What will happen to closed High Street shops?
06/12/2020 | news | business | 347
As retail chains fade, town centres may have to find other ways to attract custom.
1
Bob
06/12/2020 12:51:07 47 6
bbc
"We created 400 clone towns nobody loves. We shouldn't get upset - job losses aside - about changing them." Bulldoze them, turn into green spaces, housing, leisure areas and make those who created them pay for it.
129
06/12/2020 15:57:52 9 0
bbc
Easier said than done, but you have a point.
2
06/12/2020 12:51:27 9 4
bbc
The landlords will let them stay closed due to greedy rents, then when the councils grant them to be demolished, they will turn into flats making the landlords even more money.
Fantasy? No, its all ready happening around here.
298
07/12/2020 12:02:36 1 0
bbc
Happening here, we had a market area. Closed down and last I heard they are building some kind of homes for the elderly.
Great view for them the town centre.
3
06/12/2020 12:53:05 50 4
bbc
These retail businesses will continue to close down with their owners insatiable desire for profits before sustainability. £100m profit one year £99m profit next year, treated as a loss. Only losers are the poor employees, earning peanuts in store. The world has become so greedy, no wonder there’s so much anger
4
06/12/2020 12:56:02 73 7
bbc
Convert former high street stores into houses. It was once common to have people living above shops. Later, these houses were taken over as storage and office space for the shops below and people moved out to residential areas. We need them back as houses and ground floor premises converted into accessible affordable flats. Increasing town centre population brings more custom for remaining shops.
128
06/12/2020 15:56:48 19 0
bbc
That should also reduce the need for day-to-day travel, a good thing for a lower carbon footprint. We need to adapt, not try to hold back the tide.
134
06/12/2020 16:09:15 1 0
bbc
It costs a lot to conform to fire regs for any conversions beyond 1st floor
147
Dee
06/12/2020 17:08:53 2 0
bbc
That is happening in big cities like London. However, I’m not sure people would like to live in a very noisy high street especially on a Saturday night.
5
06/12/2020 12:56:21 7 2
bbc
There will likely be a change in patterns. This may mean that landlords have to take some sort of hit as they won’t be able to increase rents at this time.

High streets will get smaller but not go. Bars will replace other shops and some may get turned into flats
6
06/12/2020 12:56:43 6 16
bbc
Maybe stop selling overpriced items that can be obtained online cheaper. People will no longer pay more just because of which up market store they are sold in. Greed caused this nothing more.
22
06/12/2020 13:09:32 12 1
bbc
That fundamentally misses the point that others have made regarding the lack of an equal playing field on tax, rent and business rates. Until all that changes, more and more high street shops will close
62
06/12/2020 13:33:44 2 0
bbc
Youre way off the mark , its only cheaper online because its not a level playing field with overheads . Government should have moved to correct this unfairness years ago , and must take a huge blame in the demise of so much bricks and mortar operators , and the decimation our high streets we are now seeing . Online sales tax to offset business rates in hard hit town centres is long overdue .
83
06/12/2020 13:54:58 0 4
bbc
A good example of ripping people of is John Lewis. The sooner they go the better. Pure greed
226
07/12/2020 07:56:57 2 0
bbc
Oh dear.. someone who doesn’t understand basic economics. Goods are higher in price in store because the costs of sale is greater, rent, wages etc. Please think before you post
7
06/12/2020 12:56:45 5 2
bbc
Any planning needs to involve what plans Amazon have as they are indirectly driving the destruction of town centres and will continue to do so. The Amazon five year business plan would be useful to see.
8
06/12/2020 12:57:37 6 1
bbc
Still empty in 20 years.
9
06/12/2020 12:57:52 81 7
bbc
Until the retail playing field is really levelled there is no hope for high street retail outlets, crippling rates & rents, coupled with wages & taxes, who in their right mind would operate like this. While ever the likes of Amazon get away with paying a pittance of their tax liabilities, retail outlets are doomed.
68
06/12/2020 13:38:05 9 16
bbc
That's part of the plan, check out the GREAT RESET as proposed by the World Economic Forum
132
06/12/2020 16:02:27 3 5
bbc
Of course it's all Amazon's fault... yawn. Online is simply better for most things.

Who wants to waste a whole morning getting a bus into town to find a poor selection of overpriced goods when you can go online, a couple of clicks and you're done.

Big retailer were WAY too slow to take up online as they were run by dinosaurs. Now they too are becoming instinct.
152
06/12/2020 17:32:29 3 5
bbc
Amazon pay business rates, rent, corporation tax, Employers NI.....

Just because they limit their tax liability (like any other business or individual does) within legal means.
156
06/12/2020 17:46:14 2 0
bbc
Do explain what you mean by a level playing field? Firstly Amazon is online only, it's their choice, high street shops have the added benefit of being able to buy there and then and see it up close. Surely it's a consumer choice? It's all about what the customer wants, do they want to see up close or save the trolling around. Most go for home shopping, don't blame them!
177
06/12/2020 19:26:05 0 5
bbc
Wrong attitude. Why do you want any shop? They are useless and horrible to get to and find goods. They have ripped off customers for decade after decade. Easy money compared to making things. Now goods makers and customers can do better not letting a greedy local monopoly dictate and cream off the whole process. Good riddance to shops.
202
06/12/2020 22:54:39 3 0
bbc
Tax isn't the only issue for retail but ensuring a fair tax system would go a long way.

Also, claw back some of Covid debts by taxing the covid profiteers!
10
06/12/2020 12:59:02 6 1
bbc
Times were changing before covid and high streets need a different model other than just shops, however until such time as social restrictions are a distant memory new things are unlikely to be developed since arts and social spaces are currently the first areas to be hammered with restrictions. Without being able to be social, there is no future for high street areas
11
06/12/2020 12:59:40 11 2
bbc
dig up every road in the city and build over priced blocks of student flats.its the way forward where i live
282
07/12/2020 10:50:24 0 0
bbc
You must live near me as the student blocks are breeding like rabbits around here.
12
06/12/2020 13:01:11 13 3
bbc
..... town centres should become destination areas - skate parks, trampoline centres, climbing arenas, five a side football venues plus, of course, cafes, bars and restaurants.
57
06/12/2020 13:30:54 2 0
bbc
Agree that a lot of that alongside more urban housing and flats will combine to make town centres great places to live again, especially for young people trying to get their independence with lots of activities on their doorstep
13
06/12/2020 13:01:53 3 2
bbc
Turn them into flats as per most lo Don dormitory towns
14
06/12/2020 13:02:34 27 3
bbc
How about;
Individually rented market stall style food and/or home-made item spaces?
Child-care play areas?
Community-led second-hand object exchanges?

No? I guess none of these ideas make enough money.
15
06/12/2020 13:02:54 43 1
bbc
I live in Newport and I can’t actually remember the last time that I went into the high street, because it was so depressing the last time I was there, and the council’s answer to all of these crumbling historical buildings that once held shops and flats was to allow more shops to be built about twenty feet away. Time to start forcing businesses to use what we have.
16
06/12/2020 13:03:25 5 9
bbc
High streets have collapsed due to online markets. Teach the young to support local shops. Only way forward.
21
06/12/2020 13:08:46 12 3
bbc
not going to happen. teach the local shops to be online, one must evolve to survive
17
06/12/2020 13:03:50 57 6
bbc
Forget town centres as shopping areas, convert to homes and make the centres new urban living area with small convenience shops and green areas as suggested; cafe culture take over and walk to entertainment areas and nice local pub restaurants not large get em in get em drunk send them home places.
33
06/12/2020 13:14:42 41 2
bbc
Absolutely right. I stayed in a Motorhome camping site right in the middle of Bristol in October and enjoyed walking round the City centre. The most vibrant parts were by the waterside and had some of the things you mentioned, plus rowing clubs, sailing clubs, paddle boarders etc. Areas to sit and read, lots of small independant businesses doing all manner of things. It was great
69
06/12/2020 13:38:26 5 0
bbc
Great point! We need more people living in the city centres and hopefully the dwellers would take care of their new area.
18
06/12/2020 13:04:47 129 13
bbc
Another factor in the demise of town shopping is greedy councils charging large sums for parking, extending double yellows far out of towns, and even extending the charging time to ridiculous hours (eg: Nottingham, which changed the zone end time from 6pm to 9pm two years ago). I think the chickens are coming home to roost - fewer shops mean less income from parking charges. Time to rethink!
56
06/12/2020 13:24:50 46 5
bbc
Agree , but it was "time " to rethink 10-15 years ago ,tbh .. so much damage could have been mitigated. Same with government , theyve been talking for years now about levelling the playing field for bricks & mortar shops v the internet , but still have done nothing .
117
06/12/2020 15:23:57 2 5
bbc
With good (cheap, frequent, accessible) PT the lack or cost of parking isn't such an issue. How many councils have PT expansion & improvement plans?
136
06/12/2020 16:19:24 2 1
bbc
Greedy fat cats will never learn
158
06/12/2020 17:50:31 3 5
bbc
If you can’t afford to park you can’t afford to shop. Without restriction you would find all the spaces occupied. Parking charges are just another right wing red herring. For proof look at what happen to Aberystwyth when they got rid of parking controls. Shop owners were begging for the parkies to come back after a few weeks.
168
06/12/2020 18:54:54 3 7
bbc
Age of the car should die out. More home working, then driverless cars come along. No more piles of metL junk dumped on drives and by the side of the roads. Call one, use it. Then it goes away. Thinking in a car centric way is soon to be old fashioned. Life centres round the person and home now. Goods and work and entertainment and information come to us. No more traveling needed. Great!
246
07/12/2020 09:11:43 3 1
bbc
Councils are charging high parking rates because of Central Government. Since 2010 Councils have lost 50-60% of Funding from CG. Instead regressive taxation such as parking charges are levied. CG has now made it a legal duty on Council Parking regulations that Parking Systems have to be self sufficient. So the parking charges have to cover all costs of parking systems - equipment / Labour
261
07/12/2020 10:08:34 2 0
bbc
If I go to town I pay £1 per hour, not unreasonable.
313
BZ
07/12/2020 13:23:20 0 0
bbc
Blame gov funding cuts for driving councils to seek revenue elsewhere
19
06/12/2020 13:07:49 2 3
bbc
Better goods at better prices are offered by new out of town retailers. One has to ask what is the "High Street" for? We get our basics at supermarkets which avoid central rents. After that there is clothing (discounters winning), DIY (sheds on the edge of town). Expensive things we use the internet to find a price. The centres must contract.
20
06/12/2020 13:07:51 4 18
bbc
Let's be honest. We'd all rather shop from the comfort of our own home than deal with some snotty "Karen" with a btec in retail on the checkout. The high Street is dirty, old fashioned and these days dangerous, I'm glad things are moving on
30
06/12/2020 13:14:36 11 1
bbc
Agree but don’t like this Karen term that’s gaining notoriety. My daughter is Karen and although it may seem harmless it is annoying as it clouds all the same colour. Try a more original descriptor; after all you are a librarian
16
06/12/2020 13:03:25 5 9
bbc
High streets have collapsed due to online markets. Teach the young to support local shops. Only way forward.
21
06/12/2020 13:08:46 12 3
bbc
not going to happen. teach the local shops to be online, one must evolve to survive
6
06/12/2020 12:56:43 6 16
bbc
Maybe stop selling overpriced items that can be obtained online cheaper. People will no longer pay more just because of which up market store they are sold in. Greed caused this nothing more.
22
06/12/2020 13:09:32 12 1
bbc
That fundamentally misses the point that others have made regarding the lack of an equal playing field on tax, rent and business rates. Until all that changes, more and more high street shops will close
23
06/12/2020 13:09:51 14 4
bbc
they will become monuments to the greed of shareholders over the value of staff and products
280
07/12/2020 10:48:13 0 0
bbc
Do you get paid more than minimum wage for your job? If so, GREED! At least, by your logic.
24
06/12/2020 13:10:38 3 2
bbc
Smaller units made into for pop up shops for small independent businesses to rent for a reasonable price. And bigger stores could be broken up into smaller units or made into social housing as there are still long waits for council houses
25
06/12/2020 13:02:36 8 2
bbc
Debenhams in Taunton is going to be used as a detention centre for the elderly. The proposed plans were drawn up 12 months ago before the shop even closed.
Well they call it a retirement apartment.
But the rooms are as big as cells, no personal outdoor space and the front views a busy road.
72
06/12/2020 13:39:53 3 0
bbc
Yes but are the rooms free of charge ?
84
06/12/2020 13:55:12 0 0
bbc
air quality zero. get respiratory problems free
26
jez
06/12/2020 13:11:35 3 6
bbc
Turn them into hotels or offices or apartments
34
06/12/2020 13:14:46 7 2
bbc
Turn them into soci housing councils have long enough waiting list Oh I forgot no profit in it!!
27
06/12/2020 13:12:10 63 2
bbc
Very few live in the town centre with the extended housing estates everywhere.
The useful shops moved to out-of-town sites years ago normally near a main access road.
Free parking right by the shop.
How did the councils not know this would happen?
36
06/12/2020 13:15:06 31 8
bbc
Top comment ! Couldn’t agree more after being ripped off by the greedy councils and their parking police!
126
06/12/2020 15:38:24 1 0
bbc
They knew it would happen.
They also knew they'd be overruled (& made to pay legal costs) if they tried to stop it.
316
BZ
07/12/2020 13:25:23 0 0
bbc
How do you think councils can pay for services when gov cuts funding and won't allow C Tax increases
28
06/12/2020 13:12:46 3 5
bbc
And we have the usual maons about greedy landlords and shareholders, from people whose pension funds will almost certainly be invested in retail property....
42
06/12/2020 13:21:04 1 0
bbc
So what would you invest the pension funds in then? Is there any other business left?
289
07/12/2020 11:16:48 0 0
bbc
Anyone who wants to make a profit is only doing it out of GREED according to some on here.
29
06/12/2020 13:04:57 5 2
bbc
Retail space has been bought out by huge equity companies who put this years profits above substainability of there tennants.
20
06/12/2020 13:07:51 4 18
bbc
Let's be honest. We'd all rather shop from the comfort of our own home than deal with some snotty "Karen" with a btec in retail on the checkout. The high Street is dirty, old fashioned and these days dangerous, I'm glad things are moving on
30
06/12/2020 13:14:36 11 1
bbc
Agree but don’t like this Karen term that’s gaining notoriety. My daughter is Karen and although it may seem harmless it is annoying as it clouds all the same colour. Try a more original descriptor; after all you are a librarian
109
06/12/2020 14:58:00 0 0
bbc
Sorry if the term has caused any offence, I'll not use it again in the future. Also, they let anyone be a librarian these days the checkout staff probably read more than half of librarians ??
31
06/12/2020 13:14:37 35 7
bbc
Just back from the Christmas market. Decided this year I will not be buying anything online. Support local when you can.
38
06/12/2020 13:18:35 29 6
bbc
Same here, bought local and bought British
144
06/12/2020 16:52:59 4 0
bbc
Do you really think the Christmas markets surport the businesses who pay business rates all year.
157
06/12/2020 17:48:45 2 0
bbc
Your choice, all that's there sadly is hand made tat
32
06/12/2020 13:14:42 5 2
bbc
High rates and high rents that should have been lowered during the pandemic are to blame. Councils will get the business rate even though the shops are empty, they had no incentive to reduce rates. The landlords will have to find it now, they have been very short sighted to not reduce rents. Suppose theyll be next for the chop.
17
06/12/2020 13:03:50 57 6
bbc
Forget town centres as shopping areas, convert to homes and make the centres new urban living area with small convenience shops and green areas as suggested; cafe culture take over and walk to entertainment areas and nice local pub restaurants not large get em in get em drunk send them home places.
33
06/12/2020 13:14:42 41 2
bbc
Absolutely right. I stayed in a Motorhome camping site right in the middle of Bristol in October and enjoyed walking round the City centre. The most vibrant parts were by the waterside and had some of the things you mentioned, plus rowing clubs, sailing clubs, paddle boarders etc. Areas to sit and read, lots of small independant businesses doing all manner of things. It was great
297
07/12/2020 11:52:00 1 0
bbc
Yes, also a motorhomer agree will all you’ve said wonderful site, believe it’s Baltic Wharf only a stones throw from SS Great Britain but CC site has Sword of Damocles hanging over it for quayside residential development it will be a sad loss, though small it’s a fantastic site for caravans and MH’s to visit. Few Towns or Cities provide for this type of leisure pursuit which encourages tourism. ??
26
jez
06/12/2020 13:11:35 3 6
bbc
Turn them into hotels or offices or apartments
34
06/12/2020 13:14:46 7 2
bbc
Turn them into soci housing councils have long enough waiting list Oh I forgot no profit in it!!
35
06/12/2020 13:15:01 1 16
bbc
I only shop online anyway lol noobs
27
06/12/2020 13:12:10 63 2
bbc
Very few live in the town centre with the extended housing estates everywhere.
The useful shops moved to out-of-town sites years ago normally near a main access road.
Free parking right by the shop.
How did the councils not know this would happen?
36
06/12/2020 13:15:06 31 8
bbc
Top comment ! Couldn’t agree more after being ripped off by the greedy councils and their parking police!
165
06/12/2020 18:41:47 1 0
bbc
Most car parks are owned by private companies. If you think being fined for being selfish is wrong it speaks volumes about you.
171
06/12/2020 19:06:20 2 4
bbc
Rich car owners still whinging about paying a trivial fee to dump thier hunk of metal wherever it is convenient to them! Well sell the car, try public transport costs and convenience. Then realise how lucky and rich you were to have a car and the ability to park it handily for such tiny costs.

Ypu want any goods, they are delivered now, only fools travel into towns high streets, or out of townSC.
37
06/12/2020 13:16:51 51 1
bbc
Debenhams was ruined by the private equity firm then named Baroness Retail, which bought it, sold off the lucrative property portfolio, made nearly a billion in profit and then sold on. Add to this seriously poor management from the sales floor, store managers, area managers and board on bonuses for plugging scorecard. It was rotten to the core. Great staff teams though and they shall suffer.
31
06/12/2020 13:14:37 35 7
bbc
Just back from the Christmas market. Decided this year I will not be buying anything online. Support local when you can.
38
06/12/2020 13:18:35 29 6
bbc
Same here, bought local and bought British
39
06/12/2020 13:19:34 2 2
bbc
I’ve said it for years. Hydroponics to grow food.
95
06/12/2020 14:15:24 1 0
bbc
Not that simple. Hydroponics are very energy intensive.
40
06/12/2020 13:20:19 43 5
bbc
Most of Retails problems are down to the greed of landlords wanting an unrealistic return on their capital for doing virtually nothing. They should be learning by the zero return they are getting for empty properties. Radical charges are needed, reduce the rents, make parking free and make business rates based on turnover if you want to get customers into high streets, and charge online companies.
169
06/12/2020 19:02:35 8 1
bbc
Greedy retailers, and others, sold their buildings to rent them back. The only form of viable shop now is old fashioned owner occupiers. But not if you imagine you get money related to the property.

Required is a wholesale collapse in the price of all property from its fake 'value', created to be passed up the chain to political class mates that sell green fields. Make shops worthless.
41
06/12/2020 13:16:54 7 22
bbc
These shops will stand empty for years, as a stunning indictment to the utter cowardice and stupidity of lockdowns and tiered restrictions.

If we had done as those very sensible Swedes then most of those shops would still be trading. Providing jobs and much needed rates for their councils.
45
06/12/2020 13:24:56 7 6
bbc
What price would you put on your life? Would you be happy to die to save £100,000?
78
UBT
06/12/2020 13:50:38 3 0
bbc
I have friends in Sweden and most Swedes took the "sensible" approach by applying their common sense and accepting "social distancing" rules as well as furloughing employees.

In the UK, this approach cannot work, as there are too many who think the virus cannot affect them and they do not act responsibly - just witness the "pre-lockdown2" reports with people in large groups outside pubs
94
06/12/2020 14:12:47 0 0
bbc
Absolutely missing the point - this is a trend that’s been going on for years- not since Covid. Vent your irresponsible views on the right HYS at least
96
06/12/2020 14:09:46 0 0
bbc
This was happening anyway, the whole process has accelerated
It seems odd that this person would suggest the LA’s would ‘find’ the landlords, I thought their own buildings are owned from overseas
Then to suggest Government ‘buy back’ cheap, when they were suggesting to end furlough, as times have changed, I doubt this will happen either with our high debt
We won’t see any change until this is over
244
07/12/2020 09:04:52 0 0
bbc
To compare Sweden and UK is moronic. Sweden does not have the density of population that UK does therefore risk of transmission is far less.

Please think before you post next time
294
07/12/2020 11:22:14 0 0
bbc
Because the high streets only started to struggle because of Covid? As for rates, if empty, the owners become the liable party.
28
06/12/2020 13:12:46 3 5
bbc
And we have the usual maons about greedy landlords and shareholders, from people whose pension funds will almost certainly be invested in retail property....
42
06/12/2020 13:21:04 1 0
bbc
So what would you invest the pension funds in then? Is there any other business left?
59
06/12/2020 13:31:39 2 0
bbc
I'm not objecting to the pension funds being invested in property, just pointing out to the "Shareholders are evil..." brigade that they probably rely on investments for anything other than the state pension.
43
06/12/2020 13:21:05 9 3
bbc
In the future will we ever leave our homes?
133
ts
06/12/2020 16:02:34 1 0
bbc
We should continue to do so. We are a society-us humans are not hardwired to live in isolation. Doing so will unsurprisingly send mental health issues rocketing, as we have seen during the pandemic restrictions.
183
06/12/2020 20:05:26 0 0
bbc
Not if there's any chance of running into you laughing boy.
44
06/12/2020 13:21:10 20 2
bbc
Probably turn the empty shops into charity shops, coffee shops, betting shops and unemployment meeting drop in centres.
159
06/12/2020 17:51:40 9 1
bbc
If we take a step back and realise what has come of this virus? Coffee shops, pubs, cinemas are not really needed after the shift in people's requirements. Air travel, probably trains too will not be needed in their present format. It's almost like it was created to kerb the overcrowded population and global warming in one go, probably done its job, rightly or wrongly
342
07/12/2020 16:33:02 0 0
bbc
We haven't got anything like enough mobile phone shops or cash converters either.
41
06/12/2020 13:16:54 7 22
bbc
These shops will stand empty for years, as a stunning indictment to the utter cowardice and stupidity of lockdowns and tiered restrictions.

If we had done as those very sensible Swedes then most of those shops would still be trading. Providing jobs and much needed rates for their councils.
45
06/12/2020 13:24:56 7 6
bbc
What price would you put on your life? Would you be happy to die to save £100,000?
49
06/12/2020 13:28:02 2 3
bbc
What price would you put on contracting a virus that will probably be symotomless?

- fixed it for you.
50
06/12/2020 13:28:19 1 0
bbc
Symptomless*
66
06/12/2020 13:36:03 3 3
bbc
How many people do you think should lose their businesses, jobs and futures for my life? At least I've got the decency not to expect this of others. Yes, even at 63 I don't expect others sacrifice their livelihoods to reduce the REALLY TINY risk that covid-19 poses to me.
46
06/12/2020 13:25:08 8 21
bbc
Everyone talking about online being the cause. Personally, I don't go to physical shops now because of the government's OTT covid restrictions. (yes including stupid masks). Get rid of the restrictions, and I will start spending money in stores again. I'm surprised the gov haven't worked this out yet.
85
06/12/2020 13:58:05 2 0
bbc
So you've solved the problem since July, what about before that?
102
06/12/2020 14:23:13 2 0
bbc
Only muddled thinking bereft of any common sense would make a comment like this. Typical Trump thinking. Say it loud without reference to reality.
47
06/12/2020 13:25:19 18 8
bbc
The high street is dead as we know it and I couldn't be happier about it. No more covid crowds, rip off prices and queues.

Replace all these dull chain stores with modern city/town centre living space, museums and galleries, pop up markets, artisans, street artists and performers... a fantastic opportunity to finally transform crime ridden, eyesore high streets into the 21st century.
60
Joe
06/12/2020 13:32:40 7 3
bbc
Well said, it’s also much easier to buy most of it online anyway. Let’s move on.
93
06/12/2020 14:11:15 0 0
bbc
Nice idea but I think your glasses are a little Rose tinted.
278
07/12/2020 10:46:51 0 0
bbc
Isn't the attitude of everything for the absolute lowest price also to blame?
48
MVP
06/12/2020 13:27:59 78 10
bbc
The greedy landlords who own our highstreets and shopping centres need to accept that the rent they charge is no longer viable. Only then will our high streets bounce back
118
06/12/2020 15:26:54 16 19
bbc
The "greedy landlords" charge what they do because most of them spent a lot of money acquiring said properties, and have to cover the interest and costs that they incur. If they go bust too, rents will only go down when someone else absorbs all those losses.
119
06/12/2020 15:27:34 4 2
bbc
And that rent realisation will be bad news for pension funds. So crawl back rather than bounce and then only if the high streets are allowed to become agreeable places to spend time in, which mean more than just retail outlets selling tat.
315
BZ
07/12/2020 13:24:20 0 0
bbc
Agreed its a no brainer where our problems lie, same with residential housing crisis
45
06/12/2020 13:24:56 7 6
bbc
What price would you put on your life? Would you be happy to die to save £100,000?
49
06/12/2020 13:28:02 2 3
bbc
What price would you put on contracting a virus that will probably be symotomless?

- fixed it for you.
71
06/12/2020 13:39:48 2 0
bbc
I'm not particularly worried about the virus, for me.

What I don't want to do is risk passing it on to my vulnerable friends and relatives, because I'm not a self-centred keyboard warrior!
45
06/12/2020 13:24:56 7 6
bbc
What price would you put on your life? Would you be happy to die to save £100,000?
50
06/12/2020 13:28:19 1 0
bbc
Symptomless*
51
06/12/2020 13:28:50 94 21
bbc
I'll get thumbed down on this but it's about time charity shops paid full business rates. They are businesses - with targets for their staff to meet - and are also in direct competition with other businesses who have to pay full rates.

Tax excemption should also be outlawed for religion.
58
Joe
06/12/2020 13:31:05 80 20
bbc
Thumbs up for second point. Religion has no special place in our society. The sooner it fizzles out the better.
64
06/12/2020 13:36:32 27 2
bbc
You forget to mention the enormous salaries the directors and bosses of these charities earn. Charities as a business is the way to go these days
87
06/12/2020 13:55:50 10 2
bbc
Charity shops were great when they first began to appear. There were super bargains to be had. These days they are very much second hand shops. I saw a coat in one of my local charity shops which was actually priced above the retail price for the brand new identical item in the nearby Peacocks store.
110
06/12/2020 14:58:41 6 3
bbc
Most with CEO's paid over £100k per year, they are not charities as taxpayers fund them through governmentgrants to their pals who head these companies.
122
06/12/2020 15:33:52 9 2
bbc
If they can afford to have full-time salaried staff, they're nearer to being a business, however noble their cause may be.

The whole idea with taxes is that we ALL share both the benefits and the burden, not just some of us.
161
06/12/2020 18:30:27 6 10
bbc
What a load of ignorant right-wing populist nonsense.

Unfortunately, charities are a necessity, especially in a Tory run economy. With all the wealth produced by the masses there should not be a need for charities, but because most of the wealth goes to the rich, who sit on most of it because they can't utilise it, there is a desperate need.

I'd love the right-wing to stop being anonymous!
174
06/12/2020 19:12:24 1 2
bbc
So, would you go full on and privatise the NHS? They have managers, targets and could be deemed to crowd out private medical providers. The answer is NO by the way.
255
07/12/2020 09:53:38 2 0
bbc
I can see a case for small independent local charities, but I agree fully on the national charities who have a massively unfair advantage.

As for religions, why these still get tax breaks is beyond me.
283
07/12/2020 10:50:53 0 4
bbc
If charity shops paid full business rates. Then this would reduce the amount that they could give to help Cancer Heart research. So this view is both selfish and uncaring.
52
06/12/2020 13:29:48 36 1
bbc
The High Street was in decline years before on-line shopping became popular, it was the out of town supermarkets selling everything that saw a change for the worst and on-line is the final nail in the coffin.
127
06/12/2020 15:43:00 13 1
bbc
Add to that an increasing trend towards "throw -away" goods, encouraged by easier credit. Capitalism is always on the verge of teetering into being a Ponzi scheme, while socialism leads to mutual assured lowest common denominator conditions; both controlled by a ruling elite who operate outside the constraints of the system.
53
06/12/2020 13:29:59 10 1
bbc
If some of these premises are turned into apartments, the local planning authorities definitely need to change the rules regarding the size of the rooms etc so they also comply with the minimum standards set for 'conventional' housing. The same also needs to apply to office conversions.
54
06/12/2020 13:30:05 21 2
bbc
1st corner & independent shops closed due to supermarkets, High street decline starts with cost carparking & out of town development & free carparking, shopping centre all under one roof lost individuality of each region they all became cloned, the internet, & Amazon, consumers governed by price buy cheap tatt from China, clothes from sweatshops abroad, then wonder why high streets are failing !!
55
06/12/2020 13:30:21 2 4
bbc
There is however, another 'Elephant in the room' which is, who will want to live in a town centre, unless each one comes with very close-by parking, which is NOT an additional ongoing cost to those living in them?
63
06/12/2020 13:35:46 2 0
bbc
I take it you don't know many Londoners, then?
18
06/12/2020 13:04:47 129 13
bbc
Another factor in the demise of town shopping is greedy councils charging large sums for parking, extending double yellows far out of towns, and even extending the charging time to ridiculous hours (eg: Nottingham, which changed the zone end time from 6pm to 9pm two years ago). I think the chickens are coming home to roost - fewer shops mean less income from parking charges. Time to rethink!
56
06/12/2020 13:24:50 46 5
bbc
Agree , but it was "time " to rethink 10-15 years ago ,tbh .. so much damage could have been mitigated. Same with government , theyve been talking for years now about levelling the playing field for bricks & mortar shops v the internet , but still have done nothing .
12
06/12/2020 13:01:11 13 3
bbc
..... town centres should become destination areas - skate parks, trampoline centres, climbing arenas, five a side football venues plus, of course, cafes, bars and restaurants.
57
06/12/2020 13:30:54 2 0
bbc
Agree that a lot of that alongside more urban housing and flats will combine to make town centres great places to live again, especially for young people trying to get their independence with lots of activities on their doorstep
279
07/12/2020 10:47:40 0 0
bbc
Only if there are jobs for those people. If there are not decent jobs, the residents will continue the decline.
51
06/12/2020 13:28:50 94 21
bbc
I'll get thumbed down on this but it's about time charity shops paid full business rates. They are businesses - with targets for their staff to meet - and are also in direct competition with other businesses who have to pay full rates.

Tax excemption should also be outlawed for religion.
58
Joe
06/12/2020 13:31:05 80 20
bbc
Thumbs up for second point. Religion has no special place in our society. The sooner it fizzles out the better.
90
06/12/2020 14:09:17 17 12
bbc
I disagree, Religion does have a place within society but not at the tax payers expense.
258
07/12/2020 10:05:59 1 7
bbc
Religious is vitally important to many and it is those with no faith who are missing out.
42
06/12/2020 13:21:04 1 0
bbc
So what would you invest the pension funds in then? Is there any other business left?
59
06/12/2020 13:31:39 2 0
bbc
I'm not objecting to the pension funds being invested in property, just pointing out to the "Shareholders are evil..." brigade that they probably rely on investments for anything other than the state pension.
47
06/12/2020 13:25:19 18 8
bbc
The high street is dead as we know it and I couldn't be happier about it. No more covid crowds, rip off prices and queues.

Replace all these dull chain stores with modern city/town centre living space, museums and galleries, pop up markets, artisans, street artists and performers... a fantastic opportunity to finally transform crime ridden, eyesore high streets into the 21st century.
60
Joe
06/12/2020 13:32:40 7 3
bbc
Well said, it’s also much easier to buy most of it online anyway. Let’s move on.
61
06/12/2020 13:33:22 31 6
bbc
Can councils now finally accept, as the public have for ages, that the high street as a valid retail model is now dead, and has been dying since 1980. Trying to prop it it up is an expensive time-waste. It's also true that councils played a big part in killing it off (high business rates & parking charges). The model is now a few local shops, out of town shopping centres and internet shopping.
6
06/12/2020 12:56:43 6 16
bbc
Maybe stop selling overpriced items that can be obtained online cheaper. People will no longer pay more just because of which up market store they are sold in. Greed caused this nothing more.
62
06/12/2020 13:33:44 2 0
bbc
Youre way off the mark , its only cheaper online because its not a level playing field with overheads . Government should have moved to correct this unfairness years ago , and must take a huge blame in the demise of so much bricks and mortar operators , and the decimation our high streets we are now seeing . Online sales tax to offset business rates in hard hit town centres is long overdue .
292
07/12/2020 11:20:15 0 0
bbc
How could they correct it? Enforce it that all industrial units are the same £per square foot as a (formerly) busy town centre unit? Would this include engineering firms who SELL things?
55
06/12/2020 13:30:21 2 4
bbc
There is however, another 'Elephant in the room' which is, who will want to live in a town centre, unless each one comes with very close-by parking, which is NOT an additional ongoing cost to those living in them?
63
06/12/2020 13:35:46 2 0
bbc
I take it you don't know many Londoners, then?
288
07/12/2020 11:15:52 0 0
bbc
London has a public transport system. That's the difference. I can walk to my local train station in less time than it would take to use public transport to get there.
51
06/12/2020 13:28:50 94 21
bbc
I'll get thumbed down on this but it's about time charity shops paid full business rates. They are businesses - with targets for their staff to meet - and are also in direct competition with other businesses who have to pay full rates.

Tax excemption should also be outlawed for religion.
64
06/12/2020 13:36:32 27 2
bbc
You forget to mention the enormous salaries the directors and bosses of these charities earn. Charities as a business is the way to go these days
65
06/12/2020 13:36:51 54 9
bbc
"Vibrant centres like Brighton!?". You're having a laugh? ! If you want graffiti, weed infested pavements, litter strewn precints, amnesty international bookshops, sky high parking charges, gridlocked streets, and not forgetting the weekly Saturday march/demo, by left wing marxists through the town then this is the place to shop! ??
111
06/12/2020 15:01:14 14 2
bbc
Spot on
130
06/12/2020 16:00:18 5 2
bbc
Fully agree. The city centre has become a no go zone for me since the valley garden “improvements” and the Cycle lanes. If shops are what you’re after Crawley is a quicker and better option.
198
06/12/2020 22:02:28 4 2
bbc
Brighton is an absolute hole - well said
45
06/12/2020 13:24:56 7 6
bbc
What price would you put on your life? Would you be happy to die to save £100,000?
66
06/12/2020 13:36:03 3 3
bbc
How many people do you think should lose their businesses, jobs and futures for my life? At least I've got the decency not to expect this of others. Yes, even at 63 I don't expect others sacrifice their livelihoods to reduce the REALLY TINY risk that covid-19 poses to me.
67
06/12/2020 13:37:03 5 4
bbc
Couldn't vacant buildings be used as homeless shelters, secure dating venues, perhaps a collection of indoor market area for smaller businesses.
I used to love Woolworths. Shame
82
06/12/2020 13:54:29 4 1
bbc
vibrant high streets are high streets where people live on or close enough so that people can walk to. convert into housing, flats etc. Put people on the high street and it will come back. Otherwise landlords need to pay taxes for empty units.

Landlord greed and high rates are the reasons we're in this mess.
9
06/12/2020 12:57:52 81 7
bbc
Until the retail playing field is really levelled there is no hope for high street retail outlets, crippling rates & rents, coupled with wages & taxes, who in their right mind would operate like this. While ever the likes of Amazon get away with paying a pittance of their tax liabilities, retail outlets are doomed.
68
06/12/2020 13:38:05 9 16
bbc
That's part of the plan, check out the GREAT RESET as proposed by the World Economic Forum
172
06/12/2020 19:08:40 5 2
bbc
Conspiracy theory trolling alert! Chaotic and competing bog standard human greed plays havoc with matters economic, not dark force elites. The Great Reset is nothing at all to do with the drivel you CT lot ascribe to it. Waiting for your JBS Fed plan next ??
17
06/12/2020 13:03:50 57 6
bbc
Forget town centres as shopping areas, convert to homes and make the centres new urban living area with small convenience shops and green areas as suggested; cafe culture take over and walk to entertainment areas and nice local pub restaurants not large get em in get em drunk send them home places.
69
06/12/2020 13:38:26 5 0
bbc
Great point! We need more people living in the city centres and hopefully the dwellers would take care of their new area.
Removed
49
06/12/2020 13:28:02 2 3
bbc
What price would you put on contracting a virus that will probably be symotomless?

- fixed it for you.
71
06/12/2020 13:39:48 2 0
bbc
I'm not particularly worried about the virus, for me.

What I don't want to do is risk passing it on to my vulnerable friends and relatives, because I'm not a self-centred keyboard warrior!
25
06/12/2020 13:02:36 8 2
bbc
Debenhams in Taunton is going to be used as a detention centre for the elderly. The proposed plans were drawn up 12 months ago before the shop even closed.
Well they call it a retirement apartment.
But the rooms are as big as cells, no personal outdoor space and the front views a busy road.
72
06/12/2020 13:39:53 3 0
bbc
Yes but are the rooms free of charge ?
73
06/12/2020 13:40:11 11 3
bbc
Bricks & mortar stores pay higher taxes than online business with automated tills. Online businesses can avoid taxes more easily. That said, having companies bought by equity groups who then load the companies with debt and milk them for cash means that the money which should be set aside for lean times has all been hived off to profiteers, usually from another country. Need to rewrite the rules.
281
07/12/2020 10:49:31 0 0
bbc
I didn't realise that there were different tax codes for internet and bricks and mortar retailers? Would these be the tax codes that allowed the Greens to offshore that dividend 15 years ago?
74
06/12/2020 13:41:24 1 2
bbc
We may see an increasing conversion of these premises to buildings of multiple occupation. Particularly to house the single homeless, people who need "supported independent living" and ex offenders, Etc. I don't offer an opinion, I just see some incidences of this beginning to happen where I live.
75
06/12/2020 13:47:33 4 1
bbc
Probably just stay closed until economy picks up and then relet. I would like to say converted to low economy housing but little chance of that as returns to owners would be too low.
76
06/12/2020 13:48:57 6 2
bbc
Suggest, as a temporary measure, landlods are required to put a large sign in the window saying.....'ANY ENQUIRIES, ASK THAT MAN WITH A YACHT'
77
Jim
06/12/2020 13:49:55 55 1
bbc
Being a nation of shopkeepers rather than a nation of engineers and makers is really going to bite us on the bum.

Need to try and bring back a lot of manufacturing (high or low tech) from far east - otherwise we are goosed.
41
06/12/2020 13:16:54 7 22
bbc
These shops will stand empty for years, as a stunning indictment to the utter cowardice and stupidity of lockdowns and tiered restrictions.

If we had done as those very sensible Swedes then most of those shops would still be trading. Providing jobs and much needed rates for their councils.
78
UBT
06/12/2020 13:50:38 3 0
bbc
I have friends in Sweden and most Swedes took the "sensible" approach by applying their common sense and accepting "social distancing" rules as well as furloughing employees.

In the UK, this approach cannot work, as there are too many who think the virus cannot affect them and they do not act responsibly - just witness the "pre-lockdown2" reports with people in large groups outside pubs
79
06/12/2020 13:49:49 1 3
bbc
Greedy out of town outlets selling last years wears, coupled with parking problems, everything at your fingertips delivered for free etc etc.

All boils down over population, this island unless you build a few more Milton Keynes cannot cope.
80
06/12/2020 13:53:08 4 2
bbc
Pop up shops will be the way to go. Short tenancies, minimal rent application and almost guaranteed custom everytime
81
06/12/2020 13:53:18 2 2
bbc
They normally turn into nightclubs or phone unlockers which front marijuana farms, don't they?
67
06/12/2020 13:37:03 5 4
bbc
Couldn't vacant buildings be used as homeless shelters, secure dating venues, perhaps a collection of indoor market area for smaller businesses.
I used to love Woolworths. Shame
82
06/12/2020 13:54:29 4 1
bbc
vibrant high streets are high streets where people live on or close enough so that people can walk to. convert into housing, flats etc. Put people on the high street and it will come back. Otherwise landlords need to pay taxes for empty units.

Landlord greed and high rates are the reasons we're in this mess.
6
06/12/2020 12:56:43 6 16
bbc
Maybe stop selling overpriced items that can be obtained online cheaper. People will no longer pay more just because of which up market store they are sold in. Greed caused this nothing more.
83
06/12/2020 13:54:58 0 4
bbc
A good example of ripping people of is John Lewis. The sooner they go the better. Pure greed
227
07/12/2020 07:58:25 1 0
bbc
Where is your evidence of this? Prove this or please don’t post. We don’t want you posting irrelevant drivel
25
06/12/2020 13:02:36 8 2
bbc
Debenhams in Taunton is going to be used as a detention centre for the elderly. The proposed plans were drawn up 12 months ago before the shop even closed.
Well they call it a retirement apartment.
But the rooms are as big as cells, no personal outdoor space and the front views a busy road.
84
06/12/2020 13:55:12 0 0
bbc
air quality zero. get respiratory problems free
46
06/12/2020 13:25:08 8 21
bbc
Everyone talking about online being the cause. Personally, I don't go to physical shops now because of the government's OTT covid restrictions. (yes including stupid masks). Get rid of the restrictions, and I will start spending money in stores again. I'm surprised the gov haven't worked this out yet.
85
06/12/2020 13:58:05 2 0
bbc
So you've solved the problem since July, what about before that?
86
06/12/2020 14:01:53 3 4
bbc
Best to shop local. Avoid High Streets as they are dirty areas and full of Charity Shops and beggars.
88
06/12/2020 14:06:52 1 0
bbc
That’s why it needs a radical rethink
97
06/12/2020 14:16:31 0 0
bbc
Unfortunately local shops don't have the range of fresh food that a supermarket has and what it does have is usually past it's best
51
06/12/2020 13:28:50 94 21
bbc
I'll get thumbed down on this but it's about time charity shops paid full business rates. They are businesses - with targets for their staff to meet - and are also in direct competition with other businesses who have to pay full rates.

Tax excemption should also be outlawed for religion.
87
06/12/2020 13:55:50 10 2
bbc
Charity shops were great when they first began to appear. There were super bargains to be had. These days they are very much second hand shops. I saw a coat in one of my local charity shops which was actually priced above the retail price for the brand new identical item in the nearby Peacocks store.
86
06/12/2020 14:01:53 3 4
bbc
Best to shop local. Avoid High Streets as they are dirty areas and full of Charity Shops and beggars.
88
06/12/2020 14:06:52 1 0
bbc
That’s why it needs a radical rethink
89
06/12/2020 14:07:30 7 1
bbc
Like many UK businesses, its all about the obsession with quick returns for the pension funds; no investment, no cash holdings, no ability to plan for a future more than the next dividend payout. This short term thinking will be the countries long term downfall.
284
07/12/2020 10:51:13 0 0
bbc
Then you moan if the pension funds aren't fully funded for all future requirements. Make up your mind on this one.
58
Joe
06/12/2020 13:31:05 80 20
bbc
Thumbs up for second point. Religion has no special place in our society. The sooner it fizzles out the better.
90
06/12/2020 14:09:17 17 12
bbc
I disagree, Religion does have a place within society but not at the tax payers expense.
91
06/12/2020 14:09:18 5 6
bbc
Well they have to have somewhere to put the thousands of illegal immigrants they have let in this year. They can't just stay in 4 star hotels, with us all paying the bill, and army camps where they moan about not being in 4 star hotels.
114
06/12/2020 15:13:57 0 0
bbc
Daily Mail reader?
92
06/12/2020 14:10:19 4 1
bbc
Get rid of business rates on small shops permanently. Triple empty property business rates after six months to encourage reduced rents. Only way.
47
06/12/2020 13:25:19 18 8
bbc
The high street is dead as we know it and I couldn't be happier about it. No more covid crowds, rip off prices and queues.

Replace all these dull chain stores with modern city/town centre living space, museums and galleries, pop up markets, artisans, street artists and performers... a fantastic opportunity to finally transform crime ridden, eyesore high streets into the 21st century.
93
06/12/2020 14:11:15 0 0
bbc
Nice idea but I think your glasses are a little Rose tinted.
41
06/12/2020 13:16:54 7 22
bbc
These shops will stand empty for years, as a stunning indictment to the utter cowardice and stupidity of lockdowns and tiered restrictions.

If we had done as those very sensible Swedes then most of those shops would still be trading. Providing jobs and much needed rates for their councils.
94
06/12/2020 14:12:47 0 0
bbc
Absolutely missing the point - this is a trend that’s been going on for years- not since Covid. Vent your irresponsible views on the right HYS at least
39
06/12/2020 13:19:34 2 2
bbc
I’ve said it for years. Hydroponics to grow food.
95
06/12/2020 14:15:24 1 0
bbc
Not that simple. Hydroponics are very energy intensive.
41
06/12/2020 13:16:54 7 22
bbc
These shops will stand empty for years, as a stunning indictment to the utter cowardice and stupidity of lockdowns and tiered restrictions.

If we had done as those very sensible Swedes then most of those shops would still be trading. Providing jobs and much needed rates for their councils.
96
06/12/2020 14:09:46 0 0
bbc
This was happening anyway, the whole process has accelerated
It seems odd that this person would suggest the LA’s would ‘find’ the landlords, I thought their own buildings are owned from overseas
Then to suggest Government ‘buy back’ cheap, when they were suggesting to end furlough, as times have changed, I doubt this will happen either with our high debt
We won’t see any change until this is over
86
06/12/2020 14:01:53 3 4
bbc
Best to shop local. Avoid High Streets as they are dirty areas and full of Charity Shops and beggars.
97
06/12/2020 14:16:31 0 0
bbc
Unfortunately local shops don't have the range of fresh food that a supermarket has and what it does have is usually past it's best
98
06/12/2020 14:20:37 1 1
bbc
Silver lining. This could be an opportunity to reverse clone town syndrome. Imagine high streets with independent shops, adding to a local economy, with local suppliers.
Lots of jobs and social interaction.
Parks, social clubs, gyms, coffee shops, playgrounds all add to make a community spirit.
Or big chain retail parks, which "ask" to see your health credentials
99
06/12/2020 14:21:30 3 2
bbc
Blame the demise of the High Street on the over zealous negative reporting during the pandemic. Add to these, the lack of community venues like pubs, cafes, restaurants, etc and we will have a society that is so cut off from socialising & integration, the bad times are just starting.
But... those in media will still have their jobs.
107
06/12/2020 14:46:37 1 0
bbc
Agreed the the impact of the demise of high streets on the social situation is becoming critical, with lack of social interreaction bubbles will burst & sadly people will become more insular & community vitality & spirit will be lost -
100
06/12/2020 14:22:31 2 1
bbc
I agree with many views expressed on business rates, rents etc as short term solutions. But the real long term solution would be to make town centres much better places to live, with a mix of housing, leisure, activities, cafes,bars, restaurants, independent shops, small businesses, green spaces. Even small schools and health clinics. Get all that on your doorstep again- more vibrant uses
108
06/12/2020 14:49:58 0 0
bbc
You mean turn big towns and cities into Villages - no chance.