Supermarkets repay rates relief after backlash
02/12/2020 | news | business | 734
Morrisons follows Tesco's lead, with both supermarkets announcing plans to hand back a total £850m.
1
02/12/2020 11:18:00 16 13
bbc
Should bloody think they do as well.
2
02/12/2020 11:20:58 57 5
bbc
Company doing the right thing shocker!
20
02/12/2020 11:24:39 33 71
bbc
Doing the right thing would have bee. Not accepting it in the first place, disgraceful amount of money, yet they continue to squeeze their suppliers
3
02/12/2020 11:20:59 15 19
bbc
Tesco cornered the supermarket market with aggressive tactics that facilitated the closure of small businesses. They lowered their prices only when forced to do so by the rise of cheaper supermarkets.

They are not are friends
22
02/12/2020 11:26:26 14 4
bbc
Maybe, but they can spell.
4
02/12/2020 11:21:00 8 4
bbc
Targeted relief to those needing it should be applied to all help. Tax avoiders should be excluded. No-one should gain, no one should be in dire straits.
29
02/12/2020 11:29:37 3 6
bbc
Did Amazon get any? Certainly hope not but suspect Jeff added to his immense riches at our expense - again!
37
02/12/2020 11:31:32 0 2
bbc
"Tax avoiders should be excluded"

So no Universal Credit or NHS treatment for anyone who's had an ISA, then?
109
02/12/2020 11:54:58 0 1
bbc
Amazon!!!!
5
02/12/2020 11:21:19 53 11
bbc
Well done Tesco. We will certainly favour those that do the right thing when shopping.
45
02/12/2020 11:34:50 19 85
bbc
I stopped going to Tesco because during the first lockdown they started playing music in the store.

Well done for that. Annoy people by making them stand outside in a queue for fifteen minutes. Then annoy them even more by imposing your choice of irritating noise on them while they're trying to do their shopping.
Hand it back you greedy scum.

Or better still give it all directly to NHS frontline workers rather than allowing the government to misspend on track & trace contracts for chums.

_______________________________
Removed
23
02/12/2020 11:26:47 4 12
bbc
The NHS boat has well and truly sailed. They have proved that with all the support they cannot cope. Sadly at the end of this we are looking at private American style care. We cannot keep throwing money at a service which is not viable. I for one do not want any of the tax payers money going down the drain any more
7
02/12/2020 11:21:30 12 23
bbc
Tesco were given half a billion pounds they didn’t need and they held onto it for months, investing in who knows what etc. No doubt many of their small suppliers did very badly and were not helped out in the same way, and many have gone under. So handing back money you should never have taken is not such a great thing, is it? Big business is the ruin of this country, alongside other bad decisions.
18
Bob
02/12/2020 11:24:02 18 8
bbc
I guess you didn't read the article then.

It clearly states they spent the relief money on their response to the pandemic.

They've hired thousands of extra staff, bought countless new vehicles, rapidly expanded delivery. Then you have additional costs of all the screens and whatnot across thousands of stores all done in a super quick fashion.
31
02/12/2020 11:30:16 1 2
bbc
"investing in who knows what "

Yeah, cos investments have boomed over the pandemic, haven't they?
353
02/12/2020 13:55:21 1 0
bbc
In this country, a billion is a million million, not an American billion which is 1000 million.
8
02/12/2020 11:22:21 13 6
bbc
A good move potentially. Let's hope it not their suppliers such as farmers who end up paying for this.
9
02/12/2020 11:22:36 407 56
bbc
Good for Tesco. They didn't have to do this, but it's right that they are. We always hear about the evils of businesses, so good to hear something positive
64
02/12/2020 11:41:30 273 204
bbc
Tesco's should never have claimed the relief in the first instance. Their stores have been open every single day during this pandemic and they are one of the very few companies to have seen profits rise. This is just another example of companies trying to cream the system and they are only repaying the money to avoid criticism in the future
104
02/12/2020 11:53:18 24 27
bbc
They've been shamed into it! It'll be a real success when Amazon pay realistic taxes (don't hold your breath)!
448
Pip
02/12/2020 15:41:13 1 2
bbc
Yep, Tesco's get taxpayers handout to pay for shareholders dividends, yep that's certainly something positively wrong...........?
530
02/12/2020 17:23:21 0 1
bbc
Don't think they'd have paid it back unless they had been shamed into doing so. Let's see if the rest do.
558
02/12/2020 17:56:15 0 0
bbc
Should not be taking money they don't need. Callous capitalism! What happened to the greater good. All for 1 and 1 for all.
591
02/12/2020 18:46:01 0 0
bbc
You're easily pleased.
Tesco are good at PR.
602
02/12/2020 19:02:33 0 0
bbc
They did have do it you cannot pay dividends with taxpayers money.
610
02/12/2020 19:09:25 0 0
bbc
how very true. well said
635
02/12/2020 19:49:37 0 0
bbc
They've been shamed into it. Do you think they should have claimed it in the first place?
718
03/12/2020 00:18:21 0 0
bbc
My god you are so gullible, either that or you work for them. Have you forgotten about them overstating profits?
10
02/12/2020 11:22:44 3 17
bbc
The government need the money to make up for the vast sums spent on Bojo's vanity projects.
243
02/12/2020 12:52:57 1 1
bbc
What a foolish post.
11
02/12/2020 11:22:51 168 3
bbc
This is only the tip, albeit a very big one, of the iceberg.

I know of countless businesses who have not been affected by the pandemic, but have claimed furlough relief or governments grants whilst continuing to trade, some more profitably than before.

Perhaps Rishi should bring in legislation to claw back payments made where businesses have not needed them.
91
02/12/2020 11:49:22 49 4
bbc
It should be easy to check on through the tax system.
300
02/12/2020 13:19:58 1 6
bbc
And if they can’t pay because they have reinvested it in pay rises for staff of new plant? What if that plant was new cars for the board though - where are you going to draw that line. Are you going to close some? Problem with simple answers is they are provided by simple minded folk who do not think issues through.
648
02/12/2020 19:59:12 1 0
bbc
Then report them to the HMRC fraud hotline.
They are stealing out of everyone's pockets.
Don't sit on the fence saying it's nothing to do with me.
12
02/12/2020 11:22:58 148 25
bbc
I wouldn't have minded if Tesco had kept some of the money and given a substantial pay rise to their staff who have worked tirelessly and selflessly during this Pandemic. Cannot however fault them for repaying all of the money - would hope that some of the other large Supermarkets follow suit now!

Well done Tesco!!
42
02/12/2020 11:33:11 79 9
bbc
Tesco did an awful lot for its staff, especially the vulnerable. A pay rise would create big issues on the cost structure which would be passed on to the customer and the UK shopper does not like paying over the odds.
We need more to pay this back just have some others have paid back the furlough money or not taken it at all.
176
02/12/2020 12:17:55 13 3
bbc
Tesco have actually given all staff two bonuses during this period, I believe from staff I know
305
Bob
02/12/2020 13:23:38 2 1
bbc
Assume by your comment that you believe all the public servants who have also worked tirelessly and selflessly during this Pandemic should be given a substantial pay rise too?
455
Pip
02/12/2020 15:48:17 0 0
bbc
Embarrassment a great leveller.........?
13
02/12/2020 11:23:02 8 4
bbc
Today I learnt what opprobrium means.
44
02/12/2020 11:34:37 5 11
bbc
Thanks for the prompt.
"Public disgrace arising from shameful conduct."
Ready made term for this government then!
14
02/12/2020 11:23:18 15 27
bbc
What a load of piffling baloney from Tesco!

Irrespective of circumstances people need food. Tesco had an existing online and delivery system. Tesco sales and profits boomed. They took on more staff o cope.

Then they treat the taxpayer to embarrassed drivel about returning the money. Money they never needed and should not have claimed in the first place.

Who next?
21
Bob
02/12/2020 11:25:48 24 8
bbc
They estimate COVID costs at £725m and you say they didn't need it?

The expansion was needed to feed the nation, and isn't cheap to do.

It does benefit them post-pandemic - so they've essentially used it as a loan. Nothing wrong in that.
35
02/12/2020 11:31:00 6 1
bbc
You have no idea about the cost structure and customer shopping habits. The online operation is incredibly cost intensive and labour heavy. Supermarkets work to very tight margins with enormous costs and extensive infrastructure. Getting our food on the shelves safely and timely is something only a few companies can do. Your ignorance is fuelling poorly informed comments.
Volume creates the profit
57
02/12/2020 11:39:12 1 1
bbc
thinking one (whats rattling around in there)..... what nonsense
73
02/12/2020 11:44:41 0 4
bbc
They did have "an existing online and delivery system" which collapsed leaving many of us without this service.
84
02/12/2020 11:44:33 4 1
bbc
They didn't claim it. Councils applied it automatically on Government guidance.
15
02/12/2020 11:23:22 85 3
bbc
Good for them, let's hope the other big supermarkets follow their lead.
98
02/12/2020 11:51:00 12 4
bbc
You can hope!
377
02/12/2020 14:18:23 0 0
bbc
"good for them".been open all through the pandemic.1st thind they did was stop most of the offers.dont you think they are doing this before its public knowledge and they are found out.
16
02/12/2020 11:23:53 457 10
bbc
Over to you ASDA, Sainsbury, Lidl, Aldi...
60
02/12/2020 11:40:29 471 92
bbc
More to the point who in government was silly enough to believe that supermarkets would need financial support when for months only supermarkets and corner shops were allowed to open?
113
02/12/2020 11:56:50 30 1
bbc
Spot on lets wait and see who has a conscience! Expect The Range and M&M will drag their feet but taxpayers should keep pressure on to get our money back!
152
02/12/2020 12:10:39 53 7
bbc
Over to you ASDA, Sainsbury, Lidl, Aldi... Amazon... Oh yeah, Amazon don't pay business rates in the first place
170
02/12/2020 12:14:48 7 2
bbc
Small businesses in receipt of rate relief (SBRR) got £10k from the local council. Retail, Hospitality & Leisure sector could apply for up to £25k . I wonder if Tesco got up to £25k per shop/unit? That's a lot of shops though!
518
02/12/2020 16:57:42 0 1
bbc
business rates are tax deductible so Tesco won't pay them anyway, in one hand and out the other
566
02/12/2020 18:05:12 0 0
bbc
Like to think it would happen but won't hold my breath
637
02/12/2020 19:52:32 1 0
bbc
I think the American Walmart that owned Asda until a few weeks ago will ignore this morally justified request.
If they do then we need to sign up to their Walmart twitter and facebook groups and constantly remind them until it is refunded.
685
02/12/2020 21:22:13 1 0
bbc
Tesco additionally took £50m in furlough cash. Aldi took £0
17
02/12/2020 11:23:57 8 11
bbc
Pay it back. No excuse.
123
OwO
02/12/2020 11:59:18 6 2
bbc
They are. Could you not even make it all the way through the headline before rushing down to the comments?
7
02/12/2020 11:21:30 12 23
bbc
Tesco were given half a billion pounds they didn’t need and they held onto it for months, investing in who knows what etc. No doubt many of their small suppliers did very badly and were not helped out in the same way, and many have gone under. So handing back money you should never have taken is not such a great thing, is it? Big business is the ruin of this country, alongside other bad decisions.
18
Bob
02/12/2020 11:24:02 18 8
bbc
I guess you didn't read the article then.

It clearly states they spent the relief money on their response to the pandemic.

They've hired thousands of extra staff, bought countless new vehicles, rapidly expanded delivery. Then you have additional costs of all the screens and whatnot across thousands of stores all done in a super quick fashion.
51
02/12/2020 11:37:01 3 3
bbc
And made EVEN MORE profit. Absolutely not needed. It's your money too you know (assuming you pay UK tax?).
108
02/12/2020 11:54:31 0 4
bbc
Bob, got any share tips? How are the Tesco ones going?
Can't think of any other reasons for being an apologist for Tesco.
19
02/12/2020 11:24:16 5 19
bbc
To paraphrase... we shouldn't have taken the money, we were called out so we don't really have any other option.
47
02/12/2020 11:35:08 10 2
bbc
On the bright side, by using the money as a short term interest free loan, they were able to hire a load more staff.
More people in work + the government gets its money back -feels like it’s worked out as a net benefit for the country.
55
02/12/2020 11:37:37 2 1
bbc
no thats not what the statement said.... its cost them more and was needed in march april may when covid costs were £700m. hope you don't shop with amazon... Tesco have done the right thing
2
02/12/2020 11:20:58 57 5
bbc
Company doing the right thing shocker!
20
02/12/2020 11:24:39 33 71
bbc
Doing the right thing would have bee. Not accepting it in the first place, disgraceful amount of money, yet they continue to squeeze their suppliers
117
02/12/2020 11:56:59 16 2
bbc
When they claimed it they had no idea whether or not they'd need it - so they claimed to protect their business, they didn't need it so they paid it back - honesty and integrity - well done
128
02/12/2020 12:01:25 7 4
bbc
I respect Tesco for returning this money but this is probably a fair comment. However this is down to competition and a kind of weird pressure in the UK to relentlessly focus on price, regardless of quality.
In much of Europe, there is a better balance between price & quality, which perhaps is why people aren’t so fat and their food is better.
547
02/12/2020 17:40:04 1 0
bbc
This relief was automatic, and not something that had to be applied for.

At least try to know all the facts before commenting, please.
14
02/12/2020 11:23:18 15 27
bbc
What a load of piffling baloney from Tesco!

Irrespective of circumstances people need food. Tesco had an existing online and delivery system. Tesco sales and profits boomed. They took on more staff o cope.

Then they treat the taxpayer to embarrassed drivel about returning the money. Money they never needed and should not have claimed in the first place.

Who next?
21
Bob
02/12/2020 11:25:48 24 8
bbc
They estimate COVID costs at £725m and you say they didn't need it?

The expansion was needed to feed the nation, and isn't cheap to do.

It does benefit them post-pandemic - so they've essentially used it as a loan. Nothing wrong in that.
100
02/12/2020 11:51:41 0 4
bbc
Hi Bob - how are the Tesco shares doing?
3
02/12/2020 11:20:59 15 19
bbc
Tesco cornered the supermarket market with aggressive tactics that facilitated the closure of small businesses. They lowered their prices only when forced to do so by the rise of cheaper supermarkets.

They are not are friends
22
02/12/2020 11:26:26 14 4
bbc
Maybe, but they can spell.
Hand it back you greedy scum.

Or better still give it all directly to NHS frontline workers rather than allowing the government to misspend on track & trace contracts for chums.

_______________________________
Removed
23
02/12/2020 11:26:47 4 12
bbc
The NHS boat has well and truly sailed. They have proved that with all the support they cannot cope. Sadly at the end of this we are looking at private American style care. We cannot keep throwing money at a service which is not viable. I for one do not want any of the tax payers money going down the drain any more
24
02/12/2020 11:26:58 295 10
bbc
I think any business that has benefited from the pandemic should repay any support they have received.
53
02/12/2020 11:37:27 225 8
bbc
So they should. I keep getting emails from HMRC about ways I can claim for Covid-related losses, but I've not lost any money (my business isn't impacted by lockdowns), so I don't claim any relief. I respect my fellow-citizens far too much to just 'grab what I can' while others suffer very real losses, both financial and literal.
59
02/12/2020 11:40:27 9 9
bbc
Like those that belong to Bunter's mates...
96
02/12/2020 11:50:35 16 6
bbc
First on list should be PPE middlemen, and first of those the ones which sourced unusable stuff! They'll get away with it though, after all they were 'hand picked' by this government (no tenders) while small, local offers of supply were ignored.
142
02/12/2020 12:07:16 4 7
bbc
Also there should be a tax on the extra profits they've made this year, as a result of the pandemic.
217
02/12/2020 12:42:56 3 2
bbc
and they should find a way to support smaller shops
223
02/12/2020 12:11:56 0 1
bbc
Agreed Wardy but surely this must be any business that has benefited AND SURVIVED
260
02/12/2020 13:04:01 4 4
bbc
So if a local garage put its workforce on a months furlough and opened back up and found it had to put everyone on overtime to meet the unexpected demand should it pay the furlough money back and if so all of it or should it make up any pay and cost first. If you win the lottery should you pay that back. I mean you haven’t earned it and you taken from good causes the lottery otherwise funds
268
02/12/2020 12:47:22 5 0
bbc
Yes, and I extend that sentiment to furlough recipients
273
02/12/2020 12:49:24 0 0
bbc
Tell that to DS Smith
443
02/12/2020 15:39:41 1 0
bbc
What about extra taxation on those that have been furloughed?
468
02/12/2020 16:04:23 0 0
bbc
We will - by surviving as a viable enterprise and paying tax in the future. Should everyone furloughed repay as well?
545
02/12/2020 17:36:40 1 0
bbc
Are you forgetting that the supermarket workers most of whom were on minimum wage worked tirelessly to ensure food was in the shelves? You could argue the tax relief was reward for a job well done. Maybe they were planning to gift it to charity or Christmas bonus? I applaud Tesco's for what they have done
612
02/12/2020 19:10:47 0 0
bbc
very true.
25
02/12/2020 11:27:00 4 20
bbc
"The supermarket giant said the help to retailers had been a "game-changer" "

Always good to hear people referring to a deadly pandemic as a 'game'.

Very comassionate.
36
02/12/2020 11:31:09 6 1
bbc
Have you just coined a new word? If so what does it mean?
39
02/12/2020 11:31:39 2 1
bbc
as the point passes you by.... helping to keep people fed
26
02/12/2020 11:28:15 4 12
bbc
With there prices, especially with the sheer number of express stores where items are even more extortionate, I'm sure they can afford it.
86
02/12/2020 11:48:25 1 3
bbc
And if you challenge that they say 'rates are more expensive'. have their accountant never heard of consolidation?
27
02/12/2020 11:28:37 195 4
bbc
Let's hope other retailers who have benefitted from Covid and received support show similar levels of corporate public decency.

We should also follow through on chasing those who made fraudulent claim with severe penalties!
87
02/12/2020 11:48:26 54 11
bbc
Don't hold your breath - it's 'free' money after all (until our taxes go up)!
379
02/12/2020 14:22:37 0 0
bbc
Dido Harding?
28
02/12/2020 11:29:11 87 2
bbc
It will be interesting to see if Sainsbury’s major shareholders which includes Qatar will agree to return the money following their special dividend.
99
02/12/2020 11:51:22 85 10
bbc
No business taking government money for rates relief or furlough should be allowed to issue dividends on shares.
4
02/12/2020 11:21:00 8 4
bbc
Targeted relief to those needing it should be applied to all help. Tax avoiders should be excluded. No-one should gain, no one should be in dire straits.
29
02/12/2020 11:29:37 3 6
bbc
Did Amazon get any? Certainly hope not but suspect Jeff added to his immense riches at our expense - again!
90
02/12/2020 11:46:01 1 1
bbc
Relief only applied to shops selling goods to visiting members of the public. So no they didn't.
213
BD
02/12/2020 12:40:38 1 1
bbc
Don't like Amazon? Don't shop there then ...
30
02/12/2020 11:30:13 10 6
bbc
PR

The real regulation of big business

The thing that stops Ryanair charging for going to the loo, adjusts the plastic usage of retail and challenges fast fashion

It is the democratisation of ethics via the media

If you and I don't respect Primarks use or not of Bangladeshi labour we won't shop there

Change is generational even for obvious stuff

Drinking and driving took 40 years to demonise
7
02/12/2020 11:21:30 12 23
bbc
Tesco were given half a billion pounds they didn’t need and they held onto it for months, investing in who knows what etc. No doubt many of their small suppliers did very badly and were not helped out in the same way, and many have gone under. So handing back money you should never have taken is not such a great thing, is it? Big business is the ruin of this country, alongside other bad decisions.
31
02/12/2020 11:30:16 1 2
bbc
"investing in who knows what "

Yeah, cos investments have boomed over the pandemic, haven't they?
To sum up the below: 'Ah don't like Tesco (or Sainsbury or Morrisons or Asda or those bloody Gerry ones neither)................'

Welcome once more to whiners' corner where positivity is nowhere to be seen.

'Damned if they do and damned if they don't springs to mind...............
Removed
33
02/12/2020 11:30:38 4 22
bbc
Oh please. They have been called out. Stop pretending they are some sort of moral company doing the right thing.
Dreadful supermarket chain, Dreadful treatment of their staff, Expensive, and they should never have accepted rate relief in the first place.
94
02/12/2020 11:49:43 4 1
bbc
Which other supermarket chains have done the same thing?
34
02/12/2020 11:30:50 1 17
bbc
Hand it back you - you - I can’t say it as I will get post removed (again).

Or better still give it all directly to NHS frontline workers rather than allowing the government to misspend on track & trace contracts for chums.

_______________________________
14
02/12/2020 11:23:18 15 27
bbc
What a load of piffling baloney from Tesco!

Irrespective of circumstances people need food. Tesco had an existing online and delivery system. Tesco sales and profits boomed. They took on more staff o cope.

Then they treat the taxpayer to embarrassed drivel about returning the money. Money they never needed and should not have claimed in the first place.

Who next?
35
02/12/2020 11:31:00 6 1
bbc
You have no idea about the cost structure and customer shopping habits. The online operation is incredibly cost intensive and labour heavy. Supermarkets work to very tight margins with enormous costs and extensive infrastructure. Getting our food on the shelves safely and timely is something only a few companies can do. Your ignorance is fuelling poorly informed comments.
Volume creates the profit
25
02/12/2020 11:27:00 4 20
bbc
"The supermarket giant said the help to retailers had been a "game-changer" "

Always good to hear people referring to a deadly pandemic as a 'game'.

Very comassionate.
36
02/12/2020 11:31:09 6 1
bbc
Have you just coined a new word? If so what does it mean?
50
02/12/2020 11:35:50 2 3
bbc
'Comassionate' means the same as 'compassionate'. It is slightly quicker to type and uses less ink if you have to print it.
4
02/12/2020 11:21:00 8 4
bbc
Targeted relief to those needing it should be applied to all help. Tax avoiders should be excluded. No-one should gain, no one should be in dire straits.
37
02/12/2020 11:31:32 0 2
bbc
"Tax avoiders should be excluded"

So no Universal Credit or NHS treatment for anyone who's had an ISA, then?
38
02/12/2020 11:31:37 66 4
bbc
That's great news! Nice to see big business stand with the little guy for a change! Asda, Sainsburys, Morrisons Home Bargains and B&M need to follow suit.
564
02/12/2020 18:02:30 33 2
bbc
Amazon actually paying realistic tax would also be nice, after all they've been Covid winners but I'm not sure Bezos has read the 'we're all in it together' memo
576
02/12/2020 18:21:53 5 0
bbc
If only they would stand with the little guy suppliers instead of pushing them to reduce their prices to Tesco so that Tesco can undercut its competitors. We pay too little for our food, look at the ridiculously low price of milk - no wonder dairy farmers have been going out of business.
653
02/12/2020 20:14:03 0 0
bbc
Morrisons did, read the article
25
02/12/2020 11:27:00 4 20
bbc
"The supermarket giant said the help to retailers had been a "game-changer" "

Always good to hear people referring to a deadly pandemic as a 'game'.

Very comassionate.
39
02/12/2020 11:31:39 2 1
bbc
as the point passes you by.... helping to keep people fed
82
02/12/2020 11:46:56 0 3
bbc
Not when the delivery service collapsed.
40
02/12/2020 11:32:04 71 2
bbc
Well done. Right to take it originally as predicting how this would play out presented a big risk, but absolutely correct to pay it back and should be applauded. Let’s see if others follow their lead.
81
02/12/2020 11:46:55 25 64
bbc
It should have been a conditional loan in the first place. More government kneejerk incompetence.
41
02/12/2020 11:32:22 4 12
bbc
The supermarkets (and some others) have had a massive bonus from 'Coronavirus year'. That this was ever available to them shows still more incompetence on the part of this government (or was it just a deliberate transfer of public funds into shareholders' pockets?). Did Amazon get another handout too?
135
OwO
02/12/2020 12:02:15 1 1
bbc
It's available to them because to be available to *any* retail, it must be available to all. Otherwise restrictive state aid laws come into play (that pesky EU).

Take off the tinfoil hat for a change and try to understand how things work.
12
02/12/2020 11:22:58 148 25
bbc
I wouldn't have minded if Tesco had kept some of the money and given a substantial pay rise to their staff who have worked tirelessly and selflessly during this Pandemic. Cannot however fault them for repaying all of the money - would hope that some of the other large Supermarkets follow suit now!

Well done Tesco!!
42
02/12/2020 11:33:11 79 9
bbc
Tesco did an awful lot for its staff, especially the vulnerable. A pay rise would create big issues on the cost structure which would be passed on to the customer and the UK shopper does not like paying over the odds.
We need more to pay this back just have some others have paid back the furlough money or not taken it at all.
341
02/12/2020 13:45:01 4 0
bbc
"UK shopper does not like paying over the odds." - Low pay in supermarkets is balanced by income support from government. This means companies can make big profits while government tops up staff pay to survival levels.

Paying people properly and reflecting that in the cost of goods and services, instead of hiding it via indirect government subsidies is the only way to address inequality.
444
02/12/2020 15:40:03 1 1
bbc
Or they could just cut dividends? Why are the fat cats getting rich whilst the staff stay poor?
460
02/12/2020 15:53:37 0 1
bbc
"A pay rise would create big issues on the cost structure"...

You mean in fact that it would eat into the £315m paid out to investors who did nothing but sit back and wait for it....
while employees kept the wheels turning and coped with the covid risk to themselves
43
02/12/2020 11:34:04 27 1
bbc
Certainly our local Tesco spent money on Covid safety modifications, although their rigour in controlling customer density and behaviour soon wore off.

Let's hope the other big players and even small businesses who did well during the first lockdown do the same, and let's hope the government uses the money wisely.
68
02/12/2020 11:42:35 6 5
bbc
Keep hoping on both counts!
432
02/12/2020 15:32:00 0 0
bbc
Let's hope the other big players and even small businesses who did well during the first lockdown do the same

Quite agree with you

and let's hope the government uses the money wisely.

They will just find another wheeze to pay their chums more money for nothing
464
02/12/2020 16:00:30 1 0
bbc
Pay of a chunk of the debt they have from borrowing heavily
13
02/12/2020 11:23:02 8 4
bbc
Today I learnt what opprobrium means.
44
02/12/2020 11:34:37 5 11
bbc
Thanks for the prompt.
"Public disgrace arising from shameful conduct."
Ready made term for this government then!
121
02/12/2020 11:58:30 3 1
bbc
... In fact an 'oven ready' term
5
02/12/2020 11:21:19 53 11
bbc
Well done Tesco. We will certainly favour those that do the right thing when shopping.
45
02/12/2020 11:34:50 19 85
bbc
I stopped going to Tesco because during the first lockdown they started playing music in the store.

Well done for that. Annoy people by making them stand outside in a queue for fifteen minutes. Then annoy them even more by imposing your choice of irritating noise on them while they're trying to do their shopping.
127
Us
02/12/2020 12:01:24 13 2
bbc
Ah diddums den
224
02/12/2020 12:12:27 11 2
bbc
MUSIC, how dare they!! ??
303
02/12/2020 13:22:36 7 1
bbc
First world problems eh?
439
KH
02/12/2020 15:37:04 4 1
bbc
You'll be loving the festive offerings in supermarkets now then...Jingle bells!
669
02/12/2020 20:57:20 1 0
bbc
That is called social distancing ever heard of it. For the last nine months we had it. And as for the music you lucky its not this time of the year with all the Christmas songs blasting out
46
02/12/2020 11:35:01 4 11
bbc
Tesco have a community charity which supports small groups in every community - the ones that have had to stop operating because of lock down etc. £585m into that charity which could then support small groups as they restart, would be a far more effective way of dealing with this. HMG will just spaff it up the wall (to coin a phrase uttered by our PM)
77
02/12/2020 11:45:56 6 1
bbc
Charities are often poor users of money too.
19
02/12/2020 11:24:16 5 19
bbc
To paraphrase... we shouldn't have taken the money, we were called out so we don't really have any other option.
47
02/12/2020 11:35:08 10 2
bbc
On the bright side, by using the money as a short term interest free loan, they were able to hire a load more staff.
More people in work + the government gets its money back -feels like it’s worked out as a net benefit for the country.
48
02/12/2020 11:35:45 54 11
bbc
It supprised me that the goverment didn't put a clause in place that should the company make a profit come end of the financial year they have to pay a percentage back. You will find multiple companies this year make record profits and not hand any of the tax payers money back.
65
02/12/2020 11:41:36 43 6
bbc
Amazon!!!!!!
116
02/12/2020 11:56:56 4 2
bbc
Far too sensible an idea for these panicking politicians
162
02/12/2020 12:13:28 4 4
bbc
'Record profits' will be taxed in the usual way so your comment is unnecessary
384
02/12/2020 14:27:13 0 0
bbc
They all have clever accountants who would have proved that they didn't make a profit.
654
SB
02/12/2020 20:12:57 0 0
bbc
All the government grants - rates based, self-employed and for those on furlough count as taxable income, so if the business makes a profit the government get back the tax on the grant
49
02/12/2020 11:35:45 7 16
bbc
Really- why were they allowed it in the first place..... they have never been told to close during all this.....if anything Covid has done them a favour by restricting the competition for them
71
02/12/2020 11:42:05 8 1
bbc
It came down to State Aid. If the relief was for all retail then no issue of aid to specific retailers. If relief had been targeted then state aid rules would have applied limiting relief to 200,000 euros over 3 years. So for companies with multiple shops, councils across the country would have to decide who would give relief and when the limit was reached. A nightmare to administer at that time
36
02/12/2020 11:31:09 6 1
bbc
Have you just coined a new word? If so what does it mean?
50
02/12/2020 11:35:50 2 3
bbc
'Comassionate' means the same as 'compassionate'. It is slightly quicker to type and uses less ink if you have to print it.
18
Bob
02/12/2020 11:24:02 18 8
bbc
I guess you didn't read the article then.

It clearly states they spent the relief money on their response to the pandemic.

They've hired thousands of extra staff, bought countless new vehicles, rapidly expanded delivery. Then you have additional costs of all the screens and whatnot across thousands of stores all done in a super quick fashion.
51
02/12/2020 11:37:01 3 3
bbc
And made EVEN MORE profit. Absolutely not needed. It's your money too you know (assuming you pay UK tax?).
52
02/12/2020 11:37:15 4 15
bbc
Why did tesco get business rates relief. Them and the other supermarkets were the main winners during this whole debacle.
24
02/12/2020 11:26:58 295 10
bbc
I think any business that has benefited from the pandemic should repay any support they have received.
53
02/12/2020 11:37:27 225 8
bbc
So they should. I keep getting emails from HMRC about ways I can claim for Covid-related losses, but I've not lost any money (my business isn't impacted by lockdowns), so I don't claim any relief. I respect my fellow-citizens far too much to just 'grab what I can' while others suffer very real losses, both financial and literal.
146
02/12/2020 12:08:17 3 1
bbc
I suspect you're in the minority.
323
02/12/2020 13:30:54 0 0
bbc
It’s the pubs I feel sorry for, especially in tier 3 and wet only pubs almost everywhere.
551
02/12/2020 17:46:42 0 0
bbc
I would just grab what I can.
613
02/12/2020 19:11:32 0 0
bbc
pitty more don't think that way
659
02/12/2020 20:30:54 0 0
bbc
But Tesco have lost money because they have had to put huge amounts of safety procedures in place. NOT THEIR FAULT.

They should have kept the money.
54
02/12/2020 11:37:32 3 15
bbc
The right move - but absolutely shocking that it's taken a public outcry before it's happened.

Small shop-owners that have had to close, whilst watching Tesco sell the same products alongside their essentials must be seething - and understandably so.
63
02/12/2020 11:41:26 8 2
bbc
Such a public outcry only the bbc heard of it, probably from like minded mates on Twitter. They had no need to give it back, I do not see Lidle etc. doing it. Got to chase up behind I suppose.
189
02/12/2020 12:23:58 0 1
bbc
I think you're confusing what each shop was allowed to sell and one supermarket handing back money it didn't need to the government.

The "outcry" had no bearing on Tesco giving back the money received as business rate relief
19
02/12/2020 11:24:16 5 19
bbc
To paraphrase... we shouldn't have taken the money, we were called out so we don't really have any other option.
55
02/12/2020 11:37:37 2 1
bbc
no thats not what the statement said.... its cost them more and was needed in march april may when covid costs were £700m. hope you don't shop with amazon... Tesco have done the right thing
56
02/12/2020 11:38:48 4 10
bbc
Fair plays to Tesco but let’s be honest they’ve made a ton of money due to the pandemic. You have to wonder if this is more to do with the fact that they will be paying increased dividends going forward and want to avoid a public outcry.
67
02/12/2020 11:41:55 4 2
bbc
What about the £725m additional cost incurred? Or is that irrelevant because sales increased?
14
02/12/2020 11:23:18 15 27
bbc
What a load of piffling baloney from Tesco!

Irrespective of circumstances people need food. Tesco had an existing online and delivery system. Tesco sales and profits boomed. They took on more staff o cope.

Then they treat the taxpayer to embarrassed drivel about returning the money. Money they never needed and should not have claimed in the first place.

Who next?
57
02/12/2020 11:39:12 1 1
bbc
thinking one (whats rattling around in there)..... what nonsense
58
02/12/2020 11:40:24 329 21
bbc
I say "Well done Tesco". The money was made available and they claimed it. Now they recognise they didn't need it and have paid it back. Lets see more businesses act in a responsible manner please. As for pay increases, I don't see anything wrong with businesses paying their staff/workforce an increase providing it comes from company funds, is earned and is appropriate. Season's Greetings to All.
187
02/12/2020 12:23:27 94 25
bbc
Agree totally. I'm off to Tesco next time I go for my weekly shop.
264
02/12/2020 12:46:27 13 9
bbc
They only paid it back because they are paying huge dividends to shareholders.

They were probably told to pay it back by majority shareholders so that they can take their dividends without an outcry.

Trust me - Tesco didn’t “want” to hand back this damn money.
325
02/12/2020 13:31:37 8 6
bbc
Begrudgingly paid it back..
395
02/12/2020 14:54:40 6 4
bbc
Rubbish, purely to stop the negative backlash over their massive profits. NOTHING to do with sensible or nice.
595
02/12/2020 18:48:01 0 0
bbc
"Lets see more businesses act in a responsible manner please.":
Not many businesses benefitted from the lockdown; other than Supermarkets and Amazon.
605
02/12/2020 19:03:44 0 0
bbc
Are you serious, never needed the money
658
02/12/2020 20:29:28 0 0
bbc
Why should Tesco or any other business pay for all the additional costs of COVID ?

Boris & his clowns let the virus in. NZ & other countries like Uruguay prove that it was not essential to let it in.
662
Pez
02/12/2020 20:37:10 0 0
bbc
lol no. Not well done Tesco. They got caught with their hands in the cookie jar...
719
03/12/2020 00:19:25 0 0
bbc
They only paid it back after a backlash, god you are so gullible.
24
02/12/2020 11:26:58 295 10
bbc
I think any business that has benefited from the pandemic should repay any support they have received.
59
02/12/2020 11:40:27 9 9
bbc
Like those that belong to Bunter's mates...
16
02/12/2020 11:23:53 457 10
bbc
Over to you ASDA, Sainsbury, Lidl, Aldi...
60
02/12/2020 11:40:29 471 92
bbc
More to the point who in government was silly enough to believe that supermarkets would need financial support when for months only supermarkets and corner shops were allowed to open?
107
02/12/2020 11:53:46 48 23
bbc
Quite, and why did Tesco take it in the first place? Food is a necessity, did they really think they needed support?
190
02/12/2020 12:24:45 35 4
bbc
Alanjohn, easy to say with hindsight.

In March there was no guarantee that that supermarket supply chains would cope to provide stock, that people would avoid buying anything but essentials, people would avoid supermarkets as places were covid transmission risks were the highest.

So, the govt got it right on that call, even though bungled on other policies.
212
02/12/2020 12:39:49 2 27
bbc
Ridiculous Miss allocation, as usual
242
02/12/2020 12:52:57 5 4
bbc
So you could see how things where going to turn and while the government and everyone else could not, please sell your crystal ball to the government .
313
02/12/2020 13:28:04 0 1
bbc
So define who should get it and who shouldnt. Its not easy as there will always be grey areas and some companies may miss out.
409
02/12/2020 15:09:48 0 0
bbc
It was a blanket policy, which Labour Welsh govt caved into as well, not just tories in England.
At least they are giving it back, the question will be are the UK govts going to hand it to the Local authorities as it is them that should have had it.
437
Pip
02/12/2020 15:34:38 0 0
bbc
Good question, it beggars belief, when viewing the dividends then paid out..........?
480
02/12/2020 16:24:50 1 1
bbc
"who in government was silly enough to believe..."

Was that a rhetorical question Alan, or shall I start writing out a very long list?
515
02/12/2020 16:55:42 0 0
bbc
Very simple the relief was given to all companies.Even with that a number still went bust.Good on Tesco just up to the other big supermarkets who were open to give back if not all a substantial part of this money
581
02/12/2020 18:30:43 0 1
bbc
The Government have only ever been interested in supporting big business, finance and their oligarch chums, as well as themselves. There was a lack of holistic thinking and indeed commonsense from the start. All they were concerned about was how can we get our noses in the trough that everybody else will be paying back in future years.
619
02/12/2020 19:20:02 0 0
bbc
The question must surely be; who in government isn’t silly? You’ll be thinking for a long and hard while.
717
03/12/2020 00:16:43 0 0
bbc
Don't be daft, someone in government is obviously a major shareholder or has been promised a consultants job when they leave public office. 1 day a week for £100k
61
02/12/2020 11:40:38 39 1
bbc
Every little helps.
671
02/12/2020 20:58:30 1 0
bbc
I was wondering who was going to be the first to say that
62
02/12/2020 11:41:03 4 5
bbc
A good friend runs an online business - selling completely unnecessary 'stuff'. Last few years have been good. Covid 2020 has been boomtime. Got a call from accountant early in the pandemic saying gov't has just given you £10k! Still doesn't understand why. Nor do I and I've helped fund it!
54
02/12/2020 11:37:32 3 15
bbc
The right move - but absolutely shocking that it's taken a public outcry before it's happened.

Small shop-owners that have had to close, whilst watching Tesco sell the same products alongside their essentials must be seething - and understandably so.
63
02/12/2020 11:41:26 8 2
bbc
Such a public outcry only the bbc heard of it, probably from like minded mates on Twitter. They had no need to give it back, I do not see Lidle etc. doing it. Got to chase up behind I suppose.
9
02/12/2020 11:22:36 407 56
bbc
Good for Tesco. They didn't have to do this, but it's right that they are. We always hear about the evils of businesses, so good to hear something positive
64
02/12/2020 11:41:30 273 204
bbc
Tesco's should never have claimed the relief in the first instance. Their stores have been open every single day during this pandemic and they are one of the very few companies to have seen profits rise. This is just another example of companies trying to cream the system and they are only repaying the money to avoid criticism in the future
145
02/12/2020 12:08:02 113 7
bbc
They didn’t “claim” the relief, the relief was automatically applied to all retailers regardless of which retail sector they were in. They’re giving the money back, which is the main thing; try focusing on the positive instead of the negative all the time, you’d be a much happier person.
151
02/12/2020 12:10:11 72 6
bbc
They didn’t claim it, rate payments were just not collected

Get your facts right before posting
168
02/12/2020 12:14:20 41 2
bbc
Read the article All retail businesses where given this money by the government
Most I suspect will hold onto it
239
02/12/2020 12:28:00 31 8
bbc
Tesco hasn't seen profits rise. Why must you insist on commenting from without any knowledge whatsoever about the subject matter.

Investment of over £700m to adapt to teh situation. Sales are up, yes, but profits are down.

Please educate yourself before inflicting your opinions on others.
245
02/12/2020 12:53:52 10 1
bbc
How did they know they would not need them.
247
02/12/2020 12:55:13 35 2
bbc
Anyone who knows anything about business knows you 1) do everything, everything to keep the business sound and 2) then and only then when you’ve done that do you revisit to see if you can relax a little and in this case reverse some things you were entitled to claim. Tesco were entirely right to get the support when offered and as things have panned out well then honourable to hand it back.
259
jw
02/12/2020 13:02:58 22 1
bbc
I not sure that Tesco claimed the relief, more likely it was automatic. But as someone else has pointed out, they did not have to pay it back. You are probably right about possible motives but maybe the positive side should be applauded as it will/should inspire similar organisations to follow suit.
262
02/12/2020 13:04:37 11 2
bbc
Wrong, wrong, wrong... Consider the cost of all the additional staff recruited, the surge in home deliveries and costs associated with that and of course upgrades to all stores to make them safe.

Maybe if you took that massive chip off your shoulder you might be able to see clearly.
513
02/12/2020 16:53:42 1 0
bbc
They also said they had incurred large costs in dealing with the pandemic What I can say they set the standard for sanitising hands and trolleys Despite all of this their profits went up 8% and well as sales they've handled it wellThey've cleverly put their rivals in the dock and it will hurt them more the Tesco's
660
02/12/2020 20:36:08 1 0
bbc
What about the money they have invested to protect colleagues and customers, I know sainsburys has invested over £500m since March...
48
02/12/2020 11:35:45 54 11
bbc
It supprised me that the goverment didn't put a clause in place that should the company make a profit come end of the financial year they have to pay a percentage back. You will find multiple companies this year make record profits and not hand any of the tax payers money back.
65
02/12/2020 11:41:36 43 6
bbc
Amazon!!!!!!
329
02/12/2020 13:34:00 0 2
bbc
What about them? They pay business rates even if they pay limited tax. Are you confusing the two?
386
02/12/2020 14:30:37 6 0
bbc
The problem with Amazon is that they claim to trade from somewhere else. Only their UK employees and delivery pay tax, not the core business. A complete upheaval in taxes based on sales not profit, and reducing the tax-deductibles, is needed. they we can sort out our care system as well.
66
02/12/2020 11:41:54 5 18
bbc
Do they think playing the card of "the costs of the pandemic were more than the relief received" when a 5 year old could tell us their extra profits have more than made up for those costs?
79
02/12/2020 11:46:30 7 1
bbc
£725m of cost. Assuming (generously) a 10% margin would require £7.25bn sales uplift to negate the incremental cost...
134
02/12/2020 12:02:13 0 1
bbc
Unfortunately five year olds don't make it into government (unless they go the Eaton/Oxford route of course).
56
02/12/2020 11:38:48 4 10
bbc
Fair plays to Tesco but let’s be honest they’ve made a ton of money due to the pandemic. You have to wonder if this is more to do with the fact that they will be paying increased dividends going forward and want to avoid a public outcry.
67
02/12/2020 11:41:55 4 2
bbc
What about the £725m additional cost incurred? Or is that irrelevant because sales increased?
83
02/12/2020 11:47:02 2 3
bbc
Most of these costs will be in modernisation e.g Scan as you shop in every store, more delivery vans and tray cleansing. These costs would be expected in the future just not all at the same time.
92
02/12/2020 11:49:26 1 4
bbc
Yes and what about their increased profits. They didn’t invest in the business without expecting to up their profits did they?
43
02/12/2020 11:34:04 27 1
bbc
Certainly our local Tesco spent money on Covid safety modifications, although their rigour in controlling customer density and behaviour soon wore off.

Let's hope the other big players and even small businesses who did well during the first lockdown do the same, and let's hope the government uses the money wisely.
68
02/12/2020 11:42:35 6 5
bbc
Keep hoping on both counts!
69
02/12/2020 11:43:27 30 5
bbc
Well done Tesco!
70
02/12/2020 11:43:42 10 2
bbc
I wonder if Sir Phillip Mean paid his back????! I guess it costs a lot to fuel a yacht these days lol.
49
02/12/2020 11:35:45 7 16
bbc
Really- why were they allowed it in the first place..... they have never been told to close during all this.....if anything Covid has done them a favour by restricting the competition for them
71
02/12/2020 11:42:05 8 1
bbc
It came down to State Aid. If the relief was for all retail then no issue of aid to specific retailers. If relief had been targeted then state aid rules would have applied limiting relief to 200,000 euros over 3 years. So for companies with multiple shops, councils across the country would have to decide who would give relief and when the limit was reached. A nightmare to administer at that time
72
02/12/2020 11:44:22 3 9
bbc
We were fortunate and worked all the way through this year, will get rewarded with higher taxes next year to pay for it all and not one penny in rates relief. The system is morally bankrupt if it allows relief of this size to a hugely profitable business
126
02/12/2020 12:01:00 0 3
bbc
It's not the 'system' which is morally bankrupt - it's this government of liars and incompetents. To be continued post-Brexit but on a much larger scale and without an end.
14
02/12/2020 11:23:18 15 27
bbc
What a load of piffling baloney from Tesco!

Irrespective of circumstances people need food. Tesco had an existing online and delivery system. Tesco sales and profits boomed. They took on more staff o cope.

Then they treat the taxpayer to embarrassed drivel about returning the money. Money they never needed and should not have claimed in the first place.

Who next?
73
02/12/2020 11:44:41 0 4
bbc
They did have "an existing online and delivery system" which collapsed leaving many of us without this service.
74
02/12/2020 11:44:54 3 5
bbc
Why are these 'support payments' not made as conditional interest-free loans, pending a thorough analysis of real need? Those in dire straights would still take them but others may think first.
93
02/12/2020 11:49:33 3 2
bbc
No. Either all get treated the same, possibly by sector, or give nothing. Your way just hands money to the bad businesses that should close. Shops in high streets on the whole are dying out at last, long overdue. No point handing them a penny. Ask Philip Green.
103
Bob
02/12/2020 11:52:55 0 1
bbc
Same reason that all the other schemes had very little rules in place - if they needed to check everything first it would take a) weeks to set up and b) ages to process each claim.

Time was of the essence.
75
02/12/2020 11:44:58 41 10
bbc
Always the best supermarket and rise to the delivery challenge remarkably adding vast numbers of deliveries especially for the shielding, in a very quick time.

Now generously returning the state aid every company in the sector is still lapping up and keeping, eh Aldi?
673
02/12/2020 21:01:16 1 1
bbc
Yes Tesco was brilliant on the home deliveries more than can be said about Sainsbury's
76
02/12/2020 11:45:05 1 15
bbc
Capitalists will be first in line for free money and will give it back if it's in their interest or public image to do so. I admire the likes of Bill Gates who is freely donating his wealth to vaccination schemes, Tesco et al taking money they don't need and then giving it back is not in the same universe, I would join a queue for free five pound notes though so don't judge them for taking it.
136
OwO
02/12/2020 12:03:38 2 1
bbc
How do you think Bill Gates got his money in the first place?

It's nice and all pretending that communism is in any way viable, but at some point you have to grow up.
46
02/12/2020 11:35:01 4 11
bbc
Tesco have a community charity which supports small groups in every community - the ones that have had to stop operating because of lock down etc. £585m into that charity which could then support small groups as they restart, would be a far more effective way of dealing with this. HMG will just spaff it up the wall (to coin a phrase uttered by our PM)
77
02/12/2020 11:45:56 6 1
bbc
Charities are often poor users of money too.
78
02/12/2020 11:46:17 122 2
bbc
Morally the right thing to do.

Full marks to any company that pays back government handouts that were not needed. That goes for those companies who either declined or payed back furlough money too.
85
02/12/2020 11:48:12 34 3
bbc
Agreed.
120
02/12/2020 11:58:24 1 7
bbc
PR and reputation - they won't let 'morals' stand between them and their dividends.
562
02/12/2020 18:00:59 2 0
bbc
Perhaps Amazon could actually pay realistic tax to cover the cost of all the taxpayer-funded infrastructure they rely on for their business. Bezos is the 2nd richest man in the world, be great if he personally paid a few billion for some vaccines.
66
02/12/2020 11:41:54 5 18
bbc
Do they think playing the card of "the costs of the pandemic were more than the relief received" when a 5 year old could tell us their extra profits have more than made up for those costs?
79
02/12/2020 11:46:30 7 1
bbc
£725m of cost. Assuming (generously) a 10% margin would require £7.25bn sales uplift to negate the incremental cost...
207
02/12/2020 12:36:00 0 2
bbc
I guess I'm misunderstanding the article or just don't understand finance. How come for £725m of cost before revenue it would take a further £7bn to negate it?
80
02/12/2020 11:46:45 4 7
bbc
It looks like corn flakes will be going up to cover the cost
40
02/12/2020 11:32:04 71 2
bbc
Well done. Right to take it originally as predicting how this would play out presented a big risk, but absolutely correct to pay it back and should be applauded. Let’s see if others follow their lead.
81
02/12/2020 11:46:55 25 64
bbc
It should have been a conditional loan in the first place. More government kneejerk incompetence.
112
OwO
02/12/2020 11:56:43 18 4
bbc
Which would have scared off small businesses, making them go bust. Try thinking before spewing your standard atnti-whatever-the-govt-does line.
304
02/12/2020 13:22:43 2 1
bbc
So you would have let businesses including supermarkets and corner shops go out of business while you were wetting your pants and hand-wringing for months wondering what to do?
Most important was keeping people fed OK THE DAY and supporting shops and their suppliers to make sure that happened.
That couldn't wait (like cows needing milking twice a day for one).
Well done Rishi, nice one Tesco
665
02/12/2020 20:44:18 1 0
bbc
You do know how many retail jobs have gone or are going this week although. If this had been a loan many business would not taken the chance. And we would be talking about much more jobs loses than we seeing this week. The only incompetence I see here are your remarks which is obliviously aimed at the UK government. Who is this case did right to provide this money
39
02/12/2020 11:31:39 2 1
bbc
as the point passes you by.... helping to keep people fed
82
02/12/2020 11:46:56 0 3
bbc
Not when the delivery service collapsed.
67
02/12/2020 11:41:55 4 2
bbc
What about the £725m additional cost incurred? Or is that irrelevant because sales increased?
83
02/12/2020 11:47:02 2 3
bbc
Most of these costs will be in modernisation e.g Scan as you shop in every store, more delivery vans and tray cleansing. These costs would be expected in the future just not all at the same time.
14
02/12/2020 11:23:18 15 27
bbc
What a load of piffling baloney from Tesco!

Irrespective of circumstances people need food. Tesco had an existing online and delivery system. Tesco sales and profits boomed. They took on more staff o cope.

Then they treat the taxpayer to embarrassed drivel about returning the money. Money they never needed and should not have claimed in the first place.

Who next?
84
02/12/2020 11:44:33 4 1
bbc
They didn't claim it. Councils applied it automatically on Government guidance.
78
02/12/2020 11:46:17 122 2
bbc
Morally the right thing to do.

Full marks to any company that pays back government handouts that were not needed. That goes for those companies who either declined or payed back furlough money too.
85
02/12/2020 11:48:12 34 3
bbc
Agreed.
26
02/12/2020 11:28:15 4 12
bbc
With there prices, especially with the sheer number of express stores where items are even more extortionate, I'm sure they can afford it.
86
02/12/2020 11:48:25 1 3
bbc
And if you challenge that they say 'rates are more expensive'. have their accountant never heard of consolidation?
27
02/12/2020 11:28:37 195 4
bbc
Let's hope other retailers who have benefitted from Covid and received support show similar levels of corporate public decency.

We should also follow through on chasing those who made fraudulent claim with severe penalties!
87
02/12/2020 11:48:26 54 11
bbc
Don't hold your breath - it's 'free' money after all (until our taxes go up)!
607
02/12/2020 19:05:01 0 0
bbc
Yep, I recommend a book titled " There aint nonsuch thing as a free lunch"
88
DM
02/12/2020 11:48:41 16 2
bbc
Well done Tesco....every little helps.....
89
Jon
02/12/2020 11:44:54 7 6
bbc
Fair play to Tesco, credit where credit is due. I don't blame them for taking it if it was available to them, but we should not have to rely on their good-will to give that money back. It was clear from the offset that supermarkets were poised to make huge profits from the situation, it should never have been made available to them in the first place.
102
02/12/2020 11:52:50 5 1
bbc
They state clearly that it was needed at the time to stabalise the initial shock and cost of the restrictions and the sudden change in needs/habits . You no doubt would have been at the front of the queue to critcise the government for not doing enough had the supermarkets not been able to scale up their delivery and click and collect services and had to shut stores to keep costs down.
150
02/12/2020 12:09:58 2 2
bbc
Nothing was clear from the off (apart from hindsight was going to be available in abundance) and what makes you think there was huge profits to be made, it is not like we were all going to be eating more. They had to incur additional costs to adapt stores to make them covid safe environments which meant more staff etc. for similar turnover which is exactly what they did with the money.
29
02/12/2020 11:29:37 3 6
bbc
Did Amazon get any? Certainly hope not but suspect Jeff added to his immense riches at our expense - again!
90
02/12/2020 11:46:01 1 1
bbc
Relief only applied to shops selling goods to visiting members of the public. So no they didn't.
11
02/12/2020 11:22:51 168 3
bbc
This is only the tip, albeit a very big one, of the iceberg.

I know of countless businesses who have not been affected by the pandemic, but have claimed furlough relief or governments grants whilst continuing to trade, some more profitably than before.

Perhaps Rishi should bring in legislation to claw back payments made where businesses have not needed them.
91
02/12/2020 11:49:22 49 4
bbc
It should be easy to check on through the tax system.
297
02/12/2020 13:16:21 1 4
bbc
Yes because of course taxable profits under the U.K. tax system are an excellent guide to short medium and long term Covid impact. Duh!
447
02/12/2020 15:40:46 1 0
bbc
Ever heard of cash?
722
03/12/2020 00:23:14 0 0
bbc
Not really as they have closed countless tax offices over the last couple of years. Make you think their heart really isn't in it.
67
02/12/2020 11:41:55 4 2
bbc
What about the £725m additional cost incurred? Or is that irrelevant because sales increased?
92
02/12/2020 11:49:26 1 4
bbc
Yes and what about their increased profits. They didn’t invest in the business without expecting to up their profits did they?
124
OwO
02/12/2020 12:00:29 1 2
bbc
For coronavirus safety things? Absolutely not, plastic screens and sanitiser *cost* money instead of bringing you extra. What strange world do you live in?
74
02/12/2020 11:44:54 3 5
bbc
Why are these 'support payments' not made as conditional interest-free loans, pending a thorough analysis of real need? Those in dire straights would still take them but others may think first.
93
02/12/2020 11:49:33 3 2
bbc
No. Either all get treated the same, possibly by sector, or give nothing. Your way just hands money to the bad businesses that should close. Shops in high streets on the whole are dying out at last, long overdue. No point handing them a penny. Ask Philip Green.
33
02/12/2020 11:30:38 4 22
bbc
Oh please. They have been called out. Stop pretending they are some sort of moral company doing the right thing.
Dreadful supermarket chain, Dreadful treatment of their staff, Expensive, and they should never have accepted rate relief in the first place.
94
02/12/2020 11:49:43 4 1
bbc
Which other supermarket chains have done the same thing?
95
02/12/2020 11:50:33 49 3
bbc
Well played Tesco. Where are Lidl and Aldi on this?
115
02/12/2020 11:56:53 16 36
bbc
Still knocking 30% off your bill as always.
24
02/12/2020 11:26:58 295 10
bbc
I think any business that has benefited from the pandemic should repay any support they have received.
96
02/12/2020 11:50:35 16 6
bbc
First on list should be PPE middlemen, and first of those the ones which sourced unusable stuff! They'll get away with it though, after all they were 'hand picked' by this government (no tenders) while small, local offers of supply were ignored.
97
02/12/2020 11:50:44 9 1
bbc
Nice one.
15
02/12/2020 11:23:22 85 3
bbc
Good for them, let's hope the other big supermarkets follow their lead.
98
02/12/2020 11:51:00 12 4
bbc
You can hope!
28
02/12/2020 11:29:11 87 2
bbc
It will be interesting to see if Sainsbury’s major shareholders which includes Qatar will agree to return the money following their special dividend.
99
02/12/2020 11:51:22 85 10
bbc
No business taking government money for rates relief or furlough should be allowed to issue dividends on shares.
199
02/12/2020 12:29:38 4 1
bbc
Unless any monies received for rates relief/furlough etc have been repaid
328
02/12/2020 13:33:05 5 5
bbc
Great idea. Until you realise that your pension invests in these companies and you will lose out when their share price drops.
21
Bob
02/12/2020 11:25:48 24 8
bbc
They estimate COVID costs at £725m and you say they didn't need it?

The expansion was needed to feed the nation, and isn't cheap to do.

It does benefit them post-pandemic - so they've essentially used it as a loan. Nothing wrong in that.
100
02/12/2020 11:51:41 0 4
bbc
Hi Bob - how are the Tesco shares doing?