Covid-19 vaccine: First jabs 'could cut 99% of deaths' - Jonathan Van-Tam
03/12/2020 | news | health | 1,540
It is key to deploy the vaccine "as fast" as possible, England's deputy chief medical officer says.
1
03/12/2020 10:31:01 31 19
bbc
The Government should produce a “roadmap” for easing all remaining restrictions left based on target vaccination levels, now one is being rolled out.

To do so will give people confidence in there being an end in sight, a crucial morale boost, and help hold the Government to account in the areas they’re responsible for facilitating the delivery.
75
03/12/2020 11:01:51 24 8
bbc
Good point BW.
And there we have it: "No Immediate Return to Normal" after vaccination.
Wake up people!
99
03/12/2020 11:08:54 14 3
bbc
No-one truly knows how many vaccinations will be enough for a return to 'normal'

If the Government were to publish a roadmap only to find that the efficacy or longevity of the vaccine in the general population does not live up to the levens the roadmap is predicated on the necessary U-Turn would be very damaging.
125
03/12/2020 11:13:45 11 3
bbc
The problem is that they have 800,000 doses enough for 400K people, there is 67M people in the UK. give people a road map and they will drive there now thinking its okay its just me. Collectivism is needed now to get the UK and its vulnerable people through to the spring

it takes a long time to vaccinate everyone, especially everyone over the age of 18...
225
03/12/2020 11:39:28 5 7
bbc
People, at least those who aren't "elderly or vulnerable", won't take it if there are still restrictions and masks. They will need to go first before any rollout among younger ages.
419
03/12/2020 12:18:42 9 2
bbc
The trouble is that the virus does not follow "roadmaps". From the start Covid has been a moving target so a change of plan is often needed.
522
03/12/2020 12:45:16 5 4
bbc
"target vaccination levels" - so you would risk more deaths based on "targets"?

How about we roll out the vaccine and see how rapidaly the number of cases/deaths drops, you know, use actual scientific data instead of "targets". Its been the best part of a year already, we just need to wait for people to be vaccinated, then another two weeks to watch cases drop through the floor.
882
03/12/2020 13:59:42 0 1
bbc
In fairness they told everyone back in April I think that liberty restrictions would be the "new normal" But you can get access to versions of them with the latest app installed on your phone. How exciting.
2
03/12/2020 10:32:23 85 30
bbc
In other words. The ability to use the vaccine to maximum effect is very limited. This is clearly not the golden egg the press are telling everyone it is. I just hope we don't take our eyes off the ball and keep going for the Oxford University vaccine to come through. It's that vaccine that will be the saviour, not this one.
28
03/12/2020 10:45:17 35 17
bbc
Spot on, lowering our expectations early but it isn't just the media saying these are silver bullets, the politicians have been saying this and the media is just reporting that.
42
03/12/2020 10:52:07 2 20
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is a tenth of the price of the Pfizer one, and is easier to distribute, but is a lot less effective. Guess which one the UK govt will be dishing out to the plebs.
137
03/12/2020 11:17:45 2 13
bbc
So the priority list is wrong, more little porkies.

the care homes have got to wait, I really don't thing the government understands how the public feel every time they say or promise one thing and then they cannot do, for reasons they failed to take into account, is there any adults actually in government?
216
03/12/2020 11:37:10 3 10
bbc
Problem will be, while the target groups will have no issue, as they get down to 60 and lower people will say "what's the point" if there are still masks and restrictions.

It will just feed into the theories nicely for them.

When the elderly vulnerable are done (where they want it), it has to be normality
326
03/12/2020 11:43:28 3 3
bbc
What balderdash
349
03/12/2020 12:03:09 8 0
bbc
This is a step in the right direction.
453
03/12/2020 12:27:35 2 1
bbc
60% vs 90% im not too sure that a 30% drop makes something a "saviour". Maybe you need to play to the strengths of the solution rather than blindly assuming everything can be used as you feel it should be used. Everyone in the country should be offered a vaccine at some point, doesnt particularly matter what order so long as you make an effort to proioritise the vulnerable and care workers.
681
03/12/2020 13:16:51 3 0
bbc
Agree. The Astrazeneca Oxford vaccine is much easier to store, doesn't require specialist equipment and will therefore be far easier to distribute. Let's hope it is available soon.
03/12/2020 14:35:04 1 0
bbc
This is one of several vaccines, the Oxford one requires less restrictions. We will need many different vaccines and all will work together as circumstances allow.
03/12/2020 14:42:35 0 1
bbc
Nothing in medicine is a "golden egg". Medicine is an inexact science. Some times vaccines just don't take hold in people despite several attempts. We're battling nature here.
03/12/2020 15:02:42 0 1
bbc
Yes. This vaccine is about getting in first and it is stable vaccines, like the Oxford, that will be of the greatest good on a global scale. The Oxford team are also being honest about their mistakes and extending the trial.. with results in the public domain... unlike Pfizer and Moderna... we really are not being told what we are buying into.
03/12/2020 15:08:20 0 0
bbc
It does seem a lot more practical than the other two front-runners at the moment, even if it's marginally less effective.
03/12/2020 15:16:02 1 0
bbc
I think you're right.
The Pfizer one is more of a political stunt with its fast approval, but is too impractical to have a mass roll-out.
3
03/12/2020 10:37:20 11 14
bbc
As with the UK's response to Covid, No checks at Airports, no early Lockdown, no efficient 'Track and Trace' there is no information about whether those who have their own anti-bodies to Covid, as large numbers of us have had this disease without knowing, will need to have the vaccine.
14
03/12/2020 10:41:16 19 4
bbc
moan moan moan. We are a nation of moaners
184
03/12/2020 11:30:35 5 1
bbc
I'm sure Professor Van Tam said that people who have had covid should still have the vaccine as it is not known how long these antibodies will last and the protection given by the vaccine is likely to last longer.
4
03/12/2020 10:37:20 29 25
bbc
My father is in a care home. He’s 90, has Alzheimer’s and wants to die. Please explain the reasons why he should have this vaccine over someone of working age who can get the economy and their life going again. Surely by vaccinating the latter group the elderly will be protected anyway.
17
03/12/2020 10:42:11 8 45
bbc
Sick mind
18
37p
03/12/2020 10:42:24 10 2
bbc
There is some doubt about whether this vaccine stops transmission. The vaccination is to reduce or stop the effects of getting the disease.
So I'm supposing that it makes more sense to vaccinate those that are at most risk - mostly age related - until it's know if any of the vaccines will stop transmission.
29
03/12/2020 10:45:24 9 2
bbc
Who are you asking? Ask your MP about the rights to choose when you die and use common sense about whether we have time to work out a better method of selection.
77
03/12/2020 11:02:07 5 1
bbc
Maybe it's many human's mindset when dealing with death. As Cornish coroner said last week, 'ending a life early to stop someone suffering goes against the laws of nature'. Keeping someone alive with drugs and machines apparently isn't in many minds.
105
Bob
03/12/2020 11:09:51 8 1
bbc
by 'working age' I guess you mean under 60.

Probably because they don't need the Vaccine.

Life can't get back to normal until vulnerable people stop filling up hospitals.
205
03/12/2020 11:34:42 11 1
bbc
sorry to hear that he no longer wants to be here but i am sure the other residents would not want to contract it from someone who has not had the vaccine and die as a result. the vaccine is not just for the individual but also to stop the transmission to others
229
Max
03/12/2020 11:40:21 8 0
bbc
2 things:
1 - receiving this vaccine is not mandatory - he can opt not to take it
2 - if he is vaccinated it can help reduce the potential spread in that care home and to visitors further - so not just protecting him but others around that care home
513
03/12/2020 12:43:47 1 0
bbc
He can refuse to have it if he wishes.
03/12/2020 15:05:06 1 1
bbc
That is very sad but I would not recommend Covid as a way out for anyone and the care home should not be expected to care for somebody with Covid if that is avoidable.
5
03/12/2020 10:37:30 9 18
bbc
I'm starting to think the covid vaccine should be mandatory, we all know what can happen when a few positive cases slip through the net and if infections grow exponentially, doubling every few days, then I really don't see why it is not mandatory.

Once country A says they will only allow people to enter if proven to be have had vaccine it will start a domino effect, we should do the same.
24
03/12/2020 10:43:41 4 7
bbc
Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah you stay in 1939 Germany please. What about pregnant women who are advised not to have the vaccination. Shall we say they can have a yellow star so we can identify them easily?
25
37p
03/12/2020 10:44:38 3 0
bbc
I think it's more likely that countries will want a negative test rather than a vaccination certificate.
6
03/12/2020 10:37:34 73 13
bbc
I would like to see a “Plan of Action” showing targets and numbers of people per week to be vaccinated.

Now our great military is involved I think this immense undertaking has its best chance of success.

To all involved with this unprecedented logistical exercise , good luck , your work is really appreciated.
31
03/12/2020 10:46:19 25 7
bbc
No point writing a plan until we know when exactly all vaccines will be delivered.
126
Bob
03/12/2020 11:13:47 8 3
bbc
Why would they show you the plan.

Who are you?
292
03/12/2020 11:53:36 7 2
bbc
Wouldn't we all?

Sadly we live in a age where if they did publish a plan, the media would be all over it exclaiming FAILURE at even the slightest deviation

So don't expect it!
306
03/12/2020 11:56:00 1 8
bbc
Lions led by donkeys springs to mind....
477
03/12/2020 12:27:31 0 6
bbc
"I would like to see a “Plan of Action” showing targets and numbers of people per week to be vaccinated"

We know from the testing fiasco that any plan will be the basis only for missed targets and endless lies.
03/12/2020 15:07:09 0 0
bbc
You've obviously never been in the military.
7
03/12/2020 10:37:49 7 20
bbc
As testing has been rushed there’s no data to tell us of any long term side effects that may arise. Also as has now been admitted, there is no data about how long the vaccine works for. It may only be effective for a few months but I’d course this hasn’t t been tested. Ten years down to ten months, there is no way these vaccines have had all the tests done on them.
22
03/12/2020 10:42:50 17 2
bbc
Are you happy to carry on with social distancing rules for the next 10 years?
39
03/12/2020 10:49:33 11 0
bbc
Great negative comments but with no suggestions. Also note that there is decades of work in these vaccines not 10 months. We have had coronaviruses before and a lot of work has gone into them prior to this outbreak. Since Feb the scientest have been tuning that work for this specific strain. We had a vaccine for smallpox in the 1940s with very limited technology to help.
444
03/12/2020 12:24:42 7 4
bbc
You don't bother then, and I'll take yours. Anyone that turns it down willingly should be confined to their homes.
646
03/12/2020 13:09:29 3 1
bbc
"no data" - really? So there hasn't been a trial involving 43,000 people? That's "no data" is it?
8
03/12/2020 10:38:21 74 10
bbc
This is confirmed by my partner, who works in the NHS. One thing the article doesn't mention, though, is that the main reason the vaccine is unlikely to be rolled out anytime soon to care home residents, is that there is a limitation on the number of times the vaccine may be transported. Thus the vaccine is effectively only available to those who can make it to a hospital.
121
Bob
03/12/2020 11:13:19 48 2
bbc
It does on another article. Also states that it has to be transported in batches of 1000. So that is the main reason it wouldn't be sent to one care home.
303
03/12/2020 11:55:34 3 3
bbc
Whether your parner works in the NHS is irrelevant as they havent got it yet and done have any instructions on its handling. However, the vaccine does have a number of days shelf life at normal fridge temperatures
501
03/12/2020 12:40:25 1 10
bbc
Wrong; once out of the -80 freezer, Pfizer's vaccine can be kept in a fridge and used within 5 days.
Wrong: Pfizer's vaccine is transported on dry ice, which maintains cold temps for days before needing to be replenished (if even necessary, it doesn't take 5 days to go from Belgium to the UK).
I sugges that your partner stops engaging in tittle-tattle and you both inform yourselves.
877
03/12/2020 13:58:49 3 0
bbc
You are correct but there are plans to have ultra-cold transport boxes for the vaccine - however, these need to be regulated as a medical device first to ensure they are safe and effective - so further roll out will come!
905
03/12/2020 14:05:03 0 4
bbc
Wrong please listen to the experts and stop fake news.
9
03/12/2020 10:36:08 1 15
bbc
Patience ? This is a matter of life and death.

Patience doesn't apply. This needs sorting asap.
10
03/12/2020 10:39:31 9 20
bbc
Seems a bit of a waste of money for the elderly people in care homes to have the vaccination. They do not leave the home so will not be spreading the disease. Give it to the doctors, nurses and teachers and get on with normal life again for the 99.99% of the population.
13
03/12/2020 10:40:52 13 3
bbc
They do interact with each other, they aren't locked in their bedrooms 24/7
19
03/12/2020 10:42:36 1 2
bbc
someone needs to test first
241
03/12/2020 11:43:09 5 0
bbc
They are the ones most likely to need hospital care if they catch covid so by vaccinating them first the demand on the NHS is reduced thus freeing up capacity to deal with all the non-covid cases which help younger people. Front line health care workers such as doctors and nurses are high priority and with the distribution constraints they are likely to get the vaccine first.
618
03/12/2020 13:03:51 2 0
bbc
All those people working in care homes, plus visiting doctors carry the risk of bringing the virus into those homes.
DO please try & look at things from a more realistic point.
11
03/12/2020 10:39:33 96 17
bbc
Reading articles like this, I find it hard to believe the claims that old people in the UK are not cared for and are completely forgotten/neglected by society.

I'm by no means saying we have the best (or even a good) model for care of our aging population, but it's evident that lockdown has been mostly to protect the over-80s.
37
03/12/2020 10:48:42 57 4
bbc
Agree with bpmkent completely. Just to add, the average 80 plus year old does not complain too much. I expect many are resigned to life as it is. The challenge now seems to be to get the 60 plus year olds to that age without wrecking much younger people's lives. With better decision making and an effective vaccine these aims are not mutually exclusive.
276
03/12/2020 11:50:55 8 6
bbc
At what cost to society as a whole however?

Specifically targeted support to over 65s/underlying health conditions should have been the approach with "lockdown"2/tiered system, giving the economy a fighting chance to recover.

The cost for this is generational in terms of future spending cuts and tax rises. Expect a pension raid again soon.
609
03/12/2020 12:46:11 2 7
bbc
Hahahahaha! So what were the DNR notices about? Why were covid patients sent into care homes? You’re funny.
644
03/12/2020 13:09:01 7 1
bbc
Not just the over 80s: all those on cancer treatment, those with respiratory conditions (cystic fibrosis hits the young) and asthmatics, the immuno-compromised, pregnant women (the immune system is depressed in pregnancy), health care workers who face multiple exposures to infection. I could go on. A society which doesn't care for its vulnerable members is not worthy of the name.
935
03/12/2020 14:12:36 0 0
bbc
That’s what we are led to believe . . . .
03/12/2020 15:07:27 2 0
bbc
Have to agree with this. Even before the pandemic you'd have to say that policy and economics is broadly in favour of "the old", while the young shoulder low wages and high house prices and under-investment in youth services.
Just so happens our current virus seems to require even further resources for the old and thus more sacrifice by the young. Ageing demographics are no joke indeed...
03/12/2020 15:25:32 1 1
bbc
No... if you remember, during phase 1, the NHS sent loads of Covid cases off into care homes without testing them. The Lockdowns have been to protect the NHS.. if you read the medical press, doctors and nurses are on their knees and many are suffering post traumatic stress as the result of the epidemic.. not to mention the loss of routine services and the disaster if they had to turn patients away
03/12/2020 17:12:19 0 1
bbc
No it's only purpose has been to protect the NHS. Government is not interested in deaths only pretends to be.
12
03/12/2020 10:40:25 8 18
bbc
Bojo needs to stop ramping this vaccine up until there is more data. On top of this Sunak is telling us to get into the shops again. The last time he did that along with getting us to eat out, he then blamed us all for the rise in cases. He needs to stop being such a hypocrite.
10
03/12/2020 10:39:31 9 20
bbc
Seems a bit of a waste of money for the elderly people in care homes to have the vaccination. They do not leave the home so will not be spreading the disease. Give it to the doctors, nurses and teachers and get on with normal life again for the 99.99% of the population.
13
03/12/2020 10:40:52 13 3
bbc
They do interact with each other, they aren't locked in their bedrooms 24/7
55
03/12/2020 10:56:19 2 5
bbc
Alnat- so am I going to pop into 95 year old Edna who has dementia in Morrisons down the cereal aisle?
3
03/12/2020 10:37:20 11 14
bbc
As with the UK's response to Covid, No checks at Airports, no early Lockdown, no efficient 'Track and Trace' there is no information about whether those who have their own anti-bodies to Covid, as large numbers of us have had this disease without knowing, will need to have the vaccine.
14
03/12/2020 10:41:16 19 4
bbc
moan moan moan. We are a nation of moaners
138
03/12/2020 11:17:46 1 3
bbc
Track and Trace is a national disaster, we all know that.. but thats what you get for giving it to a "Jobs for mates scheme" who used Excel rather than proper software
15
03/12/2020 10:41:59 5 6
bbc
Im sure there must be a clever person out there who can sort out a way to get the vaccine to care homes - id love to see my mum before xmas!! Please help - put them in ambulances and take them in if required !
The residents and families are suffering emotionally and mentally without real contact, phoning each day doesn't help, i know, i do it!
34
03/12/2020 10:47:20 12 0
bbc
the vaccine is not going to help with that, first jabs starting next week (7/12) second jab 21 days later (28/12) full protection one week after that (4/1) and that would be for the first recipients. I suspect that the number of doses (800,000) will be exceeded by care home demand.
35
03/12/2020 10:47:20 11 0
bbc
The vaccine's not magic. Even if you mum was given the injection today (and the follow up in two weeks), she won't be fully protected until January. You'll just have to be patient. Let's not fall at this final hurdle.
38
03/12/2020 10:48:52 6 1
bbc
Many commiserations - but see my post at 10:38. The problem with getting the vaccine to care homes appears to be a limitation on the number of times it may be transported, so that it will (at first) only be available to those who can visit a hospital in person. Hence the initial rollout to NHS (and care home) staff.
289
03/12/2020 11:52:57 1 1
bbc
Nadhim zarhawi is in charge LOL good luck
16
03/12/2020 10:42:01 4 11
bbc
thank goodness for devolution as under the tories the other nations would be last,scotland rolls out next tuesday providing the vaccine can be stored somewhere that has adequate provisions,but its much gratitude to the regulators and the belgium manufacturer who have surprised us all beating others to the roll out,surely the regulators should have approved the oxford vaccine first of all/
4
03/12/2020 10:37:20 29 25
bbc
My father is in a care home. He’s 90, has Alzheimer’s and wants to die. Please explain the reasons why he should have this vaccine over someone of working age who can get the economy and their life going again. Surely by vaccinating the latter group the elderly will be protected anyway.
17
03/12/2020 10:42:11 8 45
bbc
Sick mind
118
03/12/2020 11:12:56 5 5
bbc
13 - nil at the moment. Fancy revisiting who has the sick mind?
4
03/12/2020 10:37:20 29 25
bbc
My father is in a care home. He’s 90, has Alzheimer’s and wants to die. Please explain the reasons why he should have this vaccine over someone of working age who can get the economy and their life going again. Surely by vaccinating the latter group the elderly will be protected anyway.
18
37p
03/12/2020 10:42:24 10 2
bbc
There is some doubt about whether this vaccine stops transmission. The vaccination is to reduce or stop the effects of getting the disease.
So I'm supposing that it makes more sense to vaccinate those that are at most risk - mostly age related - until it's know if any of the vaccines will stop transmission.
10
03/12/2020 10:39:31 9 20
bbc
Seems a bit of a waste of money for the elderly people in care homes to have the vaccination. They do not leave the home so will not be spreading the disease. Give it to the doctors, nurses and teachers and get on with normal life again for the 99.99% of the population.
19
03/12/2020 10:42:36 1 2
bbc
someone needs to test first
20
03/12/2020 10:42:43 5 19
bbc
I wonder if all the UK media are being “Persuaded” by the government to just report the vaccine as”good news” only. No adverse comments as this isn’t what they want, and may put people off
52
03/12/2020 10:55:37 9 4
bbc
Persuaded by the government ?

You're having a laugh aren't you ... try finding a pro government story on the BBC, every piece of news seems to be carefully slanted to provide the worst case scenario.

Slightly different when Labour are in power ... you'd almost think that the BBC had an agenda.
659
03/12/2020 13:11:59 0 0
bbc
And what evidence is there of anything "adverse" to report on? What would you have them do, make up some bad news just to present a balance?
21
03/12/2020 10:42:50 7 10
bbc
What could be worse than telling people they are vaccinated and safe, only to discover later that the vaccine had been out of freezer for too long and was ineffective. Or rather not telling them and the Coroner finding it to be so.
One step at a time will get us there. Probably better to wait and use the Astra Zenica/Oxford vaccine and know what you get is what's written on the tin.
7
03/12/2020 10:37:49 7 20
bbc
As testing has been rushed there’s no data to tell us of any long term side effects that may arise. Also as has now been admitted, there is no data about how long the vaccine works for. It may only be effective for a few months but I’d course this hasn’t t been tested. Ten years down to ten months, there is no way these vaccines have had all the tests done on them.
22
03/12/2020 10:42:50 17 2
bbc
Are you happy to carry on with social distancing rules for the next 10 years?
23
bbc
You will only feel a little prick if you get vaccinated. If you don't you will be a massive one. Removed
50
03/12/2020 10:50:41 2 0
bbc
What's your excuse then ?
63
03/12/2020 10:58:53 0 0
bbc
are you sure about this.
5
03/12/2020 10:37:30 9 18
bbc
I'm starting to think the covid vaccine should be mandatory, we all know what can happen when a few positive cases slip through the net and if infections grow exponentially, doubling every few days, then I really don't see why it is not mandatory.

Once country A says they will only allow people to enter if proven to be have had vaccine it will start a domino effect, we should do the same.
24
03/12/2020 10:43:41 4 7
bbc
Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah you stay in 1939 Germany please. What about pregnant women who are advised not to have the vaccination. Shall we say they can have a yellow star so we can identify them easily?
68
03/12/2020 11:00:36 6 1
bbc
Let me get this right, you' happy to be locked down for months, businesses to collapse, people to lose their jobs, but the moment I suggest a vaccine is made mandatory you cry out that I'M being authoritarian?

You do realise that the only reason Korea and Germany have such an effective track and trace system is because they have access to ALL personal data? JVT has said there will be a list...
5
03/12/2020 10:37:30 9 18
bbc
I'm starting to think the covid vaccine should be mandatory, we all know what can happen when a few positive cases slip through the net and if infections grow exponentially, doubling every few days, then I really don't see why it is not mandatory.

Once country A says they will only allow people to enter if proven to be have had vaccine it will start a domino effect, we should do the same.
25
37p
03/12/2020 10:44:38 3 0
bbc
I think it's more likely that countries will want a negative test rather than a vaccination certificate.
26
03/12/2020 10:44:56 1 11
bbc
It would be helpful if NHS publish accurate 100% results those will be vacineated this week for any side effects but the results not the public detail so it can create more trust in public to have vaccine
27
03/12/2020 10:45:09 310 41
bbc
The Daily Mail needs to stop it's irresponsible crusade of trying to get children going to care homes to hug their grandparents. The vaccine takes weeks to start functioning fully, in which time an elderly resident could have succumbed to the disease.
209
03/12/2020 11:35:36 146 16
bbc
Think you have a point Cheesoid.
"No Immediate Return to Normal" after vaccination.
Wake up people!
210
03/12/2020 11:35:44 25 52
bbc
Or the BBC could stop claiming that the COVID vaccine stops 99% of deaths, I fail to see how a vaccine would stop me being run over and killed by a truck. Proper contextual English please BBC.
221
W 6
03/12/2020 11:38:41 14 7
bbc
Do care home residents get a choice in the matter of whether they want to see their family or not? If mitigation measures such as testing beforehand are put in place and if all parties are happy to consent I really don't see the problem. Probably hasn't been much fun for them being cooped up with less contact with their families.
358
03/12/2020 12:05:26 42 10
bbc
Put it this way... anyone who reads The Daily Mail isn't the sharpest knife in the drawer and anything the Daily Mail has to say is best ignored...

The day you start letting anything in the Daily Mail influence your thought process or what you believe, say or do is the day hopefully a sane relatives seeks you the psychiatric help you'd be needing...
431
Pip
03/12/2020 12:22:03 31 2
bbc
The Daily Mail just needs to stop, full stop.......?
900
03/12/2020 14:04:16 0 0
bbc
Hugging is not a very English thing to do, generally speaking.
976
03/12/2020 14:25:39 1 0
bbc
The Mail and common sense are an oxymoron
986
03/12/2020 14:27:07 1 1
bbc
The Daily Mail is also irresponsible in allowing the Antivaxxers to infect thier HYS. They have virtually taken over the forum.

Johnson has continuously promised to tackle misinformation on Vaccines, but I have a distinct feeling He wont have the guts to tackle the Mail directly on this issue.
03/12/2020 14:59:05 0 0
bbc
Maybe Piers Corbyn and the rest of the looney left could also stop their anti mask anti social distancing protests
03/12/2020 15:15:43 1 0
bbc
I would like the Daily Mail to stop claiming initiatives as it's own, such as protective equipment procuring, or clean-ups. I used to regularly clear up others discarded rubbish, but not while the Mail takes the credit.
03/12/2020 15:20:47 0 0
bbc
They actually printed how much has been saved in pensions
I’m all for honest reporting, I admire their absolute disregard for the families suffering from dnr’s
If euthanasia was allowed, all these rich people would be top of the hit list, they really need to go and buy some morals
03/12/2020 15:47:24 0 0
bbc
You should just have stopped at the Daily Mail needs to stop its (no apostrophe needed) irresponsible... everything else is understood. 5 years too late maybe... but suck it up, love it and own the Daily Mail's england
03/12/2020 22:57:19 0 0
bbc
A U.K company has developed a vaccine at a fraction of the cost of the Pfizer one, so why spend billions on a foreign version? Our government should be backing our vaccine, the rest of the world would follow,injecting some much needed investment back into our economy. Instead we have gone for the easy option and missed a fantastic opportunity to show the rest of the world the way out of this mess.
2
03/12/2020 10:32:23 85 30
bbc
In other words. The ability to use the vaccine to maximum effect is very limited. This is clearly not the golden egg the press are telling everyone it is. I just hope we don't take our eyes off the ball and keep going for the Oxford University vaccine to come through. It's that vaccine that will be the saviour, not this one.
28
03/12/2020 10:45:17 35 17
bbc
Spot on, lowering our expectations early but it isn't just the media saying these are silver bullets, the politicians have been saying this and the media is just reporting that.
338
03/12/2020 12:01:33 10 1
bbc
Most of us that are prepared to have the vaccine have reasonable expectations. Minimising symptoms to give the body a fighting chance would be most welcome.
459
03/12/2020 12:29:16 3 1
bbc
No, we have gone from saying "there may be a vaccine" to saying "there is one, and there will be more" - its a significant improvement and the rollout starts now. Nobody is saying the problem is fixed, nobody is reporting that the problem is fixed. A viable solution has started and 95% protection essentially is a silver bullet.
4
03/12/2020 10:37:20 29 25
bbc
My father is in a care home. He’s 90, has Alzheimer’s and wants to die. Please explain the reasons why he should have this vaccine over someone of working age who can get the economy and their life going again. Surely by vaccinating the latter group the elderly will be protected anyway.
29
03/12/2020 10:45:24 9 2
bbc
Who are you asking? Ask your MP about the rights to choose when you die and use common sense about whether we have time to work out a better method of selection.
30
03/12/2020 10:45:46 3 19
bbc
Patience is very much a virtue when it comes to rushed, inadequately tested drugs & vaccines. Five to 10 years of real-world monitoring is probably appropriate, but gung-ho Boris has got a GE to think about.
661
03/12/2020 13:12:44 2 1
bbc
Your lack of knowledge regarding vaccine time scales is noted.

It's been pointed out on numerous occasions that lack of funding is what takes up most time in developing vaccines. The actual testing doesn't take 10 years & with every nation working on this, the results were bound to be achieved far faster.
6
03/12/2020 10:37:34 73 13
bbc
I would like to see a “Plan of Action” showing targets and numbers of people per week to be vaccinated.

Now our great military is involved I think this immense undertaking has its best chance of success.

To all involved with this unprecedented logistical exercise , good luck , your work is really appreciated.
31
03/12/2020 10:46:19 25 7
bbc
No point writing a plan until we know when exactly all vaccines will be delivered.
148
03/12/2020 11:20:52 7 0
bbc
Also, the plan will change depending on what vaccines become available and when. If the Oxford AstraZenica vaccine gets approved in the next few weeks then the plan would change significantly as supply and distribution would be simpler.
173
WZ
03/12/2020 11:27:18 3 4
bbc
The outline of a plan should have been written months ago. Priorities, places, people etc. Now is the time to fill in the gaps with the specifics.
468
03/12/2020 12:31:39 5 1
bbc
Totally agree. People seem to want everything today, even numbers you wont know till tomorrow. I know people who have been asked to to to hospital to recieve the vacine - this is real, its happening and it will ramp up rapidily with or without jo-public being given detailed plans to review for no logical reason.
673
03/12/2020 13:15:19 0 0
bbc
I dont completely agree with that! We need to plan for distribution and use; knowing who and what needs to happen as soon as we get it in our hands. Forward planning is obviously essential to avoid botching it.
32
03/12/2020 10:46:20 4 17
bbc
WHAT ?? Patience ??????? using the vaccines for trials as these vaccines have not completed yet the proper procedure of 3 phrases.....

UK is the only nation who has accept those vaccines that fail to go through the 3-phrase trials, well, the rest of the world will watch out to see if these vaccines are safe after brits use them FIRST

Thanks
45
03/12/2020 10:52:13 7 2
bbc
Think you mean 'phases', not 'phrases'.

Also the vaccines have successfully passed all three phases of testing and have been approved for use in the UK ... to be closely followed by approval in the US and Europe.

Get your tin foil hat back on ... nobody will be forcing you to have it.
455
03/12/2020 12:27:57 1 0
bbc
All of what you said is demonstrably false and/or insane ramblings.
666
03/12/2020 13:14:09 0 0
bbc
That's the three phase trials which were completed some time ago, unlike the incomplete trials of the Chinese vaccine before it was forcibly administered to millions...
33
03/12/2020 10:47:18 2 15
bbc
Double whammy. Those people who were hysterical and insisted we must all be locked down are now going to lose the plot given that they probably won't get the vaccine any time soon and there's no guarantee of its effectiveness of the logistics are mismanaged.

Now Van Tam is saying there's no end in sight and it's too soon to tell when restrictions will be pulled back.

Write 2021 off too then.
46
37p
03/12/2020 10:52:21 6 2
bbc
You're the black cloud surrounding a ray of sunshine. Without you the sunshine wouldn't be as bright.

Thanks
458
03/12/2020 12:29:13 1 0
bbc
You're a right laugh at parties, I bet?
You'll be one of these folk that if I handed you a gold bar, you'd moan about how heavy it was to carry home.
15
03/12/2020 10:41:59 5 6
bbc
Im sure there must be a clever person out there who can sort out a way to get the vaccine to care homes - id love to see my mum before xmas!! Please help - put them in ambulances and take them in if required !
The residents and families are suffering emotionally and mentally without real contact, phoning each day doesn't help, i know, i do it!
34
03/12/2020 10:47:20 12 0
bbc
the vaccine is not going to help with that, first jabs starting next week (7/12) second jab 21 days later (28/12) full protection one week after that (4/1) and that would be for the first recipients. I suspect that the number of doses (800,000) will be exceeded by care home demand.
15
03/12/2020 10:41:59 5 6
bbc
Im sure there must be a clever person out there who can sort out a way to get the vaccine to care homes - id love to see my mum before xmas!! Please help - put them in ambulances and take them in if required !
The residents and families are suffering emotionally and mentally without real contact, phoning each day doesn't help, i know, i do it!
35
03/12/2020 10:47:20 11 0
bbc
The vaccine's not magic. Even if you mum was given the injection today (and the follow up in two weeks), she won't be fully protected until January. You'll just have to be patient. Let's not fall at this final hurdle.
36
03/12/2020 10:48:32 7 18
bbc
Now that the scientists are in charge they are intent on inflicting this massive social engineering project on the country to punish the population for ignoring their advice prior to the onset of the pandemic. Anyone who believes life will ever return to what was regarded as normal in 2019 is going to be massively disappointed.
51
03/12/2020 10:55:15 11 1
bbc
So we are going to be "punished" by the scientists so that they make sure we all don't die from the virus?? I'm not sure where your logic is coming from in you comment.....................
11
03/12/2020 10:39:33 96 17
bbc
Reading articles like this, I find it hard to believe the claims that old people in the UK are not cared for and are completely forgotten/neglected by society.

I'm by no means saying we have the best (or even a good) model for care of our aging population, but it's evident that lockdown has been mostly to protect the over-80s.
37
03/12/2020 10:48:42 57 4
bbc
Agree with bpmkent completely. Just to add, the average 80 plus year old does not complain too much. I expect many are resigned to life as it is. The challenge now seems to be to get the 60 plus year olds to that age without wrecking much younger people's lives. With better decision making and an effective vaccine these aims are not mutually exclusive.
611
03/12/2020 12:47:33 6 4
bbc
Younger people don’t die from this virus without already being ill. It’s the over 70’s that see over a 95% chance of death.
15
03/12/2020 10:41:59 5 6
bbc
Im sure there must be a clever person out there who can sort out a way to get the vaccine to care homes - id love to see my mum before xmas!! Please help - put them in ambulances and take them in if required !
The residents and families are suffering emotionally and mentally without real contact, phoning each day doesn't help, i know, i do it!
38
03/12/2020 10:48:52 6 1
bbc
Many commiserations - but see my post at 10:38. The problem with getting the vaccine to care homes appears to be a limitation on the number of times it may be transported, so that it will (at first) only be available to those who can visit a hospital in person. Hence the initial rollout to NHS (and care home) staff.
7
03/12/2020 10:37:49 7 20
bbc
As testing has been rushed there’s no data to tell us of any long term side effects that may arise. Also as has now been admitted, there is no data about how long the vaccine works for. It may only be effective for a few months but I’d course this hasn’t t been tested. Ten years down to ten months, there is no way these vaccines have had all the tests done on them.
39
03/12/2020 10:49:33 11 0
bbc
Great negative comments but with no suggestions. Also note that there is decades of work in these vaccines not 10 months. We have had coronaviruses before and a lot of work has gone into them prior to this outbreak. Since Feb the scientest have been tuning that work for this specific strain. We had a vaccine for smallpox in the 1940s with very limited technology to help.
40
03/12/2020 10:50:47 13 9
bbc
The experts are out in force on here again today.
129
Bob
03/12/2020 11:14:43 0 4
bbc
zzzz
683
03/12/2020 13:17:02 0 0
bbc
Perhaps, but sadly very little evidence of any expertise coming from the NHS advisors on Sage so far either - at last not backed up by facts proven by data.

All we get is dumbed down, basic numbers, laughably interpreted by a bunch of individuals clearly motivated by their own agendas.

The best way to combat misinformation is to state facts. When will SAGE, WHO and Govts. start do you think?
41
03/12/2020 10:51:35 2 11
bbc
Jonathan Van-Tam, or 'JVT', as precisely nobody should be calling him in a press conference, was outrageous yesterday. It's a basic principle of 'pressers' involving elected officials and advisors, that there's a clear distinction between those roles in terms of how questions are answered. His pronouncements on mask-wearing and restriction-lifting were so wrong. Even Bozo had to intervene.
2
03/12/2020 10:32:23 85 30
bbc
In other words. The ability to use the vaccine to maximum effect is very limited. This is clearly not the golden egg the press are telling everyone it is. I just hope we don't take our eyes off the ball and keep going for the Oxford University vaccine to come through. It's that vaccine that will be the saviour, not this one.
42
03/12/2020 10:52:07 2 20
bbc
The Oxford vaccine is a tenth of the price of the Pfizer one, and is easier to distribute, but is a lot less effective. Guess which one the UK govt will be dishing out to the plebs.
390
03/12/2020 12:12:49 5 2
bbc
It's still over 90% effective... i think you misread the studies results.
43
03/12/2020 10:52:07 5 14
bbc
I for one welcome the new vaccine developed by a Turkish immigrant couple in a German Laboratory and fast tracked using existing EU legislation which we are able to apply at present.
44
03/12/2020 10:52:11 33 6
bbc
The logistics are huge and there will need to be continued patience, the combo of vaccine, continued restrictions and the natural improvement around spring time should get us to a better position come early June.
507
03/12/2020 12:41:14 19 2
bbc
Or in actual news, this is just the first vaccine, more are on the way and it is highly likley that most people who want a vaccine will have had it before next June.

Do we lift restrictions now, well obvoiusly not, it takes 28 days to build immunity with this vaccine and it was announced on monday, 3 days ago.
32
03/12/2020 10:46:20 4 17
bbc
WHAT ?? Patience ??????? using the vaccines for trials as these vaccines have not completed yet the proper procedure of 3 phrases.....

UK is the only nation who has accept those vaccines that fail to go through the 3-phrase trials, well, the rest of the world will watch out to see if these vaccines are safe after brits use them FIRST

Thanks
45
03/12/2020 10:52:13 7 2
bbc
Think you mean 'phases', not 'phrases'.

Also the vaccines have successfully passed all three phases of testing and have been approved for use in the UK ... to be closely followed by approval in the US and Europe.

Get your tin foil hat back on ... nobody will be forcing you to have it.
33
03/12/2020 10:47:18 2 15
bbc
Double whammy. Those people who were hysterical and insisted we must all be locked down are now going to lose the plot given that they probably won't get the vaccine any time soon and there's no guarantee of its effectiveness of the logistics are mismanaged.

Now Van Tam is saying there's no end in sight and it's too soon to tell when restrictions will be pulled back.

Write 2021 off too then.
46
37p
03/12/2020 10:52:21 6 2
bbc
You're the black cloud surrounding a ray of sunshine. Without you the sunshine wouldn't be as bright.

Thanks
72
03/12/2020 11:01:02 0 4
bbc
Cry some more when the reality sinks in.
47
03/12/2020 10:45:38 5 20
bbc
What a complete load of crap! There have been programs for route planning available for many years now. What do you think Amazon uses for their deliveries

It really is not that big a deal to plan a route between different care homes, so that each refrigerated pack of vaccine is efficiently used. It's just a pathetic level of incompetence and ineptness that stands in the way: which will cost lives
66
03/12/2020 11:00:22 14 0
bbc
No: Amazon tends not to have -70deg refrigeration - and more importantly, there is a hard limit on the number of times the vaccine may be transported.
48
03/12/2020 10:52:46 9 6
bbc
Every Gov promises jam tommorow.
I've yet to see any ever deliver.
49
03/12/2020 10:53:34 2 21
bbc
i saw an old lady aged 98 on the news today,let us be honest with ourselves as she may have another 9 months of life left so as she is OK at this time do we need to vaccinate her or is she a guinnie pig in reality.
64
37p
03/12/2020 10:59:11 11 0
bbc
You're a compassionate person.
You will only feel a little prick if you get vaccinated. If you don't you will be a massive one. Removed
50
03/12/2020 10:50:41 2 0
bbc
What's your excuse then ?
36
03/12/2020 10:48:32 7 18
bbc
Now that the scientists are in charge they are intent on inflicting this massive social engineering project on the country to punish the population for ignoring their advice prior to the onset of the pandemic. Anyone who believes life will ever return to what was regarded as normal in 2019 is going to be massively disappointed.
51
03/12/2020 10:55:15 11 1
bbc
So we are going to be "punished" by the scientists so that they make sure we all don't die from the virus?? I'm not sure where your logic is coming from in you comment.....................
20
03/12/2020 10:42:43 5 19
bbc
I wonder if all the UK media are being “Persuaded” by the government to just report the vaccine as”good news” only. No adverse comments as this isn’t what they want, and may put people off
52
03/12/2020 10:55:37 9 4
bbc
Persuaded by the government ?

You're having a laugh aren't you ... try finding a pro government story on the BBC, every piece of news seems to be carefully slanted to provide the worst case scenario.

Slightly different when Labour are in power ... you'd almost think that the BBC had an agenda.
53
03/12/2020 10:55:37 3 23
bbc
This vaccine is not safe, not yet.
I will be waiting for the EU and the USA approval. Johnson is gambling with our health. The USA and the EU wants to see more date before approving it. Wonder why. Wake up people. I don't trust the uk gov
59
Bob
03/12/2020 10:57:44 15 2
bbc
Stop scare mongering
61
03/12/2020 10:58:03 0 5
bbc
this is why the OAP are in the firing line.
62
03/12/2020 10:58:41 7 0
bbc
So when is it safe, professor? When the 12 month old EMI or the financially motivated FDA say so?
Don't have it if you don't want it ut keep your I'll informed opinions to yourself.
74
03/12/2020 11:01:43 7 0
bbc
The vaccine is as safe as any other new vaccine.

The only difference in the testing and approvals process is that a serial process has been conducted in parallel.

The process usually includes long delays between phases and the data is handed to the regulators in one big lump after all the trials.

For this vaccine the MHRA and other regulators have been analysing results as they come in
88
03/12/2020 11:04:59 8 0
bbc
And I don't trust your opinion on this, because quite frankly, it has no basis in reality. To make a statement like 'this vaccine is not safe' I'm assuming you are a doctor or scientist with at least a PhD, you have studied all the data available and written a peer reviewed paper on this?
194
je
03/12/2020 11:10:00 3 0
bbc
It's been tested on 1000s. What is your qualification? 'Wake up people' - classic. I suppose we're 'sheeple'. Comments like this should be banned.
54
03/12/2020 10:56:12 3 14
bbc
So why cant they put the vaccine in ice boxes in small vans then distibute to care homes that have booked and can inoculate there residents all at once on the same day. Or is the profit margin to small for the distribution companys.
91
03/12/2020 11:06:30 11 0
bbc
Good job you're not running the distribution if you think it's that easy to maintain -80degC.
13
03/12/2020 10:40:52 13 3
bbc
They do interact with each other, they aren't locked in their bedrooms 24/7
55
03/12/2020 10:56:19 2 5
bbc
Alnat- so am I going to pop into 95 year old Edna who has dementia in Morrisons down the cereal aisle?
162
03/12/2020 11:24:42 4 1
bbc
You just sound like a sick weirdo. What about I'll vulnerable children and young adults that cannot leave home, should they not get it either ?
Views like yours belong in a different era.
56
03/12/2020 10:56:57 236 60
bbc
Are you being asked to mine coal with your teeth or are you being asked to be socially cautious and wear a mask in a shop for a few months?

Aren't the people who melt with indignation as they complain about the fiendish inconvenience of a few months of hygiene the same people who normally call others snowflakes?

Vaccines are coming. Take it. Be careful. Then we will gradually get our lives back
130
03/12/2020 11:15:03 88 172
bbc
If that is the case, then the government should commit to removing all restrictions once enough people have been vaccinated.
The issue is that the goalposts keep moving (remember 3 weeks to flatten the curve), so it is not surprising that a lot of people don't want to follow the rules any longer. The government needs to declare an 'end date' and stick to it
There's no vaccine for stupid. The sheep keep bleating on ebven although we are being told no back to normal after vaccination.... The new normal is here... Hate to tell you Poldarks but you aint getting your life back unless you take it back! Removed
207
03/12/2020 11:35:20 35 14
bbc
Well said. Patience seems to be in short supply nowadays, even when lives may be in danger. The sheer idiocy of those who won't do a few simple things to help safeguard themselves or others is breathtaking, it's any excuse to complain, complain, complain ... So what if it takes a few more months for things to improve, can't we be glad there's now hope for the future for people of all ages?
327
03/12/2020 11:44:10 7 36
bbc
Pathetic!
412
03/12/2020 12:05:31 20 25
bbc
"Aren't the people who melt with indignation as they complain about the fiendish inconvenience of a few months of hygiene"

I don't see many complaining about that at all. My criticism has always been aimed at the hysterical overreaction to this, and the desire to chase immortality at any economic cost. There will be a very high price to pay for that.
515
03/12/2020 12:44:07 6 12
bbc
IF it was just mask wearing (which doesn't work BTW .. a Danish study proved it) we could all play along with the stupid game I guess.

But when you are prevented from travelling to do things and events are cancelled you are ruining peoples lives.

OK .. you probably just flump from one sofa to another .. so you don't notice any change.

Active & sociable people have had enough. No justification.
579
03/12/2020 12:57:49 2 10
bbc
Masks don't work. Follow the science. Source: Randomised Control Trial (the Gold standard) from Denmark.
969
03/12/2020 14:22:38 1 1
bbc
I would say that anyone who bellyaches over having to wear a mask is more likely to BE a snowflake. I mean what do you think a snowflake is exactly?
03/12/2020 14:29:49 1 1
bbc
You keep preaching to the majority that have followed the rules. It's the minority that are holding the majority to ransom.

And no you won't get your lives back... a lot of these restrictions will remain in place as another form of control.
03/12/2020 15:51:12 0 0
bbc
Thanks for your response Boris, don't know why you have to hide behind pseudonyms such as Poldarks, be honest who you really are
03/12/2020 16:16:21 0 0
bbc
'Aren't the people who melt with indignation as they complain about the fiendish inconvenience of a few months of hygiene the same people who normally call others snowflakes?'

Interesting spin, but no, these people who melt with indignation are more likely to be the snowflakes.
03/12/2020 16:36:01 1 0
bbc
There is a ten page leaflet published titled REG 174 INFORMATION FOR UK HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS on gov dot uk website which states the following... (Fertility) It is unknown whether COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine BNT162b2 has an impact on fertility. Still think anyone with doubts is a nutjob anti vaxxer???
57
03/12/2020 10:57:10 2 8
bbc
There's no easy answer to this.

To appear compassionate and politically correct then the older and more vulnerable people require vaccinating first.

To get the economy going the younger and the working population need vaccinating first.

Catch 22. Looks like politics will win.
73
03/12/2020 11:01:40 9 0
bbc
The young tend not to die so do not need the vaccine - hence open the economy and vaccine to the elderly. Simple.
76
03/12/2020 11:01:57 0 1
bbc
100%
123
37p
03/12/2020 11:13:26 3 0
bbc
It seems to me that those at most risk need vaccination. Nothing to do with compassionate or PC.
191
03/12/2020 11:05:06 0 1
bbc
Completely wrong. The covid-19 risk to young people is negligible, but they are the ones who will live long enough to reap any unforeseen long term adverse effects from any vaccine

The benefit/risk equation is vastly better the older you are.
192
03/12/2020 11:06:27 0 0
bbc
why... are they most at risk then? You can still work in a mask.
58
03/12/2020 10:57:38 2 21
bbc
If I can't stop wearing a mask and still need to distance I'm not having the jab end of
78
Bob
03/12/2020 11:02:30 9 0
bbc
No-one is going to force you, it's your decision. But don't try to influence anyone else's decision either.
Great. With a bit of luck you'll catch it and die. Good riddance. Removed
93
03/12/2020 11:06:52 4 2
bbc
But if you and thousands of others don't have the jab, you'll have to social distance and wear a mask. It's the new normal, accept reality and get on with it. Or do you think BB is reality?
53
03/12/2020 10:55:37 3 23
bbc
This vaccine is not safe, not yet.
I will be waiting for the EU and the USA approval. Johnson is gambling with our health. The USA and the EU wants to see more date before approving it. Wonder why. Wake up people. I don't trust the uk gov
59
Bob
03/12/2020 10:57:44 15 2
bbc
Stop scare mongering
60
03/12/2020 10:57:45 187 26
bbc
The question put to the PM and team at yesterday's press conference by the ITV journalist was a disgrace "...aren't you failing to protect our most vulnerable".

NO!

They are doing what they can. This particular vaccine has a very strict set of conditions for transport, cases of 975 vaccines cannot be split up. You cannot take these to care homes. Stop moaning & trying to generate headlines.
69
03/12/2020 11:00:47 43 112
bbc
"975 vaccines cannot be split up."
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wrong. They can and they remain viable in a standard refrigeration unit for several hours. Stop looking for ridiculous excuses.
357
03/12/2020 12:04:50 8 7
bbc
Once delivered the vaccines can be stored in a fridge for up to 5 days. Once delivered they can be split up. I think people are not reading the information properly.
607
03/12/2020 12:45:01 7 13
bbc
Remember when they sent ill with covid elederly people from hospitals to care homes? Remember the DNR notices? Remember the rates of death of people with learning disabilities? They have totally failed to protect the vulnerable. Food banks are good things too.
635
03/12/2020 13:07:11 0 22
bbc
So ask yourself the obvious question "Why didn't they make the vaccine in smaller cases, so that care homes could use them?"

Everyone knew that care homes were the main area of concern. But they still created cases of 975 vaccines that can't be separated!

Quite pathetic.
53
03/12/2020 10:55:37 3 23
bbc
This vaccine is not safe, not yet.
I will be waiting for the EU and the USA approval. Johnson is gambling with our health. The USA and the EU wants to see more date before approving it. Wonder why. Wake up people. I don't trust the uk gov
61
03/12/2020 10:58:03 0 5
bbc
this is why the OAP are in the firing line.
53
03/12/2020 10:55:37 3 23
bbc
This vaccine is not safe, not yet.
I will be waiting for the EU and the USA approval. Johnson is gambling with our health. The USA and the EU wants to see more date before approving it. Wonder why. Wake up people. I don't trust the uk gov
62
03/12/2020 10:58:41 7 0
bbc
So when is it safe, professor? When the 12 month old EMI or the financially motivated FDA say so?
Don't have it if you don't want it ut keep your I'll informed opinions to yourself.
You will only feel a little prick if you get vaccinated. If you don't you will be a massive one. Removed
63
03/12/2020 10:58:53 0 0
bbc
are you sure about this.
49
03/12/2020 10:53:34 2 21
bbc
i saw an old lady aged 98 on the news today,let us be honest with ourselves as she may have another 9 months of life left so as she is OK at this time do we need to vaccinate her or is she a guinnie pig in reality.
64
37p
03/12/2020 10:59:11 11 0
bbc
You're a compassionate person.
65
03/12/2020 11:00:21 140 8
bbc
My father is in a care home. My mother is a healthy over-80 year old. They will be among the first people to get this vaccine. I know there is a risk but to allow my parents to hug for the first time in months will be worth it.
193
je
03/12/2020 11:08:16 38 81
bbc
There isn't risk though.
297
03/12/2020 11:54:29 6 38
bbc
The vaccine is another BBC red herring. Let's talk about something positive so we don't have to draw attention to the fact that over 600 people died in the last 24 hours of Covid at the end of the "circuit breaker" lockdown.

The BBC don't like challenging the government on the sticky issues but will cheerlead this vaccine foolishness, just like they cheerled the non existent track and trace.
Pathetic Removed
438
03/12/2020 12:23:20 16 10
bbc
'Allow' them? Too much of this authoritarian language being accepted. I'm a completely fit and both physically and mentally healthy 70+, and I will not be infantilised by the Government and its advisers. I am more than capable of making my own assessment of when it is sensible to 'hug' or 'be 'hugged'.
654
03/12/2020 13:11:04 6 2
bbc
Scientists have done well to currently create at least 9 different types of vaccine; many are still under test to evaluate their effectiveness and safety. When distributed to billions on the planet there may well regrettably occur some adverse reactions. However, the elderly should now have nothing to fear, and every reason to celebrate this milestone, and look forward to Christmas and new year.
929
03/12/2020 14:11:22 3 1
bbc
They should be “allowed” to hug without being subjected to a new and very controversial vaccine.
03/12/2020 14:58:54 1 0
bbc
The risks are that it doesn't meet the 95% protection expectation or wears off quicker than hoped - that's pretty much it.
Definitely not worth turning it down for.
47
03/12/2020 10:45:38 5 20
bbc
What a complete load of crap! There have been programs for route planning available for many years now. What do you think Amazon uses for their deliveries

It really is not that big a deal to plan a route between different care homes, so that each refrigerated pack of vaccine is efficiently used. It's just a pathetic level of incompetence and ineptness that stands in the way: which will cost lives
66
03/12/2020 11:00:22 14 0
bbc
No: Amazon tends not to have -70deg refrigeration - and more importantly, there is a hard limit on the number of times the vaccine may be transported.
67
03/12/2020 11:00:27 2 9
bbc
according to PRIVETE EYE this morning our chancellor will get rich on this one,page 7
80
03/12/2020 11:02:33 2 6
bbc
They're all getting rich from humanities misery
89
Bob
03/12/2020 11:05:13 2 0
bbc
PRIVETE EYE? What is that?
24
03/12/2020 10:43:41 4 7
bbc
Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah you stay in 1939 Germany please. What about pregnant women who are advised not to have the vaccination. Shall we say they can have a yellow star so we can identify them easily?
68
03/12/2020 11:00:36 6 1
bbc
Let me get this right, you' happy to be locked down for months, businesses to collapse, people to lose their jobs, but the moment I suggest a vaccine is made mandatory you cry out that I'M being authoritarian?

You do realise that the only reason Korea and Germany have such an effective track and trace system is because they have access to ALL personal data? JVT has said there will be a list...
98
03/12/2020 11:08:33 1 6
bbc
So we will be back to normal in weeks right? You do know even with vaccination it we will still be locked down for months, and as you have mentioned businesses will collapse and people will lose their jobs. What are your suggestions for pregnant women if you want to make this mandatory for all?
60
03/12/2020 10:57:45 187 26
bbc
The question put to the PM and team at yesterday's press conference by the ITV journalist was a disgrace "...aren't you failing to protect our most vulnerable".

NO!

They are doing what they can. This particular vaccine has a very strict set of conditions for transport, cases of 975 vaccines cannot be split up. You cannot take these to care homes. Stop moaning & trying to generate headlines.
69
03/12/2020 11:00:47 43 112
bbc
"975 vaccines cannot be split up."
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wrong. They can and they remain viable in a standard refrigeration unit for several hours. Stop looking for ridiculous excuses.
95
03/12/2020 11:08:08 40 2
bbc
Listen to what the scientists said. THEY stated the cases currently cannot be split up and transported, it wasn't something I just made up.
166
03/12/2020 11:26:10 39 3
bbc
The cases can't be split up as the regulator hasn't approved splitting cases.

I agree that the question was ridiculous. Surely now we are getting vaccines available the objective must be to distribute as fast as is practicably possible to the highest priority people that can be reached.

Some people just looking for any reason to point the finger and declare this another government fail.
463
03/12/2020 12:30:27 22 1
bbc
Check your facts - no they can't be split until the regulator approves a way of doing so. Do you really think that they would deliberately delay vaccinating the most vulnerable on a whim?
538
BFM
03/12/2020 12:49:35 0 13
bbc
They don't even need to be in a standard fridge. All you need is a polystyrene box with a bit of the dry ice in it from the Hospitals store.
566
03/12/2020 12:55:51 16 0
bbc
Yes, the whole 975 can be kept viable for hours in a fridge. However if you have #250 people in a care home (a big one) then you have to have the other 725 people nearby or you'll waste doses. This becomes a bigger issue if you go away from towns and cities and the distance to travel becomes larger. It is just a matter of working out how they can safely split the package size and retain viability.
624
03/12/2020 13:05:12 11 0
bbc
There is a limit on how many times you can transport the doses, there is a time limit on how long you can wait to give them once they are in storage. You cannot just take out X doses, put them in a fridge and drive round helath care homes merrilly injecting people. This vaccine is best asminstered in hospital, its quite normal for hospitals to be good places for healthcare, get used to it.
639
03/12/2020 13:07:53 0 13
bbc
They could easily have created smaller cases, had they wanted to.
695
03/12/2020 13:19:31 0 3
bbc
Thanks for your input professor clay
701
03/12/2020 13:20:40 4 0
bbc
5 days:

"After storage for up to 30 days in the Pfizer thermal shipper, vaccination centers can transfer the vials to 2-8°C storage conditions for an additional five days, for a total of up to 35 days. Once thawed and stored under 2-8°C conditions, the vials cannot be re-frozen or stored under frozen conditions"

https://www.pfizer.com/news/hot-topics/covid_19_vaccine_u_s_distribution_fact_sheet
03/12/2020 20:19:30 0 0
bbc
Idiotic comment
03/12/2020 22:58:00 0 1
bbc
A U.K company has developed a vaccine at a fraction of the cost of the Pfizer one, so why spend billions on a foreign version? Our government should be backing our vaccine, the rest of the world would follow,injecting some much needed investment back into our economy. Instead we have gone for the easy option and missed a fantastic opportunity to show the rest of the world the way out of this mess.
70
03/12/2020 11:00:52 4 8
bbc
And there we have it: "No Immediate Return to Normal" after vaccination.
Wake up people!
190
03/12/2020 11:31:52 2 0
bbc
I fail to see why you view this as a shock. People will be vaccinated as of next week. Do you seriously think all the pubs and theatres are going to open the second the first needle comes out of someone's arm?
71
03/12/2020 11:00:57 291 58
bbc
Will you stop denigrating people of 60 and over please. We are not all decrepit and a waste of time. I am 67 and still working full time caring for children with severe and complex needs. As for the vaccine, I am happy to wait and see and continue to look after my own health - thank you.
82
03/12/2020 11:03:12 35 90
bbc
i am 75 but a cut off is needed on really old age.
90
37p
03/12/2020 11:06:09 55 4
bbc
Agreed. I'm 65 and still working full time with no health issues and do object to being put on a discard pile because of my age.
113
Bob
03/12/2020 11:11:51 76 8
bbc
It's based off stats about who is filling up the hospitals. Don't take is personally.
120
03/12/2020 11:13:14 62 3
bbc
I am in my 60's,working as a home delivery driver for one of the major supermarkets. We have had little or no PPE throughout. I have delivered to shielding and people with covid. Because of my age I am very low down the list for a vaccination. If I was offered one today I wouldn't hesitate to say yes. There are concerns, but die of covid or the vaccine? I would sooner try than not.
296
03/12/2020 11:54:13 18 1
bbc
I am 66, working successfully on a full-time freelance basis, haven't had the need to see a GP for more than ten years.
381
03/12/2020 12:09:51 44 8
bbc
Please get off your high horse and stop getting offended by simple statistics. Overall, people in your age group are more at risk than younger people. Obviously, you'll be higher up in the priority list. Don't take it if you don't want it. You may be fit and healthy and, if so, good for you! Not everyone else is in the same boat.
Why do you say they are denigrating peope over 60? The statistics say that group are at greater risk (I'm almost in the over 60 category) and whilst it may be skewed slightly the virus isn't checking whether you work or not. Be grateful that you are given priority and can then choose whether or not to have it!
386
DVa
03/12/2020 12:10:28 20 2
bbc
You clearly aren't in the discard pile because you're high priority. Get over yourself and take the vaccine.
428
03/12/2020 12:21:38 20 1
bbc
You can look after your own health and STILL get covid. It may not affect you, it may make you really ill , it may kill you, but you might also pass it on to others if you don't take the vaccination. Get vaccinated asap and then forget about it. I have never had flu in my life or any serious illness, but will get vaccinate the moment its offered to me. Think of other people.
531
03/12/2020 12:46:50 2 4
bbc
Well done Hens, with age brings wisdom :)
544
03/12/2020 12:50:47 2 0
bbc
Well said, I am a just a teenager 63, so waiting until Easter.
568
Bob
03/12/2020 12:56:05 6 3
bbc
Facts are facts.

COVID accounts for 12% of deaths in 2020 for 85+, 13% for those 75-84, 11% for those 65-75 and 9% for 45-64.
569
03/12/2020 12:56:12 3 9
bbc
Absolutely , hens this whole sorry saga has been carried out as though we are under the control of a Police state . The idea of personal responsibility for an individuals action has all but been eliminated .
585
03/12/2020 12:58:35 4 1
bbc
I'm in a similar position to you but accept that if we all get vaccinated we can stop this virus in its tracks and save lives. You sound like you are the type of person who would spend half and hour of their time in the interests of others.
593
03/12/2020 12:59:48 1 7
bbc
I am 74 and if anyone wants my place in the queue for this new fangled mRNA vaccine they can have it.
689
03/12/2020 13:18:28 10 0
bbc
No one is denigrating you. The vaccination phases are based on average risks of serious effect of covid infection in the entire population. Do you want a counsellor to phone up everyone over the age of (say) 70 and make sure their feelings weren't hurt by this way of organising a mass vaccination in a pandemic? Maybe older folks have thinner skins or can't see the bigger picture ;)
738
03/12/2020 13:29:11 5 1
bbc
All those children with complex needs you are caring for are at increased risk. Your unwillingness to see the bigger picture puts them and you at greater risk of getting Covid. Have the vaccine for them not yourself, don't be selfish.
916
03/12/2020 14:08:31 0 4
bbc
well said. my mother is a very fit 80 year old who exercised regularly eats well and as a result has no major health issues. She takes the flu jab but she has said she will not be rushing for any covid vaccine any time soon, due to the lack of transparency over the trials.
931
03/12/2020 14:11:40 1 0
bbc
ok boomer
983
03/12/2020 14:26:54 3 0
bbc
Wow you're going to manufacture your own vaccine to protect yourself and everyone else around you, that's amazing.
ps
03/12/2020 14:53:51 1 0
bbc
Nobody will force you to have the vaccine. As far as I am aware it is not compulsory.
03/12/2020 18:56:35 0 0
bbc
True comment. Well put.
46
37p
03/12/2020 10:52:21 6 2
bbc
You're the black cloud surrounding a ray of sunshine. Without you the sunshine wouldn't be as bright.

Thanks
72
03/12/2020 11:01:02 0 4
bbc
Cry some more when the reality sinks in.
224
37p
03/12/2020 11:39:18 2 0
bbc
I remember reality.

That's the thing that existed before HYS posters started creating a fantasy world of suppositions, hoaxes and hatred.

I did enjoy it but it looks like it's gone forever in haze of group hatred.
57
03/12/2020 10:57:10 2 8
bbc
There's no easy answer to this.

To appear compassionate and politically correct then the older and more vulnerable people require vaccinating first.

To get the economy going the younger and the working population need vaccinating first.

Catch 22. Looks like politics will win.
73
03/12/2020 11:01:40 9 0
bbc
The young tend not to die so do not need the vaccine - hence open the economy and vaccine to the elderly. Simple.
979
03/12/2020 14:25:58 1 0
bbc
How flawed an argument, the young are mobile, hence the virus spread. The biggest spread occurs in educational facilities - it's the young ones spreading it to parents and then to grand parents, are you completely blind!? To stop the virus you need to find the source - children, young adults are the super spreaders.
03/12/2020 15:33:52 0 0
bbc
But the young do die.. just less of them. My friend Kevin was 50 when he died from the Covid that he had caught from one of his patients... and Dr Wen Lieung, who was the chinese doctor who first warned us of Covid was around 30 when he died.
The reason to vaccinate care staff, medical staff and the elderly first is to take the pressure off the NHS.. if that is a political decision.. so be it.
53
03/12/2020 10:55:37 3 23
bbc
This vaccine is not safe, not yet.
I will be waiting for the EU and the USA approval. Johnson is gambling with our health. The USA and the EU wants to see more date before approving it. Wonder why. Wake up people. I don't trust the uk gov
74
03/12/2020 11:01:43 7 0
bbc
The vaccine is as safe as any other new vaccine.

The only difference in the testing and approvals process is that a serial process has been conducted in parallel.

The process usually includes long delays between phases and the data is handed to the regulators in one big lump after all the trials.

For this vaccine the MHRA and other regulators have been analysing results as they come in
1
03/12/2020 10:31:01 31 19
bbc
The Government should produce a “roadmap” for easing all remaining restrictions left based on target vaccination levels, now one is being rolled out.

To do so will give people confidence in there being an end in sight, a crucial morale boost, and help hold the Government to account in the areas they’re responsible for facilitating the delivery.
75
03/12/2020 11:01:51 24 8
bbc
Good point BW.
And there we have it: "No Immediate Return to Normal" after vaccination.
Wake up people!
57
03/12/2020 10:57:10 2 8
bbc
There's no easy answer to this.

To appear compassionate and politically correct then the older and more vulnerable people require vaccinating first.

To get the economy going the younger and the working population need vaccinating first.

Catch 22. Looks like politics will win.
76
03/12/2020 11:01:57 0 1
bbc
100%
139
03/12/2020 11:17:57 0 1
bbc
But they are also the ones who carry and spread the virus...
4
03/12/2020 10:37:20 29 25
bbc
My father is in a care home. He’s 90, has Alzheimer’s and wants to die. Please explain the reasons why he should have this vaccine over someone of working age who can get the economy and their life going again. Surely by vaccinating the latter group the elderly will be protected anyway.
77
03/12/2020 11:02:07 5 1
bbc
Maybe it's many human's mindset when dealing with death. As Cornish coroner said last week, 'ending a life early to stop someone suffering goes against the laws of nature'. Keeping someone alive with drugs and machines apparently isn't in many minds.
58
03/12/2020 10:57:38 2 21
bbc
If I can't stop wearing a mask and still need to distance I'm not having the jab end of
78
Bob
03/12/2020 11:02:30 9 0
bbc
No-one is going to force you, it's your decision. But don't try to influence anyone else's decision either.
79
03/12/2020 11:02:31 2 6
bbc
Bet the Honourable Members of the House won't have to be patient!
84
Bob
03/12/2020 11:04:04 7 3
bbc
Yes they will
67
03/12/2020 11:00:27 2 9
bbc
according to PRIVETE EYE this morning our chancellor will get rich on this one,page 7
80
03/12/2020 11:02:33 2 6
bbc
They're all getting rich from humanities misery
58
03/12/2020 10:57:38 2 21
bbc
If I can't stop wearing a mask and still need to distance I'm not having the jab end of
Great. With a bit of luck you'll catch it and die. Good riddance. Removed
71
03/12/2020 11:00:57 291 58
bbc
Will you stop denigrating people of 60 and over please. We are not all decrepit and a waste of time. I am 67 and still working full time caring for children with severe and complex needs. As for the vaccine, I am happy to wait and see and continue to look after my own health - thank you.
82
03/12/2020 11:03:12 35 90
bbc
i am 75 but a cut off is needed on really old age.
87
03/12/2020 11:04:57 31 1
bbc
74 it is then.
96
03/12/2020 11:08:10 72 2
bbc
I am not so sure. I know a couple who are both in their 90s and are mentally and physically very fit. I also know some 35 year olds who the complete opposite with as much life in them as a frozen cod. Who makes the choice?
290
03/12/2020 11:53:04 31 1
bbc
What you think this is? Logan’s Run?
446
03/12/2020 12:25:20 8 0
bbc
There are 160,000 people older than 85 in the UK.
Vaccine is £30 for two doses, so £4.8 million to vaccinate them all.

Hardly an amount to warrant telling them to take their chances in dying from the virus.
472
03/12/2020 12:32:53 3 1
bbc
72, hale and hearty. I think the general view is that 80+ is old age. Huff Post says there should be a badge “Be patient with me. I’m training to be an old person.”
662
03/12/2020 13:12:56 3 0
bbc
It’s very nice that an older person is willing to say this, but it says a lot about the world - all of it good - that we’ve decided that older people should be protected.

We just need to make sure we ensure that we also offer 90% protection to the working age people affected by the economic fallout.

We don’t have to choose. It is an ideological lie to say we do. We just have to find a way.
03/12/2020 17:37:31 0 0
bbc
Who are you Adolf Hitler?
If we start to choose people who we think should not have the vaccine like “really old people” does that mean we should start writing off others we don’t personally like?
83
03/12/2020 11:03:58 89 28
bbc
Well, I see from some of these comments that the "Anti-Vaccination" movement seems to have gained some credibility amongst certain parts of the population. With this sort of attitude we could expect to see more existing viruses killing people off, as the reluctance to accept immunisation grows. I still can't understand what the Anti Vaxers hope to achieve by their negative narrative though.....
103
03/12/2020 11:09:39 80 6
bbc
I think that these people disproportionately come onto bulletin boards to spread their theories. That's just what they do, all the time, everywhere.

The rest of us who don't and prefer to read the facts just need to not get too dispirited as we are still in the majority

Billions and billions of vaccines have been given since the first vaccine and the world is getting healthier and more populous
104
03/12/2020 11:09:45 5 17
bbc
It doesnt matter if your anti-vaccination or not. Nobody besides NHS and care home staff is going to get vaccinated before April at the earliest. This nightmare will go on for most of next year. If it's too good to be true then it's not true.
106
03/12/2020 11:09:52 5 25
bbc
ever heard of thalidomide ?
108
03/12/2020 11:10:25 9 9
bbc
I've always been an 'Anti Vaxer', I'll just accept that the dust on the carpet will eventually reach the ceiling!
110
37p
03/12/2020 11:11:14 8 9
bbc
Maybe you could ask in an open way and with an open mind to try and understand why people feel this way?
259
03/12/2020 11:46:24 8 0
bbc
After looking at the comments from conspiracy nutters on the Mail website it's actually quite refreshing to some reason and sanity on the BBC boards. For a change.
345
03/12/2020 12:02:17 8 3
bbc
They're just snowflakes frit of the needle.
535
03/12/2020 12:47:44 6 4
bbc
Let me help with a different point of view. Its the feeling that the government and the BBC (the government's propaganda arm) are telling you what to do, what's best for you, how to think, where to stand. Then the populace juts complying and screaming to 'get this vaccine inside my body now'. Where's the critical assessment? Why this blind unquestionable adherence to 'the science'?
751
03/12/2020 13:31:22 4 4
bbc
We need to rely on competent scientists to assess vaccine safety. We cant really force people to have the vaccine though, but I also don't see why we should eventually have to tolerate risks posed by non-vaccinated people. Eventually, I feel those who refuse vaccination should not be permitted in public gatherings; eg: shops, pubs, cinemas, schools, workplaces, restaurants, public transport etc.
942
03/12/2020 14:16:17 3 2
bbc
I’m not anti vaccine at all - I’m anti untested vaccinations to prevent a virus that is not dangerous to the vast majority of the population.
03/12/2020 15:09:46 0 0
bbc
It's probably time to resurrect the notion of Moscow (and Beijing) gold. It's not all paranoia.
03/12/2020 15:27:01 0 0
bbc
The problem is that the reaction to people who prefer not to have vaccines has been to (a) simplfy & claim vaccines are entirely perfect (the dumbification of science), and (b) to attempt to denounce anyone who chooses not to have them by shaming them. Neither is effective.

Nothing is entirely perfect, there is risk to any medical intervention - and shaming people doesn’t normally change minds
79
03/12/2020 11:02:31 2 6
bbc
Bet the Honourable Members of the House won't have to be patient!
84
Bob
03/12/2020 11:04:04 7 3
bbc
Yes they will
85
03/12/2020 11:04:29 1 13
bbc
Not having it if I still have to distance what a con
86
03/12/2020 11:04:45 1 12
bbc
More data needed before
And if goes wrong who is going to be accountable ?
119
03/12/2020 11:13:13 1 0
bbc
No one the govt is giving waivers.
82
03/12/2020 11:03:12 35 90
bbc
i am 75 but a cut off is needed on really old age.
87
03/12/2020 11:04:57 31 1
bbc
74 it is then.
539
03/12/2020 12:50:07 1 0
bbc
Ouch!
975
03/12/2020 14:25:17 1 0
bbc
Why stop at age?
The majority of people dying of Covid have other underlying health conditions. Many caused by excessive BMI.
There should also be a cut of with excessive BMI, especially if is self inflicted.
An individual BMI over 30 causes all sorts of health issues that Doctor Covid really appreciates and that costs the NHS billions.

& then there is of course quality of life to consider?
53
03/12/2020 10:55:37 3 23
bbc
This vaccine is not safe, not yet.
I will be waiting for the EU and the USA approval. Johnson is gambling with our health. The USA and the EU wants to see more date before approving it. Wonder why. Wake up people. I don't trust the uk gov
88
03/12/2020 11:04:59 8 0
bbc
And I don't trust your opinion on this, because quite frankly, it has no basis in reality. To make a statement like 'this vaccine is not safe' I'm assuming you are a doctor or scientist with at least a PhD, you have studied all the data available and written a peer reviewed paper on this?
67
03/12/2020 11:00:27 2 9
bbc
according to PRIVETE EYE this morning our chancellor will get rich on this one,page 7
89
Bob
03/12/2020 11:05:13 2 0
bbc
PRIVETE EYE? What is that?
196
03/12/2020 11:32:13 1 0
bbc
Its a magazeene.
71
03/12/2020 11:00:57 291 58
bbc
Will you stop denigrating people of 60 and over please. We are not all decrepit and a waste of time. I am 67 and still working full time caring for children with severe and complex needs. As for the vaccine, I am happy to wait and see and continue to look after my own health - thank you.
90
37p
03/12/2020 11:06:09 55 4
bbc
Agreed. I'm 65 and still working full time with no health issues and do object to being put on a discard pile because of my age.
777
03/12/2020 13:36:46 1 2
bbc
Even those with health issues shouldn't be put on the discard pile...
955
03/12/2020 14:19:23 0 0
bbc
bed blocker
54
03/12/2020 10:56:12 3 14
bbc
So why cant they put the vaccine in ice boxes in small vans then distibute to care homes that have booked and can inoculate there residents all at once on the same day. Or is the profit margin to small for the distribution companys.
91
03/12/2020 11:06:30 11 0
bbc
Good job you're not running the distribution if you think it's that easy to maintain -80degC.
214
03/12/2020 11:36:17 0 2
bbc
... but it can be kept for several days at fridge temperatre, so webbly's idea is viable.
694
03/12/2020 13:18:52 0 0
bbc
It can actually be stored at 2-8ºC for up to 5 days, as per Pfizer:

"After storage for up to 30 days in the Pfizer thermal shipper, vaccination centers can transfer the vials to 2-8°C storage conditions for an additional five days, for a total of up to 35 days. Once thawed and stored under 2-8°C conditions, the vials cannot be re-frozen or stored under frozen conditions."
92
03/12/2020 11:06:44 1 1
bbc
Should read 'Patients required........'?
58
03/12/2020 10:57:38 2 21
bbc
If I can't stop wearing a mask and still need to distance I'm not having the jab end of
93
03/12/2020 11:06:52 4 2
bbc
But if you and thousands of others don't have the jab, you'll have to social distance and wear a mask. It's the new normal, accept reality and get on with it. Or do you think BB is reality?
94
03/12/2020 11:07:04 3 7
bbc
They lost me when they started talking of immunity passport it's the crime of the century
100
37p
03/12/2020 11:09:11 4 1
bbc
It's also a red herring. The length of time it's going to take to get any vaccine rolled out means that it's not practical
178
03/12/2020 11:28:55 1 0
bbc
The only governemtn talk of immunity passports has been in replyng in the negative when asked if they will be introduced.
69
03/12/2020 11:00:47 43 112
bbc
"975 vaccines cannot be split up."
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wrong. They can and they remain viable in a standard refrigeration unit for several hours. Stop looking for ridiculous excuses.
95
03/12/2020 11:08:08 40 2
bbc
Listen to what the scientists said. THEY stated the cases currently cannot be split up and transported, it wasn't something I just made up.
82
03/12/2020 11:03:12 35 90
bbc
i am 75 but a cut off is needed on really old age.
96
03/12/2020 11:08:10 72 2
bbc
I am not so sure. I know a couple who are both in their 90s and are mentally and physically very fit. I also know some 35 year olds who the complete opposite with as much life in them as a frozen cod. Who makes the choice?
97
03/12/2020 11:08:22 1 9
bbc
Any decent route planner in one of the many logistics/transport firms could organise a route to distribute it to care homes. Less than 1000 doses would not cover a huge geographical area and could be within spitting distance of an NHS hospital.

Afraid just pathetic excuses for more anticipated failure.
68
03/12/2020 11:00:36 6 1
bbc
Let me get this right, you' happy to be locked down for months, businesses to collapse, people to lose their jobs, but the moment I suggest a vaccine is made mandatory you cry out that I'M being authoritarian?

You do realise that the only reason Korea and Germany have such an effective track and trace system is because they have access to ALL personal data? JVT has said there will be a list...
98
03/12/2020 11:08:33 1 6
bbc
So we will be back to normal in weeks right? You do know even with vaccination it we will still be locked down for months, and as you have mentioned businesses will collapse and people will lose their jobs. What are your suggestions for pregnant women if you want to make this mandatory for all?
127
03/12/2020 11:14:39 4 1
bbc
Surely it should be pregnant persons????
1
03/12/2020 10:31:01 31 19
bbc
The Government should produce a “roadmap” for easing all remaining restrictions left based on target vaccination levels, now one is being rolled out.

To do so will give people confidence in there being an end in sight, a crucial morale boost, and help hold the Government to account in the areas they’re responsible for facilitating the delivery.
99
03/12/2020 11:08:54 14 3
bbc
No-one truly knows how many vaccinations will be enough for a return to 'normal'

If the Government were to publish a roadmap only to find that the efficacy or longevity of the vaccine in the general population does not live up to the levens the roadmap is predicated on the necessary U-Turn would be very damaging.
94
03/12/2020 11:07:04 3 7
bbc
They lost me when they started talking of immunity passport it's the crime of the century
100
37p
03/12/2020 11:09:11 4 1
bbc
It's also a red herring. The length of time it's going to take to get any vaccine rolled out means that it's not practical