/12/2020 13:21:26 6 8
bbc
Think you summed up big business quite nicely there - customers come last on the list, way below shareholders and executives making as much money as possible...
25
dan
04/12/2020 13:23:53 5 1
bbc
Yes, because customers treated supermarkets so well back in March when they panic bought until the shelves were bare...
89
04/12/2020 14:00:37 17 1
bbc
1) The whole point of business is to make money otherwise what would be the point
2)Any business that put it's customers last would, unless they hold a monopoly, lose their customers and without customers would not make money - return to point 1
123
04/12/2020 14:25:18 9 1
bbc
FNLisa - your statement reflects your failure to understand democracy. We are talking about public limited companies who are owned by their shareholders. It neither your decision or anyone other non-shareholder to dictate the free running of a business. Business like Tesco believe in customers and when they don't, customer go elsewhere. Plenty of retailers who have found that out the hard way.
23
04/12/2020 13:21:36 9 2
bbc
I think all businesses big and small, even independent operators like corner shops that have not been adversely affected should repay any taxpayers money, why should some businesses gain financially when they haven't suffered when so many previously viable businesses go to the wall because they haven't received enough Government help...
24
04/12/2020 13:22:01 12 2
bbc
Credit where it is due; the MP's appear to have used their right to scrutinize well in this matter.
22
04/12/2020 13:21:26 6 8
bbc
Think you summed up big business quite nicely there - customers come last on the list, way below shareholders and executives making as much money as possible...
25
dan
04/12/2020 13:23:53 5 1
bbc
Yes, because customers treated supermarkets so well back in March when they panic bought until the shelves were bare...
26
04/12/2020 13:26:38 6 5
bbc
Really disappointed with Coop deciding not to pay back the business rate relief- I will have to vote with my feet and use one of the supermarkets who supports their local communities.
42
04/12/2020 13:34:08 7 3
bbc
Think again.
Most of the time the only supermarket in your local community, and supporting it, is the Co-op.
6
04/12/2020 13:10:12 58 25
bbc
"In October, Tesco's chairman John Allan said he would "defend to the death" the board's decision to pay a dividend and that he didn't 'remotely feel any sort of guilt over it'."

Pretty much says it all, doesn't it?
27
04/12/2020 13:26:50 15 2
bbc
I hope that you and people who think like you will be happy with no companies paying dividends and therefore killing your pension savings stone dead and effectively valueless by the time you retire.

I despair that anyone can still think in such an illogical blinkered way.
150
COB
04/12/2020 14:54:59 0 2
bbc
By the time the muppets in power have finished plundering the pension pots they will be worthless anyway - damned either way. Work hard all your life and do the right/responsible thing - get punished. Long live the revolution!! :-)
188
04/12/2020 15:27:49 1 0
bbc
Dividends go to shareholders - 55% of who are overseas investors.

Only 2% of UK shares are owned by pension funds.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/investmentspensionsandtrusts/bulletins/ownershipofukquotedshares/2018#beneficial-owners
28
04/12/2020 13:27:04 16 4
bbc
Sounds like their hands have been forced by Tesco's offer to repay rather than "the right thing to do" and on the other hand it's shows how loose a grip our government has with our cash
234
04/12/2020 18:19:06 1 0
bbc
Not really. Anyone with a basic understanding of economics knows that less money in the public purse means higher taxes and less consumer spending. A pragmatic decision by supermarkets.
29
04/12/2020 13:27:19 5 6
bbc
This confirms what many were thinking, while millions of people are clinging by their fingernails others have more cash than they know what to do with.
It seems like some have never had it so good while others have been left to rot
30
04/12/2020 13:27:23 4 3
bbc
Better late than never. I wonder if Lidl would always have returned the money or have caved in to pier pressure ?.
31
04/12/2020 13:20:51 23 2
bbc
What about The Range? They've stayed open during two lockdowns and they have been heaving with customers!
47
04/12/2020 13:36:15 12 1
bbc
quite agree cannot for the life of me see how their tat was essential. the queues outside all through lockdown 1 and 2 have been ridiculous
4
MVP
04/12/2020 13:09:22 9 3
bbc
This is a good PR move by Lidl and hopefully the other grocery retailers will follow.

The supermarkets have benefited from the lockdowns and it is morally wrong that they should receive government support while other retailers are prohibited from trading.
32
04/12/2020 13:30:55 3 0
bbc
Do try and keep up. Lidl is the last of the big six to do this.
Granted there's still Co-op, Waitrose and M&S to go but they're not major players.
11
04/12/2020 13:17:01 4 14
bbc
BIG DEAL...
All supermarkets have made huge profits in 2020.
The GOV should hit them with windfall taxes to pay for the COVID crisis.
33
04/12/2020 13:23:13 3 1
bbc
Better getting Amazon to cough up 10b or so.
21
01
04/12/2020 13:15:25 13 6
bbc
Has Jeff Bezos paid anything? I thought not!
34
04/12/2020 13:23:16 19 9
bbc
Why would he? Is he a supermarket? Or just a person?
35
GPH
04/12/2020 13:23:30 26 10
bbc
And Marks & Spencer, one of the UK's 'leading' retailers, who pays it staff minimum wage, charges premium prices, keeps the relief monies. Shocking.
52
04/12/2020 13:40:02 10 3
bbc
...and they made a loss during the period
77
04/12/2020 13:51:29 4 1
bbc
Are you sure? M&S were always well known for paying better than other retailers. Never worked their myself so wouldn't know... It would explain why most of their staff are miserable though.
20
Lee
04/12/2020 13:14:56 9 3
bbc
After banging on for years about how ethical they are have the Co-op taken an unethical stance on this and trousered the cash?
36
04/12/2020 13:33:06 5 5
bbc
Co op are not the pile it high and sell it cheap kind of shop so may j not have benefitted as much.
48
04/12/2020 13:36:21 1 0
bbc
Our Co-op is closing as it cannot compete in our town with the Big Boys.
37
04/12/2020 13:21:20 7 7
bbc
All supermarket groups shouldn't have been given it in the first place.

Only giving it back because they got rumbled and it's good PR.
6
04/12/2020 13:10:12 58 25
bbc
"In October, Tesco's chairman John Allan said he would "defend to the death" the board's decision to pay a dividend and that he didn't 'remotely feel any sort of guilt over it'."

Pretty much says it all, doesn't it?
Removed
39
04/12/2020 13:25:29 10 3
bbc
Retailers in the position to pay dividends to investors should repay/not claim any monies made available to them by the Govt. during this health and economic crisis. Retailers that bucked the trend and made profits (minus normal running costs) should do the same. It’s only fair to expect everyone to take some kind of economic hit including investors in companies that have done well!
69
04/12/2020 13:50:52 6 2
bbc
If you are referring to the Tesco dividend then you should know that this was based on the 2019 profits & did not have anything to do with the pandemic. Great that Tesco et al are repaying money's & I agree that others should do so but HMG did not nationalise the economy & so businesses that could stay open & make money have done so legally. Remember dividends go to your pension fund too!
13
04/12/2020 13:18:59 16 7
bbc
The only way they will do so is if enough of us speak up and make a real noise.
40
04/12/2020 13:33:42 6 0
bbc
All big tech will understand is a big hit on their revenue. Real noise or speak up won't do it. Are you willing to stop "paying"?
41
04/12/2020 13:33:53 7 2
bbc
Can BBC let us know if The Range received this relief also?
151
04/12/2020 14:56:00 2 0
bbc
The Range? Never heard of it...
26
04/12/2020 13:26:38 6 5
bbc
Really disappointed with Coop deciding not to pay back the business rate relief- I will have to vote with my feet and use one of the supermarkets who supports their local communities.
42
04/12/2020 13:34:08 7 3
bbc
Think again.
Most of the time the only supermarket in your local community, and supporting it, is the Co-op.
75
04/12/2020 13:49:17 4 1
bbc
Isn't the Co-Op's strategy to move into areas with existing small convenience stores/corner shops, muscle them out of business via brand recognition and sales, (People seem to ignore how overpriced most of their stock is when not on sale) and then pretend like they give a hoot about local communities?
43
04/12/2020 13:34:53 22 6
bbc
Could we now see the banks dip into their coffers and also return the money they have had?
228
04/12/2020 17:40:07 3 0
bbc
All but RBS have.
7
04/12/2020 13:07:26 6 6
bbc
Waitrose and the Co-op can't ignore other retailers are handing the money back. M&S should also hand back for all of their food retail stores and a proportion of their larger stores which stayed open as food reatilers.
44
04/12/2020 13:35:10 0 2
bbc
Totally agree
45
04/12/2020 13:35:33 30 1
bbc
Apologies. When I said "pier pressure" I meant peer pressure. I don't think seaside attractions were involved in this at all.
50
04/12/2020 13:38:54 10 1
bbc
Not sure, some of those piers are quite intimidating :D
61
04/12/2020 13:44:57 1 0
bbc
Got to resist the temptation at blaming the pokey nightclub on the Aberystwyth seafront...
3
04/12/2020 13:08:43 13 1
bbc
Iceland needs to hand back their cash too.
46
04/12/2020 13:28:19 2 0
bbc
I think their account has been frozen!
31
04/12/2020 13:20:51 23 2
bbc
What about The Range? They've stayed open during two lockdowns and they have been heaving with customers!
47
04/12/2020 13:36:15 12 1
bbc
quite agree cannot for the life of me see how their tat was essential. the queues outside all through lockdown 1 and 2 have been ridiculous
36
04/12/2020 13:33:06 5 5
bbc
Co op are not the pile it high and sell it cheap kind of shop so may j not have benefitted as much.
48
04/12/2020 13:36:21 1 0
bbc
Our Co-op is closing as it cannot compete in our town with the Big Boys.
19
04/12/2020 13:21:06 8 2
bbc
So have Amazon, ebay, facebook, et al. Also apple. Especially as they all hide behind tax shelters. Windfall taxes are absolutely needed there.
49
04/12/2020 13:36:29 3 0
bbc
Taxes, yes. Stop using their "services", it's all they will understand.
45
04/12/2020 13:35:33 30 1
bbc
Apologies. When I said "pier pressure" I meant peer pressure. I don't think seaside attractions were involved in this at all.
50
04/12/2020 13:38:54 10 1
bbc
Not sure, some of those piers are quite intimidating :D
16
daz
04/12/2020 13:19:50 93 9
bbc
Good on Mr Pritchard for shutting the doors on 26th December, Pity other shops don't follow suit, it should be made compulsory to close Boxing Day! Essential workers do need that rest
51
04/12/2020 13:38:58 24 4
bbc
It actually was compulsory in the past for shops to remain closed on Boxing Day, and Bank Holidays, and for them to only be able to trade for 8/9 hours for most days of the week (need to check the times here), and the pubs to only open for 8 hours on Saturday and 6 on Sunday but then-
158
daz
04/12/2020 15:02:52 9 1
bbc
Public that don't work these areas expect everyone else to work 24/7 to serve them, I'm sorry but it doesn't work like that,everyone is entitled to a family/social life
207
04/12/2020 16:13:20 1 1
bbc
I don’t think this is correct. I remember people queuing for the Boxing Day sales on Christmas Day night 50 years ago.
35
GPH
04/12/2020 13:23:30 26 10
bbc
And Marks & Spencer, one of the UK's 'leading' retailers, who pays it staff minimum wage, charges premium prices, keeps the relief monies. Shocking.
52
04/12/2020 13:40:02 10 3
bbc
...and they made a loss during the period
148
04/12/2020 14:54:18 0 1
bbc
So it is ok to take tax payer's money to subsidise a bad retailer, keeping bad business going on free money taken from the public? They had he same chances being a food seller that the others did.
159
04/12/2020 15:02:17 3 2
bbc
I just couldn't believe it that M& S are not repaying that tax. I've been a loyal customer for over 50 years ( food and clothes) and I'm so disappointed. I shall be shopping elsewhere. Shame on you.
53
04/12/2020 13:40:03 21 6
bbc
Whilst I agree that the pandemic has, if anything, pushed more shoppers into supermarkets (from specialist shops), and of course it's good that they are now repaying the money, I don't blame them for taking it in the first place. If someone offers you money, you take it... no brainer.

The problem stems from a gov't who didn't bother to assess who would really need it, and just threw money around.
65
04/12/2020 13:47:17 10 1
bbc
I agree, when this relief was first offered no business knew how or if they would be trading throughout the year
Its called covering your back!
11
04/12/2020 13:17:01 4 14
bbc
BIG DEAL...
All supermarkets have made huge profits in 2020.
The GOV should hit them with windfall taxes to pay for the COVID crisis.
54
04/12/2020 13:40:31 1 1
bbc
I agree, my Tesco shop has gone up by at least 25% for less items - someone is making lots of money out of this tragedy
11
04/12/2020 13:17:01 4 14
bbc
BIG DEAL...
All supermarkets have made huge profits in 2020.
The GOV should hit them with windfall taxes to pay for the COVID crisis.
55
04/12/2020 13:40:48 3 1
bbc
Why should supermarkets be hit with a windfall tax.
They have invested in extra staff,screens,sanitiser stations,home deliveries etc.
They have provided the nation with food for the entire pandemic.
Every business has times when they can take advantage of current situations.
Can you imagine what scorn would have been placed on them if they had decided not to open?
11
04/12/2020 13:17:01 4 14
bbc
BIG DEAL...
All supermarkets have made huge profits in 2020.
The GOV should hit them with windfall taxes to pay for the COVID crisis.
56
04/12/2020 13:41:04 2 1
bbc
Yeah because the Covid crisis was their fault and they should bear the brunt. Maybe if we try really hard, we can pin this on the Mars Rover and and bill NASA while we're at it
Removed
19
04/12/2020 13:21:06 8 2
bbc
So have Amazon, ebay, facebook, et al. Also apple. Especially as they all hide behind tax shelters. Windfall taxes are absolutely needed there.
58
04/12/2020 13:34:50 4 0
bbc
Yawn! Change the record. Latest UK Tax Gap figure is roughly £31billion. Of that, roughly £1.7billion is down to avoidance by folks like Amazon and so on, just 5.48% of the total. This, as well as the fact lawyers are really expensive, is why HMG concentrate their tax raising efforts elsewhere.
59
04/12/2020 13:37:50 4 2
bbc
Amazon ?
83
04/12/2020 13:52:51 3 2
bbc
YOUR HAVING A LAUGH

Screw the country to the ground

Like the Green's, £250 missing from BHS pension pot, not £250 from Arcadia, yet both of them sitting in Monaco on a multi £m yacht
13
04/12/2020 13:18:59 16 7
bbc
The only way they will do so is if enough of us speak up and make a real noise.
60
04/12/2020 13:44:56 0 6
bbc
I won't be doing that. I like my shopping to be as cheap as possible. If the government decided to tax them more, I'd end up paying more... That would be OK if my tax bill went down as a result, but there's literally zero chance that my tax bill would be cut, so I'd end up worse off. Be careful what you wish for.
208
04/12/2020 16:15:07 1 0
bbc
knowing the price of everything but not the value.
45
04/12/2020 13:35:33 30 1
bbc
Apologies. When I said "pier pressure" I meant peer pressure. I don't think seaside attractions were involved in this at all.
61
04/12/2020 13:44:57 1 0
bbc
Got to resist the temptation at blaming the pokey nightclub on the Aberystwyth seafront...
137
04/12/2020 14:44:57 1 0
bbc
You can’t blame the nightclub in Aberystwyth! Wales is closed till further notice or new management. Whichever comes first!
62
04/12/2020 13:45:17 16 3
bbc
WE should now turn our attention on DIY stores which remained open during lockdowns, no doubt they also got business rate relief. I remember the pictures of long queues at
B & Q, Wicks and many others also took advantage.
68
04/12/2020 13:48:44 8 4
bbc
I also remember B&Q shut to all but click and collect with 2 week waiting periods
That I'm sure affected their income!
63
DrR
04/12/2020 13:46:28 3 1
bbc
Good for them. This will make more money available for businesses which really need it.
64
04/12/2020 13:47:00 47 6
bbc
Why does everyone seem to think that paying dividends to shareholders is any different to paying staff? the shareholders are mainly pensions and insurance companies who will need this money to pay the same workers when they retire!
76
DrR
04/12/2020 13:51:43 37 4
bbc
Why would anyone invest in a company if you didn't get a return? Even the independent shop keeper invests time and money in their business and takes a wage or some profits, they don't get criticised.
78
04/12/2020 13:53:45 6 4
bbc
Because staff do the work but shareholders just collect the proceeds?

Shareholders are NOT "mainly pensions and insurance companies" - that's only 6% of them now. Most shares - 55% of them - are owned by overseas investors.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/investmentspensionsandtrusts/bulletins/ownershipofukquotedshares/2018#beneficial-owners
99
04/12/2020 14:08:45 2 2
bbc
It’s a question of sharing the pain in the short term. In the long term there is a chance of recouping any loss for major investors such as pension providers. Most commentators do not appear against dividends per se, if companies can pay full dividends they don’t need public money which is needed elsewhere. This money was meant to keep jobs and businesses open, not enable payment of dividends.
121
04/12/2020 14:22:45 2 0
bbc
Its not, its how shares work but Sir Phil as an example paid divis but underfunded the Pension scheme for years, sold the shops to his Mrs for pennies, they made millions on the leases rented back to the group paying divis & will now declare business losses then collect the insurance for said loses, build habitation in the said properties then cities & towns go back to the 19th century model!
53
04/12/2020 13:40:03 21 6
bbc
Whilst I agree that the pandemic has, if anything, pushed more shoppers into supermarkets (from specialist shops), and of course it's good that they are now repaying the money, I don't blame them for taking it in the first place. If someone offers you money, you take it... no brainer.

The problem stems from a gov't who didn't bother to assess who would really need it, and just threw money around.
65
04/12/2020 13:47:17 10 1
bbc
I agree, when this relief was first offered no business knew how or if they would be trading throughout the year
Its called covering your back!
66
04/12/2020 13:47:41 17 3
bbc
If everyone has to have the Pfizer vaccine , at £47 for the 2 jabs , then this pays for over 40 million of our population. Not a bad start.
16
daz
04/12/2020 13:19:50 93 9
bbc
Good on Mr Pritchard for shutting the doors on 26th December, Pity other shops don't follow suit, it should be made compulsory to close Boxing Day! Essential workers do need that rest
67
DrR
04/12/2020 13:48:16 5 2
bbc
It makes no difference to me I don't go in a shop on Christmas Day or Boxing Day.
141
04/12/2020 14:47:11 14 2
bbc
It's not about you. It's about shop workers whose Christmas Day is spoiled by having Boxing Day at work to think about.
197
04/12/2020 15:50:38 4 2
bbc
Me me me me. We are talking about the shop workers here NOT you.
62
04/12/2020 13:45:17 16 3
bbc
WE should now turn our attention on DIY stores which remained open during lockdowns, no doubt they also got business rate relief. I remember the pictures of long queues at
B & Q, Wicks and many others also took advantage.
68
04/12/2020 13:48:44 8 4
bbc
I also remember B&Q shut to all but click and collect with 2 week waiting periods
That I'm sure affected their income!
39
04/12/2020 13:25:29 10 3
bbc
Retailers in the position to pay dividends to investors should repay/not claim any monies made available to them by the Govt. during this health and economic crisis. Retailers that bucked the trend and made profits (minus normal running costs) should do the same. It’s only fair to expect everyone to take some kind of economic hit including investors in companies that have done well!
69
04/12/2020 13:50:52 6 2
bbc
If you are referring to the Tesco dividend then you should know that this was based on the 2019 profits & did not have anything to do with the pandemic. Great that Tesco et al are repaying money's & I agree that others should do so but HMG did not nationalise the economy & so businesses that could stay open & make money have done so legally. Remember dividends go to your pension fund too!
119
04/12/2020 14:20:53 0 2
bbc
It’s not a question of legality but morals. The fact that one can do something doesn’t mean that one should. I’m conscious that pension providers invest in many kinds of businesses and that dividends are how they make money but dividends are impacted by all kinds of events (and the warning is always investments can go down as well as up!)
186
04/12/2020 15:20:57 0 1
bbc
Do you realise how much money the government are handing out to try and keep companies in business. This should be for businesses that are facing closure legitimately, Tesco's were not in that position. They have grabbed at free money, tax payers money and then handed it out as there own. Its disgusting, John Allan should be taught some morals.
70
04/12/2020 13:50:58 5 1
bbc
Well done to these companies. Now it is the time of the sole traders and smaller limited companies who have also worked all through the pandemic and still taken government support for themselves and those who work for them and did so througout.
71
04/12/2020 13:50:34 49 4
bbc
Good for them as well.

We going to See Arcadia do the same, like hell we are.

Sir and Lady Green have between them screwed the country of £250m from BHS pension pot, now doing the same amount from the Arcadia pension as well.

It is time the government took charge, pension pots belong to the worker, not the company, to play with, It should be a criminal offence touching that money, PAY IT BACK
82
04/12/2020 13:56:22 9 3
bbc
That will be down to the administrators, not the company
120
04/12/2020 14:21:26 3 1
bbc
Whilst I agree that the Greens need to pay for the challenges in the Pension pots in their companies. Putting the money in Govt control give the opportunity for them to plunder the pot in good times. However, where the money is held and who controls Pension pots does need fixing.
132
04/12/2020 14:39:36 4 0
bbc
Leave it to the government to take charge? Yes Gordon Brown thought that was a great idea too, remember!!
187
04/12/2020 15:26:47 2 2
bbc
This is why you should sort your pension yourself.
No law to stop billionaires taking it. Very strange
193
04/12/2020 15:36:45 5 0
bbc
Non executive directors are supposed to be the conscience of the Board. There have been pension scandals for years now, wasn’t it Maxwell who started it or Polypeck? Anyway whoever it was controls were apparently strengthened 30 years ago and yet we still see fraud like this on a big scale.
219
04/12/2020 16:54:52 2 3
bbc
I am not a fan of Green,but if you look at all the facts he did not screw up the pension fund of BHS or Arcadia.He got his dividends many years ago.John Lewis has a deficit of over 1 billion and are you going to ask all the employees /partners to give back all their bonuses /dividends that they got over all the years
72
04/12/2020 13:45:12 2 2
bbc
Banks ?
73
04/12/2020 13:45:55 17 3
bbc
It’s easy to be dismissive. Yes, it’s not right for them to pay dividends having got tax payers help. This is the right thing for them to do, but they didn’t have to. It would be fairer to ensure online retailers pay their fair share and then actual physical stores in retail parks and on the high streets would be less likely to close down making our towns and cities less like ghost towns.
74
04/12/2020 13:46:25 6 8
bbc
And Marks & Spencer, one of the UK's 'leading' retailers, who pays it staff minimum wage, charges premium prices, keeps the relief monies. Shocking.
79
04/12/2020 13:54:35 5 0
bbc
Word for word, cut and paste from an earlier comment (13:23)

But as I replied on that comment - M&S made a loss during the period not windfall profits
42
04/12/2020 13:34:08 7 3
bbc
Think again.
Most of the time the only supermarket in your local community, and supporting it, is the Co-op.
75
04/12/2020 13:49:17 4 1
bbc
Isn't the Co-Op's strategy to move into areas with existing small convenience stores/corner shops, muscle them out of business via brand recognition and sales, (People seem to ignore how overpriced most of their stock is when not on sale) and then pretend like they give a hoot about local communities?
139
04/12/2020 14:30:42 1 0
bbc
Oh, so the 15 million pounds raised by their members this year did not help any local communities then?
64
04/12/2020 13:47:00 47 6
bbc
Why does everyone seem to think that paying dividends to shareholders is any different to paying staff? the shareholders are mainly pensions and insurance companies who will need this money to pay the same workers when they retire!
76
DrR
04/12/2020 13:51:43 37 4
bbc
Why would anyone invest in a company if you didn't get a return? Even the independent shop keeper invests time and money in their business and takes a wage or some profits, they don't get criticised.
101
04/12/2020 14:09:23 3 1
bbc
If you invest in a company you take a risk. You make a profit when the company does well and not if it is struggling. I pay 40% tax, why should my hard earned tax be used to prop up a company that passes my money straight into a shareholders pocket. If a company is taking a hit for whatever reason the shareholder takes a hit, not bailed out using someone else's money. Avoid M & S till they pay up.
35
GPH
04/12/2020 13:23:30 26 10
bbc
And Marks & Spencer, one of the UK's 'leading' retailers, who pays it staff minimum wage, charges premium prices, keeps the relief monies. Shocking.
77
04/12/2020 13:51:29 4 1
bbc
Are you sure? M&S were always well known for paying better than other retailers. Never worked their myself so wouldn't know... It would explain why most of their staff are miserable though.
88
04/12/2020 14:00:09 4 4
bbc
Their staff are partners, salaries are relatively low but in normal times they also receive a profuit share that boosts their annual income
Covid hit profits which meant they made a loss, I think for the first time ever

No profit, no profit share and repaying any relief would increase the losses they incurred
138
04/12/2020 14:45:16 0 2
bbc
You'll find Aldi & Lidl pay the best rates.
64
04/12/2020 13:47:00 47 6
bbc
Why does everyone seem to think that paying dividends to shareholders is any different to paying staff? the shareholders are mainly pensions and insurance companies who will need this money to pay the same workers when they retire!
78
04/12/2020 13:53:45 6 4
bbc
Because staff do the work but shareholders just collect the proceeds?

Shareholders are NOT "mainly pensions and insurance companies" - that's only 6% of them now. Most shares - 55% of them - are owned by overseas investors.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/investmentspensionsandtrusts/bulletins/ownershipofukquotedshares/2018#beneficial-owners
92
04/12/2020 14:05:06 7 0
bbc
So you would like a stop to dividends? Do you not see the problem that with no prospect of a dividend investors will take their money elsewhere and the company folds. An investor has to have an incentive to invest in any company!
95
04/12/2020 14:07:11 3 0
bbc
Uk shareholders own shares in overseas companies!
74
04/12/2020 13:46:25 6 8
bbc
And Marks & Spencer, one of the UK's 'leading' retailers, who pays it staff minimum wage, charges premium prices, keeps the relief monies. Shocking.
79
04/12/2020 13:54:35 5 0
bbc
Word for word, cut and paste from an earlier comment (13:23)

But as I replied on that comment - M&S made a loss during the period not windfall profits
80
04/12/2020 13:55:31 5 1
bbc
From the 4th line of this BBC news story.

"It follows similar moves by the UK biggest grocers including Tesco, Sainsbury's and Asda, and will see more than £1.9bn handed back to taxpayers"

I thought this money would go back to the Treasury?

As a UK tax payer, I cant wait to get my share of the £1.9bn.

I know it wont be much, but Every Little Helps!

You just made my Christmas BBC News.
85
04/12/2020 13:58:00 2 7
bbc
you won't see any of it. the Government will just spaff it away on some pet project that turns out to be a complete waste of money.
81
04/12/2020 13:56:15 3 9
bbc
It's a shame that this money is being wasted by throwing it back at the Government. It should have been distributed to their hard-working staff, staff who are finally being recognized as 'key workers' but who still get paid a lot less than, say, policemen or nurses.
Give the money as staff bonuses instead !
71
04/12/2020 13:50:34 49 4
bbc
Good for them as well.

We going to See Arcadia do the same, like hell we are.

Sir and Lady Green have between them screwed the country of £250m from BHS pension pot, now doing the same amount from the Arcadia pension as well.

It is time the government took charge, pension pots belong to the worker, not the company, to play with, It should be a criminal offence touching that money, PAY IT BACK
82
04/12/2020 13:56:22 9 3
bbc
That will be down to the administrators, not the company
59
04/12/2020 13:37:50 4 2
bbc
Amazon ?
83
04/12/2020 13:52:51 3 2
bbc
YOUR HAVING A LAUGH

Screw the country to the ground

Like the Green's, £250 missing from BHS pension pot, not £250 from Arcadia, yet both of them sitting in Monaco on a multi £m yacht
6
04/12/2020 13:10:12 58 25
bbc
"In October, Tesco's chairman John Allan said he would "defend to the death" the board's decision to pay a dividend and that he didn't 'remotely feel any sort of guilt over it'."

Pretty much says it all, doesn't it?
84
04/12/2020 13:57:48 12 4
bbc
Says it all that John Allen is doing his job right. His job, as chairman, is to ensure that the business generates profits so that the people who have invested huge sums of money (a lot is our pensions) in the business see a return on that investment.

You surely can't be criticising the board of a big business for delivering returns to their investors? To do so would be the politics of envy.
80
04/12/2020 13:55:31 5 1
bbc
From the 4th line of this BBC news story.

"It follows similar moves by the UK biggest grocers including Tesco, Sainsbury's and Asda, and will see more than £1.9bn handed back to taxpayers"

I thought this money would go back to the Treasury?

As a UK tax payer, I cant wait to get my share of the £1.9bn.

I know it wont be much, but Every Little Helps!

You just made my Christmas BBC News.
85
04/12/2020 13:58:00 2 7
bbc
you won't see any of it. the Government will just spaff it away on some pet project that turns out to be a complete waste of money.
231
04/12/2020 17:59:41 0 1
bbc
It will get lost in some spurious rail project........
86
04/12/2020 13:59:51 6 4
bbc
It's good that this has happened. I don't want to bang a well worn drum but if Amazon have benefited. Either directly or indirectly. Some of that needs to be clawed back. Even if it's just a one off increase or introduction of high rate band in corporation tax(which is only paid on profit) i favour a short sharp response over years of attrition.
170
04/12/2020 15:09:47 3 0
bbc
Rubbish. Half or so of what is on sale at Amazon is from small sellers. These lazy generic blame Amazon is stupid, there are thousands selling properly on line, Amazon is just on big department store. With brilliant logistics.
87
04/12/2020 14:00:04 1 4
bbc
Nice touch from the Germans.
102
04/12/2020 14:09:58 6 1
bbc
German owned, yes, but that's not really an accurate representation of the real story.

As has been explained many times by many people, Aldi and Lidl have a much higher % of stock sourced from local suppliers than most of the other supermarkets. German owned or not, they are doing more to support UK businesses (especially small and medium farmers and food producers) than Tesco, Asda et al. do.
77
04/12/2020 13:51:29 4 1
bbc
Are you sure? M&S were always well known for paying better than other retailers. Never worked their myself so wouldn't know... It would explain why most of their staff are miserable though.
88
04/12/2020 14:00:09 4 4
bbc
Their staff are partners, salaries are relatively low but in normal times they also receive a profuit share that boosts their annual income
Covid hit profits which meant they made a loss, I think for the first time ever

No profit, no profit share and repaying any relief would increase the losses they incurred
135
04/12/2020 14:34:47 6 0
bbc
What are you on about? Its Waitrose/John Lewis that treat their employees as partners, not M&S.
22
04/12/2020 13:21:26 6 8
bbc
Think you summed up big business quite nicely there - customers come last on the list, way below shareholders and executives making as much money as possible...
89
04/12/2020 14:00:37 17 1
bbc
1) The whole point of business is to make money otherwise what would be the point
2)Any business that put it's customers last would, unless they hold a monopoly, lose their customers and without customers would not make money - return to point 1
90
04/12/2020 14:03:54 2 5
bbc
£35m in covid related costs!!!! what for? hand sanitisers, masks and a few screens in each shop and grooming salons..please..oh ..lets not forget the one way systems markers
93
04/12/2020 14:05:48 0 3
bbc
I was referring to pets at home stores..sorry didn't make that clear
100
04/12/2020 14:09:21 2 0
bbc
If only you had some idea of the costs related to being covid compliant
Removed
91
04/12/2020 14:04:15 3 4
bbc
So like... it's great they did that, but they didn't HAVE to. That's a problem.

I find it confusing the govt couldn't draw up some agreement whereby they would lend the money, then if a company had profits and could afford to pay it back. They would pay it back.

Any information on the worst offenders who still made profit an kept the money? I would like to see that so I know who to avoid.
78
04/12/2020 13:53:45 6 4
bbc
Because staff do the work but shareholders just collect the proceeds?

Shareholders are NOT "mainly pensions and insurance companies" - that's only 6% of them now. Most shares - 55% of them - are owned by overseas investors.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/investmentspensionsandtrusts/bulletins/ownershipofukquotedshares/2018#beneficial-owners
92
04/12/2020 14:05:06 7 0
bbc
So you would like a stop to dividends? Do you not see the problem that with no prospect of a dividend investors will take their money elsewhere and the company folds. An investor has to have an incentive to invest in any company!
195
04/12/2020 15:45:07 0 0
bbc
1. Disappointed investors can sell shares, but the money they take elsewhere doesn't leave the company. Others pay to buy.

2. Shares aren't the only way to invest in a business - just the most suitable for speculation. Bonds pay returns to investors - but don't drive the destructive short-term management that chases dividends, share buy-backs & bonuses over investment, productivity & a future.
90
04/12/2020 14:03:54 2 5
bbc
£35m in covid related costs!!!! what for? hand sanitisers, masks and a few screens in each shop and grooming salons..please..oh ..lets not forget the one way systems markers
93
04/12/2020 14:05:48 0 3
bbc
I was referring to pets at home stores..sorry didn't make that clear
94
04/12/2020 14:06:04 2 5
bbc
Trouble with this is that as these sums come off the balance sheet of the supermarkets, who exist to generate profit and returns for their investors (many of which are our pensions); prices will probably rise in supermarkets. That will hit the poorest people the hardest.

The gov't getting some money back won't result in tax reductions for average joe: normal people will actually be worse off.
98
04/12/2020 14:08:14 3 0
bbc
It may mean that the government may not need to raise taxes so significatly for the average joe though
78
04/12/2020 13:53:45 6 4
bbc
Because staff do the work but shareholders just collect the proceeds?

Shareholders are NOT "mainly pensions and insurance companies" - that's only 6% of them now. Most shares - 55% of them - are owned by overseas investors.

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/investmentspensionsandtrusts/bulletins/ownershipofukquotedshares/2018#beneficial-owners
95
04/12/2020 14:07:11 3 0
bbc
Uk shareholders own shares in overseas companies!
96
04/12/2020 14:07:15 6 4
bbc
The public should boycott the supermarkets which are not handing the support back. If Tesco and Lidl can do it Waitrose, M&S and Sainsbury can! Its about morality!
103
04/12/2020 14:10:40 4 0
bbc
what about the Co-oP ?
105
04/12/2020 14:11:41 2 0
bbc
Try reading the article - Sainsburys have!
97
04/12/2020 14:07:22 7 1
bbc
So far the decision by Tesco has raked back £2 billion for the taxpayer! Don't congratulate others for following suit, they were left with no option.
94
04/12/2020 14:06:04 2 5
bbc
Trouble with this is that as these sums come off the balance sheet of the supermarkets, who exist to generate profit and returns for their investors (many of which are our pensions); prices will probably rise in supermarkets. That will hit the poorest people the hardest.

The gov't getting some money back won't result in tax reductions for average joe: normal people will actually be worse off.
98
04/12/2020 14:08:14 3 0
bbc
It may mean that the government may not need to raise taxes so significatly for the average joe though
104
04/12/2020 14:11:22 1 2
bbc
Do you honestly think they won't, whatever the supermarkets do or don't do?
116
04/12/2020 14:17:37 1 2
bbc
After Covid and Brexit and their mismanagement of both? You are, most surely, having a laugh.
64
04/12/2020 13:47:00 47 6
bbc
Why does everyone seem to think that paying dividends to shareholders is any different to paying staff? the shareholders are mainly pensions and insurance companies who will need this money to pay the same workers when they retire!
99
04/12/2020 14:08:45 2 2
bbc
It’s a question of sharing the pain in the short term. In the long term there is a chance of recouping any loss for major investors such as pension providers. Most commentators do not appear against dividends per se, if companies can pay full dividends they don’t need public money which is needed elsewhere. This money was meant to keep jobs and businesses open, not enable payment of dividends.
90
04/12/2020 14:03:54 2 5
bbc
£35m in covid related costs!!!! what for? hand sanitisers, masks and a few screens in each shop and grooming salons..please..oh ..lets not forget the one way systems markers
100
04/12/2020 14:09:21 2 0
bbc
If only you had some idea of the costs related to being covid compliant