Dune and Matrix 4 streaming plan prompts urgent talks from AMC cinemas
04/12/2020 | news | business | 441
Odeon owner AMC is alarmed by Warner Bros' plan to stream films in US as soon as they hit cinemas.
1
04/12/2020 11:15:07 11 12
bbc
I simply can't imagine myself ever visiting a cinema again to watch a movie, Covid or no Covid.
40
04/12/2020 11:21:03 5 2
bbc
Neither can I.
A complete waste of money.
And full of noisy people.
2
04/12/2020 11:17:31 46 7
bbc
It's the death of the cinema. Been coming for years.
39
04/12/2020 11:20:23 16 27
bbc
And about time too.
Good riddance to a waste of money.
49
04/12/2020 11:38:23 8 5
bbc
Cinema attendance in the UK has been on an upward trend for about 50 years now, 2018 saw the highest number of admissions in decades. But don't let facts get in the way of grabbing a few likes.
3
jon
04/12/2020 11:17:49 4 3
bbc
This could be the thin end of the wedge. We may never see movies on the big screen again!
4
04/12/2020 11:18:00 3 1
bbc
This is very sad. But it is getting difficult to see how cinemas can continue.
5
04/12/2020 11:18:18 1 3
bbc
Its not an epic until some watches it I'm waging it wont be a mark on the original movie
16
04/12/2020 11:22:53 3 1
bbc
Lynch's take on Dune wasn't without it's critics

After the relative failure of Blade Runner 2046, I don't know that another Villeneuve sci-fi "epic" would have the legs they think it would at the cinema
6
04/12/2020 11:18:31 22 4
bbc
I'd love to go the cinema and watch a movie, but the reality is that it will be hellish. Wearing a mask throughout, not being able to sit next to friends, not being able to go for a meal or a drink afterwards. And paying £25+ for the privilege.

The Cinema experience just isn't compatible with anti-Covid measures. Much better just watching it at home.
152
04/12/2020 12:39:38 4 1
bbc
went to see Tenet when lockdown was lifted - forgot about my mask tbh - but it was an engrossing movie… and the cinema was largely empty…
7
04/12/2020 11:19:03 62 11
bbc
I absolutely hate the cinema experience. Who wants to sit in a room full of people as they munch down their crisps and popcorn as you are trying to "get into" a film, having paid a kings ransom for the privilege? Not me.
13
04/12/2020 11:20:52 10 85
bbc
You'd rather watch a low quality pirate copy on your phone?
130
04/12/2020 12:32:11 12 6
bbc
You think you're paying a king's ransom now, watching it in the cinema? HBO Max costs $15 a month, $120 a year; that's just for access to Warner Bros' film content, with extra subscriptions needed to watch each studio's films. And once the cinemas are all gone, you can bet that they'll introduce "Box Office" fees for any high-budget new releases. Corporate monopolies only lead to more extortion...
8
RW
04/12/2020 11:19:29 125 19
bbc
People seem to have lost the art of cinema going these days, so who wants to go anyway?

Mobile calls and message bleeps, glowing mobile screens, chatting like no one else is there, filthy seats, massively overpriced snacks.

With home cinema TVs as they are now, why bother?
41
04/12/2020 11:35:13 69 5
bbc
For me, the key thing is I want to watch something with my friends and family. Not with 50 other people irritating me! Each trip is a lottery in terms of experience (e.g. noisy people, lots of texters, sitting next to a stinker etc), let alone also considering whether the film is any good. Could be a big waste of money!
108
04/12/2020 12:22:05 2 10
bbc
No matter how big your TV, you can't replicate the cinema experience.

The answer to others annoying you is to go when the cinema's are quiet, I also go mid-week, early evening very few people in the cinema.
331
04/12/2020 15:40:47 1 0
bbc
Luckily there are some exceptions, small cinemas with clean comfy seats, space between pairs for reasonably priced coffee and/or drinks from bar just outside. When Covid is over we'll be going back.
9
04/12/2020 11:19:50 10 5
bbc
People love the cinema so no reason why it cant bounce back. Its an event, a night out, a bit of escapism.
Of course there will be those who moan and say they wont go, but they probably never went anywhere or did anything, so wont be missed.
10
04/12/2020 11:19:51 76 10
bbc
Too expensive. Poor films. People that cannot behave. Why I do not visit the conema any more.
229
04/12/2020 13:16:42 15 2
bbc
Its the sticky carpets The tacky feeling when you try to walk to or from your seat.

Oh, and being able to pause so I can take a loo break.
318
04/12/2020 14:33:37 0 1
bbc
Poor films? Haha.... oh boy. You're not into film, are you?
11
04/12/2020 11:20:07 2 5
bbc
Before anyone says BuT I'Ll JuSt WaTcH MoViEs At HOmE CiNeMa iS ToO ExPenSive... just remember most people will never replicate the full cinema experience at home.

The technologies that make the cinema truly great are licensed to professional operators, thus you can't have them. You also won't be able to get the film itself on release date unless lawyered and minted.
24
jay
04/12/2020 11:26:18 2 3
bbc
hmmm,£ 200, full 1080p ,120 inch screen £25 sony sound system off gumtree ,full cinema experience ,plus the option of 300 inch screen in the summer outside ,all for the price of four of us going to the imax
25
04/12/2020 11:26:57 2 1
bbc
What the "full cinema experience" that includes people crunching away on crisps, texting, mobiles pinging all the time and chatting away to their mates. Nope, I don't replicate this at home thank God.
77
tom
04/12/2020 11:55:57 0 1
bbc
These days we are getting much closer to the cinema experience than we were in 1980. Large TV's with 4k and soon 8k definition are becoming commonplace, home theatre surround sound systems are much improved. Technologies like Atmos hitting the mass market. You might lose a little immersion but gain a lot of comfort, convenience and ultimately if goes to streaming services day 1 - you get it quick.
12
jay
04/12/2020 11:20:37 5 2
bbc
the sleeper must awaken....
7
04/12/2020 11:19:03 62 11
bbc
I absolutely hate the cinema experience. Who wants to sit in a room full of people as they munch down their crisps and popcorn as you are trying to "get into" a film, having paid a kings ransom for the privilege? Not me.
13
04/12/2020 11:20:52 10 85
bbc
You'd rather watch a low quality pirate copy on your phone?
30
04/12/2020 11:29:30 30 2
bbc
That's not what he said at all.
32
04/12/2020 11:30:48 21 2
bbc
No, Id rather watch on a big telly, at home with my family and I have no interest in the latest films, I'm happy to wait and whilst doing so catch up on the thousands of great films already out there.
133
04/12/2020 12:33:10 7 0
bbc
love the cinema but thats literally the definition of a straw man argument right there!
149
04/12/2020 12:39:03 3 5
bbc
They’re not low quality at all
211
04/12/2020 13:03:25 11 1
bbc
He didn't mention pirate copy once. It's backward people like yourself that stop progression and consumer choice.
Guarantee that i will be able to watch a good HD quality film for free within days of it being streamed,you just have to know where to look.
Most recentley been watching season 2 of the mandalorian in HD for free no Disney+ subscriptions nor netflix,nor HBO or any others.
A little digging and you will find the right road,google is your friend.
Removed
257
04/12/2020 13:41:15 3 0
bbc
NO; I'd rather watch a UHD disc with Dolby Atmos sound (10 speakers including ceiling) on my 65" OLED TV thanks!
325
04/12/2020 15:22:52 1 1
bbc
Yes, even on a phone sized screen. Absolutely. Control of the noise volume, stop pause, time of viewing choices. No other strangers near me. But upgrade to a decent sized screen and cinema has zero excuse to exist!
428
05/12/2020 15:47:58 0 0
bbc
Umm, missing the point a bit aren't you. This whole article is about having high quality new films directly at home. You've pulled the whole "pirated copy on your phone" out of thin air.
14
04/12/2020 11:20:54 35 10
bbc
Yep, concur with the sentiments so far.

Why would anyone wish to sit with noisy obnoxious disease-spreaders when today's UHD (extremely) large-screen TVs and quality sound systems provide perfect performance, to which you can pause at any time.

Been years since I've been now - this has been the case for some time.
21
04/12/2020 11:25:06 3 6
bbc
Yup. Here in our coastal town, we have a nice "boutique" cinema with lovely seats and an 8K projector. I'm from Manchester, those multi screen complexes are filthy anyway!

Boutique? We're still all in a room together; if I'm not vaccinated by the time Dune comes out, my sister will have to sit through it with me, or loan me her new 50" 4K TV :)
15
DSA
04/12/2020 11:22:02 3 5
bbc
Cinema has passed it's sell by date but is desparately trying to survive the technological advances - it won't.
5
04/12/2020 11:18:18 1 3
bbc
Its not an epic until some watches it I'm waging it wont be a mark on the original movie
16
04/12/2020 11:22:53 3 1
bbc
Lynch's take on Dune wasn't without it's critics

After the relative failure of Blade Runner 2046, I don't know that another Villeneuve sci-fi "epic" would have the legs they think it would at the cinema
23
04/12/2020 11:26:12 0 1
bbc
* its critics
62
04/12/2020 11:46:19 1 1
bbc
Blade Runner 2049 was well received by the public and critics, and made over $100m at the box office, not really sure how you've classed this as a 'relative failure'. I guess it just didn't live up to your personal expectations, David.
17
04/12/2020 11:23:07 10 5
bbc
Such a shame. The cinema is probably the thing I've missed the most about normal life during lockdown. Watching films at home just doesn't compare.
18
04/12/2020 11:23:13 23 4
bbc
Personally a great movie is enhanced at cinema. Scale and sensory immersion.
I can appreciate the film producers needing revenue. But they may be just killing off their future too.
Be careful
72
tom
04/12/2020 11:52:27 13 5
bbc
More than anything these days I find they simply put the volume too loud in cinemas. A decade ago it always seemed much more immersive, now sometimes (especially with action films) I feel a numb pain in my ears after visiting...
19
04/12/2020 11:23:57 20 7
bbc
50"+TV and a host of streaming services, add in popcorn and pizza delivered to your door and hey presto, no need for cinema.
51
04/12/2020 11:39:37 18 27
bbc
Try watching a 2.35:1 movie even on your 50" screen; it will be shown in 'letterbox' to fit the sides in. A cinema screen is 500" with better sound, and no temptation to pause or switch channels. It's immersive, and a much better shared experience with an appreciative audience.

Now compare your home setup with IMax...
158
04/12/2020 12:41:02 2 4
bbc
At c.£12/month, or c.£120/year, for each of those streaming services? Given that the average cost of a cinema ticket in the UK's £7.11, you'd have to be watching new releases awfully regularly (or be eating a pretty large amount of popcorn and pizza) for that to be a better deal; even excluding the expense of the Ultra HD large TV, surround sound system, and the high speed broadband service...
20
04/12/2020 11:24:39 4 2
bbc
They tested the waters with Tenet which was released in cinemas only and ended up losing a lot of money. Movies like Dune and Matrix 4 cost so much the studios need to release them where they have the best chance of at least making their money back. At the moment that is a cinema/streaming hybrid. Come next summer or next winter things might be different. Hope 007 is streamed soon.
33
04/12/2020 11:32:04 1 1
bbc
Tenet did OK in cinemas, but streaming and physical sales will help

Warner's deal with HBO Max, to offer cinema and streaming on same day, could work. Those you can go, and want to go, to the movies can. Those you can't or won't, have another viable option.
14
04/12/2020 11:20:54 35 10
bbc
Yep, concur with the sentiments so far.

Why would anyone wish to sit with noisy obnoxious disease-spreaders when today's UHD (extremely) large-screen TVs and quality sound systems provide perfect performance, to which you can pause at any time.

Been years since I've been now - this has been the case for some time.
21
04/12/2020 11:25:06 3 6
bbc
Yup. Here in our coastal town, we have a nice "boutique" cinema with lovely seats and an 8K projector. I'm from Manchester, those multi screen complexes are filthy anyway!

Boutique? We're still all in a room together; if I'm not vaccinated by the time Dune comes out, my sister will have to sit through it with me, or loan me her new 50" 4K TV :)
398
04/12/2020 23:44:48 0 0
bbc
There is no 8k projector in the cinema market, even Barco and Christie do not have 8k, unless you mean 8k wobulation and even then 8k hasn't even filtered into the home cinema market, JVC new projector doesn't contain the 8k chip so it's not really 8k. I will pull up a seat and wait here until you can let me know which of the major cinema projection brands is running 8k? Go ahead :-)
404
05/12/2020 05:36:25 0 0
bbc
50 "inches" is pretty small by today's standards.
22
04/12/2020 11:25:16 7 2
bbc
I visited my local independent cinema lots during the relaxed period we had over the summer. Social distancing very well managed. Very pleasant experience. And not multiplex prices (seat, beer and a snack for roughly the same as the seat price at a multiplex). Will definitely be going back once it re-opens. But not for Matrix-4 or this Dune thing! How about something original?
16
04/12/2020 11:22:53 3 1
bbc
Lynch's take on Dune wasn't without it's critics

After the relative failure of Blade Runner 2046, I don't know that another Villeneuve sci-fi "epic" would have the legs they think it would at the cinema
23
04/12/2020 11:26:12 0 1
bbc
* its critics
11
04/12/2020 11:20:07 2 5
bbc
Before anyone says BuT I'Ll JuSt WaTcH MoViEs At HOmE CiNeMa iS ToO ExPenSive... just remember most people will never replicate the full cinema experience at home.

The technologies that make the cinema truly great are licensed to professional operators, thus you can't have them. You also won't be able to get the film itself on release date unless lawyered and minted.
24
jay
04/12/2020 11:26:18 2 3
bbc
hmmm,£ 200, full 1080p ,120 inch screen £25 sony sound system off gumtree ,full cinema experience ,plus the option of 300 inch screen in the summer outside ,all for the price of four of us going to the imax
11
04/12/2020 11:20:07 2 5
bbc
Before anyone says BuT I'Ll JuSt WaTcH MoViEs At HOmE CiNeMa iS ToO ExPenSive... just remember most people will never replicate the full cinema experience at home.

The technologies that make the cinema truly great are licensed to professional operators, thus you can't have them. You also won't be able to get the film itself on release date unless lawyered and minted.
25
04/12/2020 11:26:57 2 1
bbc
What the "full cinema experience" that includes people crunching away on crisps, texting, mobiles pinging all the time and chatting away to their mates. Nope, I don't replicate this at home thank God.
47
04/12/2020 11:37:20 1 2
bbc
So does no-one know how to shout "Shut up" or "Turn that phone off"?

It works quite well.
26
04/12/2020 11:27:05 65 7
bbc
Cinemas have made a good living from charging high prices for seats and eye-watering prices for drinks and snacks. They could get away with this when all we had at home was a 20" TV. With fast broadband and 4K TVs becoming increasingly affordable, cinemas have lost their main advantage.
43
04/12/2020 11:35:30 43 11
bbc
You do know you can watch a film wihtou eating hot-dogs and popcorn, right?
114
04/12/2020 12:26:06 2 5
bbc
Well, hope you look forward to the big Hollywood studios eliminating the middle men and charging even higher prices for their streaming services' exclusive content, along with 'Box Office' fees of £20+ for any new releases anyone's remotely interested in, since they'll be able to get away with it. What're you going to do- go to the cinema instead?
182
04/12/2020 12:52:41 5 2
bbc
Again, I don't think people actually examine the economics before firing off their first impressions. Cinemas charge highly for snacks... because they need that revenue stream. Leases for the property are extremely high. The prices charged by studios to exhibit their films are high, and often come with stringent conditions (e.g. insisting on showing other, less successful films, length of run).
292
04/12/2020 14:01:03 1 0
bbc
They haven't, the film companies take the money the first few weeks, cinemas rely on the later weeks to get their money back. That's why they charge so much for everything.
There was a huge issue about 20 years ago when Disney announced they'd release a film on DVD about two weeks into its cinema run, cinemas went nuts as no one would come after it was released on DVD and they'd have made no money
27
04/12/2020 11:28:03 82 3
bbc
I use to love going to the cinema but my attendance had dropped over the last few years to only watching the few films I felt it was worth investing the time and money to watch on the big screen. Plus dealing with Food munching / texting morons really dampened the experience.
282
04/12/2020 13:55:48 6 1
bbc
They're too expensive here and it's only worth watching blockbusters, but the cinemas make little money as the film companies take the first few weeks' revenue, then put them on home media so no one goes to the cinema by week three.
Film companies don't want cinemas, they want to cut out the middle man and with home equipment so good now.
28
04/12/2020 11:28:09 30 9
bbc
Watching a movie at the cinema, on iMax, as the studio intended, remains by far the best way to enjoy a film. I can’t imagine watching Avatar on TV. But I went to see it three times at the cinema. Some movies are experiences, as well as entertainment. Going to the cinema will always remain such. Which won’t stop me watching a lot of films at home. But a trip to the cinema will remain special.
37
04/12/2020 11:34:27 9 5
bbc
I haven't been to the cinema for ages (otjust lockdown era). I'm looking forward to rekindling my habit once thing open up again.
64
04/12/2020 11:47:10 2 2
bbc
totally with you on imax - I'd still pay good money to see rolling stones - live at the max (an imax movie of the stones in concert back in 1990's) again ! Sad or what.
29
04/12/2020 11:28:29 23 2
bbc
Honestly I'm torn. Going to the cinema is a great experience in lots of ways, despite sticky floors and limited legroom (some cinemas far better than others). Then again, I have a decent TV at home, a comfy sofa, and I can pause it when I get up to go to the loo.

Certainly during the pandemic it's just not a risk worth taking. Price, really, is the tipping point for me in the long term.
61
04/12/2020 11:45:35 21 2
bbc
this is exactly how we feel James! Going to the cinema is only for movies we want to see really badly and aren't prepared to wait for to come on to Sky (other movie channel services are available!) :) But at the moment, the thought of sitting in a confined space with a 100 or so other people for up to 3 hours is a definite no from me :(
421
05/12/2020 14:43:05 0 0
bbc
see that's where you differ from the business and corporations point of view

price(profit) is everything to them. absolutely. everything. then the rest of it falls in somewhere
13
04/12/2020 11:20:52 10 85
bbc
You'd rather watch a low quality pirate copy on your phone?
30
04/12/2020 11:29:30 30 2
bbc
That's not what he said at all.
36
04/12/2020 11:33:56 15 1
bbc
Thank you
31
04/12/2020 11:30:12 2 2
bbc
im sure they will figure out a deal to get people to subscribe to a 100 quid a month popcorn subscription with the streaming service.
13
04/12/2020 11:20:52 10 85
bbc
You'd rather watch a low quality pirate copy on your phone?
32
04/12/2020 11:30:48 21 2
bbc
No, Id rather watch on a big telly, at home with my family and I have no interest in the latest films, I'm happy to wait and whilst doing so catch up on the thousands of great films already out there.
20
04/12/2020 11:24:39 4 2
bbc
They tested the waters with Tenet which was released in cinemas only and ended up losing a lot of money. Movies like Dune and Matrix 4 cost so much the studios need to release them where they have the best chance of at least making their money back. At the moment that is a cinema/streaming hybrid. Come next summer or next winter things might be different. Hope 007 is streamed soon.
33
04/12/2020 11:32:04 1 1
bbc
Tenet did OK in cinemas, but streaming and physical sales will help

Warner's deal with HBO Max, to offer cinema and streaming on same day, could work. Those you can go, and want to go, to the movies can. Those you can't or won't, have another viable option.
66
04/12/2020 11:47:58 0 0
bbc
Tenet has lost between 50 and 100 million dollars. That is not okay for a summer Nolan blockbuster. They wouldn't have been happy with 50-100 million dollars in profit never mind loss it's a disaster for a movie like that
34
lee
04/12/2020 11:32:17 7 7
bbc
For those of you worried about Covid at the cinema...

“I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.”
35
04/12/2020 11:32:38 2 2
bbc
The movement here is organic - its supply and demand - if lots of people want to go to the cinema and do go to the cinema, then great, business as usual. If people don't want to go, then we go down streaming plan B. If Cinema still has a place in 2021 and onwards, then there is no issue here. If Cinema doesn't have a place, then it is what it is...
30
04/12/2020 11:29:30 30 2
bbc
That's not what he said at all.
36
04/12/2020 11:33:56 15 1
bbc
Thank you
28
04/12/2020 11:28:09 30 9
bbc
Watching a movie at the cinema, on iMax, as the studio intended, remains by far the best way to enjoy a film. I can’t imagine watching Avatar on TV. But I went to see it three times at the cinema. Some movies are experiences, as well as entertainment. Going to the cinema will always remain such. Which won’t stop me watching a lot of films at home. But a trip to the cinema will remain special.
37
04/12/2020 11:34:27 9 5
bbc
I haven't been to the cinema for ages (otjust lockdown era). I'm looking forward to rekindling my habit once thing open up again.
38
04/12/2020 11:19:53 3 5
bbc
Like Debenhams and Top Shop, cinemas are a relic of the past.
Let them go to the wall.
We will be better off without them.
They are a waste of money.
81
04/12/2020 11:59:25 2 0
bbc
So we can soon spend pretty much our entire lives stuck in our own homes, never needing to go anywhere, as either we experience everything or interact via a screen, or get things delivered.

Sounds about as enticing as spending your life in a prison cell!

But pubs are still popular as apparently getting drunk at home, and far more cheaply, doesn't appeal.
2
04/12/2020 11:17:31 46 7
bbc
It's the death of the cinema. Been coming for years.
39
04/12/2020 11:20:23 16 27
bbc
And about time too.
Good riddance to a waste of money.
148
04/12/2020 12:38:09 3 1
bbc
That's a charming attitude to have, especially towards people that actually work in the industry. If there aren't as many cinemas then studios will be able to charge what they like for YET another streaming service. Cinemas don't make a huge profit on the ticket $$ as most of it goes to the studios. The majority of their money comes from the concession sales.
1
04/12/2020 11:15:07 11 12
bbc
I simply can't imagine myself ever visiting a cinema again to watch a movie, Covid or no Covid.
40
04/12/2020 11:21:03 5 2
bbc
Neither can I.
A complete waste of money.
And full of noisy people.
8
RW
04/12/2020 11:19:29 125 19
bbc
People seem to have lost the art of cinema going these days, so who wants to go anyway?

Mobile calls and message bleeps, glowing mobile screens, chatting like no one else is there, filthy seats, massively overpriced snacks.

With home cinema TVs as they are now, why bother?
41
04/12/2020 11:35:13 69 5
bbc
For me, the key thing is I want to watch something with my friends and family. Not with 50 other people irritating me! Each trip is a lottery in terms of experience (e.g. noisy people, lots of texters, sitting next to a stinker etc), let alone also considering whether the film is any good. Could be a big waste of money!
185
04/12/2020 12:54:25 4 11
bbc
So you've got a big enough house to watch at home with all your friends and family? Lucky guy. And you employ a house maid, to clear up all the mess they'll leave behind- or are you happy to clear up after all of them yourself? And none of your friends or family'll be the slightest bit noisy, or smelly, or texting on their mobiles either? Congratulations- you've got better ones than I do...
386
04/12/2020 20:52:01 2 0
bbc
I agree, its always been a lottery whether you'll get some short attention span idiot near you who can't stop talking or stay off their phone.

But the last few years that lottery seems to be turning into a certainty. Cinemas should have been on this from day one as its the single biggest thing stopping real film fans going.
42
04/12/2020 11:35:15 1 3
bbc
Maybe the demise of cinema will lead to better spoken word sound quality, and end to mumbling and earth shattering explosions?
26
04/12/2020 11:27:05 65 7
bbc
Cinemas have made a good living from charging high prices for seats and eye-watering prices for drinks and snacks. They could get away with this when all we had at home was a 20" TV. With fast broadband and 4K TVs becoming increasingly affordable, cinemas have lost their main advantage.
43
04/12/2020 11:35:30 43 11
bbc
You do know you can watch a film wihtou eating hot-dogs and popcorn, right?
68
tom
04/12/2020 11:48:16 8 5
bbc
Of course you CAN, but sometimes its nice to have a drink when you're sat there for 2 hours. I've found cinemas to be a lot more accomodating these days, letting you bring in your own food and drink. If a cinema won't even let me bring in a bottle of water then I'm simply not going to go there.
116
04/12/2020 12:26:43 7 0
bbc
What is this witchcraft?
225
DC
04/12/2020 13:13:14 1 0
bbc
But you can't watch a film without the people sitting around you eating hot-dogs and popcorn, right?
347
04/12/2020 16:37:02 0 0
bbc
Have you tried the hot dogs recently?
44
04/12/2020 11:35:31 26 8
bbc
Where on earth do you all live? I live in Horsham and went to Cineworld in Crawley regularly using my unlimited pass. The pass works out to be very good value if you want to go often enough (I went 3 times a month on average). No one is forcing you to buy food there, I don't. Also, the vast majority behave themselves very well, yes even in Crawley :)
110
04/12/2020 12:22:17 7 10
bbc
No but you are forced to listen to everybody else munching away and even if you do get 10 seconds of silence, I'm just sitting there waiting for the next time someone starts unwrapping a sweet. Terrible experience.
131
04/12/2020 12:32:27 6 4
bbc
Basically, this is a comments section on the BBC. It's akin to the comments section on the Daily Mail. The people that post are small minded and revel in the collapse of industry. "I don't like the cinema, good riddance" not thinking for a second about all the people that affects in distribution, exhibition etc etc etc. It's pretty pathetic.
188
04/12/2020 12:55:07 2 3
bbc
A 'vast majority' behave themselves? Good behaviour should be a given. My last visit to the cinema was to see Skyfall. The catering stewards were busier than a Nando's diner with no apologies for the continuous interruptions. As for the public, don't get me started. I gave up, got my money back. With 85" TV's available now at consumer prices its a no from me, I'll stick to TV.
326
Bob
04/12/2020 15:27:00 0 2
bbc
Read the negative comments carefully and you'll notice a pattern.

The follow similar trend 'I haven't been to the cinema in years'.... then list a bunch of things they assert to be true today, even though they haven't been in years.

As usual they're often totally out of touch and off-base with reality.
45
04/12/2020 11:36:10 2 1
bbc
Surely the studios own the rights to the film and can therefore release it as they see fit assuming no contract already exists for distribution.
46
04/12/2020 11:37:00 3 4
bbc
The death of cinema has been a long time coming.
This will be the nail in the coffin for Hollywood profits.

Once films hits the Internet, it's free.
25
04/12/2020 11:26:57 2 1
bbc
What the "full cinema experience" that includes people crunching away on crisps, texting, mobiles pinging all the time and chatting away to their mates. Nope, I don't replicate this at home thank God.
47
04/12/2020 11:37:20 1 2
bbc
So does no-one know how to shout "Shut up" or "Turn that phone off"?

It works quite well.
53
04/12/2020 11:40:19 1 1
bbc
Yes, but us brits prefer to sit tutting and mumbling our disapproval to ourselves :-)
48
04/12/2020 11:37:54 1 1
bbc
Cinema companies need to move with the times and become the streamers for big box office movies. I'd happily pay for that. Samsung started by selling noodles in Taegu, Korea. Netflix started by selling or renting DVDs. Look at them now.
2
04/12/2020 11:17:31 46 7
bbc
It's the death of the cinema. Been coming for years.
49
04/12/2020 11:38:23 8 5
bbc
Cinema attendance in the UK has been on an upward trend for about 50 years now, 2018 saw the highest number of admissions in decades. But don't let facts get in the way of grabbing a few likes.
102
04/12/2020 12:18:09 2 0
bbc
His name is Jeeves, you know never to rely on him as a source of knowledge ;-)
50
04/12/2020 11:38:35 10 1
bbc
"The new releases will be available on the service, which is not yet available in the UK, for one month after release."

... and it's exactly this attitude that fuels pirating. I think many of us have proven we're willing to pay for streaming services providing a service like this, but once again staggered regional releases lead to lost revenue from people who don't want to wait.
19
04/12/2020 11:23:57 20 7
bbc
50"+TV and a host of streaming services, add in popcorn and pizza delivered to your door and hey presto, no need for cinema.
51
04/12/2020 11:39:37 18 27
bbc
Try watching a 2.35:1 movie even on your 50" screen; it will be shown in 'letterbox' to fit the sides in. A cinema screen is 500" with better sound, and no temptation to pause or switch channels. It's immersive, and a much better shared experience with an appreciative audience.

Now compare your home setup with IMax...
71
tom
04/12/2020 11:51:05 15 3
bbc
A cinema screen is 500" sure, but you're not sitting 8 feet away from it. Physical size doesn't really matter all that much, its all about relative size. Throw in a 7.1 Atmos surround sound system and maybe bump that TV up to 65" and you've got a pretty decent home cinema setup, and on top of that you don't need to drive there, you can have whatever food you like, and you can pause if you want.
400
04/12/2020 23:49:11 0 0
bbc
Agreed. The lucky few who have say a Sony laser projector with trinnov atmos set up and 16 feet screen will ultimately benefit from this. Google Rob Hahn home theatee to see what I mean
52
04/12/2020 11:39:55 3 5
bbc
Sigh, yet another filming of Dune. Just read the book but forget about the sequel novels as the the quality falls off sharply.
78
04/12/2020 11:56:20 1 1
bbc
Have you read the prequel Novels House Harkonnen, House Atreides etc?
47
04/12/2020 11:37:20 1 2
bbc
So does no-one know how to shout "Shut up" or "Turn that phone off"?

It works quite well.
53
04/12/2020 11:40:19 1 1
bbc
Yes, but us brits prefer to sit tutting and mumbling our disapproval to ourselves :-)
54
04/12/2020 11:41:45 31 3
bbc
Laughable, open talks discussing how the customer will interact with its product. 5G VR and the poor over priced outdated cinema “experience” isn’t relevant to the on demand age, I’d pay more to watch in private with friends and family, rather than overpriced stale popcorn ??selling environments, often surrounded by intimidating rude phone obsessed millennials unable to put the phone down.
55
04/12/2020 11:27:40 65 4
bbc
lets see, my last trip to the cinema several years back. Screen out of focus, people chatting and waving their mobile phones about, ridiculously overpriced food and drinks.

I'm more than happy to stay at home at get the big screen experience on my own big screen.
376
04/12/2020 18:54:54 4 0
bbc
Cinema has been hanging by a thread for years just like a lot of retail. Covid has broken the thread.

The concept needs re-inventing or it will die.

Overpriced seats to see what can easily be downloaded, and mediocre food and snacks at excessive prices are not a winning formula.
380
04/12/2020 19:24:39 0 0
bbc
Go midweek, quieter.
56
04/12/2020 11:27:59 238 35
bbc
Option 1. Get remote and press play, watch movies on big TV with (optional) snacks in the comfort of my own home which I have complete control over.

Option 2. Travel miles, pay at least £25, pay £££ for popcorn, get bags checked - told off for Tesco purchases being in my own bag, wedge between strangers and listen to mobile beeps and people being inconsiderate.

Not a competition really is it?
80
04/12/2020 11:57:54 65 3
bbc
Cinemas will go the same way as Arcadia...
106
04/12/2020 12:20:10 21 5
bbc
Cinemas here cost between £4 and £5 per adult. I think that is more than reasonable. It would be awful if they went under.
109
04/12/2020 12:22:13 21 6
bbc
Looking at the probable cost of Option 1, though- if you have to pay £12 a month or £100 a year (the approx cost of HBO Max subscription), for each separate studio's film content, then it might not work out as such a great deal after all. Not to mention that, with the cinemas gone, and piracy eliminated, the Hollywood studios can overprice their exclusive streaming services as much as they want...
113
04/12/2020 12:24:52 17 0
bbc
Mulan was £25 when it was released on Disney+ and that'll be the standard cost, if not more on streaming services, not to mention the monthly/subscription on top.
120
04/12/2020 12:27:46 11 8
bbc
You also forgot to include family/friends popping in and out of the room, on their mobile phones too, potential internet issues/lagging and other distractions in option 1.
122
04/12/2020 12:28:34 12 8
bbc
Yeah but not everyone has a sound system at home like that of a movie theater that really brings movies to life...

a soundbar while being fine for watching RomComs isnt really going to do it if youre watching action movies or superhero flicks -- I mean it can but its no where near cinema experience.

Depends how petty you are really.
132
04/12/2020 12:32:50 11 1
bbc
...and you can pause the film while you go to the loo so you don't miss anything!!
136
04/12/2020 12:35:45 7 5
bbc
Never had a problem taking my own snacks into a cinema, you're going to the wrong one
161
04/12/2020 12:41:20 6 2
bbc
Over several years I've invested in Home cinema -electric screen/basic projector and gradually upgraded to a 4k upscaling 3D Blu ray player, decent budget receiver, 7 speaker SS, Benq 4K/3D projector. Not cheap but I can watch Amazon Prime, Netflix, a collection of Blu Ray disks inc. 3D (which look and sound stunning) on large screen as many times as I want. No huge black screen when off either!
173
04/12/2020 12:48:55 14 24
bbc
"[Stay at home] Not a competition really is it?" Clearly not a hard question for antisocial people who neither enjoy social experiences, think or care about wider economic issues, the impact on towns and communities, or care about the livelihoods of millions of people around the world. But, yes, you get to eat your own snacks.
180
04/12/2020 12:52:25 3 17
bbc
OK boomer
207
04/12/2020 13:00:23 2 11
bbc
Option 1. Change Cinema.
Option 2. How unsociable.
217
04/12/2020 13:08:20 13 4
bbc
Surely by that rationale you would never leave the house?
Pub? Buy from off license.
Food? Online delivery.
Exercise? Buy a treadmill.
Cafe? Buy instant coffee.
Work? Got a laptop.
No matter how big your telly it won’t be as good. Movies are made for movie screens.
224
04/12/2020 13:12:58 4 2
bbc
But it won't be just 'press play'.

It is unlikely to be included in your standard service & is likely to be pay-per-view for the initial release - in the region of £25 if recent releases are anything to go by.

The making of the films still has to be paid for & economically viable so nobody is getting it for 'free'.

& no matter what home system you have - you still cannot beat cinema experience.
264
04/12/2020 13:40:00 1 0
bbc
Is getting told off for bringing in your own snacks a common experience for most? I've seen people say it before, but in 30 years I've never had that happen to me. I always rock up with a bag for life with a coke, popcorn, and whatever and don't try to hide it. Normally go to Odeon and Empire cinemas.
266
04/12/2020 13:47:36 1 1
bbc
Go alone, in the morning, not miles, not living in london and its still better than watching films at home.
294
New
04/12/2020 14:01:59 1 0
bbc
It depends where you are. Going to the cinema in London is about as enjoyable as travelling from Stansted on Ryanair, but at BA/Heathrow prices. Outside London, I used to head to the cinema at least once a month for £6 a ticket. Turn up, decide what to see, enjoy. The London experience is exactly Option 2, with the additional pleasure of having to book weeks in advance to see any big releases.
307
A
04/12/2020 14:15:05 0 0
bbc
You don't have to sit through loads of adverts and trailers first either.
315
04/12/2020 14:24:44 0 0
bbc
I don't see much problem in the cinemas having a little bit of exclusivity for a month or so. It will still be shown on the home subscription networks in a while and at the same time will induce people to get off of their homes a little and get some air on the streets, not to mention saving the jobs of those who works in cinemas.
But indeed cinemas are not the same with all those phone noises.
316
04/12/2020 14:27:26 1 1
bbc
Mate, you are comparing two completely different experiences. You can also watch a gig on youtube rather than 'live'. I think you should go out a bit more.
332
04/12/2020 15:44:40 0 2
bbc
I'm surprised by the amount of up votes.

Surely everyone is excited to get out there after all these restrictions and don't just want to stay home watching TV!

The cinema is a relatively cheap night out.

Spend money on experiences (cinema) rather than stuff (big TV). My perfectly good second-hand TV was £20 - would have been top of the range 10 years ago. I'll spend my savings on experiences!
57
04/12/2020 11:34:09 5 5
bbc
Cinema really has had its day.
58
04/12/2020 11:34:25 9 1
bbc
I agree the cinema experience is not as enjoyable as it should be, noisy people, over priced snacks, cost of tickets etc..
I'd also add to this the fact that whilst online/technological advances have done nothing to enhance the high street shopping experience and in most cases have proved to be the death of a number of big high street chains why would cinema be any different?
82
CFM
04/12/2020 12:01:25 4 1
bbc
The problem is every cinema business model is based on selling you over priced snacks and drinks. Strip down a cinema to it's basic function of watching a movie and not providing the extras and none of them would make any profit.
59
04/12/2020 11:34:56 8 3
bbc
Bye bye Cinemas, bye bye bricks and mortar retail, great innit.
60
04/12/2020 11:44:27 22 8
bbc
Cinema attendance in 2018 (not revenue, actual attendance) hit a high not seen since 1970. Admissions have been trending upwards for 40 years solid (until COVID, obviously), despite home video, DVD, streaming etc. 86m in 1981 compared to 176.1m in 2019.

Of course it's easier for some just to assume as they no longer go, nobody else does. Another fact -the average price of a UK ticket is £7.11.
104
04/12/2020 12:19:27 7 23
bbc
The average price may or may not be £7.11 but I can guarantee nobody is actually paying anywhere near that low. As usual you can make any point with statistics, we are talking abut the real world.
223
04/12/2020 13:07:26 0 1
bbc
I'm not sure the above is a great analysis. 1980-1985 were the lowest period of attendance in UK cinema history, due to the impact of video tape, so a fairly subjective starting point. UK population was also 56m compared to 67m today, meaning the number of trips has only actually improved from 1.5 per individual per year to 2.5 per individual since 81. It's actually decreased since 2005 onwards.
374
04/12/2020 18:01:54 0 0
bbc
But that rise was mainly due to three or four blockbusters.
29
04/12/2020 11:28:29 23 2
bbc
Honestly I'm torn. Going to the cinema is a great experience in lots of ways, despite sticky floors and limited legroom (some cinemas far better than others). Then again, I have a decent TV at home, a comfy sofa, and I can pause it when I get up to go to the loo.

Certainly during the pandemic it's just not a risk worth taking. Price, really, is the tipping point for me in the long term.
61
04/12/2020 11:45:35 21 2
bbc
this is exactly how we feel James! Going to the cinema is only for movies we want to see really badly and aren't prepared to wait for to come on to Sky (other movie channel services are available!) :) But at the moment, the thought of sitting in a confined space with a 100 or so other people for up to 3 hours is a definite no from me :(
16
04/12/2020 11:22:53 3 1
bbc
Lynch's take on Dune wasn't without it's critics

After the relative failure of Blade Runner 2046, I don't know that another Villeneuve sci-fi "epic" would have the legs they think it would at the cinema
62
04/12/2020 11:46:19 1 1
bbc
Blade Runner 2049 was well received by the public and critics, and made over $100m at the box office, not really sure how you've classed this as a 'relative failure'. I guess it just didn't live up to your personal expectations, David.
63
04/12/2020 11:46:29 43 2
bbc
With a couple of notable exceptions (such as Joker and Tenet), i simply cannot be bothered with the expense, time and transit anymore. Parking/public transport, 2 tickets and a coke each cost me and the Mrs near £30 in total now for a trip to the pictures, and there's very few releases i'm willing to spend that type of money on these days.
28
04/12/2020 11:28:09 30 9
bbc
Watching a movie at the cinema, on iMax, as the studio intended, remains by far the best way to enjoy a film. I can’t imagine watching Avatar on TV. But I went to see it three times at the cinema. Some movies are experiences, as well as entertainment. Going to the cinema will always remain such. Which won’t stop me watching a lot of films at home. But a trip to the cinema will remain special.
64
04/12/2020 11:47:10 2 2
bbc
totally with you on imax - I'd still pay good money to see rolling stones - live at the max (an imax movie of the stones in concert back in 1990's) again ! Sad or what.
65
04/12/2020 11:47:25 8 5
bbc
Why do cinemas feel the need to control what we watch when we watch it, surly they are dinosaurs of the past like print media ?
165
04/12/2020 12:45:07 0 0
bbc
Because otherwise, the studios'll have total control over what you watch and whenever you're allowed to watch it. Next thing you know, you'll have to pay box office fees for every film you watch on their streaming service, have to re-pay whenever you want to re-watch them, and face prosecution for piracy any time you try to record them for future re-viewing. Careful what you wish for..
33
04/12/2020 11:32:04 1 1
bbc
Tenet did OK in cinemas, but streaming and physical sales will help

Warner's deal with HBO Max, to offer cinema and streaming on same day, could work. Those you can go, and want to go, to the movies can. Those you can't or won't, have another viable option.
66
04/12/2020 11:47:58 0 0
bbc
Tenet has lost between 50 and 100 million dollars. That is not okay for a summer Nolan blockbuster. They wouldn't have been happy with 50-100 million dollars in profit never mind loss it's a disaster for a movie like that
67
MB
04/12/2020 11:48:03 4 2
bbc
Cinema is or will become niche, for those that want the experience, thats the end-game. Theatres need to concentrate/modernise on the experience to survive. There is demand and therefore money for streaming latest movies this the economic certainty that drives the end-game and money talks as always. Just my opinion.
43
04/12/2020 11:35:30 43 11
bbc
You do know you can watch a film wihtou eating hot-dogs and popcorn, right?
68
tom
04/12/2020 11:48:16 8 5
bbc
Of course you CAN, but sometimes its nice to have a drink when you're sat there for 2 hours. I've found cinemas to be a lot more accomodating these days, letting you bring in your own food and drink. If a cinema won't even let me bring in a bottle of water then I'm simply not going to go there.
84
04/12/2020 12:03:48 8 1
bbc
I used to go to the cinema to get away from my fridge and constant snacking at home! And hearing other people chomping on food from incredibly rustly bags for an entire film is the worst thing about cinema. (Have they thought of using cloth bags for crisps?)
69
04/12/2020 11:48:45 0 2
bbc
Well they had a hard time back in the 70's as colour tv hit peoples homes big time, they bounced back then but maybe this is the straw that broke the camels back !!!
70
04/12/2020 11:46:00 12 3
bbc
Here's a brief idea of Cineworlds finances a year ago..'The group made a pre-tax profit of 349 million US dollars (£262.2 million) in 2018 compared with 155.1 million dollars (£116.5 million) a year earlier.' I really don't feel bad for them having a bad year or 2. Cinema isn't going to disappear even if it comes back a bit smaller or takes longer to 'recover'.
51
04/12/2020 11:39:37 18 27
bbc
Try watching a 2.35:1 movie even on your 50" screen; it will be shown in 'letterbox' to fit the sides in. A cinema screen is 500" with better sound, and no temptation to pause or switch channels. It's immersive, and a much better shared experience with an appreciative audience.

Now compare your home setup with IMax...
71
tom
04/12/2020 11:51:05 15 3
bbc
A cinema screen is 500" sure, but you're not sitting 8 feet away from it. Physical size doesn't really matter all that much, its all about relative size. Throw in a 7.1 Atmos surround sound system and maybe bump that TV up to 65" and you've got a pretty decent home cinema setup, and on top of that you don't need to drive there, you can have whatever food you like, and you can pause if you want.
337
04/12/2020 16:10:14 0 2
bbc
But you're still just watching TV. it's nothing special. Worse actually as TV shows are usually full-screen, but many movies are shown in letterbox so shrunk; vertical field can be much smaller than a cinema. You might as well hold a smartphone 8" from your face and claim it's as good!

And you don't have the audience.
18
04/12/2020 11:23:13 23 4
bbc
Personally a great movie is enhanced at cinema. Scale and sensory immersion.
I can appreciate the film producers needing revenue. But they may be just killing off their future too.
Be careful
72
tom
04/12/2020 11:52:27 13 5
bbc
More than anything these days I find they simply put the volume too loud in cinemas. A decade ago it always seemed much more immersive, now sometimes (especially with action films) I feel a numb pain in my ears after visiting...
73
04/12/2020 11:52:42 2 6
bbc
Go woke - go broke.
97
04/12/2020 12:13:46 0 1
bbc
how is this relevant to anything
74
04/12/2020 11:53:43 5 5
bbc
Cinemas are a thing of the past. They've been dying for years.
75
CFM
04/12/2020 11:55:04 0 3
bbc
"AMC banned all Universal films" real smart move! Means less blockbusters at AMC cinemas, less people likely to attend a physical cinema and will accelerate Hollywood's drive for different consumer revenue streams not based on a cinema. Basically the cinema is killing off their own business.
76
04/12/2020 11:55:26 4 4
bbc
Cinema is dead.
96
04/12/2020 12:11:11 1 0
bbc
Cinema with its current business model of overpriced tickets and snacks for mediocre films is dead.
Like other industries undergoing a paradigm shift outside their control they must adapt or die not double down on restrictions of seeing new films; what makes piracy thrive is the difficulty of accessing content, not just price.
Film studios will survive just fine it's the actual cinemas suffering.
11
04/12/2020 11:20:07 2 5
bbc
Before anyone says BuT I'Ll JuSt WaTcH MoViEs At HOmE CiNeMa iS ToO ExPenSive... just remember most people will never replicate the full cinema experience at home.

The technologies that make the cinema truly great are licensed to professional operators, thus you can't have them. You also won't be able to get the film itself on release date unless lawyered and minted.
77
tom
04/12/2020 11:55:57 0 1
bbc
These days we are getting much closer to the cinema experience than we were in 1980. Large TV's with 4k and soon 8k definition are becoming commonplace, home theatre surround sound systems are much improved. Technologies like Atmos hitting the mass market. You might lose a little immersion but gain a lot of comfort, convenience and ultimately if goes to streaming services day 1 - you get it quick.
52
04/12/2020 11:39:55 3 5
bbc
Sigh, yet another filming of Dune. Just read the book but forget about the sequel novels as the the quality falls off sharply.
78
04/12/2020 11:56:20 1 1
bbc
Have you read the prequel Novels House Harkonnen, House Atreides etc?
79
04/12/2020 11:57:41 4 3
bbc
Cinema's will not be a thing of the past, more Studios will soon announce similar plans. The Cinema chains will go bust in 2021 and these Studios will be there like vultures to buy up the cheap stock that administrators will be selling. Then cinema's will be owned by the Studios, delays to releasing on streaming platforms will resume in 2022. Cinema ticket prices will increase.
56
04/12/2020 11:27:59 238 35
bbc
Option 1. Get remote and press play, watch movies on big TV with (optional) snacks in the comfort of my own home which I have complete control over.

Option 2. Travel miles, pay at least £25, pay £££ for popcorn, get bags checked - told off for Tesco purchases being in my own bag, wedge between strangers and listen to mobile beeps and people being inconsiderate.

Not a competition really is it?
80
04/12/2020 11:57:54 65 3
bbc
Cinemas will go the same way as Arcadia...
178
04/12/2020 12:51:07 1 2
bbc
More like the same way as Blockbuster. Ask yourself, though- did anyone spend more money on home movies and video games at Blockbuster than the average person spends on movie, video game and streaming service subscriptions today? They always claim it's 'change for the better', but the consumers always end up paying more for it...
38
04/12/2020 11:19:53 3 5
bbc
Like Debenhams and Top Shop, cinemas are a relic of the past.
Let them go to the wall.
We will be better off without them.
They are a waste of money.
81
04/12/2020 11:59:25 2 0
bbc
So we can soon spend pretty much our entire lives stuck in our own homes, never needing to go anywhere, as either we experience everything or interact via a screen, or get things delivered.

Sounds about as enticing as spending your life in a prison cell!

But pubs are still popular as apparently getting drunk at home, and far more cheaply, doesn't appeal.
58
04/12/2020 11:34:25 9 1
bbc
I agree the cinema experience is not as enjoyable as it should be, noisy people, over priced snacks, cost of tickets etc..
I'd also add to this the fact that whilst online/technological advances have done nothing to enhance the high street shopping experience and in most cases have proved to be the death of a number of big high street chains why would cinema be any different?
82
CFM
04/12/2020 12:01:25 4 1
bbc
The problem is every cinema business model is based on selling you over priced snacks and drinks. Strip down a cinema to it's basic function of watching a movie and not providing the extras and none of them would make any profit.
83
04/12/2020 12:01:55 3 5
bbc
I grew up with my prime teenage years in the 80s and saw some some of the best blockbusters movies ever made in the cinema IMO. I can still quote many memorable lines and scenes from them today. Now ask a child to recite a memorable line from an Avengers movie...also CGI, green screen and physics defying stunts just do not make a good movie I'm afraid.
91
04/12/2020 12:10:53 0 2
bbc
Is this a joke? So many lines in Avenger films that you cannot even count on with your fingers toes have literally become meme's because they are so memorable. More people know Avengers memes than can name what planet Luke Skywalker grew up on.
68
tom
04/12/2020 11:48:16 8 5
bbc
Of course you CAN, but sometimes its nice to have a drink when you're sat there for 2 hours. I've found cinemas to be a lot more accomodating these days, letting you bring in your own food and drink. If a cinema won't even let me bring in a bottle of water then I'm simply not going to go there.
84
04/12/2020 12:03:48 8 1
bbc
I used to go to the cinema to get away from my fridge and constant snacking at home! And hearing other people chomping on food from incredibly rustly bags for an entire film is the worst thing about cinema. (Have they thought of using cloth bags for crisps?)
399
Tim
04/12/2020 23:47:27 0 0
bbc
Well you could use a cloth bag for crisps, if you want them nice and stale, as if paying a fiver for them wasn't enough punishment.
85
04/12/2020 12:04:18 3 0
bbc
Making movies, like every other activity, is about making money for those who make them. The need now is for said makers to discern the best way to put their product in the hands of the consumers who'll pay to see them - at a cinema, by purchasing copies, or by downloading them... in all likelihood, all 3. In days of yore, I used to wish that I could buy a copy of a film as I left the cinema.
86
04/12/2020 12:07:13 6 2
bbc
I love the cinema experience but it is Expensive for families. I would rather pay 10 to 15 to rent a film for a couple of nights than pay 30 to 40 for a night at the Cinema. Its a more comfortable experience.
I would love the option for both but fact is i rarely go Cinema now and prefer having a Friday night Movie night with Kids. The pandemics has just underline it.
87
04/12/2020 12:09:28 42 12
bbc
Such negative comments on here. Cinemas are going nowhere. I have a big TV at home with the surround sound but I am sorry, you cannot replicate the big screen experience at home and the studios and most people at home know that. Mulan streamed at home did not bring in the sort of revenue that cinemas would have. This is a short term fix for the studios until some normality comes back.
208
04/12/2020 13:02:06 1 0
bbc
100%, you get it. This is also a boon for the cinema industry, world wide. They now have a commitment from a big studio to release films theatrically where they can. If others step up and take the hit then the industry can chug along.
209
04/12/2020 13:02:50 0 0
bbc
Well said sir.
365
04/12/2020 17:31:21 0 0
bbc
Plus, anyone who thinks watching a new release at home is going to be really cheap is in for a shock!
Big screen, sound that vibrates your body and as for IMAX - wow!
88
04/12/2020 12:09:49 0 0
bbc
It's unsurprising that the "middle man" used to enjoying sole access to a product for a period of time is unhappy about customers having a choice as to whether to use their services or watch at home.
89
04/12/2020 12:10:21 6 2
bbc
Cinema used to be a cheap night out, but now, its just another rip off, from big US owned corporations.
90
04/12/2020 12:10:40 0 2
bbc
The effective size of TVs now (sit a few foot away from a 55" screen) as opposed to cinema screens (sit many meters away from 45 foot screen) means that there is little difference to the experience.
93
04/12/2020 12:12:50 2 1
bbc
This is just nonsense. A good cinema screen with massive sound is significantly more immersive than a cheap 4k TV and a soundbar.
83
04/12/2020 12:01:55 3 5
bbc
I grew up with my prime teenage years in the 80s and saw some some of the best blockbusters movies ever made in the cinema IMO. I can still quote many memorable lines and scenes from them today. Now ask a child to recite a memorable line from an Avengers movie...also CGI, green screen and physics defying stunts just do not make a good movie I'm afraid.
91
04/12/2020 12:10:53 0 2
bbc
Is this a joke? So many lines in Avenger films that you cannot even count on with your fingers toes have literally become meme's because they are so memorable. More people know Avengers memes than can name what planet Luke Skywalker grew up on.
92
04/12/2020 12:11:48 4 0
bbc
No, this isn't going to kill the economic demand for cinemas, people will still go once we're through Covid. Those who were going to stream will do so regardless, whether they have to wait a few weeks or not, while for those going to the cinema it is often about having a night out instead of a night in (or an afternoon out with the kids as the case may be). That doesn't change.
90
04/12/2020 12:10:40 0 2
bbc
The effective size of TVs now (sit a few foot away from a 55" screen) as opposed to cinema screens (sit many meters away from 45 foot screen) means that there is little difference to the experience.
93
04/12/2020 12:12:50 2 1
bbc
This is just nonsense. A good cinema screen with massive sound is significantly more immersive than a cheap 4k TV and a soundbar.
115
04/12/2020 12:26:31 0 0
bbc
Agreed, but for many the difference is just not worth the cost difference and all the hassle. Going to a cinema used to be a treat, now its just a chore. (or am I just getting old!!)
94
04/12/2020 12:12:56 10 1
bbc
the large cinemas such as Odeon and Vue charge a ridiculous amount for movies, the last time I looked at Vue, it would have cost me £50 to take the family compared to £28 at Light cinema. Cut your prices and customers may go back to the cinema rather than sit at home watching it stream or visiting cheaper, more friendly cinemas!
95
04/12/2020 12:13:14 3 1
bbc
If the only way for cinemas to survive is by having a monopoly on new film releases then they don't deserve to survive.
But I don't think it's like that; on the whole, people don't choose a night at the cinema just so they can watch the latest film, they do it to meet up with friends, go on dates, have dinner before, discuss the film over drinks after.
76
04/12/2020 11:55:26 4 4
bbc
Cinema is dead.
96
04/12/2020 12:11:11 1 0
bbc
Cinema with its current business model of overpriced tickets and snacks for mediocre films is dead.
Like other industries undergoing a paradigm shift outside their control they must adapt or die not double down on restrictions of seeing new films; what makes piracy thrive is the difficulty of accessing content, not just price.
Film studios will survive just fine it's the actual cinemas suffering.
73
04/12/2020 11:52:42 2 6
bbc
Go woke - go broke.
97
04/12/2020 12:13:46 0 1
bbc
how is this relevant to anything
98
04/12/2020 12:14:05 1 2
bbc
The studios don't make decent films anymore, they are nearly all remakes of classics or follow ups to any successful film.
99
JWS
04/12/2020 12:15:13 2 2
bbc
The writing appears to be on the wall for cinemas. Luxury cinemas (Everyman etc.) will probably still have a market in future if they survive lockdowns. I can't sit in a mask for 2 hours though so will avoid.
100
04/12/2020 12:15:56 1 2
bbc
The decline of the cinema experience seems to have gone hand in hand with the increase in multiculturalism. What passes as acceptable in certain quarters is not tolerated in others and as such, people have decided to stay put and invest in home-technology.

Cinema in the last 10-15 years has been disappointing here in London, there are no standards to which an audience is supposed to meet, sadly.
164
04/12/2020 12:44:23 0 1
bbc
Dogwhistle much?