Bonmarché collapses into administration
02/12/2020 | news | business | 535
More than 1,500 jobs are at risk following the collapse of the women's fashion chain.
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bbc
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02/12/2020 13:16:55 47 7
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Whilst I feel sorry for the employees I have no sympathy for the company who have failed to modernise and keep up with the times. To rent so much floor space to the Arcadia Group was in hindsight not such a good decision. Eggs in 1 basket come to mind.

I hope that the staff find work in the New Year.
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02/12/2020 14:15:03 25 1
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I think you'll find that is was Debenhams renting space to Arcadia Group companies, not Bonmarche.
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02/12/2020 14:21:15 4 4
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I echo your sentiments, but it's very difficult to see where the jobs come from.

Hospitality is on furlough life support and the job losses will come in 2021.

Amazon can't/won't hire them... they are pushing for as much automation as possible in their mega-warehouses.

The fallout from the botched 2nd tier/lockdown will be catastrophic - they chose to keep schools open, for what... no jobs?!
290
02/12/2020 15:58:42 1 0
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Where?
3
02/12/2020 13:17:13 90 7
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What a shame, not just because it was a good store, but for all the jobs now in jeopardy. The economic impact of the lockdown, whether a cause or a catalyst for decline, is devastating the high street. Soon there'll be no pubs, reataurants, and nothing left of the bricks-and-mortar economy but vape shops, bookies, and Jobcentres with aueues round the block.
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02/12/2020 13:30:29 63 52
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And all this before brexit kicks in so you could be right in what you are saying we will just have to wait and see by the end of next year.
27
02/12/2020 13:37:42 12 4
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Sad part is that some people are happy about it...
164
Pip
02/12/2020 14:45:52 8 7
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with queus round the block
-------
for the food banks, post Brexit.........?
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02/12/2020 13:19:30 18 6
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It's not disrespectful, it's a fact.
Their target customer is older, who have been shielding / stuck inside more and aren't as likely to use the Internet as a form of shopping.

It's a shame that an established brand is struggling but need to evolve with the times.
382
02/12/2020 17:01:03 5 0
bbc
We got over the loss of Woolworth sad then for folk who lost their jobs but suggest we bring more product back into Britain's manufacturing and wait for the moan rather inflated costs, for there lies a large part of the issue
6
02/12/2020 13:19:53 211 9
bbc
Arcadia, Debenhams, Bon Marche

Sorry for the job losses, especially now.

But these companies all had issues long before any of this.
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02/12/2020 14:35:34 103 49
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Issues such as tax-avoiding Amazon.
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02/12/2020 15:13:39 17 5
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It's probably more the 'fault' of supermarkets selling anything and everything all in one place if it's anybodies fault.

My own thinking is that it's more that things change a lot faster nowadays than they ever did. Retailers that don't offer anything different or catch the trend will fail. All the above names remind me of the nineties and have never really evolved from that era.
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02/12/2020 15:37:00 15 0
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Totally agree with you. Badly run renting in stead of buying the buildings. No long term plans and the board investing more in their bonus than the business.
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02/12/2020 15:52:15 10 0
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Which companies don't have issues these days.
Half the year closed & 50% reduced foot traffic doesn't help.
282
02/12/2020 15:56:12 3 13
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Tory imposed rate hikes?
331
02/12/2020 16:23:16 3 0
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Yep online giants that will lead to less choice as the olygopoly takes hold. Something has to change this is not good for the consumer look at the cheap airline model good for a fraction of time then a total con with creeping price increases. Business needs to be free but not at the cost to the consumer!
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02/12/2020 16:28:07 3 0
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You are right one issue for me was I noticed some years ago that the quality of clothes went down. For example Bon March t shirts a few year ago where longer and thicker not flimsy like now, it proved to be false economy for companies to put quantity before quality for that reason I stopped buying.
505
03/12/2020 07:57:57 2 0
bbc
Yes, sorry for the job losses, but I hadn't set foot in an Arcadia shop for years, as soon as I realised that slime ball Green owned them. Horrible man, with ex Sainsbury's Coupe not far behind!
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03/12/2020 09:37:14 0 0
bbc
why would you want ppl to carry on working for a failing company?

there are better jobs available at new better businesses.

once you have been at a role for a few years it gets stale and its time to move up the pay scale which usually means working for a new business as the incumbent often refuse to promote or give pay rise - why shud they if they already hv u slaving away for them!?
525
03/12/2020 10:54:33 0 0
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Yes and who sucked the money out the head.
7
02/12/2020 13:22:23 143 7
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Like no one saw this coming! Seriously all these big stores in trouble and all with this “top talent”.
Overpaid idiots in charge making stupid decisions that anyone on the shop floor could tell them isn’t going to work or that things need to change.
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psh
02/12/2020 14:38:08 87 6
bbc
The 'Overpaid idiots in charge' are not idiots at all - I seriously doubt that any of them will be wondering how they're going to afford Christmas presents this year. It's just a Monopoly game to them and I expect that they've made very sensible decisions to ensure that they maximize what THEY get out of these companies with the minimum risk to THEM.
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WM
02/12/2020 15:58:12 3 0
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I take it you cut hair because everyone who I know who could do better is always cutting my hair.....
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02/12/2020 16:00:23 7 0
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A good few years ago the drinks chain Threshers collapsed, after a century in business. Shop floor staff could see it coming years ahead... the six figure salary bosses could not.
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02/12/2020 16:20:18 8 0
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I agree with with. The Fat Cats couldn’t care because they move on forgetting the people that carry these businesses, and now out of work. What a pity
500
03/12/2020 06:58:31 3 0
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Same of jaguarlandrover.. pompous idiots have been in charge for years and the company was bought out multiple times by different car makers in the past... management culture need to change in UK and Europe if we want to survive against the Chinese companies
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02/12/2020 13:22:57 39 2
bbc
Retail is like a horrible game of dominoes at the moment.
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Dee
02/12/2020 15:50:23 5 4
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Not necessarily. Many companies are thriving.
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02/12/2020 13:25:10 31 2
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Its a shame it was the one place you could guarantee to get a decent warm dressing gown in a decent size not one of these teeny things that barely covers your bum that the rest of the shops have.
Personally, I’d rather see my wife in one of those teeny things that barely covers her bum.... Removed
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02/12/2020 13:37:16 7 12
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Politely suggest a smaller bum is in order...
272
GOG
02/12/2020 15:51:34 1 3
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obs need to lose some!!
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02/12/2020 13:25:47 41 36
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Good luck to the people who have lost their livelihoods. Can those who will be jumping up and down (mainly in the public sector) because of the vaccine, remember the private sector has been decimated to protect YOU!!!
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02/12/2020 13:31:14 45 9
bbc
I think it’s been done to protect everyone ... including you...
50
02/12/2020 13:53:34 12 5
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Really? There was me with 100 + kids in a room being told that was to help everyone. Public sectors are not treated well and yet suddenly we are privileged? This isn't us verses you, just stop that crap already.
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xlr
02/12/2020 15:24:58 2 2
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I can't hear you over the sound of my public sector low salary being frozen for the next five years, sorry
308
02/12/2020 16:08:23 2 1
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Rubbish comment. Who do you think runs the hospitals.
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02/12/2020 13:26:18 11 2
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Companies do not seem to be very good at changing what they do aside from Amazon
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02/12/2020 14:49:49 4 2
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Their time will come - especially if they lose their massive tax avoidance advantage!
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xlr
02/12/2020 15:27:35 1 0
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Amazon are terrible at change too. They just started with a winner and have been riding it ever since.

They've tried moving into groceries, with repeat order buttons you can have at home: fail. They've tried to become a new eBay with third party sellers: eBay is better for that stuff. They tried to enter the cloud storage arena: also fail.
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Dee
02/12/2020 15:47:09 1 0
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That’s not entirely true. Brands can reinvent themselves for a new generation and market. It just takes the appropriate mindset.
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02/12/2020 13:27:15 8 4
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And the wedge keeps getting tapped in further.
The other scenario will add more in the new year.
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02/12/2020 13:17:13 90 7
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What a shame, not just because it was a good store, but for all the jobs now in jeopardy. The economic impact of the lockdown, whether a cause or a catalyst for decline, is devastating the high street. Soon there'll be no pubs, reataurants, and nothing left of the bricks-and-mortar economy but vape shops, bookies, and Jobcentres with aueues round the block.
13
02/12/2020 13:30:29 63 52
bbc
And all this before brexit kicks in so you could be right in what you are saying we will just have to wait and see by the end of next year.
30
02/12/2020 13:39:15 17 28
bbc
Brexit, the last chapter, will see off those companies mortally wounded by the Chinese virus. Brexit needs to be posponed for a year or better still cancelled altogether.
51
02/12/2020 13:55:44 12 18
bbc
The Brexit tic is uttered again. A load of codswhallop! Your Covid obsession is more to blame!
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Pip
02/12/2020 14:47:20 1 2
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Oh we'll sadly have a good idea before the end of next year or before this one's out..........?
293
02/12/2020 16:00:21 3 1
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It's a shame about BonMarche and the other retailers, but hopefully some others will be saved now that we have an approved vaccine in the UK which should mean we get back to normal sooner than other EU countries who still have to wait for the EU to approve it.
341
02/12/2020 16:28:16 1 2
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Yes shame they could have held on until we were free from the shackles of the EU , then they would have had a better chance.
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02/12/2020 13:30:48 3 19
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Ah don't care : another bloody foreign sounding company. We don't need 'em! Blaaaaahhh who cares??
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02/12/2020 13:33:14 14 6
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Get a life. If it weren't for foreign companies this country wouldn't have jack all.
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02/12/2020 13:35:24 4 3
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You are going to love what's coming.... But young people? Because you are most probably very old and miserable... and a xenophobe.
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02/12/2020 14:38:15 0 2
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It sounds 'foreign' because it's French, you obtuse xenophobe.
10
02/12/2020 13:25:47 41 36
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Good luck to the people who have lost their livelihoods. Can those who will be jumping up and down (mainly in the public sector) because of the vaccine, remember the private sector has been decimated to protect YOU!!!
15
02/12/2020 13:31:14 45 9
bbc
I think it’s been done to protect everyone ... including you...
16
02/12/2020 13:32:01 10 9
bbc
And all because Amazon doesn’t play on a level playing field ..They’ll be more white vans nose to tail everywhere soon ..
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02/12/2020 13:33:58 11 5
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And more packaging filing up the landfill poluting our planet
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02/12/2020 13:56:36 3 1
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It's all Amazons fault. Yawn!
The Arcadia Group of shops, Debenhams and Bonmarche have been crushed by their competitors like Next, Asos, Boohoo and Primark. Why? Because they saw the market direction and responded while the dinosaurs carried on believing their way was right based on previous performance.

They have let their former customers and, more importantly, their staff down.
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Dee
02/12/2020 15:43:42 0 0
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Amazon is weak in the clothing market in which Bonmarche, Arcadia and Debenhams operated. Those 3 clothing companies failed because people found a better offering elsewhere.
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02/12/2020 13:32:12 57 13
bbc
It's shame for the people who will lose their jobs, but, like it or not, this is progress. People don't want to go to shops anymore in the hope they'll have the required item, when you can order it online, usually cheaper, and get it delivered often by 10pm that day. It may be the death of the high street, but it's driven by what we want.
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02/12/2020 13:42:02 53 16
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Yes an awful society driven by social media and smart phone addiction.
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02/12/2020 13:50:27 11 6
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In what way is this progress? Less jobs, ppl isolated more so as living online, moving less as it all happens from your chair. This isn't progress, the bigger picture is far darker.
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02/12/2020 14:10:26 9 3
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I disagree. It may be what some people want, but not all. My recent experiences of online clothes shopping -

1) Size 12: too small. Size 14: out of stock. Similar style Size 14: too big. Cost £3.75 to return.
2) Ordered item that I already have in my wardrobe. Same description, same fabric, same size. When the item arrived it was a different 'cut' and poor fit. Cost £3 to return.
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02/12/2020 14:39:54 10 1
bbc
With all these continued shop closures there is going to be a colossal loss in business rates (tax) Who will plug the gap?
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02/12/2020 14:42:49 0 4
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And tax-avoiding Jeff Bezos.
504
03/12/2020 07:53:00 1 0
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till the drivers go on strike
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02/12/2020 13:25:10 31 2
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Its a shame it was the one place you could guarantee to get a decent warm dressing gown in a decent size not one of these teeny things that barely covers your bum that the rest of the shops have.
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bbc
Personally, I’d rather see my wife in one of those teeny things that barely covers her bum.... Removed
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02/12/2020 13:25:32 7 18
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"Women's fashion chain Bonmarché has fallen into administration"

Who?
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02/12/2020 13:30:48 3 19
bbc
Ah don't care : another bloody foreign sounding company. We don't need 'em! Blaaaaahhh who cares??
20
02/12/2020 13:33:14 14 6
bbc
Get a life. If it weren't for foreign companies this country wouldn't have jack all.
16
02/12/2020 13:32:01 10 9
bbc
And all because Amazon doesn’t play on a level playing field ..They’ll be more white vans nose to tail everywhere soon ..
21
02/12/2020 13:33:58 11 5
bbc
And more packaging filing up the landfill poluting our planet
22
02/12/2020 13:34:03 9 4
bbc
50 something loyal customer base .Rubbish .People who use chain high st retailers have no loyalty what so ever . These chains are going bust for one main reason .Overheads . When going was good it was easy to import goods from 3rd world counries & sell for 4/5 times mark up .overheads were secondary .buying cheap & selling in volume from expensive shops worked .But now volume is down so are they
14
02/12/2020 13:30:48 3 19
bbc
Ah don't care : another bloody foreign sounding company. We don't need 'em! Blaaaaahhh who cares??
23
02/12/2020 13:35:24 4 3
bbc
You are going to love what's coming.... But young people? Because you are most probably very old and miserable... and a xenophobe.
24
02/12/2020 13:35:38 39 8
bbc
It's because some businesses just aren't catching onto online.
Lots of older people are online now, you've got to remember people who were 20 in 1990 are now 50 and have used some sort of technology throughout their lives. Revolutionise.
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Bob
02/12/2020 14:21:18 39 3
bbc
This nonsense again. Every time a shop fails people say 'they didn't do online'.

You realise Bonmarche has been selling online for over a decade?

People saying the same guff about Debenhams when they were one of the first retailers to try ecommerce out back in the bloody 90s.

'Online' is rarely the issue with these failings.
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02/12/2020 13:36:40 78 10
bbc
Retail needs to transform. High streets need to transform. Free parking, restaurant and a cafe culture, open spaces for leisure and recreation., Entertainment. We want well paid, engaged knowledgeable staff in shops with a can do attitude. Otherwise we'll just stay at home in the warm and dry, get exactly what we want at a lower cost.
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Bob
02/12/2020 14:14:47 74 10
bbc
'We want well paid, engaged knowledgeable staff in shops'

I'm sure we do. But here's the problem - people don't want to pay for it.

The reason online won is because it has the best price.

Just look at your own message. You want high quality staff which needs paying for to visit a shop floor that needs paying for - aka high prices - but don't even want to pay small change for parking.
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02/12/2020 15:22:34 5 3
bbc
Agree; just like you still get in Denmark, Sweden, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, France, to name a few I've shopped in. The average garage till minder or cafe waiter abroad is a better person to be served by than the majority of retail staff in the UK.
365
02/12/2020 16:48:23 2 1
bbc
Reform our tax regime when it comes to online sales which don't attract anything like the grief the high street does The tax burden should shift to them they hide profits where possible but increased business rates not so easy to avoid
419
02/12/2020 17:53:52 1 2
bbc
Shop staff are not volunteers, regardless of what they are paid, they are paid to do a job so should do the job to the best of their ability. If they are not prepared to do the job properly don't take the money. Regarding parking charges, most town centres compete for my custom, I work hard for my money, if a town want me to spend my money with them then encourage me to come, don't make me pay.
468
02/12/2020 20:03:31 1 0
bbc
No you don't, you want cheap stuff, everyone does, that's human nature, which is why high street shops in this internet age are doomed.
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02/12/2020 13:25:10 31 2
bbc
Its a shame it was the one place you could guarantee to get a decent warm dressing gown in a decent size not one of these teeny things that barely covers your bum that the rest of the shops have.
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02/12/2020 13:37:16 7 12
bbc
Politely suggest a smaller bum is in order...
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02/12/2020 13:50:17 6 1
bbc
My husband politely suggests you develop an appreciation for something that' s built for comfort, not for speed. :P (Also, I think she meant the length of the dressing gown.)
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02/12/2020 16:56:26 0 0
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What's wrong with hav a tidy up before appearing downstairs, seems lazy to me
3
02/12/2020 13:17:13 90 7
bbc
What a shame, not just because it was a good store, but for all the jobs now in jeopardy. The economic impact of the lockdown, whether a cause or a catalyst for decline, is devastating the high street. Soon there'll be no pubs, reataurants, and nothing left of the bricks-and-mortar economy but vape shops, bookies, and Jobcentres with aueues round the block.
27
02/12/2020 13:37:42 12 4
bbc
Sad part is that some people are happy about it...
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Pip
02/12/2020 14:47:54 3 2
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and other in complete denial.........?
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02/12/2020 13:38:18 17 3
bbc
Once upon a time there were all independent stores and department stores. Then along came speculators and finance companies to sweep them all up. Now the internet has them by the short and curlies and high streets are declining. There is still an obvious demand out there. Get down to providing what a web screen does not provide and therein will lie success.
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02/12/2020 14:56:35 5 2
bbc
Primark seems to be doing OK without a 'web screen'.
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02/12/2020 13:38:25 59 7
bbc
Landlords need to stop milking the cash cow, local councils need to stop milking the cash cow of parking costs. See what happened. The world evolved. It's time to transform all our lives for the better
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02/12/2020 13:40:36 62 5
bbc
I hope landlords bankrupt too. They deserve it. Cost of commercial rent tripled in London in the last 10 years. Tripled. Income didn't, not even retail spending. Landlords don't care and I hope they jump.
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Bob
02/12/2020 14:10:39 9 1
bbc
The problem with landlords is they are lord of the land and that land keeps growing in value.

They will want to realise that value.

Thanks to continued property values they can merely turn their place into flats should commercial entities not be available.

Ergo, there's little incentive for many of them to offer cheap rent to shops.
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Bob
02/12/2020 14:33:51 8 4
bbc
Some Landlords have a mortgage to pay.
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02/12/2020 15:09:55 3 2
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How do the councils make up the shortfall?.
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02/12/2020 15:41:29 7 0
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Amen to your comment.
What price city centre property now!!
These stores used to own their shops but made the mistake of selling and then leasing back at high rents - bad move.
Ian
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02/12/2020 15:59:18 4 4
bbc
If you are suggesting people don’t go to their high street because they don’t want to pay for parking then it is clear to me that they are the problem
378
02/12/2020 16:57:24 3 0
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You might like to bear in mind that a lot of pension companies invest in retail properties and rents amongst other things, so failing retail has other repercussions as well.
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TV
02/12/2020 18:11:38 1 0
bbc
Yeah, if councils actually did what they are best at and got rid of all the non jobs they would need less money. As it is they outsource core work to shaft employees so guess what, they can get stuffed! I AM NOT A CONSUMER as I don't need much to live a happy life, lol.
448
02/12/2020 18:42:34 1 0
bbc
Parking costs are definitely a barrier for some, myself included. My own hometown have increased these parking charges three times in the last year or so but many of the shops have either moved elsewhere out of town or gone bust. The council are wringing their hands about lost parking revenue whilst they should be more concerned as to how that situation arose.
13
02/12/2020 13:30:29 63 52
bbc
And all this before brexit kicks in so you could be right in what you are saying we will just have to wait and see by the end of next year.
30
02/12/2020 13:39:15 17 28
bbc
Brexit, the last chapter, will see off those companies mortally wounded by the Chinese virus. Brexit needs to be posponed for a year or better still cancelled altogether.
36
02/12/2020 13:43:18 32 7
bbc
When someone says Chinese virus, I rate their intelligence as low I rate trump lack of intelligence.
63
02/12/2020 13:59:14 14 18
bbc
You can't cancel a democratic vote no matter how much you may disagree with it. Its impact remains to be seen but that isn't how a democracy behaves.
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02/12/2020 13:40:01 5 1
bbc
I recently had a stay in hospital where both the HCAs were young ex shop workers*, both said it was the best job they ever had; if only the government would after some time served open up a route to nursing for them without the fees.

* I appreciate thats a limited sample, but not a route many shop workers would naturally consider I suspect.
29
02/12/2020 13:38:25 59 7
bbc
Landlords need to stop milking the cash cow, local councils need to stop milking the cash cow of parking costs. See what happened. The world evolved. It's time to transform all our lives for the better
32
02/12/2020 13:40:36 62 5
bbc
I hope landlords bankrupt too. They deserve it. Cost of commercial rent tripled in London in the last 10 years. Tripled. Income didn't, not even retail spending. Landlords don't care and I hope they jump.
70
02/12/2020 14:04:03 3 1
bbc
hopefully the market will dictate that they have to drop their prices to make commercial space more attractive again. Particularly city centres. I think the growth of local areas will be a good thing in the long run.
96
02/12/2020 14:23:05 3 8
bbc
if only it were that simple - the landlords are mostly owned by pension funds - so no rent = no pension. So we do need to look at massively increased taxes on pension income over say £100k - nobody who had the income to build a pension income of that size needs it!
193
02/12/2020 15:04:09 10 3
bbc
Well some good news (for you) is that Intu (a large retail landlord) is bankrupt many of the shopping centres will have to be demolished if they cannot be sold. It took a chunk of UK Pensions with it and some large town centres may never recover but at least you're happy!

Rather than wishing ill on others (with loads of collateral damage) you could channel your frustration to improve your lot?
33
02/12/2020 13:41:04 3 10
bbc
Is there any reason to use a High Street shop !
Honestly, I dont visit menswear shops because the clothes are all that weird twee sailor stripe tshirts and pink pastel shorts nonsense that probably look fine if you're a neckbeard Hipster with an eating disorder. Someone put together a menswear shop selling clothes that I might actually wear and I'll start going. And stop making the mens section a small grotty cupboard on the top floor. Removed
146
02/12/2020 14:38:31 31 1
bbc
Sadly true, 57 and rarely venture into clothes shops, so little relevant to me
150
02/12/2020 14:41:09 3 2
bbc
Is Foster Brothers still going?
213
02/12/2020 15:12:31 1 2
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Not sure where you are shopping.
254
02/12/2020 15:37:01 4 1
bbc
Amen to your comment.
Come on people, buy well made cotton, wool, silk, bamboo clothing and leather shoes that LAST.
Stop polluting the planet with plastic fleece, acrylic, oil based fibres making so called trainers.
Ian
285
02/12/2020 15:57:26 1 6
bbc
It feels like the world has moved on and left you behind. The shops that cater for you have gone out of business because there aren’t enough people like you buying those items.
302
Dee
02/12/2020 16:04:48 1 0
bbc
Depending on your price point, try Zara, Arket, H&M, Mango, Reiss, TK Maxx, Massimo Dutti, John Lewis. There are hundreds out there.
303
02/12/2020 16:04:51 0 2
bbc
Why would I open a clothes shop catering for people who declare they can get by just fine without buying clothes? You'd shop rarely and buy in small volumes at low margins.
364
02/12/2020 16:47:59 1 0
bbc
Best comment of the day, If you want normal clothes of decent quality I recommend Sainsbury's but all the supermarkets are good. This says everything you need to know about clothes shops.
398
02/12/2020 17:29:01 1 0
bbc
I see my husband has found an ally ??
17
02/12/2020 13:32:12 57 13
bbc
It's shame for the people who will lose their jobs, but, like it or not, this is progress. People don't want to go to shops anymore in the hope they'll have the required item, when you can order it online, usually cheaper, and get it delivered often by 10pm that day. It may be the death of the high street, but it's driven by what we want.
35
02/12/2020 13:42:02 53 16
bbc
Yes an awful society driven by social media and smart phone addiction.
107
02/12/2020 14:26:20 2 1
bbc
Is that any worse than needless and wanton consumerism?
155
02/12/2020 14:42:39 1 5
bbc
You can waste your time trudging round stores only to find they haven't got your size of the only thing you like, won't order it for you (Why ever not ?). Then get soaked trying to find a parking ticket machine that works .... and all before 5pm .....

Enjoy Douglas.
344
02/12/2020 16:29:03 0 7
bbc
That's nonsense. What anyone besides my mother thinks is of no concern to me, I wear what I want, but I always look smart because that's true style. As for the death of the high street, betsyboo is spot on - I could go to my main shop, but I shop online. Paying people anything more than minimum wage to sell me clothes of my choosing seems odd; I don't pay the computer, why would I pay them?.
30
02/12/2020 13:39:15 17 28
bbc
Brexit, the last chapter, will see off those companies mortally wounded by the Chinese virus. Brexit needs to be posponed for a year or better still cancelled altogether.
36
02/12/2020 13:43:18 32 7
bbc
When someone says Chinese virus, I rate their intelligence as low I rate trump lack of intelligence.
64
02/12/2020 14:00:06 8 8
bbc
To be fair naming viruses after their country of origin isn't uncommon. The Hong Kong flu springs to mind.
534
03/12/2020 13:38:20 0 0
bbc
Do you really think the Chinese are telling the truth as to its origins - it’s a Chinese flu and Trump was right about that?
37
02/12/2020 13:47:00 9 2
bbc
This is a consequence of multiple chains being owned under the umbrella of one company/tycoon. It needs to stop. Next thing you know we will be getting groceries from Amazon. Anything goes wrong there, and again, we are screwed. The public really need to support independent shops instead of heading straight online.
49
02/12/2020 13:53:27 5 3
bbc
You can already buy groceries on Amazon as they have a partnership with Morrisons. It's called Amazon Fresh. The difference is that Amazon understands its customer, these failed retail brands don't. Would be helpful if Amazon paid some tax though.
192
02/12/2020 15:02:29 1 1
bbc
You haven't looked at Amazon recently then - good for you!
38
02/12/2020 13:47:12 38 4
bbc
I was a ‘loyal’ 50-something Bon Marche customer and am fortunate enough to have money to spend on clothes. However, they had already lost my custom by deciding that anyone over a certain size is no longer worthy of their attention. This season’s new stock is also so frumpy that not even my 82 year old mother would wear it. Sorry for the staff but past it’s sell-by date.
obs too large Removed
434
02/12/2020 18:16:15 2 0
bbc
Echo your comments. Also very sorry for the staff. Bon Marche forgets the over 50s in most if not all cases are not blue rinsed ladies anymore. They needed more variations of more fashionable clothing alongside basic wardrobe items. Not all fashionable stuff has to have holes in or slogans all over it, so they have lost out on sales by not keeping their stock linked to trends & adapted
to suit.
449
02/12/2020 18:49:28 2 0
bbc
I was once a loyal Bonmarche customer too for years until Peacocks clothing started appearing in their stores. Cue massive drop in quality and sizing was appalling, although this wasn't reflected in lower prices. I feel very sorry for the staff but it's demise was really down to bad owners that let down their customers and their own staff.
39
02/12/2020 13:47:42 8 2
bbc
Oh, Bon Marche Rodney, Bon Marche!
40
02/12/2020 13:39:01 8 3
bbc
Shame for the workers , but sure the BBC will soon return to normal mode with Sob stories of Rich Celebs and there lack of confidence.
41
02/12/2020 13:48:51 6 1
bbc
ViralSyn

Honestly, I dont visit menswear shops because the clothes are all that weird twee sailor stripe tshirts and pink pastel shorts nonsense that probably look fine if you're a neckbeard Hipster with an eating disorder. Someone put together a menswear shop selling clothes that I might actually wear and I'll start going.

****

Hahahhahaha : very amusing!

The unintended ones are the best!
42
02/12/2020 13:49:34 26 3
bbc
Change happens. People's buying habits change. Some adapt in time, some don't. History is littered with businesses that are no longer needed as much as they were (blacksmiths, farriers, barrel makers, cart makers, newsprinters, hat makers, silversmiths etc). Change or wither & die is name of the game. Arcadia, Debenhams & Bon M failed to change & failed to offer what customers want. Others didnt.
82
02/12/2020 14:14:45 12 3
bbc
Change is the only constant.
313
Dee
02/12/2020 16:14:22 0 0
bbc
Agree 100%. I think the high street will reinvent itself but less in terms of clothing retail & more in terms of personal services, eg showrooms for viewing, ordering online & click & collect, hairdressers/barbers/grooming, nail bars, beauty salons, tattoo parlours, cinema, gyms, trampolining halls, yoga studios, vets & pet grooming, gaming studios, educational/training offices, etc
351
02/12/2020 16:35:15 0 0
bbc
Exactly, as spoofed so well in The Simpsons with Mr Burns and his investment in Consolidated Spats. Also hat makers are called milliners, which I guess just proves your point. Frumpy old clothes for frumpy old people aren't exactly 'style' in the opinion of, um, anyone, besides frumpy old people. :) Well made, yes. Never ever stylish, no.
425
dsf
02/12/2020 18:03:46 0 0
bbc
I get what you are saying but it's not a direct parallel. City centres are in danger of becoming desolate wastelands as shops and office space become obsolete. It's not just a case of one business replacing another. When we can get everything with one click on a website we need to look at what the future financial, social and political consequences are. We are entering an unprecedented era.
26
02/12/2020 13:37:16 7 12
bbc
Politely suggest a smaller bum is in order...
43
02/12/2020 13:50:17 6 1
bbc
My husband politely suggests you develop an appreciation for something that' s built for comfort, not for speed. :P (Also, I think she meant the length of the dressing gown.)
134
02/12/2020 14:35:39 5 5
bbc
Yes it wwas the length and it was for my disabled mother so go troll somewhere else nasty piece of work
17
02/12/2020 13:32:12 57 13
bbc
It's shame for the people who will lose their jobs, but, like it or not, this is progress. People don't want to go to shops anymore in the hope they'll have the required item, when you can order it online, usually cheaper, and get it delivered often by 10pm that day. It may be the death of the high street, but it's driven by what we want.
44
02/12/2020 13:50:27 11 6
bbc
In what way is this progress? Less jobs, ppl isolated more so as living online, moving less as it all happens from your chair. This isn't progress, the bigger picture is far darker.
67
02/12/2020 14:01:44 6 3
bbc
It feels like we're heading towards a society akin to Pixar's WALL-E doesn't it?
45
02/12/2020 13:50:35 21 3
bbc
I know it’s grim for employees but all these firms are useless. Poorly managed and selling products no one wants.

The stores you rush past to get to the good ones. Maybe this needs a National drive with start ups and small enterprises. Councils need to stop fleecing with rates, and we can have high streets to be proud of. Either that or do what they do around here...convert the lot into flats
46
02/12/2020 13:51:23 29 5
bbc
"You can't just sell stuff to people any more. You have to embrace the way that 50-plus women live their life."

I quite agree. Women of 50-plus these days want to be in Phase Eight figure-demonstrating apparel. A woman is like a modern car - 50k miles is just past the early-wear settling down phase and the start of a long life of fun and enjoyment. As the just past 55 memsahib regularly reminds!
47
02/12/2020 13:52:32 27 3
bbc
Another useless company gone. Feel sorry for the workforce but it was badly run by owners who didn't understand the market. The companies owned by rich tycoons and uncaring private equity are now being found out. This process has been long overdue.
48
02/12/2020 13:53:14 38 4
bbc
Will there be anything left on the High Street post covid restrictions? Apart from rubbish Mike Ashley stores...
54
02/12/2020 13:58:37 44 1
bbc
Charity shops. And bookies.
56
02/12/2020 13:59:31 2 3
bbc
You can buy most things at supermarkets anyway
58
02/12/2020 13:54:27 4 1
bbc
no...
71
02/12/2020 14:04:41 1 1
bbc
I have researched general marketing for a long time and can only point you in the direction of public opinion when the large street markets started to disappear in the 50s and early 60s to make way for supermarkets and clothes chain stores.
143
02/12/2020 14:38:06 7 1
bbc
Mobile phone, shops coffee shops and hair salons, what a grim place it'll be
159
02/12/2020 14:44:27 6 2
bbc
The "High Street" really only dates from the late eighteenth century with the invention of shopping malls designed to appeal to the emerging upper middle classes in the big cities - that's when the department stores date from. Maybe their time is over.
220
Dee
02/12/2020 15:17:14 1 0
bbc
Even though I don’t shop in his stores, I always see queues outside. I’m even more amazed that he would want to invest in the likes of Debenhams or Arcadia at this point in time. He’s an optimist - I’ll give him that.
235
xlr
02/12/2020 15:22:21 3 0
bbc
Vaping shops are doing well.
457
02/12/2020 19:27:58 0 0
bbc
Mike Ashley is pretty tedious.
37
02/12/2020 13:47:00 9 2
bbc
This is a consequence of multiple chains being owned under the umbrella of one company/tycoon. It needs to stop. Next thing you know we will be getting groceries from Amazon. Anything goes wrong there, and again, we are screwed. The public really need to support independent shops instead of heading straight online.
49
02/12/2020 13:53:27 5 3
bbc
You can already buy groceries on Amazon as they have a partnership with Morrisons. It's called Amazon Fresh. The difference is that Amazon understands its customer, these failed retail brands don't. Would be helpful if Amazon paid some tax though.
10
02/12/2020 13:25:47 41 36
bbc
Good luck to the people who have lost their livelihoods. Can those who will be jumping up and down (mainly in the public sector) because of the vaccine, remember the private sector has been decimated to protect YOU!!!
50
02/12/2020 13:53:34 12 5
bbc
Really? There was me with 100 + kids in a room being told that was to help everyone. Public sectors are not treated well and yet suddenly we are privileged? This isn't us verses you, just stop that crap already.
13
02/12/2020 13:30:29 63 52
bbc
And all this before brexit kicks in so you could be right in what you are saying we will just have to wait and see by the end of next year.
51
02/12/2020 13:55:44 12 18
bbc
The Brexit tic is uttered again. A load of codswhallop! Your Covid obsession is more to blame!
52
02/12/2020 13:56:12 4 1
bbc
I feel sorry for the people who may end up losing there jobs over this, but I cannot help but put the blame solely on the people running the business.

If you remove the ability to sell to everyone and focus purely on one set of customers you lose business.

There is a reason for men as to why Jacamo is as big as they are, they cater to all.
190
02/12/2020 15:01:53 0 2
bbc
Who?
214
Dee
02/12/2020 15:13:25 0 0
bbc
I feel sorry for the people losing their jobs too. However, I couldn’t disagree more with your point on catering to everyone. There are hundreds of competitors in clothing at every price/quality/style point let alone 2nd hand/hire market. You need to stand out from the crowd to appeal.
16
02/12/2020 13:32:01 10 9
bbc
And all because Amazon doesn’t play on a level playing field ..They’ll be more white vans nose to tail everywhere soon ..
53
02/12/2020 13:56:36 3 1
bbc
It's all Amazons fault. Yawn!
The Arcadia Group of shops, Debenhams and Bonmarche have been crushed by their competitors like Next, Asos, Boohoo and Primark. Why? Because they saw the market direction and responded while the dinosaurs carried on believing their way was right based on previous performance.

They have let their former customers and, more importantly, their staff down.
204
02/12/2020 15:08:24 1 1
bbc
As if billionaire Sir Sleazy Green cares a jot!
48
02/12/2020 13:53:14 38 4
bbc
Will there be anything left on the High Street post covid restrictions? Apart from rubbish Mike Ashley stores...
54
02/12/2020 13:58:37 44 1
bbc
Charity shops. And bookies.
55
02/12/2020 13:58:46 18 11
bbc
Not one politician will lose their job during this farce. They do not care about anyone but themselves, no matter what they say. In any case ever utterance is a lie. Their has to be consequences for the people destroying out towns and lives.

It's not Covid it's this Government's response to it, and abject failure.

Sad for the jobless.
68
02/12/2020 14:03:08 16 5
bbc
Why should any politician be responsible for these businesses failing? It is the fault of the business owners for not listening to the public. Supermarkets are doing very well at selling clothes, just check what Sainsbury, ASDA & TESCO are getting up to. Times are changing, some businesses move with the times and some just fail.
73
Bob
02/12/2020 14:05:50 6 2
bbc
So you're blaming COVID for this yet this is the second time they've entered administration in just over a year.

So what do you think caused it last year then? Because it clearly can't have been a disease that was yet to exist, much less the government response to it.

Fact is people are to blame. People don't shop in the high street like they used to.
139
02/12/2020 14:37:18 1 2
bbc
No it's not Covid, or the government for that matter. The world has moved on, the internet has been invented, and people no longer wish to trail around poorly laid out, understocked and dowdy shops staffed by people who often have no idea what they stock or where it is. Sorry, but for most things my default is to see what I can find on-line before getting into the car.
idiot, not for gov to bail out private badly run companies Removed
48
02/12/2020 13:53:14 38 4
bbc
Will there be anything left on the High Street post covid restrictions? Apart from rubbish Mike Ashley stores...
56
02/12/2020 13:59:31 2 3
bbc
You can buy most things at supermarkets anyway
57
02/12/2020 13:59:39 9 1
bbc
Change indeed does happen and you either pay attention to the road ahead or you lose sight and come off said road. Peoples’ habits are changing and even with COVID-19 it would have happened at some point in the next year or so-unfortunately the pandemic has merely accelerated such demise. It’s those on the front losing their jobs who have my sympathies.
178
Dee
02/12/2020 14:56:16 2 1
bbc
Agree 100%. However, many of the owners chose not to take action, even if they had the financial firepower. In many cases, they overpaid for these companies & were not able to recoup their investments. So, instead of putting some resources into improving the brand, they decided to pay themselves or their wives who lived in tax havens enormous dividends & then run the company into the ground.
48
02/12/2020 13:53:14 38 4
bbc
Will there be anything left on the High Street post covid restrictions? Apart from rubbish Mike Ashley stores...
58
02/12/2020 13:54:27 4 1
bbc
no...
59
02/12/2020 13:57:47 12 1
bbc
Not another one. We're fast heading towards a future of online shopping, massive supermarket chains, JD Sports and Sports Direct. God help us.
121
02/12/2020 14:31:39 3 1
bbc
actually.we will soon be calling them big box stores,another americanism,ooh like private equity firms,probably.
60
02/12/2020 13:51:42 10 2
bbc
kate hardcastle.these are smart,sophisticate women,why t f they shopping in bonmarche then kate.be more concerned that when any entity is sold to a private equity firm it mainly goes to hell in a hand cart.
61
02/12/2020 14:01:11 10 2
bbc
The business model has been on the slide for years. When my better half say's it's rubbish and no point in shopping there, it really must be rubbish.
62
02/12/2020 14:00:50 5 5
bbc
"Bonmarché specialises in clothing for the over-50s."

With a name like that, it sounds more like a sweet shop.
30
02/12/2020 13:39:15 17 28
bbc
Brexit, the last chapter, will see off those companies mortally wounded by the Chinese virus. Brexit needs to be posponed for a year or better still cancelled altogether.
63
02/12/2020 13:59:14 14 18
bbc
You can't cancel a democratic vote no matter how much you may disagree with it. Its impact remains to be seen but that isn't how a democracy behaves.
104
02/12/2020 14:25:36 17 14
bbc
Well, it was an advisory referendum, and if people are going to claim it became written into law when the Tories won the election with it in their manifesto, that would imply manifestos are bound by law... which we know is nonsense, since there'd be a lot of politicians in jail if it were.

So you can cancel a democratic vote. But not this one, for some reason.
138
02/12/2020 14:37:06 18 6
bbc
But we're not getting what was promised by those who 'won' the vote, so your comment is null and void.
36
02/12/2020 13:43:18 32 7
bbc
When someone says Chinese virus, I rate their intelligence as low I rate trump lack of intelligence.
64
02/12/2020 14:00:06 8 8
bbc
To be fair naming viruses after their country of origin isn't uncommon. The Hong Kong flu springs to mind.
142
02/12/2020 14:37:51 16 3
bbc
And Spanish Flu came from the USA - but never miss an opportunity to point a finger!
65
02/12/2020 14:02:08 2 7
bbc
Can we go back to Brexit Project Fear now?

I think COVID Project Fear has run it’s course, double a bad flu year (that we ignored).

”Kerrrching, £350Bn debt plus 1 in 10 unemployed, would you like some 30 year extended financing with that?”

How long before MSM C-19 Fear switches to Blame mode (“overreaction, lack of judgement, we never thought it a good idea, Boris, Cummings, etc...”

Jan/Feb?
123
02/12/2020 14:33:13 6 1
bbc
Well your Lordship, we are now approaching what was formerly termed 'project Fear' by Brexiteers, and it now looks like 'project reality'. And as for 'overreaction' some who thought that Covid 19 was a hoax,or had been exaggerated are now seriously ill or dead. Remember President Bolsonaro who said it was just a 'little cold',?He changed his mind in intensive care
66
02/12/2020 14:02:43 13 10
bbc
Lockdown and tiers are doing more damage than the virus.

People know if they are at risk and can take precautions, the rest need to be allowed to get on.
153
02/12/2020 14:42:10 5 1
bbc
That's a flawed argument. It's far more complicated. The reason the virus is not causing so much harm is because the lockdowns have slowed it down. So you can't just make that comparison. It's not an either/or situation.
44
02/12/2020 13:50:27 11 6
bbc
In what way is this progress? Less jobs, ppl isolated more so as living online, moving less as it all happens from your chair. This isn't progress, the bigger picture is far darker.
67
02/12/2020 14:01:44 6 3
bbc
It feels like we're heading towards a society akin to Pixar's WALL-E doesn't it?
55
02/12/2020 13:58:46 18 11
bbc
Not one politician will lose their job during this farce. They do not care about anyone but themselves, no matter what they say. In any case ever utterance is a lie. Their has to be consequences for the people destroying out towns and lives.

It's not Covid it's this Government's response to it, and abject failure.

Sad for the jobless.
68
02/12/2020 14:03:08 16 5
bbc
Why should any politician be responsible for these businesses failing? It is the fault of the business owners for not listening to the public. Supermarkets are doing very well at selling clothes, just check what Sainsbury, ASDA & TESCO are getting up to. Times are changing, some businesses move with the times and some just fail.
69
02/12/2020 14:04:01 1 10
bbc
menswear, womenswear, just the start, yes some don't keep up with the times, and folk blame covid. It's not covid - it's the disproportionate response to it. Plenty more "non-essential" will go in the next 2 months, nobody is going anywhere other then supermarkets, while they have to put a mask on.
The "don't kill granny" brigade don't like it, but it is a fact.

Save jobs. End mask laws NOW.
78
02/12/2020 14:09:41 4 4
bbc
Yeah. I can't be the only person that doesn't think this is entirely down to online shopping. If you take a standard t shirt and put it next to a superdry one, it's obvious that the superdry one is of far better quality. Id rather buy clothes in person as I can check for things like this, and I absolutely HATE waiting for things to arrive. Its the gov that have killed these businesses.
87
02/12/2020 14:10:54 3 1
bbc
women near me,pregnant at 16,daughter pregnant at 16.shes a granny at 33 ish.i will ask her what she thinks about killing granny remarks.
230
02/12/2020 15:20:18 0 0
bbc
If you think a mask has caused this...you deserve sympathy rather than an answer. Bet you're one of the 52% too - not hard to spot them.
32
02/12/2020 13:40:36 62 5
bbc
I hope landlords bankrupt too. They deserve it. Cost of commercial rent tripled in London in the last 10 years. Tripled. Income didn't, not even retail spending. Landlords don't care and I hope they jump.
70
02/12/2020 14:04:03 3 1
bbc
hopefully the market will dictate that they have to drop their prices to make commercial space more attractive again. Particularly city centres. I think the growth of local areas will be a good thing in the long run.
48
02/12/2020 13:53:14 38 4
bbc
Will there be anything left on the High Street post covid restrictions? Apart from rubbish Mike Ashley stores...
71
02/12/2020 14:04:41 1 1
bbc
I have researched general marketing for a long time and can only point you in the direction of public opinion when the large street markets started to disappear in the 50s and early 60s to make way for supermarkets and clothes chain stores.
72
02/12/2020 14:04:55 8 4
bbc
Not really surprising, as their clothes wouldn't appeal to anyone but the 70+ woman. I work in an office of menopausal women and we are all of us about as far from wearing their clothes as we could be. Like many of middle range shops, they fail to pull in the younger ages that keep their customer base topped up so the customer ages out.
101
02/12/2020 14:22:26 3 3
bbc
"an office full of menopausal women"do you have to hide the scissors?asking for a friend.
106
02/12/2020 14:26:16 1 1
bbc
I don't have any difficulty in buying from Whistles, Brora, or Hobbs and I am 74.
127
Dee
02/12/2020 14:33:26 1 1
bbc
Agreed, Zee. There is a clothing range at every price, quality and style point (online or not) for every single age group. People simply chose not to shop at Bonmarche, Debenhams & Arcadia because they preferred the offers elsewhere.
55
02/12/2020 13:58:46 18 11
bbc
Not one politician will lose their job during this farce. They do not care about anyone but themselves, no matter what they say. In any case ever utterance is a lie. Their has to be consequences for the people destroying out towns and lives.

It's not Covid it's this Government's response to it, and abject failure.

Sad for the jobless.
73
Bob
02/12/2020 14:05:50 6 2
bbc
So you're blaming COVID for this yet this is the second time they've entered administration in just over a year.

So what do you think caused it last year then? Because it clearly can't have been a disease that was yet to exist, much less the government response to it.

Fact is people are to blame. People don't shop in the high street like they used to.
105
02/12/2020 14:23:20 3 2
bbc
Covid didn't cause it but it certainly accelerated it.
74
02/12/2020 14:05:59 7 1
bbc
Going to a lot of High Street landlords without paying stores. I bet they're *rses are twitching as we speak.
85
02/12/2020 14:16:05 3 2
bbc
The market fell out of the bottom?
93
02/12/2020 14:20:20 2 1
bbc
ooo cheeky.top post mate.
188
02/12/2020 15:00:05 1 1
bbc
If you have a pension pot yours needs to twitch too!
75
02/12/2020 14:06:37 26 6
bbc
Save the planet and stop buying rubbish that you don't really need, get shops to stop selling said rubbish and most importantly get manufacturers to stop making instantly throw away able tat. We only have one world so look after it.
114
Dee
02/12/2020 14:30:34 12 12
bbc
This is an idealistic view. What about the people in 3rd world countries whose very survival depends on 1st world jobs (no matter how poorly paid)? What are they to do - starve?
471
02/12/2020 20:24:00 0 0
bbc
Primark is wear once and in the bin it goes ...
76
02/12/2020 14:08:40 6 2
bbc
The jobs solution is apparently to increase pay for care workers as there are plenty of vacancies but no-one will take them.
200
02/12/2020 15:06:40 2 3
bbc
...now those nice Europeans have been sent home!
77
02/12/2020 14:08:42 6 2
bbc
We as people are to blame for these shops failing. So many people now buy most or all of their clothing items online, and may only ever go to a shop to return the items that they do not or that fit them.

So if we want to keep people in jobs in our high streets we need to buy from the shops, not their websites. Simples.
81
02/12/2020 14:12:24 4 2
bbc
Theoretically, Yes.
However you're not going to change modern consumerism from a "stay at home and we will deliver it to your door" model to a historical "lets go to the shops".
88
02/12/2020 14:12:54 3 1
bbc
mate.seriously "we are to blame"stop taking a knee to everything.every business must/will adapt or go under.
95
02/12/2020 14:23:01 2 1
bbc
All true, but I don't honestly think we will ever go back to shopping on the high street in the numbers we did in yesteryear. All too often these days, town centres are unwelcoming places, full of empty shops, rather than the bustling thoroughfares they used to be. We need to accept what is happening, and come up with bold plans to provide what the community actually wants.
109
Dee
02/12/2020 14:27:05 1 1
bbc
Unfortunately it’s more complicated than that. There are too many clothing retailers (online or not) at every single price, quality & style point. Those without a clear offering will fail as shoppers are more savvy than ever. In addition,
bricks & mortar retailers like Bonmarche are dealing with high rents & business rates in less affluent areas & have to shift a lot of product to stay afloat.
125
02/12/2020 14:33:18 2 1
bbc
There’s no point complaining about the behaviours of shoppers. Retail has changed and the high street needs to adapt. It’s not for shoppers to revert to a way of doing things they no longer prefer. Going forward the high street will be smaller and stores will need to provide a much richer experience with staff that are more engaged than just stacking shelves and taking our money at the till.
158
02/12/2020 14:44:24 2 1
bbc
Why would you want to keep High St shops open?
It’s like keeping gas lamplighters when everything has gone electric!
You can’t stop the March of time and technology!
196
02/12/2020 15:05:52 1 1
bbc
Well, that's just going to get an 'after you' response.
69
02/12/2020 14:04:01 1 10
bbc
menswear, womenswear, just the start, yes some don't keep up with the times, and folk blame covid. It's not covid - it's the disproportionate response to it. Plenty more "non-essential" will go in the next 2 months, nobody is going anywhere other then supermarkets, while they have to put a mask on.
The "don't kill granny" brigade don't like it, but it is a fact.

Save jobs. End mask laws NOW.
78
02/12/2020 14:09:41 4 4
bbc
Yeah. I can't be the only person that doesn't think this is entirely down to online shopping. If you take a standard t shirt and put it next to a superdry one, it's obvious that the superdry one is of far better quality. Id rather buy clothes in person as I can check for things like this, and I absolutely HATE waiting for things to arrive. Its the gov that have killed these businesses.
102
02/12/2020 14:25:30 2 2
bbc
Sorry, it's not the government at all - it's every single one of us who shops online - unless, I'm mistaken the government doesn't force us to shop online?
233
02/12/2020 15:21:53 0 0
bbc
I completely disagree. Superdry is just one example of tat at inflated prices because it has a logo on it, otherwide they're £1.95 in Primark. BTW Superdry isn't looking too solid either.
356
Dee
02/12/2020 16:40:55 0 0
bbc
It depends on whether your local demographic is affluent or not. Superdry will probably not open a shop in an area where they can’t shift product or is in a high crime location.
17
02/12/2020 13:32:12 57 13
bbc
It's shame for the people who will lose their jobs, but, like it or not, this is progress. People don't want to go to shops anymore in the hope they'll have the required item, when you can order it online, usually cheaper, and get it delivered often by 10pm that day. It may be the death of the high street, but it's driven by what we want.
79
02/12/2020 14:10:26 9 3
bbc
I disagree. It may be what some people want, but not all. My recent experiences of online clothes shopping -

1) Size 12: too small. Size 14: out of stock. Similar style Size 14: too big. Cost £3.75 to return.
2) Ordered item that I already have in my wardrobe. Same description, same fabric, same size. When the item arrived it was a different 'cut' and poor fit. Cost £3 to return.
113
02/12/2020 14:30:10 12 5
bbc
Sure, trying stuff on is obviously ideal, but compared to a trip to the High St:

> Have to wait until Saturday
> Parking: £4
> Food: £3
> More pollution/waste
> Might not have in stock
> Can't find deals as easily
> Way more time spent
> Limited to small selection of shops

I know which I prefer.
363
02/12/2020 16:47:24 1 0
bbc
And what would have been your cost to travel to same store to find they were out of your size and cut had changed far more than £3 at a guess plus you probably would be the only one in the shop.

M&S condensed their retail outlets shut a number locally and opened a new vast store in longbridge Bham, with exception of food hall empty every time we have been and never fail to park easy vast areas.
29
02/12/2020 13:38:25 59 7
bbc
Landlords need to stop milking the cash cow, local councils need to stop milking the cash cow of parking costs. See what happened. The world evolved. It's time to transform all our lives for the better
80
Bob
02/12/2020 14:10:39 9 1
bbc
The problem with landlords is they are lord of the land and that land keeps growing in value.

They will want to realise that value.

Thanks to continued property values they can merely turn their place into flats should commercial entities not be available.

Ergo, there's little incentive for many of them to offer cheap rent to shops.
77
02/12/2020 14:08:42 6 2
bbc
We as people are to blame for these shops failing. So many people now buy most or all of their clothing items online, and may only ever go to a shop to return the items that they do not or that fit them.

So if we want to keep people in jobs in our high streets we need to buy from the shops, not their websites. Simples.
81
02/12/2020 14:12:24 4 2
bbc
Theoretically, Yes.
However you're not going to change modern consumerism from a "stay at home and we will deliver it to your door" model to a historical "lets go to the shops".
42
02/12/2020 13:49:34 26 3
bbc
Change happens. People's buying habits change. Some adapt in time, some don't. History is littered with businesses that are no longer needed as much as they were (blacksmiths, farriers, barrel makers, cart makers, newsprinters, hat makers, silversmiths etc). Change or wither & die is name of the game. Arcadia, Debenhams & Bon M failed to change & failed to offer what customers want. Others didnt.
82
02/12/2020 14:14:45 12 3
bbc
Change is the only constant.
25
02/12/2020 13:36:40 78 10
bbc
Retail needs to transform. High streets need to transform. Free parking, restaurant and a cafe culture, open spaces for leisure and recreation., Entertainment. We want well paid, engaged knowledgeable staff in shops with a can do attitude. Otherwise we'll just stay at home in the warm and dry, get exactly what we want at a lower cost.
83
Bob
02/12/2020 14:14:47 74 10
bbc
'We want well paid, engaged knowledgeable staff in shops'

I'm sure we do. But here's the problem - people don't want to pay for it.

The reason online won is because it has the best price.

Just look at your own message. You want high quality staff which needs paying for to visit a shop floor that needs paying for - aka high prices - but don't even want to pay small change for parking.
110
02/12/2020 14:27:13 9 4
bbc
That's an overly simplistic view. The reason online has won such a large wallet share is not purely down to cost. These businesses fundamentally deliver good customer experience, added to which is complacency on behalf of landlords, traditional retail and councils. As above, retail needs to transform and provide value-add. Also it isn't small change for parking - it is a significant barrier.
261
02/12/2020 15:42:37 7 5
bbc
Small charge for parking? Like£2 to park for 2hrs in a car park 10 minutes from a market town centre consisting mostly of betting shops, estate agents, a couple of takeaways, maybe even a few food stores?
Councils make every attempt to prevent the motorist without offering alternative park and ride. The provision of cycle tracks is a final straw.
2
02/12/2020 13:16:55 47 7
bbc
Whilst I feel sorry for the employees I have no sympathy for the company who have failed to modernise and keep up with the times. To rent so much floor space to the Arcadia Group was in hindsight not such a good decision. Eggs in 1 basket come to mind.

I hope that the staff find work in the New Year.
84
02/12/2020 14:15:03 25 1
bbc
I think you'll find that is was Debenhams renting space to Arcadia Group companies, not Bonmarche.
203
02/12/2020 15:00:20 0 6
bbc
I think you will find Debenhams was part of Arcadia first for over 200 years, it was only when Debenhams was sold Arcadia still rented their space
74
02/12/2020 14:05:59 7 1
bbc
Going to a lot of High Street landlords without paying stores. I bet they're *rses are twitching as we speak.
85
02/12/2020 14:16:05 3 2
bbc
The market fell out of the bottom?
86
02/12/2020 14:17:18 6 3
bbc
If anyone caught the BBC replaying their interview with the CEO of Debenhams in September...

when it was going to be Q2 2021 before any big decisions were being made, and there was no chance of any bad happening before Christmas...

That is the calibre of naivety that is in charge of the UK high street.
97
Bob
02/12/2020 14:23:21 1 2
bbc
Yes he should have known before the second wave began that we would have a second wave and another lockdown that would close his stores for another month.
69
02/12/2020 14:04:01 1 10
bbc
menswear, womenswear, just the start, yes some don't keep up with the times, and folk blame covid. It's not covid - it's the disproportionate response to it. Plenty more "non-essential" will go in the next 2 months, nobody is going anywhere other then supermarkets, while they have to put a mask on.
The "don't kill granny" brigade don't like it, but it is a fact.

Save jobs. End mask laws NOW.
87
02/12/2020 14:10:54 3 1
bbc
women near me,pregnant at 16,daughter pregnant at 16.shes a granny at 33 ish.i will ask her what she thinks about killing granny remarks.
77
02/12/2020 14:08:42 6 2
bbc
We as people are to blame for these shops failing. So many people now buy most or all of their clothing items online, and may only ever go to a shop to return the items that they do not or that fit them.

So if we want to keep people in jobs in our high streets we need to buy from the shops, not their websites. Simples.
88
02/12/2020 14:12:54 3 1
bbc
mate.seriously "we are to blame"stop taking a knee to everything.every business must/will adapt or go under.
89
02/12/2020 14:17:32 11 2
bbc
I feel truly sorry for the staff at all these companies going under.

First it was online tax-dodging retailers, then Brexit for some, with Covid as the nail in the coffin.

But, remembering back to the 1990s, I remember when a lot of these companies abused their position on the high street to kill of independent & businesses - what goes around comes around.

I wonder what will kill Amazon one day
149
02/12/2020 14:40:55 3 1
bbc
Governments will kill Amazon.
They will get worried about them getting too strong and not paying them enough tax!
189
02/12/2020 15:01:33 0 1
bbc
Greed, tax and employee protection - probably. Can't come soon enough.
90
02/12/2020 14:20:33 4 4
bbc
Replace the sales staff with good looking hunky young men and those 50 years young women would be shopping there like no tomorrow! ??
99
02/12/2020 14:23:59 2 2
bbc
Very naive psychology, I assure you that older women don't wish to be served by 'hunky young men'.
2
02/12/2020 13:16:55 47 7
bbc
Whilst I feel sorry for the employees I have no sympathy for the company who have failed to modernise and keep up with the times. To rent so much floor space to the Arcadia Group was in hindsight not such a good decision. Eggs in 1 basket come to mind.

I hope that the staff find work in the New Year.
91
02/12/2020 14:21:15 4 4
bbc
I echo your sentiments, but it's very difficult to see where the jobs come from.

Hospitality is on furlough life support and the job losses will come in 2021.

Amazon can't/won't hire them... they are pushing for as much automation as possible in their mega-warehouses.

The fallout from the botched 2nd tier/lockdown will be catastrophic - they chose to keep schools open, for what... no jobs?!
148
02/12/2020 14:40:23 4 5
bbc
If we still manufactured stuff it would provide quality jobs but now we import all our 'stuff' we're left with a service economy which has been decimated. Brexit will finish it off.
24
02/12/2020 13:35:38 39 8
bbc
It's because some businesses just aren't catching onto online.
Lots of older people are online now, you've got to remember people who were 20 in 1990 are now 50 and have used some sort of technology throughout their lives. Revolutionise.
92
Bob
02/12/2020 14:21:18 39 3
bbc
This nonsense again. Every time a shop fails people say 'they didn't do online'.

You realise Bonmarche has been selling online for over a decade?

People saying the same guff about Debenhams when they were one of the first retailers to try ecommerce out back in the bloody 90s.

'Online' is rarely the issue with these failings.
173
02/12/2020 14:49:12 6 1
bbc
And Primark goes from strength to strength without online.

Some things are obvious online purchases but clothes are not. No wonder there are around 10 courier vans in my street every day and half the load is returns!
455
02/12/2020 19:19:39 0 2
bbc
Many companies have gone online... and some a long time ago.... they just didn't do it very well.
74
02/12/2020 14:05:59 7 1
bbc
Going to a lot of High Street landlords without paying stores. I bet they're *rses are twitching as we speak.
93
02/12/2020 14:20:20 2 1
bbc
ooo cheeky.top post mate.
94
02/12/2020 14:22:58 4 2
bbc
Feel sorry for the staff but its not exactly a trend setting shop
77
02/12/2020 14:08:42 6 2
bbc
We as people are to blame for these shops failing. So many people now buy most or all of their clothing items online, and may only ever go to a shop to return the items that they do not or that fit them.

So if we want to keep people in jobs in our high streets we need to buy from the shops, not their websites. Simples.
95
02/12/2020 14:23:01 2 1
bbc
All true, but I don't honestly think we will ever go back to shopping on the high street in the numbers we did in yesteryear. All too often these days, town centres are unwelcoming places, full of empty shops, rather than the bustling thoroughfares they used to be. We need to accept what is happening, and come up with bold plans to provide what the community actually wants.
119
02/12/2020 14:29:15 1 1
bbc
that would depend on the mix of said community.
32
02/12/2020 13:40:36 62 5
bbc
I hope landlords bankrupt too. They deserve it. Cost of commercial rent tripled in London in the last 10 years. Tripled. Income didn't, not even retail spending. Landlords don't care and I hope they jump.
96
02/12/2020 14:23:05 3 8
bbc
if only it were that simple - the landlords are mostly owned by pension funds - so no rent = no pension. So we do need to look at massively increased taxes on pension income over say £100k - nobody who had the income to build a pension income of that size needs it!
86
02/12/2020 14:17:18 6 3
bbc
If anyone caught the BBC replaying their interview with the CEO of Debenhams in September...

when it was going to be Q2 2021 before any big decisions were being made, and there was no chance of any bad happening before Christmas...

That is the calibre of naivety that is in charge of the UK high street.
97
Bob
02/12/2020 14:23:21 1 2
bbc
Yes he should have known before the second wave began that we would have a second wave and another lockdown that would close his stores for another month.
115
02/12/2020 14:27:44 4 2
bbc
maybe if he had looked up spanish flu.he could have at least try to plan ahead.even torys cant get away with people dropping like flies in the street.bad press you know.
231
02/12/2020 15:20:56 2 1
bbc
To be fair it was coming up to winter and we were never realistically going to get rid of endemic covid once it started spreading through the UK, so this has been somewhat predictable.
98
02/12/2020 14:23:26 3 1
bbc
This used to be such a lovely shop not so good recently but it still doesn’t deserve this to happen I for one love looking before I buy and I hate internet shopping as so often it’s not what you have seen online we need our shops even more now and must keep buying from them not just the internet or we will never have a high street again
90
02/12/2020 14:20:33 4 4
bbc
Replace the sales staff with good looking hunky young men and those 50 years young women would be shopping there like no tomorrow! ??
99
02/12/2020 14:23:59 2 2
bbc
Very naive psychology, I assure you that older women don't wish to be served by 'hunky young men'.
209
02/12/2020 15:10:18 0 0
bbc
How sure?
100
02/12/2020 14:25:07 2 1
bbc
Astonished that they assessed their demographic as the over 50s. I would have said the over 70s. Not surprised they are vanishing.