Live animal exports to be banned in England and Wales
03/12/2020 | news | politics | 609
The environment secretary says the ban could be in place by the end of 2021 in a move away from EU rules.
1
03/12/2020 10:28:15 265 18
bbc
Great news – now stop being worried about being accused of being racist/predujiced against minorities and follow Belgiums example in banning unstunned Halal and Kosher slaughter.
38
03/12/2020 10:35:51 19 111
bbc
So where's the Animal rights here ? It just proves these organisation are another platform for the left, they don't really care about animals.
45
03/12/2020 10:38:10 84 3
bbc
Yes. In the 21st century animal welfare should always take precendence over religious practices.
142
03/12/2020 10:52:48 40 9
bbc
Better still, just ban religion!
149
03/12/2020 10:57:23 54 2
bbc
Came hear to say exactly the same thing.

I love meat, but prefer to spend the same money on smaller portions that have a higher welfare standard and almost always with local providence.

Lockdown has been brilliant for this with the local farmers & butchers working together to offer high grade British outdoor reared meat with almost zero food miles.

Cruel religious slaughter practices must stop.
179
03/12/2020 11:07:31 14 22
bbc
Yes!
There is no good reason why Israel always gets what it wants.
The Labour Party has become paranoid over it.
Nobody is allowed to criticize Israel!!
Well, they should be.
And I always will, no matter how much the country moans!
In fact, the more it moans, the more I will criticize.
187
03/12/2020 11:09:50 4 37
bbc
“follow Belgiums example in banning unstunned Halal and Kosher slaughter.”

If I were convinced stunning causes less suffering I would agree wholeheartedly

But opinion is divided, including among vets

The point of Halal and Kosher is to prevent suffering

The trouble is there is no way to know how much an animal suffers

So as long as it’s over quickly I believe in letting people do it their way
311
03/12/2020 11:49:19 11 1
bbc
Yes, this throat slitting is not our culture.
313
03/12/2020 11:50:30 5 4
bbc
From what I have read about Halal slaughter practice, electrical stunning is usually permitted. The rule is that the animal should not be injured or diseased before its throat is cut. Captive bolt stunners are not permitted, as they cause injury. I got this from an article written by a Muslim. I understand that some (not all) Jews rule out any kind of stunning.
322
03/12/2020 11:54:14 2 6
bbc
... actually, very most animals for halal meat are stunned before slaughter
Send Boris!! Removed
3
03/12/2020 10:28:45 134 17
bbc
If we all bought British the farmer's wouldn't need to export livestock. Support your local Farmers' Market.
23
03/12/2020 10:33:32 48 83
bbc
Britain is not self-sufficient in food production. It wasn't even during the war. Didn't the Daily Express tell you that?
43
03/12/2020 10:37:26 24 1
bbc
But we all buy from the supermarkets.
If you are lucky enough to source a direct supply you'll get British grown, humanely treated, 21 day hung meat cheaper than the supermarket and a million times better quality. But we can't all do that, we need more real butchers on the high street.
55
03/12/2020 10:39:48 26 0
bbc
Neither would we need to buy thousands-of-airmiles- polluting NZ (halal) Lamb, whilst Welsh hill farmers have to export Lamb to keep their heads above water. Also found NZ Venison in the supermarket this morning. We have UK Venison farms, and an overabundance of wild deer that need culling in controlled circumstances.
130
03/12/2020 10:53:57 1 1
bbc
I think you mean supermarkets wouldn't need to import meat, if we are exporting meat it means we are making a profit on it, or do you not want farmers making money?
154
03/12/2020 10:58:36 5 6
bbc
I'll support British farmers when they stop hunts entering their land and killing foxes and deer with hounds...........Yes it's still continuing with foxes killed by dogs/terrier men on a weekly basis and deer chased to exhaustion all in the name of sport while Johnson sits by threatening hunt Sabs with anti-terror laws.
223
03/12/2020 11:18:22 0 6
bbc
If there were no British farmers, we would not need to support anyone.
Let them all go to the wall.
We do not need them.
256
Seb
03/12/2020 11:25:58 0 0
bbc
Great idea if you can afford it and we use them occasionally. Probably not a problem in Beaconsfield.
343
03/12/2020 12:01:16 0 0
bbc
... and our fishermen
416
BZ
03/12/2020 13:00:59 0 0
bbc
if you can afford it
540
03/12/2020 17:18:32 0 0
bbc
Not sure my local farmers market sells horse meat! -However, I completely agree with you about supporting farmer's markets and of course generally buying local to wherever you live.
561
04/12/2020 04:29:39 0 0
bbc
Farmers markets are way too expensive for the majority.
579
04/12/2020 09:21:24 0 0
bbc
I do, if I can afford it.
Unfortunately, I usually can't.
Normally premium quality, but at premium prices.
4
03/12/2020 10:29:27 145 4
bbc
Good, there is no need to live export animals for slaughter. Hopefully the EU will follow
165
03/12/2020 11:02:04 30 2
bbc
Not a hope
Live animal exports is a massive part of the EUs economy
3.4m live animals, Cattle, Sheep, Pigs, are exported to nations outside the EU every year
https://www.ciwf.org.uk/media/4037267/Export_of_live_animals_from_eu_to_noneu_countries.pdf
180
03/12/2020 11:07:32 10 5
bbc
UK free at last to enact higher animal welfare standards than the EU?

The "nasty" Tories at that, pushing for higher standards?

But Brexit was supposed to be a race to the bottom.

Not what the Impartial BBC has been "reporting" these past 5 years is it?

If Brexit is not the promised unmitigated failure we were promised; will there be any resignations from the BBC war rooms?

No, me neither.
286
03/12/2020 11:37:39 2 3
bbc
Now to ban the atrocious travel conditions humans have to endure when flying low cost airlines, it's inhumane.
5
03/12/2020 10:29:27 97 10
bbc
Now do something about the inhumane treatment and conditions of chickens in the UK!
301
03/12/2020 11:45:04 4 7
bbc
The UK will still ship them alive. So no chance.
6
03/12/2020 10:29:39 14 30
bbc
If everyone went vegetarian, we would not have these problems. Nobody needs meat to keep 100% healthy. The live animal trade is there simply for no other reason than some people 'like the taste'. Terrible situation. Poor animals.
19
03/12/2020 10:32:52 14 3
bbc
Also think about the poor insects & birds that die & suffer during harvesting of vegetables, wheat,fruits etc.
24
03/12/2020 10:33:54 5 4
bbc
Yep. Love the taste and smell of bacon in the morning
27
03/12/2020 10:34:39 6 5
bbc
They do, cattle etc. are far more efficient at converting plant matter into proteins that we can digest.
They also provide a wider biodiversity compared to vast, pesticided and fertilised, monocrops.
37
03/12/2020 10:35:46 6 5
bbc
And with enough selective breeding we could create vegetarian lions, and wolves with an appetite for lentils. Alternatively, we could accept that eating animals is natural.
54
03/12/2020 10:39:34 1 5
bbc
youre probably sitting there with your leather belt and shoes on as you typed
279
03/12/2020 11:33:39 1 0
bbc
I agree but please look into the dairy and egg farming; the animals used are all slaughtered and babies are killed etc etc - loads of suffering.
7
03/12/2020 10:30:13 49 5
bbc
Whilst I am sure every care is taken ,the distressing sounds from livestock trucks at the ports is something best no longer heard.
48
03/12/2020 10:38:55 11 8
bbc
or herd :)
138
03/12/2020 10:55:20 2 0
bbc
Only for export - they didn't say anything about importing live animals for slaughter.
265
03/12/2020 11:28:09 1 0
bbc
If every care had been taken, the animals would not be there, in the first place!
8
03/12/2020 10:30:30 76 6
bbc
About time. The EU should introduce a similar law - no live exports across countries.
33
03/12/2020 10:35:07 22 15
bbc
Maybe a limit on how far live animals can travel or how long they can be in transit would be better?
314
03/12/2020 11:51:13 1 0
bbc
The objective of the EU is do away with recognising borders. So this cannot be implemented as it would be recognising a border.
9
03/12/2020 10:30:31 87 25
bbc
Quicker vaccine approvals and superior animal welfare standards.

The EU will not be happy!
47
03/12/2020 10:38:51 59 23
bbc
Yeah, funny reading about the German chap saying that we would miss the EU as the EU produced that vaccine. Quite the opposite - we still got the vaccine (despite leaving) AND we approved it quicker that the EU (despite them claiming to make it...)!! So exactly what are we missing in that case?!
66
03/12/2020 10:42:02 12 13
bbc
The quicker vaccine approval via EU law. You didn't get sucked in by the jingoistic nonsense yesterday did you..........
308
03/12/2020 11:47:43 2 1
bbc
Basing decisions on "annoying" your "opponent" is utterly stupid. But here we are.
This has been thoroughly debunked. I suggest you read something other than the Express and Daily Heil.
442
03/12/2020 13:25:57 1 1
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
10
03/12/2020 10:31:12 6 20
bbc
Might this just be something to do with the shortage of vets who are needed to check animal exports
46
03/12/2020 10:38:26 2 1
bbc
and why do you think that? Any chance of a fact to back up that made up comment?
11
03/12/2020 10:31:22 66 12
bbc
But animal welfare was supposed to be worse when we leave the EU.
I bet we're not going to allow caged veal or force fed four gras!
39
03/12/2020 10:35:52 34 26
bbc
"Four" gras? I see you don't shop at Waitrose.
118
03/12/2020 10:50:58 1 1
bbc
That would be a benefit indeed.
218
03/12/2020 11:17:38 6 1
bbc
Or mink farming Only UK Austria and Croatia have banned it
444
03/12/2020 13:26:37 1 0
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
12
03/12/2020 10:31:56 56 7
bbc
The UK has some of the best animal welfare standards in the world - we need to keep it that way and always look to improve.
50
03/12/2020 10:39:21 6 93
bbc
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Mad cow diseases and foot mouth diseases ?????

AND

In the UK animals will get electric shock first before being throat cut

Halal is the more human way
445
03/12/2020 13:26:51 0 5
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
13
03/12/2020 10:32:04 9 21
bbc
Some exports of cattle and horses are for breeding. Not easy if they're dead on arrival.

A ban may be contrary to the beloved WTO rules that Brexiteers are fond of.

It will adversely affect UK exports so an own goal for "global Britain."

Otherwise it's another world-beating symbolic gesture driven by Carrie.
30
03/12/2020 10:34:56 11 9
bbc
Breeding is allowed as these animals are very valuable and looked after. I don't think you have sufficient intelligence to make public posts.
44
03/12/2020 10:37:39 6 4
bbc
you think the law is going to stipulate animals from farms and zoos which are going abroad for breeding have to be slaughtered first? Im assuming youre a Labour supporter grasping for straws on this one?
62
03/12/2020 10:40:42 8 4
bbc
And if you could get off your soapbox you'd be able to read that the ban is on live exports for slaughter, or do you think breeding and racing animals are to be slaughtered after doing the business or racing?
Typical one eyed remainer tactics!
102
03/12/2020 10:48:07 6 0
bbc
The ban would apply to export of animals for fattening or slaughter, as the article clearly states.
Any evidence that this would breach WTO rules?
Live animal exports form a very small part of overall exports.
Improved animal welfare is a good thing.
So your comment is another world-beating waste of time!
234
03/12/2020 11:20:24 2 0
bbc
You should read the article before posting. Breeding stock is specifically excluded.
14
Val
03/12/2020 10:32:07 33 14
bbc
Thank goodness, a step in the right direction. This is the main reason I voted to come out of the EU.
31
03/12/2020 10:34:59 20 36
bbc
I didn't think sheep could vote for Brexit, but then again...
113
03/12/2020 10:50:16 3 2
bbc
If so, then you have come up with a truly original reason for voting to leave. Most people voted because of foreigners and have since changed their narrative to include other things like the laws imposed on us by the evil EU or something about hard hats and health and safety. So, thank you for having a good reason for voting to leave.
318
03/12/2020 11:52:16 2 0
bbc
The EU which have done NOTHING about the slaughter of migratory birds over MALTA
452
03/12/2020 13:28:35 0 1
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
15
03/12/2020 10:32:19 70 10
bbc
So that's standards rising after Brexit then.
105
03/12/2020 10:48:44 18 23
bbc
Only one so far
443
03/12/2020 13:26:11 1 1
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
16
03/12/2020 10:32:31 46 12
bbc
"Environment Secretary George Eustice said the ban could be in force by the end of 2021 in a post-Brexit break from EU trade rules."

You mean our own laws determined by our own parliament elected by us.
269
03/12/2020 11:29:21 7 2
bbc
That is a change.
340
03/12/2020 12:01:08 0 1
bbc
Well done for being able to correctly interpret the English language.
448
03/12/2020 13:27:52 0 1
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
17
03/12/2020 10:32:39 9 18
bbc
I'm guessing that this will mean price increases for British consumers. That seems to be the Govt's priority in all things Brexit. Not that their livestock producer chums will complain.
40
03/12/2020 10:35:54 6 0
bbc
did you want to expand on that strange comment?
76
03/12/2020 10:43:20 1 0
bbc
Why would the banning of live exports mean price increases for British consumers? Please explain.
90
03/12/2020 10:45:29 1 0
bbc
How does it mean a price increase?
18
03/12/2020 10:32:50 4 24
bbc
This will confuse some Brexit supporters, a benefit of Brexit that also endorses veganism.
25
03/12/2020 10:33:59 15 3
bbc
How does it endorse veganism ?

It's you that sounds confused.
35
03/12/2020 10:35:22 8 0
bbc
slaughtering livestock before transportation abroad is an endorsement for veganism? I think its you that is confused
36
PW
03/12/2020 10:35:30 7 0
bbc
not sure how slaughtering a lamb before export supports veganism, but hey-ho!
162
03/12/2020 11:00:08 2 0
bbc
It doesn't endorse veganism, which is, in itself a rather strange religion & like other religions, not founded on facts.
257
03/12/2020 11:26:10 0 0
bbc
So slaughtering an animal on UK soil before export endorses veganism? I must look "veganism" up as I think I may have got hold of the wrong end of the stick.
6
03/12/2020 10:29:39 14 30
bbc
If everyone went vegetarian, we would not have these problems. Nobody needs meat to keep 100% healthy. The live animal trade is there simply for no other reason than some people 'like the taste'. Terrible situation. Poor animals.
19
03/12/2020 10:32:52 14 3
bbc
Also think about the poor insects & birds that die & suffer during harvesting of vegetables, wheat,fruits etc.
59
03/12/2020 10:40:37 0 2
bbc
most flee the harvesters ;but you might make a better point if you fretted about pesticides.
20
03/12/2020 10:32:54 52 4
bbc
This marks a more humane treatment of animals and is excellent news.
446
03/12/2020 13:27:07 1 17
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
21
03/12/2020 10:32:59 175 15
bbc
Whatever view you take on Brexit, there should be widespread agreement that the EU has done far too little for the welfare of animals and that we now have the opportunity to implement the highest standards of care and compassion towards farmed animals
57
03/12/2020 10:39:53 62 89
bbc
The highest level would be to not kill and eat them
75
03/12/2020 10:43:18 19 1
bbc
Spain has been selling British bovine to Morocco behind closed doors, where animal welfare isn't even in the dictionary. EU standards? ... can't see them
86
03/12/2020 10:45:01 10 23
bbc
Yeah we just allow fox hunting and grouse shooting at ridiculous levels. The RSPCA also doesn't agree with you, but I'm sure your HYS, completely baseless opinion carries just as much weight. https://www.rspca.org.uk/whatwedo/endcruelty/changingthelaw/brexit
122
03/12/2020 10:52:33 14 14
bbc
EU sets minimum standards, each country can go beyond that if they choose to do so (remember, we were always soveriegn), except we decided not to...

I guess you wanted the EU to set far stricter guidelines and control than what they actually did.
Reading some of the comments, it seems some believe that the EU force the UK to operate to their minimum standards and force us to export live animals.
Both untrue. The UK could always choose to operate to higher standards, and exporting live animals was also our choice.
In reality, Brexit won't change anything regarding animal welfare.
22
03/12/2020 10:33:01 11 17
bbc
Finally, one possible benefit of Brexit (assuming the ban doesn't fall foul of WTO rules). But I'd still rather have seen the UK trying to exert its influence as an EU member to improve livestock welfare standards across Europe, instead of going it alone. That could have benefited millions more animals without disadvantaging UK farmers.
28
03/12/2020 10:34:49 13 4
bbc
because the EU are so open minded to change.
3
03/12/2020 10:28:45 134 17
bbc
If we all bought British the farmer's wouldn't need to export livestock. Support your local Farmers' Market.
23
03/12/2020 10:33:32 48 83
bbc
Britain is not self-sufficient in food production. It wasn't even during the war. Didn't the Daily Express tell you that?
58
03/12/2020 10:40:23 26 0
bbc
It wouldn't be a bad thing if we gave a try at being more self sufficient ...surely...a step in the right direction
We seem to pretty good at creating Gammon in this country... Removed
63
03/12/2020 10:40:46 18 1
bbc
I don't see your point, this article is about exporting not importing. If we exported less we'd need to import less.
197
03/12/2020 11:13:00 3 0
bbc
We became self sufficient during the war, due in large to allotments and eating all the offal. We weren't before, because we'd globalised and relied on imports. Post war we were self sufficient and supposed to stay that way, in case of unforseen stoppage of imports. Around 97 we have up, started to increase population whilst selling our national assets to EU nations and relying on their imports.
327
03/12/2020 11:57:25 0 0
bbc
The word export should have given you a clue NOT import
355
03/12/2020 12:05:24 2 0
bbc
... only because we don't need to ... we could use surplus heat from buildings and powerstations to grow soft tropical fruits
... we could stop building 3 bed semis on green fields ... build low rise on the current built estate ... even reduce our built footprint
... eat more fish ... the germans won't be shooting up our trawlers this time
507
03/12/2020 16:17:30 0 0
bbc
Tell me many places that where before, during or after the war.
565
04/12/2020 08:17:50 0 0
bbc
Showing your class there Stawcat - not everyone who has animal rights on their mind is an Express reader. I've not read any comments suggesting the UK isn't self-sufficient in food production. Typical liberal perspective - shout when people disagree with you and if that doesn't work, call them names. Grown up...
6
03/12/2020 10:29:39 14 30
bbc
If everyone went vegetarian, we would not have these problems. Nobody needs meat to keep 100% healthy. The live animal trade is there simply for no other reason than some people 'like the taste'. Terrible situation. Poor animals.
24
03/12/2020 10:33:54 5 4
bbc
Yep. Love the taste and smell of bacon in the morning
18
03/12/2020 10:32:50 4 24
bbc
This will confuse some Brexit supporters, a benefit of Brexit that also endorses veganism.
25
03/12/2020 10:33:59 15 3
bbc
How does it endorse veganism ?

It's you that sounds confused.
26
03/12/2020 10:34:32 146 7
bbc
They should also ban the importation of meat produced in a way that does not meet the UK welfare standards.
140
03/12/2020 10:55:53 7 50
bbc
So do you propose an army of millions of weldare inspectors barging their way into other countries in order to examine their facilities?
341
03/12/2020 11:44:41 1 0
bbc
Get rid of double standards
578
04/12/2020 09:19:11 0 0
bbc
We do already, but there have been numerous convictions of slaughters in the UK breaking those practices. Worse, large-scale slaughter houses now pass so many animals through it is impossible to check every one.
6
03/12/2020 10:29:39 14 30
bbc
If everyone went vegetarian, we would not have these problems. Nobody needs meat to keep 100% healthy. The live animal trade is there simply for no other reason than some people 'like the taste'. Terrible situation. Poor animals.
27
03/12/2020 10:34:39 6 5
bbc
They do, cattle etc. are far more efficient at converting plant matter into proteins that we can digest.
They also provide a wider biodiversity compared to vast, pesticided and fertilised, monocrops.
22
03/12/2020 10:33:01 11 17
bbc
Finally, one possible benefit of Brexit (assuming the ban doesn't fall foul of WTO rules). But I'd still rather have seen the UK trying to exert its influence as an EU member to improve livestock welfare standards across Europe, instead of going it alone. That could have benefited millions more animals without disadvantaging UK farmers.
28
03/12/2020 10:34:49 13 4
bbc
because the EU are so open minded to change.
91
03/12/2020 10:45:35 3 2
bbc
Agree, making changes would never be easy, but if the UK had acted as a leader instead of a reluctant hanger-on, we might have had more friends within Europe. Now we certainly have given up any influence that we might have had.
101
03/12/2020 10:48:04 2 1
bbc
Maybe not, but the UK was the country to do it.
147
03/12/2020 10:56:52 1 2
bbc
I thought the standard Brexiteer opinion was that the EU was no longer the organisation we signed up to, and had therefore changed?
29
03/12/2020 10:34:54 55 12
bbc
It's pretty clear the UK is going to have much superior animal welfare standards to the EU contrary to what remained were saying. To export into the UK the EU should also ban live animal exports. It's just not acceptable in today's world.
49
03/12/2020 10:39:15 12 20
bbc
But we will accept lower standards from other countries. So we apply the same standards to how live stock are farmed but allow lower standards of meat to be imported.
262
03/12/2020 11:26:55 5 0
bbc
Because the EU has its own agenda.
It is always the biggest hypocrite of them all.
It says one thing, yet, does the opposite, day in and day out.
447
03/12/2020 13:27:23 0 1
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
13
03/12/2020 10:32:04 9 21
bbc
Some exports of cattle and horses are for breeding. Not easy if they're dead on arrival.

A ban may be contrary to the beloved WTO rules that Brexiteers are fond of.

It will adversely affect UK exports so an own goal for "global Britain."

Otherwise it's another world-beating symbolic gesture driven by Carrie.
30
03/12/2020 10:34:56 11 9
bbc
Breeding is allowed as these animals are very valuable and looked after. I don't think you have sufficient intelligence to make public posts.
14
Val
03/12/2020 10:32:07 33 14
bbc
Thank goodness, a step in the right direction. This is the main reason I voted to come out of the EU.
31
03/12/2020 10:34:59 20 36
bbc
I didn't think sheep could vote for Brexit, but then again...
150
03/12/2020 10:57:31 4 4
bbc
They didn't. They voted to remain in the EU, which shows exactly why their views are irrelevant...
194
03/12/2020 11:11:57 3 0
bbc
But then again, it's obviously you don't have the requisite equipment to be able to think.
217
03/12/2020 11:17:32 4 2
bbc
You pop up in every HYS to berate Brexit.

Like that poor Japanese soldier still fighting a war decades after it had finished.
236
03/12/2020 11:20:32 1 1
bbc
Is it me...or is this gammon salty?
323
03/12/2020 11:56:15 2 0
bbc
Don't see why not, clearly all sorts of freak voted remain too. Only those with closed minds and/or lacking wisdom can bask in certainty. Evidence aplenty of both on HYS.
32
03/12/2020 10:35:00 12 1
bbc
The NFU says this (good news for once!) could affect our own food supply chain. Can someone explain please?
8
03/12/2020 10:30:30 76 6
bbc
About time. The EU should introduce a similar law - no live exports across countries.
33
03/12/2020 10:35:07 22 15
bbc
Maybe a limit on how far live animals can travel or how long they can be in transit would be better?
83
03/12/2020 10:44:22 7 0
bbc
If packaged meat can sit on a shelf for a week, it can sit in transit for a day. There's no need to transport live animals.
159
03/12/2020 11:00:05 1 0
bbc
That could be a problem in relation to the number of abattoirs available. Several closed. One independent local butcher used to slaughter on the premises. Foot & Mouth stopped that and he eventually went out of business (plus killed off by supermarkets).
210
03/12/2020 11:15:54 3 0
bbc
By slavishly following the EU's rules on slaughter (which no other EU country bothered to) we closed down a huge number of our abattoir facilities. thus ensuring the animals have to travel much further. Perhaps we can now open up a few more local facilities to cut down the transit miles?
370
03/12/2020 12:11:03 0 0
bbc
there are already very strict rules on that.Which include variations on drivers hours to permit journeys to be as expeditious as possible,but refrigerator trucks are a lot better.Animals going for breeding are also covered,a trade which will continue.
34
03/12/2020 10:35:20 74 5
bbc
Great news. I always find it really hard to understand how a nation of 'animal lovers' of many dogs and cats, we could for so long watch while these poor sheep and other animals are tortured in these ways. So happy that we are now not going to be doing this and all of these poor animals will no longer suffer.
68
03/12/2020 10:42:18 41 10
bbc
We couldn't stop it while in the EU, it wasn't about us just watching- there was nothing we could do.
251
03/12/2020 11:25:10 0 4
bbc
But what happens if we negotiate the right away, with the EU, in the coming days?
Then we would be back to square one.
Let's hope not.
280
Pip
03/12/2020 11:34:56 2 2
bbc
But happy to accept 'Halal' or 'Kosher' inhumane killing of animals, strange..........?
I never understood how any pet owner could eat animals. And don't even get me started on meat food outlets at zoos and aquaria. Most humans really are stupid and unethical.
440
03/12/2020 13:25:36 1 2
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
521
03/12/2020 16:40:14 0 0
bbc
The animals will still suffer. Would be better if they were treated well, like a pet cat or dog.
It will likely take a revolutionary change of attitude away from the stuck mindset of the human species or a realisation that there just will not be enough land for people to farm meat in the future to cope with providing food for increased populations.
18
03/12/2020 10:32:50 4 24
bbc
This will confuse some Brexit supporters, a benefit of Brexit that also endorses veganism.
35
03/12/2020 10:35:22 8 0
bbc
slaughtering livestock before transportation abroad is an endorsement for veganism? I think its you that is confused
18
03/12/2020 10:32:50 4 24
bbc
This will confuse some Brexit supporters, a benefit of Brexit that also endorses veganism.
36
PW
03/12/2020 10:35:30 7 0
bbc
not sure how slaughtering a lamb before export supports veganism, but hey-ho!
6
03/12/2020 10:29:39 14 30
bbc
If everyone went vegetarian, we would not have these problems. Nobody needs meat to keep 100% healthy. The live animal trade is there simply for no other reason than some people 'like the taste'. Terrible situation. Poor animals.
37
03/12/2020 10:35:46 6 5
bbc
And with enough selective breeding we could create vegetarian lions, and wolves with an appetite for lentils. Alternatively, we could accept that eating animals is natural.
115
03/12/2020 10:50:35 2 5
bbc
It is not natural for humans to eat large animals. We cannot kill them by hand (we can only kill them by using implements). Therefore large animals are not our natural food. That is why too much red meat causes cancer - we should not be eating it.
1
03/12/2020 10:28:15 265 18
bbc
Great news – now stop being worried about being accused of being racist/predujiced against minorities and follow Belgiums example in banning unstunned Halal and Kosher slaughter.
38
03/12/2020 10:35:51 19 111
bbc
So where's the Animal rights here ? It just proves these organisation are another platform for the left, they don't really care about animals.
182
03/12/2020 11:08:30 6 4
bbc
How do you know that they don't care about animals?
Just a wild guess, right?
332
03/12/2020 11:40:52 2 0
bbc
Meaningless nonsense!
439
03/12/2020 13:23:34 2 3
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
11
03/12/2020 10:31:22 66 12
bbc
But animal welfare was supposed to be worse when we leave the EU.
I bet we're not going to allow caged veal or force fed four gras!
39
03/12/2020 10:35:52 34 26
bbc
"Four" gras? I see you don't shop at Waitrose.
81
03/12/2020 10:44:16 11 5
bbc
Maybe Calum doesn't but that doesn't make him less of a person than you.

You are helping confirm my suspicious that the 'debate' over the EU /Europe had more to do with British class divisions than it did Europe
103
03/12/2020 10:48:32 2 3
bbc
Tastier than three.
213
03/12/2020 11:17:08 2 2
bbc
Pedante. Hope I spelt it right
240
03/12/2020 11:22:24 2 0
bbc
Auto correct didn't like foie.
249
03/12/2020 11:24:38 3 0
bbc
You are rather a tool though aren't you?
To misquote Robin Williams, if there was ever a person in dire need of a bl*w j*b, it's you!
520
03/12/2020 16:39:31 0 0
bbc
Only the rich rejoiners can afford Waitrose, Aldi is what we plebs use. Though I expect if you don't have it delivered via Ocado, you send your butler or maid to actually do the shopping. You should try Aldi, our local store is running a promotion on South African produce, seems they may be stocking more of it next year, now that the EU's non-tariff barriers won't apply. ;-)
17
03/12/2020 10:32:39 9 18
bbc
I'm guessing that this will mean price increases for British consumers. That seems to be the Govt's priority in all things Brexit. Not that their livestock producer chums will complain.
40
03/12/2020 10:35:54 6 0
bbc
did you want to expand on that strange comment?
92
03/12/2020 10:45:39 2 0
bbc
I imagine its based on the comment in the story that this will have an impact on UK food supply chains. Though quite how we are not told, but that usually means... And so we will use this to push up prices in the shops.
41
03/12/2020 10:35:54 3 6
bbc
Another small win.... which could be insignificant without wider trade deals.
42
03/12/2020 10:35:57 2 1
bbc
Will live animals still be allowed to travel over/from Northern Ireland?
64
03/12/2020 10:41:16 1 0
bbc
No.
74
03/12/2020 10:43:05 1 0
bbc
They will be transported by land to the Republic and then by ship (as before) as before.
3
03/12/2020 10:28:45 134 17
bbc
If we all bought British the farmer's wouldn't need to export livestock. Support your local Farmers' Market.
43
03/12/2020 10:37:26 24 1
bbc
But we all buy from the supermarkets.
If you are lucky enough to source a direct supply you'll get British grown, humanely treated, 21 day hung meat cheaper than the supermarket and a million times better quality. But we can't all do that, we need more real butchers on the high street.
260
Pip
03/12/2020 11:26:40 0 0
bbc
What High Streets........?
382
03/12/2020 12:22:21 0 0
bbc
what high street with the likes of Amazon who are determined to see the end of high shopping there is little hope. It's interesting to see that many people are/would be happy to pay more for their meat yet people don't seem to share that view when shopping on the high for other goods?
13
03/12/2020 10:32:04 9 21
bbc
Some exports of cattle and horses are for breeding. Not easy if they're dead on arrival.

A ban may be contrary to the beloved WTO rules that Brexiteers are fond of.

It will adversely affect UK exports so an own goal for "global Britain."

Otherwise it's another world-beating symbolic gesture driven by Carrie.
44
03/12/2020 10:37:39 6 4
bbc
you think the law is going to stipulate animals from farms and zoos which are going abroad for breeding have to be slaughtered first? Im assuming youre a Labour supporter grasping for straws on this one?
1
03/12/2020 10:28:15 265 18
bbc
Great news – now stop being worried about being accused of being racist/predujiced against minorities and follow Belgiums example in banning unstunned Halal and Kosher slaughter.
45
03/12/2020 10:38:10 84 3
bbc
Yes. In the 21st century animal welfare should always take precendence over religious practices.
482
03/12/2020 14:23:07 0 4
bbc
Yeah recently read cruel details of 2001 foot and mouth disease and the way you self righteous people humanly killed the animals (new borns coming out and being hit with brunt instruments on the head)
10
03/12/2020 10:31:12 6 20
bbc
Might this just be something to do with the shortage of vets who are needed to check animal exports
46
03/12/2020 10:38:26 2 1
bbc
and why do you think that? Any chance of a fact to back up that made up comment?
9
03/12/2020 10:30:31 87 25
bbc
Quicker vaccine approvals and superior animal welfare standards.

The EU will not be happy!
47
03/12/2020 10:38:51 59 23
bbc
Yeah, funny reading about the German chap saying that we would miss the EU as the EU produced that vaccine. Quite the opposite - we still got the vaccine (despite leaving) AND we approved it quicker that the EU (despite them claiming to make it...)!! So exactly what are we missing in that case?!
164
03/12/2020 11:01:51 16 8
bbc
A classic piece of Brexiteer disinformation, the EU laws and medical regulations always allowed the sovereign nations of Europe to follow the route we did so what exactly is your point?
485
03/12/2020 14:29:01 3 0
bbc
The vaccine was created by Turkish immigrant scientists, it is a German Co who will benefit and a US Co will produce the vaccine in Belgium (a benefit of an FTA which we opt out of next month). We approved it so fast because the MHRA used EU emergency powers (according to the MHRA) or because they used new UK methods which don't exist yet (according to Matt Hancock).

That's all your missing!
581
04/12/2020 09:29:14 0 0
bbc
we haven't left, and won't until 31Dec, still in transition period.
Which is why we have d he vaccine so quickly, along with being accepted by our regulator before the EU regulator. Ic no deal?
It won't come here by road, likely not much will, until our gov gets its act together.
A first.
7
03/12/2020 10:30:13 49 5
bbc
Whilst I am sure every care is taken ,the distressing sounds from livestock trucks at the ports is something best no longer heard.
48
03/12/2020 10:38:55 11 8
bbc
or herd :)
idiot Removed
268
03/12/2020 11:28:46 1 0
bbc
Joking, on a serious subject.
29
03/12/2020 10:34:54 55 12
bbc
It's pretty clear the UK is going to have much superior animal welfare standards to the EU contrary to what remained were saying. To export into the UK the EU should also ban live animal exports. It's just not acceptable in today's world.
49
03/12/2020 10:39:15 12 20
bbc
But we will accept lower standards from other countries. So we apply the same standards to how live stock are farmed but allow lower standards of meat to be imported.
82
03/12/2020 10:44:17 4 1
bbc
Lower or different?
189
03/12/2020 11:09:56 3 0
bbc
Then obviously this should be amended. But you do have the choice of not buying meat from those countries and, by doing so, encouraging improved standards if they want to sell here. Eating less meat anyway is always going to be a good outcome for animals and humans.
12
03/12/2020 10:31:56 56 7
bbc
The UK has some of the best animal welfare standards in the world - we need to keep it that way and always look to improve.
50
03/12/2020 10:39:21 6 93
bbc
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Mad cow diseases and foot mouth diseases ?????

AND

In the UK animals will get electric shock first before being throat cut

Halal is the more human way
114
03/12/2020 10:50:17 16 1
bbc
Funny how the countries that claimed low/no BSE were also those who made testing for it illegal.
Even more amusing is that the self-confessed Chinese resident pretends to support the religion of the victims in their ongoing ethnic cleansing...
137
03/12/2020 10:55:15 29 1
bbc
You are aware that BSE originated from animal feed produced in Belgium to a lower standard than UK feed?

Only a fool would call stunning "an electric shock" & Halal slaughter is a barbaric practice.
161
03/12/2020 11:00:06 27 1
bbc
"Halal is the more human way"

.. said no sensible person ever
196
03/12/2020 11:12:51 11 1
bbc
You are a very sad person. I will pray for you.
253
03/12/2020 11:25:17 13 1
bbc
At least an 'electric shock' (or captive bolt) causes immediate unconsciousness unlike Halal slaughter where the poor creatures suffocate on their own blood.
267
03/12/2020 11:28:16 12 1
bbc
Totally, the animals can't smell the blood, or hear the screams from their slaughtered kin, as they slowly die waiting for the blood to drain from their throats.
Halal is about as backward as it gets, and stupid enough to class anything living in water as fruit, as the Christians did hundreds of years ago!
522
03/12/2020 16:41:23 3 0
bbc
Says the man from China where a wet market Pangolin is reputed to have caught covid from a bat or some other odd creature they keep in such places and so caused a global economic catastrophe when they passed it to a human, who promptly exported it to Italy, so they say.
585
04/12/2020 09:43:08 0 0
bbc
actually, cattle get a stun bolt, many animals are " stunned" by being suffocated in a tank of carbon dioxide, or in argon/ nitrogen mixture, the second being slightly more humane.
51
03/12/2020 10:33:14 31 2
bbc
Wonderful news .
52
03/12/2020 10:33:57 13 2
bbc
About time
53
03/12/2020 10:39:30 6 5
bbc
Are people classed as live animals when going on holiday?
428
03/12/2020 13:12:29 0 0
bbc
Only when you travel cattle class.
6
03/12/2020 10:29:39 14 30
bbc
If everyone went vegetarian, we would not have these problems. Nobody needs meat to keep 100% healthy. The live animal trade is there simply for no other reason than some people 'like the taste'. Terrible situation. Poor animals.
54
03/12/2020 10:39:34 1 5
bbc
youre probably sitting there with your leather belt and shoes on as you typed
3
03/12/2020 10:28:45 134 17
bbc
If we all bought British the farmer's wouldn't need to export livestock. Support your local Farmers' Market.
55
03/12/2020 10:39:48 26 0
bbc
Neither would we need to buy thousands-of-airmiles- polluting NZ (halal) Lamb, whilst Welsh hill farmers have to export Lamb to keep their heads above water. Also found NZ Venison in the supermarket this morning. We have UK Venison farms, and an overabundance of wild deer that need culling in controlled circumstances.
94
03/12/2020 10:45:56 14 1
bbc
Spot on. We've just finished off a venison casserole, home cooked with locally produced meat from the Beaconsfield Farmers Market. No airmiles there.
56
03/12/2020 10:39:48 11 12
bbc
Vegetarian's think about the poor insects & birds that die & suffer during harvesting of vegetables, wheat ,fruits etc. in farm fields!
97
03/12/2020 10:46:37 2 1
bbc
This does not compare with the suffering that these exported animals go through. Also, this article has nothing to do with vegetarianism.
132
03/12/2020 10:54:00 0 1
bbc
Equally Lifestyle Vegans, who claim not to use anything made from dead animals, but continue to travel in vehicles powered by fossil fuels..

Fossil fuels. There's a clue in the name.
241
03/12/2020 11:22:57 0 0
bbc
Well said. Just because the insects aren't 'sentient' beings in a humanly understandable way, doesn't mean they don't suffer. Plants also react under stress...
21
03/12/2020 10:32:59 175 15
bbc
Whatever view you take on Brexit, there should be widespread agreement that the EU has done far too little for the welfare of animals and that we now have the opportunity to implement the highest standards of care and compassion towards farmed animals
57
03/12/2020 10:39:53 62 89
bbc
The highest level would be to not kill and eat them
192
03/12/2020 11:11:27 6 14
bbc
Yes - there is no need to kill animals for food.
It is totally unnecessary.
And, environmentally, farming animals is very bad.
Removed
305
03/12/2020 11:46:42 2 2
bbc
And by the same token not to have so many of them, particularly cows and sheep, thereby helping alleviate the gas emissions.
353
03/12/2020 12:04:37 0 2
bbc
Then there would be far fewer of them - maybe only in Heritage Parks/Zoos (This is the Bullfighting justification by the way).
365
03/12/2020 12:09:18 3 0
bbc
True I worked in a chicken factory inthe 80s horrible place still can't belive some of the things I done, worse is I still eat meat because I am weak hopefully these new plant based meat alternatives will provide the likes of me the answear
432
03/12/2020 13:17:39 1 0
bbc
Then they would all go extinct. We domesticated these animals thousands of years ago and we have a moral duty to keep them in existence. High welfare, non-factory farming is the answer with use of natural animal manure instead of dangerous, harmful man-made fertilisers.
476
03/12/2020 14:08:51 1 0
bbc
Think this through - if we all became veggies what would happen to the countries livestock? I can guarantee the farmers would not be able to carry on caring for the animals if there was no money in it, and so all our farms breeds would be headed towards extinction, the way of so many already.
504
03/12/2020 16:13:31 0 0
bbc
I don't think carnivores cope well on a vegan diet, so we'd have to kill all carnivores or watch them starve to death.
543
03/12/2020 17:53:23 1 0
bbc
But then they would not exist in the first place.,
23
03/12/2020 10:33:32 48 83
bbc
Britain is not self-sufficient in food production. It wasn't even during the war. Didn't the Daily Express tell you that?
58
03/12/2020 10:40:23 26 0
bbc
It wouldn't be a bad thing if we gave a try at being more self sufficient ...surely...a step in the right direction
112
03/12/2020 10:50:14 6 0
bbc
We'd need to halve the population of the UK first (in itself a good thing for the planet).
19
03/12/2020 10:32:52 14 3
bbc
Also think about the poor insects & birds that die & suffer during harvesting of vegetables, wheat,fruits etc.
59
03/12/2020 10:40:37 0 2
bbc
most flee the harvesters ;but you might make a better point if you fretted about pesticides.
60
03/12/2020 10:40:37 5 9
bbc
Why now ?
Given the dealt at ports the livestock will be dead anyway.
Virtue out of necessity.
23
03/12/2020 10:33:32 48 83
bbc
Britain is not self-sufficient in food production. It wasn't even during the war. Didn't the Daily Express tell you that?
We seem to pretty good at creating Gammon in this country... Removed
99
03/12/2020 10:47:00 13 10
bbc
Oh look another nasty racist remoener, yet because it's against whitey BBC doesn't class it as a racist remark.
109
03/12/2020 10:49:32 8 3
bbc
And creating people who make anti white, ageist comments.
13
03/12/2020 10:32:04 9 21
bbc
Some exports of cattle and horses are for breeding. Not easy if they're dead on arrival.

A ban may be contrary to the beloved WTO rules that Brexiteers are fond of.

It will adversely affect UK exports so an own goal for "global Britain."

Otherwise it's another world-beating symbolic gesture driven by Carrie.
62
03/12/2020 10:40:42 8 4
bbc
And if you could get off your soapbox you'd be able to read that the ban is on live exports for slaughter, or do you think breeding and racing animals are to be slaughtered after doing the business or racing?
Typical one eyed remainer tactics!
23
03/12/2020 10:33:32 48 83
bbc
Britain is not self-sufficient in food production. It wasn't even during the war. Didn't the Daily Express tell you that?
63
03/12/2020 10:40:46 18 1
bbc
I don't see your point, this article is about exporting not importing. If we exported less we'd need to import less.
73
03/12/2020 10:42:50 4 3
bbc
You need to produce it in the first place in order to consume it locally or export it.
42
03/12/2020 10:35:57 2 1
bbc
Will live animals still be allowed to travel over/from Northern Ireland?
64
03/12/2020 10:41:16 1 0
bbc
No.
65
03/12/2020 10:41:22 9 3
bbc
It's taking forever, but encouraging to see steps are being taken towards stopping the treatment of animals like commercial commodity.
87
03/12/2020 10:45:04 4 2
bbc
They are a commercial commodity.
9
03/12/2020 10:30:31 87 25
bbc
Quicker vaccine approvals and superior animal welfare standards.

The EU will not be happy!
66
03/12/2020 10:42:02 12 13
bbc
The quicker vaccine approval via EU law. You didn't get sucked in by the jingoistic nonsense yesterday did you..........
145
03/12/2020 10:56:27 11 8
bbc
But EU legislation on the UK statute books was supposed to be negligible; according to all the ardent Remoaners.

Clearly it isn't, but as this demonstrates, the UK is capable of enacting its own rules, regulations and legislation without having to be in the corrupt protectionist racket that is the EU.

This is in stark contrast to what the Impartial BBC has been telling us for the past 5 years.
67
03/12/2020 10:42:03 2 10
bbc
What do animal and small children have in common? They have very little sway over how they are brought up and how their parents live.

So why did it take so long for the government to agree to give poor kids lunches?
84
03/12/2020 10:44:26 15 1
bbc
Perhaps you ought to ask the parents of those children why they buy cigarettes, phone top ups & scratch cards in preference for feeding their children.
148
03/12/2020 10:56:56 2 0
bbc
They've always given poor kids lunches during school time.
What has been asked now is lunches for all kids in & out of school
I'm all for means testing & helping those in most need, but not every ones children
Parents where they can should look after their own
429
03/12/2020 13:15:04 1 0
bbc
Because the government has been giving them taxpayers' money to buy food with. If they choose to spend it on other things how is that the government's fault?
34
03/12/2020 10:35:20 74 5
bbc
Great news. I always find it really hard to understand how a nation of 'animal lovers' of many dogs and cats, we could for so long watch while these poor sheep and other animals are tortured in these ways. So happy that we are now not going to be doing this and all of these poor animals will no longer suffer.
68
03/12/2020 10:42:18 41 10
bbc
We couldn't stop it while in the EU, it wasn't about us just watching- there was nothing we could do.
255
03/12/2020 11:25:50 3 2
bbc
We could do a Brexit.
Well, we have now.
So good riddance to bad rubbish.
69
03/12/2020 10:42:31 12 3
bbc
Send Boris! Now deal with the inhuman conditions of Chicken Farming!
70
03/12/2020 10:42:34 104 6
bbc
The banning of none stunned animal slaughter should also be banned.

As a priority.
146
03/12/2020 10:56:42 12 40
bbc
So you want to force everyone to use non-stunned methods?
188
03/12/2020 11:09:50 15 2
bbc
If a British slaughter man hadn't stunned an animal first he would be prosecuted, having witnessed animals being halal slaughtered it's barbaric & cruel, I could never understand goverments of any colour allowing it.
270
03/12/2020 11:29:50 14 1
bbc
I must admit my post sounds confusing.
Let me clarify - no animals should be slaughtered without being stunned first - apologies.
71
03/12/2020 10:42:46 4 10
bbc
Not one for animal cruelty by any means but "Only a few thousand of the millions of animals bred for meat in the UK end up being shipped to Europe for slaughter." - seems like a storm in a teacup. One is too many you might say but to pin your brexit vote on this seems a tad extreme - this could have been dealt with easily without brexit - so stop waffling that Brexit brought this about - fools
98
03/12/2020 10:46:50 7 0
bbc
And exactly how could it have been changed without brevity after the European Court previously overruled a ban. At least check your facts and btw this is just the tip of the iceberg!
136
03/12/2020 10:54:44 1 0
bbc
"this could have been dealt with easily without brexit"

No it couldn't, did you even bother to read the piece?
Or are you so blind you refuse to see

"a breach of EU free trade rules."

You can't ban them while still a member of the EU simple fact
72
03/12/2020 10:42:50 33 2
bbc
If this happens it will be absolutely brilliant news, after decades of campaigning. These animals are transported many hundreds of miles in appalling conditions over which we have no control, many as far as brutal slaughter houses in Turkey.
450
03/12/2020 13:28:06 3 12
bbc
The Tories have voted that animals can't feel pain as part of the EU bill, marking the beginning of our anti-science Brexit

Independent Nov.20 2017.
63
03/12/2020 10:40:46 18 1
bbc
I don't see your point, this article is about exporting not importing. If we exported less we'd need to import less.
73
03/12/2020 10:42:50 4 3
bbc
You need to produce it in the first place in order to consume it locally or export it.
129
03/12/2020 10:53:21 7 1
bbc
We CAN do that, but the EU led to farmers going out of business because of imports and the CAP rewarding the larger land-owners rather than the small-holders. Remember the 'butter mountains' and 'milk lakes'? We should import only those things we can't grow/produce because of our climate and/or go back to eating what's in season here. But we import 'chilled' meat, we could export 'chilled meat'.
211
03/12/2020 11:16:21 5 0
bbc
So how do we export it if we don't produce it?
Take a stroll around Wales, Cumbria or Ayrshire, what are those fluffy white animals covered in wool, that obviously aren't being produced?
42
03/12/2020 10:35:57 2 1
bbc
Will live animals still be allowed to travel over/from Northern Ireland?
74
03/12/2020 10:43:05 1 0
bbc
They will be transported by land to the Republic and then by ship (as before) as before.
120
03/12/2020 10:51:27 1 1
bbc
In a lorry on the ship or they get a seat?
21
03/12/2020 10:32:59 175 15
bbc
Whatever view you take on Brexit, there should be widespread agreement that the EU has done far too little for the welfare of animals and that we now have the opportunity to implement the highest standards of care and compassion towards farmed animals
75
03/12/2020 10:43:18 19 1
bbc
Spain has been selling British bovine to Morocco behind closed doors, where animal welfare isn't even in the dictionary. EU standards? ... can't see them
17
03/12/2020 10:32:39 9 18
bbc
I'm guessing that this will mean price increases for British consumers. That seems to be the Govt's priority in all things Brexit. Not that their livestock producer chums will complain.
76
03/12/2020 10:43:20 1 0
bbc
Why would the banning of live exports mean price increases for British consumers? Please explain.
77
03/12/2020 10:43:33 5 14
bbc
*huffs and puffs until red in the face*

Typical BBC with their pro-Brexit/UK and anti-EU agenda. Why can't we have some balanced journalism?

*stomps feet*

Don't we hate sensationalist journalists who spread misinformation for their own gains? Well, except for the one in No 10, but that's not the point.
78
03/12/2020 10:43:34 10 1
bbc
Good, about time too.
79
03/12/2020 10:43:36 104 4
bbc
We are rejecting live animal exports on cruelty grounds so does this mean that religious slaughter of conscious animals will also be banned?
116
03/12/2020 10:50:39 53 4
bbc
Let's hope so.

And male genital mutilation for similar reasons.
80
03/12/2020 10:43:38 2 9
bbc
Ahhh this must be it, the long awaited Brexit dividend.......
95
03/12/2020 10:46:01 2 6
bbc
Yes, animals get to be slaughtered quicker. Great news for them.
39
03/12/2020 10:35:52 34 26
bbc
"Four" gras? I see you don't shop at Waitrose.
81
03/12/2020 10:44:16 11 5
bbc
Maybe Calum doesn't but that doesn't make him less of a person than you.

You are helping confirm my suspicious that the 'debate' over the EU /Europe had more to do with British class divisions than it did Europe
220
03/12/2020 11:18:04 2 1
bbc
Well said Sir
49
03/12/2020 10:39:15 12 20
bbc
But we will accept lower standards from other countries. So we apply the same standards to how live stock are farmed but allow lower standards of meat to be imported.
82
03/12/2020 10:44:17 4 1
bbc
Lower or different?
33
03/12/2020 10:35:07 22 15
bbc
Maybe a limit on how far live animals can travel or how long they can be in transit would be better?
83
03/12/2020 10:44:22 7 0
bbc
If packaged meat can sit on a shelf for a week, it can sit in transit for a day. There's no need to transport live animals.
67
03/12/2020 10:42:03 2 10
bbc
What do animal and small children have in common? They have very little sway over how they are brought up and how their parents live.

So why did it take so long for the government to agree to give poor kids lunches?
84
03/12/2020 10:44:26 15 1
bbc
Perhaps you ought to ask the parents of those children why they buy cigarettes, phone top ups & scratch cards in preference for feeding their children.
127
03/12/2020 10:52:43 3 0
bbc
And then go out on the streets of Britain and attempt to find an emaciated child.
85
03/12/2020 10:44:58 19 2
bbc
This is good. It will stop unnecessary suffering for animals during long transit. It also means when the French farmers set fire to the lorries they will feel no pain.
111
03/12/2020 10:50:04 3 10
bbc
"It will stop unnecessary suffering for animals during long transit"

Except you can still take live animals from Land's End to John O' Groats.
21
03/12/2020 10:32:59 175 15
bbc
Whatever view you take on Brexit, there should be widespread agreement that the EU has done far too little for the welfare of animals and that we now have the opportunity to implement the highest standards of care and compassion towards farmed animals
86
03/12/2020 10:45:01 10 23
bbc
Yeah we just allow fox hunting and grouse shooting at ridiculous levels. The RSPCA also doesn't agree with you, but I'm sure your HYS, completely baseless opinion carries just as much weight. https://www.rspca.org.uk/whatwedo/endcruelty/changingthelaw/brexit
174
03/12/2020 11:04:16 18 4
bbc
The RSPCA became a politically motivated, detached from reality organisation run by animal extremists some time ago.
My money goes to far more deserving animal charities, where more of it is spent on actual animal welfare, rather than £230k salaries...
190
03/12/2020 11:10:34 20 5
bbc
RSPCA express concerns about what may happen post brexit
Your link is nearly 3yrs old
As to fox hunting we have banned it, but EU art 13 would allow for it, it also allows Foie gras, Bull fighting & all sorts of other horrible treatment of animals
There are also 5,000 fur farms in the EU
UK banned them 20 years ago
EU don't give a flying about animal welfare
65
03/12/2020 10:41:22 9 3
bbc
It's taking forever, but encouraging to see steps are being taken towards stopping the treatment of animals like commercial commodity.
87
03/12/2020 10:45:04 4 2
bbc
They are a commercial commodity.
184
03/12/2020 11:09:34 1 0
bbc
That attitude is what's bought us swine fever, foot and mouth, anthrax and God knows what else. Time to start thinking like an adult about our planet and who we share it with, rather than your stomach or wallet.
88
03/12/2020 10:45:11 8 3
bbc
And now also ban train transporting people in overcrowded cages
245
03/12/2020 11:23:33 3 0
bbc
No need to ban that. You have a choice.
89
03/12/2020 10:45:20 12 21
bbc
Brexiteers who were previously happy to eat chlorinated chicken as part of a US trade deal are now suddenly extolling the virtues of animal welfare.

Any port in a storm, unless it's blocked by lorries of course
126
03/12/2020 10:47:12 7 2
bbc
Not Brexit again zzzzz
131
03/12/2020 10:53:58 5 3
bbc
Can you name one brexiteer who actually said we should be eating US chlorinated chicken?
Can you list one reason chlorinated chicken would be an actual health problem?
Do you know our own water is chlorinated, and fluorinated, and is used to clean, feed and inject our chickens?
Are you anti-vaxx as well? They contain 'chemicals', like H2O ??
141
03/12/2020 10:55:59 6 4
bbc
Strawcat, do you wear a tinfoil hat with "remain" written on the front? Bet you do! Ha ha!
143
03/12/2020 10:53:54 6 3
bbc
It`s funny how lefties think...they cannot move on...`Corbynated Chicken` went out with the arc. What next `Strawcat`......"Cummings` fault"..."Brexit`s fault!"...."Trump`s fault!"...etc etc
207
03/12/2020 11:14:59 2 2
bbc
You've been filling your face with chlorinated EU salad stuffs for years, so what's your point?
This "chlorinated" term is intentionally alarming & aimed at the uneducated in any case, as it involves washing chicken/salad using water containing not much more chlorine than is added to the tapwater we drink every day.

Perhaps you'd prefer salmonella & typhoid...
219
03/12/2020 11:17:57 3 1
bbc
Good old EU standards, protecting us from chlorine:

"A recent study by the Chemical and Veterinary Inspection Office (CVAU) in Stuttgart found that 10 per cent of 4,300 fruit and vegetable samples from within the EU had a level of chlorate higher than the 0.01mg/kg maximum level set by the EU, with some samples exhibiting hundreds of times more."

EU good.

USA BAD!!!!!!!
226
03/12/2020 10:59:26 2 2
bbc
Rather tiresome and predictable attempt to bring Brexit into this
17
03/12/2020 10:32:39 9 18
bbc
I'm guessing that this will mean price increases for British consumers. That seems to be the Govt's priority in all things Brexit. Not that their livestock producer chums will complain.
90
03/12/2020 10:45:29 1 0
bbc
How does it mean a price increase?
28
03/12/2020 10:34:49 13 4
bbc
because the EU are so open minded to change.
91
03/12/2020 10:45:35 3 2
bbc
Agree, making changes would never be easy, but if the UK had acted as a leader instead of a reluctant hanger-on, we might have had more friends within Europe. Now we certainly have given up any influence that we might have had.
426
03/12/2020 13:07:48 0 0
bbc
Are you saying the likes of Blair and Cameron were "reluctant hangers-on"? I would have said they were full-blown europhiles to the marrow.
40
03/12/2020 10:35:54 6 0
bbc
did you want to expand on that strange comment?
92
03/12/2020 10:45:39 2 0
bbc
I imagine its based on the comment in the story that this will have an impact on UK food supply chains. Though quite how we are not told, but that usually means... And so we will use this to push up prices in the shops.
48
03/12/2020 10:38:55 11 8
bbc
or herd :)
idiot Removed
55
03/12/2020 10:39:48 26 0
bbc
Neither would we need to buy thousands-of-airmiles- polluting NZ (halal) Lamb, whilst Welsh hill farmers have to export Lamb to keep their heads above water. Also found NZ Venison in the supermarket this morning. We have UK Venison farms, and an overabundance of wild deer that need culling in controlled circumstances.
94
03/12/2020 10:45:56 14 1
bbc
Spot on. We've just finished off a venison casserole, home cooked with locally produced meat from the Beaconsfield Farmers Market. No airmiles there.
80
03/12/2020 10:43:38 2 9
bbc
Ahhh this must be it, the long awaited Brexit dividend.......
95
03/12/2020 10:46:01 2 6
bbc
Yes, animals get to be slaughtered quicker. Great news for them.
437
03/12/2020 13:21:58 0 0
bbc
Great news for them to be slaughtered humanely in the UK rather than endure an horrendus journey to be slaughtered in an inhumane manner.
96
03/12/2020 10:46:23 3 8
bbc
It looks as though this has now become an environmental department. People will wake up when we are forced to import much of our basic foodstuffs because all small farmers have quit.
107
03/12/2020 10:49:11 4 1
bbc
"It looks as though this has now become an environmental department"

It was announced by the Secretary of State for the Environment. I'm pretty sure that has alway been an environmental department. There's a clue in the name.
56
03/12/2020 10:39:48 11 12
bbc
Vegetarian's think about the poor insects & birds that die & suffer during harvesting of vegetables, wheat ,fruits etc. in farm fields!
97
03/12/2020 10:46:37 2 1
bbc
This does not compare with the suffering that these exported animals go through. Also, this article has nothing to do with vegetarianism.
71
03/12/2020 10:42:46 4 10
bbc
Not one for animal cruelty by any means but "Only a few thousand of the millions of animals bred for meat in the UK end up being shipped to Europe for slaughter." - seems like a storm in a teacup. One is too many you might say but to pin your brexit vote on this seems a tad extreme - this could have been dealt with easily without brexit - so stop waffling that Brexit brought this about - fools
98
03/12/2020 10:46:50 7 0
bbc
And exactly how could it have been changed without brevity after the European Court previously overruled a ban. At least check your facts and btw this is just the tip of the iceberg!
We seem to pretty good at creating Gammon in this country... Removed
99
03/12/2020 10:47:00 13 10
bbc
Oh look another nasty racist remoener, yet because it's against whitey BBC doesn't class it as a racist remark.
119
03/12/2020 10:51:05 10 2
bbc
It is quite amazing that people feel it's OK to use this clearly demeaning and racist term and that the Beeb seems to feels it's OK as well.
144
03/12/2020 10:56:18 6 3
bbc
I think the Gammons would refer to you as a "Snowflake"
100
03/12/2020 10:47:16 6 3
bbc
This is a positive move & actually of benefit to the UK economy, as it will create jobs in the UK meat processing industry & add greater value to exports.
110
03/12/2020 10:49:35 2 12
bbc
So are you going to re-train as a slaughterman or are you happy for the foreign ones to come here and do the job, since they'll be out of work?