Ofsted points to total school disruption in some areas
01/12/2020 | news | education | 435
Regional Ofsted bosses say schooling has been 'completely disrupted' by Covid-19 in some areas.
1
01/12/2020 14:10:18 36 11
bbc
So what? If the alternative is to close schools until this is over then there is no alternative. They need to stay open, be as safe as possible, and continue to educate.
27
01/12/2020 14:37:12 22 2
bbc
Agreed - not an ideal situation, but we there are very few workable alternatives. The education and welfare of children needs to be a higher priority than pubs and non-essential shops.
80
01/12/2020 15:18:26 4 0
bbc
That is all well and good - and I agree with you. But we need to accept that exams at the end of year 11 are not going to be straightforward this year. Best to prepare for a robust teacher assessment now.
135
01/12/2020 15:47:08 3 1
bbc
"If the alternative is to close schools until this is over then there is no alternative"

Makes no sense. You've postulated an alternative and then said there isn't one.
2
01/12/2020 14:11:02 55 12
bbc
Kids don't learn as well at home, too many distractions and they don't view they're parents the same way as teachers - it's a tough time to be a kid.
25
01/12/2020 14:33:50 44 3
bbc
Not all parents actually have the time to teach their children either, no matter how much they would like to.

When we had to quarantine our children because of Covid, it involved working 18 hour days to try to juggle work, childcare and teaching - the result was basically doing none of them very well.
48
01/12/2020 14:52:30 12 9
bbc
Wrong.

My children both caught up considerably under lockdown and returned to school well ahead of schedule.

They are 8 and 9 though so were keen to learn, not sure that would be the case in 5 years when other interests take over admittedly.
124
01/12/2020 15:40:33 9 4
bbc
If families & schools had been given stability, then new routines would have emerged & that stability would have allowed everyone to concentrate on improving their ability to deliver in the “new normal”.

The half measures & constant change of our response to covid - the in, out, shake it all about nature of it - does not a happy nation make. All coulda, woulda, shoulda now. The damage is done.
132
01/12/2020 15:44:57 5 3
bbc
I bet you've been all in favour of people not going back to work after CV19 and home working continuing though?

If the Government had taken CV19 transmission by children as seriously as it should have, it would have invested more in enabling kids to study at home. Virtual classrooms are surely a possibility in this day and age?!

Supply the BB and laptops and "Bob's your uncle"!
259
01/12/2020 16:55:54 5 1
bbc
My partner does online when her class gets sent home - attendance is dire.
Many households have 1 laptop - so 2+ children learning from home cannot all be online at the same time.
We need to stop with the pretend rules on the schools - only actual kids who are +ve need to go home not entire years.
The kids must go to school, they might not like it but their future depends on it.
3
01/12/2020 14:11:47 8 7
bbc
I understand that regions are assessed on "cases per 100,000 residents" with 200 considered very high.
I'd like to see the same data published for schools, I have heard, by hearsay only, not by "facts", that a local comp had 70 cases in one half term (although probably not all at once). That is equivalent to 7,000 per 100,000. If 200 justifies a high tier lockdown what does 7,000 justify?
328
01/12/2020 17:37:03 1 0
bbc
One of the Carlisle schools was closed with over 90 confirmed cases and that's just the ones that were tested by the time it shut.
331
01/12/2020 17:38:32 1 0
bbc
https://www.bbc.co.uk/ne
ws/uk-england-cumbria-55019331
4
01/12/2020 14:12:55 78 16
bbc
This is about free day care and ensuring people can go to work and pay taxes. Nothing to do with education. If the likes of Green paid tax on £1.2bn divis, then the 'unwashed masses' wouldn't need to have their hard earned sucked off them.
154
01/12/2020 15:55:46 38 42
bbc
Tosh, tosh, tosh, tosh and more tosh.

Put the Marxism book down and just for once consider that maybe the best place for a child to be is in a nurturing environment and with other children.

Not sure what experience you had but I'm guessing it wasn't a pleasant one.
191
01/12/2020 16:21:27 11 15
bbc
Free day care can't you look after your own children - if the answer is no then you should not have had them!
348
01/12/2020 17:52:00 1 0
bbc
Children receive the best education in school, which is why most countries including the UK are trying to keep schools open.The tax issue is in the UK that compared to European standards the top 0.01% and the bottom 50% pay less in taxes than they would in other European countries. The top 1 to 10% of earners in the UK pay more than the European average.
5
01/12/2020 14:14:14 18 8
bbc
That is down to the fact that cases are high in schools where the infection rate is high. 1st wave we had a low number of infections but in the 2nd wave we have been hit hard. Our local paper is reporting numerous cases in school after school. Simple solution close schools in tier3 due to them been the epicenter of infections spreading to the wider community. Common sense need but Boris has none
6
01/12/2020 14:11:50 10 10
bbc
No easy answers here but on balance Exams must still be taken. Teachers assessment is totally unfair and very biased.
14
01/12/2020 14:26:46 5 2
bbc
Exams are biased towards pupils that haven't had to learn remotely or self-isolate. It's not a fair plying field.
190
01/12/2020 16:20:48 0 0
bbc
Totally biased - in which direction?
Totally unfair - on whom? Those that already have an "unfair" advantage, presumably.

Biased towards a system that assesses each child as an individual; is that biased in favour of fairness, perhaps?
7
01/12/2020 14:16:24 31 6
bbc
Given the way viruses spread every year in the autumn school term, this is not a surprise.. However, the lack of a plan regarding gcse exams in England beggars belief.
130
01/12/2020 15:44:48 15 2
bbc
"lack of a plan regarding gcse exams "

Isn't the plan to have the exams as normal?

Is that not 'a plan'?
344
01/12/2020 17:49:05 1 0
bbc
The GCSEs and other exams will go ahead as normal. The timetables are available on the exam boards' websites. Apart from a couple of papers, they start on June 7th and end on July 2nd. What more of a plan are you expecting?
8
01/12/2020 14:16:35 16 13
bbc
Wow. The BBC dust this story down once a week and spray a sheen of panic over it, ready to present once again as balanced reporting.
18
01/12/2020 14:28:32 9 6
bbc
I wish the tory voters would investigate before making their silly comments
37
01/12/2020 14:43:52 0 2
bbc
its because theres pretty much nothing else going on I suppose
46
Jon
01/12/2020 14:51:14 3 1
bbc
To cite the article, the "latest official figures for overall attendance in England show". These figures weren't there to be reported in the past, that's how linear time works. Do you think everything needs to be reported once and never revisited even as new information comes to light?
9
01/12/2020 14:20:14 10 9
bbc
Oh stop crying.

They're children. And in >>99.99% of cases are totally immune to COVID.
They have many years in which to catch up on their education.

The 60000 people who've died of COVID here in Britain don't get a second chance.
13
01/12/2020 14:25:03 17 1
bbc
....and the staff? We had a primary school teacher die in our county 2 weeks ago who had Covid. Staff with chronic health conditions are expected to be at work, with no funding allowing additional supply staff to protect them (ie, working in the classroom to allow them to remote teach). All schools want is a level playing field and that won't be possible with no change to exams at this rate.
10
01/12/2020 14:20:15 90 39
bbc
BBC instruction to all journalists:

- go find a problem
- identify the most negative statistics possible
- ignore solutions and the positive
- write a piece - the message is that "we are all doomed"

BBC - almost 1 in 5 secondary schools sending pupils home.

Reality - 80% of schools are operating fairly normally
15
01/12/2020 14:27:34 24 47
bbc
Utter rubbish,people just head in sand,have you children,are they off school,why knock the tv people for telling you the truth
29
01/12/2020 14:41:15 14 0
bbc
but those 20% of schools are educating hundreds of thousands of children. THey can't just be written off. And that's just one week: more schools than that have sent children home at least once, in some areas multiple times.
63
01/12/2020 15:04:34 4 9
bbc
Terry, do you work at ITV son?
128
01/12/2020 15:44:17 5 1
bbc
1 in 5 and 20% are precisely the same. D-, See Me
134
01/12/2020 15:46:59 4 6
bbc
Yawn, the Tory Bot Propaganda Machine doesn't like people knowing the facts so attacks the messenger!!
140
01/12/2020 15:50:28 9 0
bbc
I know what you are saying Terry, although it is fundamentally incorrect to state that the 80% of schools you quote are 'operating fairly normally'. That's completely untrue. Perhaps what you mean is, without significant disruption from pupil absence?
150
01/12/2020 15:53:42 7 2
bbc
Terry instructions for HYS:
* tell everyone the BBC is awful
* return to BBC every day
* tell everyone the BBC is awful

Reality of 80% operating normally is unusual.
152
01/12/2020 15:55:34 9 0
bbc
the reality is that school children across the country are not going to be sitting exams on a level playing field. Some will have uninterrupted years, others will have missed a lot of school through no fault of their own and their exam results and future ambitions are going to be unfairly affected. That is the story.
163
01/12/2020 15:59:53 3 0
bbc
20% of school-age children is a huge deal in terms of numbers of disrupted pupils and lessons. It also has a huge impact upon those schools affected, which are judged on progress and end of key stage attainment. You can't fail and shut an otherwise successful school because of this situation wrecking their attendance and attainment levels. It's absolutely correct that Ofsted are looking at this.
242
01/12/2020 16:49:19 2 0
bbc
Something wrong with your cognition?
Article says official figures show 22% of pupils absent last Thursday and 75% of schools sent home at least some pupils.
Ofsted defend by saying some areas will have seen relatively little impact this term.
Actual data being defended by a qualitative statement from Ofsted - this is just pure semantics by them to hide the BS reality we can all see and expected.
305
01/12/2020 17:20:15 1 1
bbc
Hence rampant covid and no christmas soaring unemployment pubs shut shops going bankrupt but ewe must keep the kids at school but yes the bbc is utterly terrified that its 4 billion budget might get cut so it will say what bojo wants it to say. btw do you know that ITV costs you a lot more than the bbc but its hidden from you.
319
01/12/2020 17:30:58 0 0
bbc
"go and find" - don't agree with the rest either, 1 in five sending home means exactly the same as 8% fairly normal, both are reality. Schools need to teach logic.
350
01/12/2020 17:52:37 0 1
bbc
The story is slightly misreported. 1 in 5 have a bubble off. Every school will have pupils off. Coupled with the dodge that people awaiting tests aren’t classed as absent but aea, the numbers are higher than this suggests.
376
01/12/2020 18:22:01 1 0
bbc
96%+ is classed as good attendence.
11
01/12/2020 14:21:59 3 0
bbc
Just another brick in the wall...
12
01/12/2020 14:25:01 3 10
bbc
keep the schools open
Ridiculous to send entire schools home due to one infection
Like to know which areas have shut schools.
Home schooling and on line fails children
19
01/12/2020 14:29:15 19 0
bbc
Schools don't shut due to one case. Public Health England assess each case and the probable number of exposed people. Usually just a few people will be told to self-isolate. If there are a number of contactees, it could be a whole class or year group. Only multiple infections across year groups would result in a whole school closure. Public Health England make the decision - not headteachers.
21
01/12/2020 14:30:32 4 0
bbc
Schools don't shut for one infection. They close bubbles when a child tests positive and having been instructed to do so by the DfE or Public Health England. The areas that have shut schools are typically where infection rates are very high.
100
01/12/2020 15:31:37 2 0
bbc
Factually incorrect Donald
204
01/12/2020 16:26:22 0 0
bbc
Keep the mouth open
Ridiculous to read anything other than absurd nonsense
Like to know some non-figure to support some tinfoil conspiracy
An extraordinary lack of knowledge does not prevent comments and fails

Oh, it's you again Arfur. SHould have known.
9
01/12/2020 14:20:14 10 9
bbc
Oh stop crying.

They're children. And in >>99.99% of cases are totally immune to COVID.
They have many years in which to catch up on their education.

The 60000 people who've died of COVID here in Britain don't get a second chance.
13
01/12/2020 14:25:03 17 1
bbc
....and the staff? We had a primary school teacher die in our county 2 weeks ago who had Covid. Staff with chronic health conditions are expected to be at work, with no funding allowing additional supply staff to protect them (ie, working in the classroom to allow them to remote teach). All schools want is a level playing field and that won't be possible with no change to exams at this rate.
17
01/12/2020 14:27:42 2 0
bbc
Well that's what happens when the govt of the day insists in selling off playing fields. Hard to find a level one.
41
01/12/2020 14:45:42 1 8
bbc
every school my kids went to seemed to have teachers using every excuse to not be there
54
01/12/2020 15:00:12 0 0
bbc
There have been changes to exams - in my subject (English) we have been able to drop the study of one text in the Literature exam. Also, the time allowed is longer - both papers used to allocate 45 minutes per essay; now, each essay is given 50, with the unseen poetry section being given 55. Also, the exams start three weeks later, giving 5 weeks study after the Easter break instead of 2.
92
01/12/2020 15:24:56 0 0
bbc
Teachers are not the only key workers who have health problems expected to carry on
6
01/12/2020 14:11:50 10 10
bbc
No easy answers here but on balance Exams must still be taken. Teachers assessment is totally unfair and very biased.
14
01/12/2020 14:26:46 5 2
bbc
Exams are biased towards pupils that haven't had to learn remotely or self-isolate. It's not a fair plying field.
10
01/12/2020 14:20:15 90 39
bbc
BBC instruction to all journalists:

- go find a problem
- identify the most negative statistics possible
- ignore solutions and the positive
- write a piece - the message is that "we are all doomed"

BBC - almost 1 in 5 secondary schools sending pupils home.

Reality - 80% of schools are operating fairly normally
15
01/12/2020 14:27:34 24 47
bbc
Utter rubbish,people just head in sand,have you children,are they off school,why knock the tv people for telling you the truth
194
01/12/2020 16:23:43 2 3
bbc
You just cant help some folk if the spin doesn't suit ignore it, given circumstances I think nearly 80% in school is pretty good going
309
01/12/2020 17:23:06 0 1
bbc
the tv people telling the truth? what planet are you on? what about the recent forged bank account stuff for starters. Good grief British Fed Up try alleged uk wake up!
16
01/12/2020 14:26:27 24 17
bbc
Correct BBC's scaremongering headlines. Vast majority of school open and operating as normal throughout the UK, no problems here.
Another tory liar,have you children at school? Bet no,just some oldfart agreeing to tory lies Removed
32
01/12/2020 14:42:03 7 1
bbc
78% attendance nationall isn't "operating normally". Some schools will be below 50%. That's a crazy number
172
01/12/2020 16:07:58 2 0
bbc
Not a single school in the four nations is operating as normal. If they did, they would be breaking the law. Perhaps you mean: operating within the Covid-19 guidelines and coping. If so, then say that, not some spurious fantasy you've invented in your head. If you don't know what you are talking about, don't talk.
13
01/12/2020 14:25:03 17 1
bbc
....and the staff? We had a primary school teacher die in our county 2 weeks ago who had Covid. Staff with chronic health conditions are expected to be at work, with no funding allowing additional supply staff to protect them (ie, working in the classroom to allow them to remote teach). All schools want is a level playing field and that won't be possible with no change to exams at this rate.
17
01/12/2020 14:27:42 2 0
bbc
Well that's what happens when the govt of the day insists in selling off playing fields. Hard to find a level one.
8
01/12/2020 14:16:35 16 13
bbc
Wow. The BBC dust this story down once a week and spray a sheen of panic over it, ready to present once again as balanced reporting.
18
01/12/2020 14:28:32 9 6
bbc
I wish the tory voters would investigate before making their silly comments
110
01/12/2020 15:37:55 1 2
bbc
We do unlike many others
123
01/12/2020 15:42:53 0 1
bbc
Would even they be Tory voters if they had that kind of attention span?
256
01/12/2020 16:53:39 1 0
bbc
Sorry Mr or Mrs Marxist
12
01/12/2020 14:25:01 3 10
bbc
keep the schools open
Ridiculous to send entire schools home due to one infection
Like to know which areas have shut schools.
Home schooling and on line fails children
19
01/12/2020 14:29:15 19 0
bbc
Schools don't shut due to one case. Public Health England assess each case and the probable number of exposed people. Usually just a few people will be told to self-isolate. If there are a number of contactees, it could be a whole class or year group. Only multiple infections across year groups would result in a whole school closure. Public Health England make the decision - not headteachers.
16
01/12/2020 14:26:27 24 17
bbc
Correct BBC's scaremongering headlines. Vast majority of school open and operating as normal throughout the UK, no problems here.
Another tory liar,have you children at school? Bet no,just some oldfart agreeing to tory lies Removed
47
01/12/2020 14:51:21 3 4
bbc
This is a very nasty comment and should be removed
120
01/12/2020 15:39:28 1 0
bbc
Wrong, I have 3 children
12
01/12/2020 14:25:01 3 10
bbc
keep the schools open
Ridiculous to send entire schools home due to one infection
Like to know which areas have shut schools.
Home schooling and on line fails children
21
01/12/2020 14:30:32 4 0
bbc
Schools don't shut for one infection. They close bubbles when a child tests positive and having been instructed to do so by the DfE or Public Health England. The areas that have shut schools are typically where infection rates are very high.
23
01/12/2020 14:33:15 0 3
bbc
love to know those areas and the schools.
PHE oh yes they didnt know what t cells were until recently...
we have to avoid closure and home schooling at all costs
22
01/12/2020 14:30:50 80 9
bbc
The media will whinge whatever.

Schools open and the media will whinge about 1 in 5 kids being off, ignoring that 4 in 5 kids are in school fine.

Close the schools and the media will complain about kids missing out on their education.

What's it to be? Why so negative. No wonder people are losing faith in the mainstream media
67
01/12/2020 15:09:18 17 7
bbc
Is 20% out not bad?
157
01/12/2020 15:56:52 5 5
bbc
"No wonder people are losing faith in the mainstream media"

Evidence please?

Define "whinge" - is it "report some facts" or "report some facts that you don't like"?
247
01/12/2020 16:51:52 5 2
bbc
That's not what the article shows - 75% of schools have had to send pupils home. 22% off school last Thursday.
I am not for closing schools - I think the policies are ridiculous because they treat schools like little bubble which is nonsense. Only kids with +ve test should be sent home.
397
02/12/2020 09:13:45 1 0
bbc
"...are losing faith" - wrong faith was lost in most media long ago.
21
01/12/2020 14:30:32 4 0
bbc
Schools don't shut for one infection. They close bubbles when a child tests positive and having been instructed to do so by the DfE or Public Health England. The areas that have shut schools are typically where infection rates are very high.
23
01/12/2020 14:33:15 0 3
bbc
love to know those areas and the schools.
PHE oh yes they didnt know what t cells were until recently...
we have to avoid closure and home schooling at all costs
161
01/12/2020 15:58:32 1 0
bbc
No, we have to protect the vulnerable until a vaccine is widely available, protect people's jobs, the economy and people's health (including their mental health). We don't have to avoid closure "at all costs".
24
01/12/2020 14:33:43 20 11
bbc
To all the tory people,this news has been reported on ITV,Sky and local radio
Just because it doesn't agree with your world doesn't mean it's incorrect,when will you accept that sometimes your leader is wrong
31
01/12/2020 14:41:55 9 14
bbc
you believe the media!!!?
98
01/12/2020 15:29:51 1 0
bbc
Polarisation is the problem here not tories. Not everything in human society fits into to distinct boxes!
115
01/12/2020 15:39:43 2 1
bbc
Oh the irony! ????
229
01/12/2020 16:41:58 0 0
bbc
And thereb6lies the problem looney left would deny that whatever the Tory government did was wrong, vivid is NOT aware of any of your preferences or biases
2
01/12/2020 14:11:02 55 12
bbc
Kids don't learn as well at home, too many distractions and they don't view they're parents the same way as teachers - it's a tough time to be a kid.
25
01/12/2020 14:33:50 44 3
bbc
Not all parents actually have the time to teach their children either, no matter how much they would like to.

When we had to quarantine our children because of Covid, it involved working 18 hour days to try to juggle work, childcare and teaching - the result was basically doing none of them very well.
264
01/12/2020 16:57:18 2 0
bbc
Yes when schools were closed people started to see the multiple reasons for kids to go back there.
I do think we have to keep schools open - but the rules are meaning too many are being sent home and it's going to hurt their future.
278
01/12/2020 17:03:47 1 0
bbc
You need to take the time. You can’t have a go at schools for not providing essential education then refuse to make sure your children stick to it.
Most schools are providing online lessons and work. In my school every child has been catered for - even giving laptops and 4G routers out.
The only ones not participating are those whose parents don’t bother to log them on.
329
01/12/2020 17:37:34 0 1
bbc
The schools need changing. They are stuck in a rut behind the times. They are underfunded and badly managed. There are not enough teachers. The modern world is all happening on IT. Lessons should be accessible on-line for all. Children should be growing food and gardening and farming for half the school week and learning how to avoid so many additives in their diet which are damaging their health.
334
01/12/2020 17:41:26 0 0
bbc
Or the ability
26
01/12/2020 14:35:32 37 4
bbc
Compared to doctors schools are doing very well, at least children get to see a teacher at work, a child won't see a doctor at work!
30
01/12/2020 14:41:41 26 1
bbc
They have become an extinct breed
36
NMT
01/12/2020 14:42:55 1 10
bbc
Also won't see a butcher, a baker or a candlestick maker. What's your point?
61
01/12/2020 15:03:37 3 4
bbc
No, you can still se a Doctor, they just aren't seeing the usual hypochondriac and time wasters.
215
01/12/2020 16:34:08 1 2
bbc
Ridiculous if a dis needed then one would have been seen, as for teachers I know more than the odd one who went away in normal term time as schools were closed and meant to be working from home
352
01/12/2020 17:53:59 0 0
bbc
Oh come on
1
01/12/2020 14:10:18 36 11
bbc
So what? If the alternative is to close schools until this is over then there is no alternative. They need to stay open, be as safe as possible, and continue to educate.
27
01/12/2020 14:37:12 22 2
bbc
Agreed - not an ideal situation, but we there are very few workable alternatives. The education and welfare of children needs to be a higher priority than pubs and non-essential shops.
156
01/12/2020 15:56:47 1 4
bbc
The education and welfare of children needs to be a higher priority than people who have reached the end of life and are going to die soon anyway because their immune system has stopped working.

That group could be a lot better protected, especially in hospitals, but the government have DISMALLY FAILED to do it. So its hard choices time.

If life is to continue, the young must come first.
314
01/12/2020 17:26:54 2 2
bbc
Nonsense. Stop this stupid belief schooling is education. Education can go on perfectly well with not a single crowded herd based age restricted, teacher non choice, limited subjects, lousy school. Schooling is child jailing free childcare, for lazy parents who prefer riches of working over their children's care and education. Education long overdue its 'high street'/on line revolution. Close all.
339
01/12/2020 17:42:31 0 0
bbc
Surely any business that provides employees with a liveable income is essential by default?
28
01/12/2020 14:38:38 2 14
bbc
Yep self-isolating rules basically mean whole year groups are being cleared out every other week

This is what happens when you allow the bully boys (unions) to run you ragged in the summer when the risks were low and we might have not noticed the virus in schools

Every sniffle could be the virus and now and every child knows it - school is optional
205
01/12/2020 16:28:01 0 0
bbc
"Bully boy unions run you ragged"

Sorry Margaret, you are dead and your anti-collectivism is what caused most of the problems we have right now.

Joseph Goebbels, the Reich Minister of Propaganda in Nazi Germany, wrote often on the need to appeal to emotions and instincts, instead of intellect, and on the unimportance of truth.
10
01/12/2020 14:20:15 90 39
bbc
BBC instruction to all journalists:

- go find a problem
- identify the most negative statistics possible
- ignore solutions and the positive
- write a piece - the message is that "we are all doomed"

BBC - almost 1 in 5 secondary schools sending pupils home.

Reality - 80% of schools are operating fairly normally
29
01/12/2020 14:41:15 14 0
bbc
but those 20% of schools are educating hundreds of thousands of children. THey can't just be written off. And that's just one week: more schools than that have sent children home at least once, in some areas multiple times.
58
01/12/2020 15:01:51 16 10
bbc
Spot on Terry, the BBC have become obsessed with emotion and drama rather than objective, pragmatic news reporting
103
Jon
01/12/2020 15:33:51 10 0
bbc
You're right. As a quick example, there are 3,297 maintained, mainstream (so not independent or special needs) KS4 schools open, with 2,925,072 students. That's an average of 887 students per school, so 20% (659 schools) would represent 585,014 students, the same as the population of Liverpool. Again, that's without including special needs setting which have lower student counts but more staff.
274
01/12/2020 17:01:18 1 1
bbc
In our school They’re still being educated, just off site. And if they’re not it’s down to the parents.
26
01/12/2020 14:35:32 37 4
bbc
Compared to doctors schools are doing very well, at least children get to see a teacher at work, a child won't see a doctor at work!
30
01/12/2020 14:41:41 26 1
bbc
They have become an extinct breed
59
NMT
01/12/2020 15:02:11 0 0
bbc
What Doctors? Or do you mean Candlestick makers? I'd agree with that....:-)
24
01/12/2020 14:33:43 20 11
bbc
To all the tory people,this news has been reported on ITV,Sky and local radio
Just because it doesn't agree with your world doesn't mean it's incorrect,when will you accept that sometimes your leader is wrong
31
01/12/2020 14:41:55 9 14
bbc
you believe the media!!!?
16
01/12/2020 14:26:27 24 17
bbc
Correct BBC's scaremongering headlines. Vast majority of school open and operating as normal throughout the UK, no problems here.
32
01/12/2020 14:42:03 7 1
bbc
78% attendance nationall isn't "operating normally". Some schools will be below 50%. That's a crazy number
33
01/12/2020 14:42:12 1 18
bbc
So some people appear to value education on this

Can they tell me one piece of knowledge they remember learning at school except the skills (so not really knowledge strictly) of reading, writing (so communicating with the written word inc via computer) and basic maths that they've used in adult life?

And you aren't working in education of course.

Education is not designed to be useful
57
NMT
01/12/2020 15:01:12 18 0
bbc
How to type. How to grow a plant. How my blood travels round my body. How to identify animals. How my brain works. How to socially interact with my peers in the workplace and in a social situation. It gave me the discipline to get on with a task, to structure a project and keep to a timetable. I could go on....
77
01/12/2020 15:14:32 4 0
bbc
eh! How is a skill not formed from prior knoweledge James?
116
01/12/2020 15:39:54 0 0
bbc
I learnt next to nothing at school. I was in home-ed for most of my primary years, and could already read before I should have started school anyway. When I went back for secondary school, the only subjects I learnt much in were French and History. Everything else I learnt at home, usually a couple of years before I had to sit through it all being read out to me by a teacher.
210
01/12/2020 16:30:52 0 0
bbc
If education was simply a memory trick, then I can confidently assert i learned my times tables from 1 to 10, maybe a couple of obscure facts about ... oh hang on, my Biochemistry degree, my LLB, the ability to learn, read, write, think, analyse, critically appraise, a bit of Spanish, and a really tiny bit of physics. Hence my 10 grade A results at O-level, taken two years early.
34
NMT
01/12/2020 14:42:22 92 6
bbc
Judging by the school children I see on my train journey every day, and the ones out and about in the evenings and weekends, the School taking precautions mean nothing if the children are mixing as normal outside of school. (These are over 12's I am seeing, not primary school children)
196
01/12/2020 16:24:27 34 0
bbc
Well, it's all lip service really.

Take my school: we have had scattered cases, and have been commended for our approach, but in the end there's no point in staggered breaks, masks in corridors and wiping tables between lessons when scores of pairs of siblings negate the year group bubbles the moment they get home, and others while travelling to and from school, on weekends etc.
224
01/12/2020 16:39:23 9 5
bbc
Perfectly put - but I don't blame kids or the schools.
This is HMG/DfE - it was obvious this was going to happen. The only policy needed is individuals who test +ve need to isolate - the concept of class and year 'bubbles' is a total joke. Expecting classroom windows to be kept open in below zero - another joke of a policy with minimal benefit.
35
01/12/2020 14:42:35 58 10
bbc
I wonder, when all this is over, our attitude towards education will have changed? Let's be honest, for many people sending their kids to school is just free childcare and always has been. However with children having to learn remotely at home, perhaps some of those less caring parents will actually have some idea about what education is all about and the difficulties faced by teacher. Some hope!
38
01/12/2020 14:44:52 27 1
bbc
You'd think so. Bit what I've see so far though to be honest. Usually self entitled people thinking everything it there to serve them.
151
Liz
01/12/2020 15:52:53 5 0
bbc
Hmm I think that it's so difficult to get some parents to engage with schools and their children are the ones who lose out....I don't think they realise or want to admit that there are no jobs for school leavers who don't have qualifications.
164
01/12/2020 16:01:00 1 3
bbc
"Let's be honest, for many people sending their kids to school is just free childcare and always has been"

Yes, let us be honest:

Where did you get that notion?
Has it been researched by a non-crackpot researcher?
Do you believe the only benefit for those children is simply to enable their parents to "not have to look after them", or might there be a social / educational dimension to it?
346
01/12/2020 17:51:18 3 0
bbc
That is the problem!
For some people school is childcare- let’s be honest
When my lad was at primary and secondary school for that matter the vast majority of parents didn’t even turn up at parents evenings
369
01/12/2020 18:06:11 1 0
bbc
Not a chance unfortunately. I can only go off my own experience but while I've made sure my kids have everything they need for home learning, at my own expense, and without question, I've heard many a parent whining that 'they (teachers or govt presumably) should supply laptops and such,' if they want the kids to learn'.
26
01/12/2020 14:35:32 37 4
bbc
Compared to doctors schools are doing very well, at least children get to see a teacher at work, a child won't see a doctor at work!
36
NMT
01/12/2020 14:42:55 1 10
bbc
Also won't see a butcher, a baker or a candlestick maker. What's your point?
8
01/12/2020 14:16:35 16 13
bbc
Wow. The BBC dust this story down once a week and spray a sheen of panic over it, ready to present once again as balanced reporting.
37
01/12/2020 14:43:52 0 2
bbc
its because theres pretty much nothing else going on I suppose
35
01/12/2020 14:42:35 58 10
bbc
I wonder, when all this is over, our attitude towards education will have changed? Let's be honest, for many people sending their kids to school is just free childcare and always has been. However with children having to learn remotely at home, perhaps some of those less caring parents will actually have some idea about what education is all about and the difficulties faced by teacher. Some hope!
38
01/12/2020 14:44:52 27 1
bbc
You'd think so. Bit what I've see so far though to be honest. Usually self entitled people thinking everything it there to serve them.
39
01/12/2020 14:45:07 7 4
bbc
I wonder how many parents will take their kids out of schools from 11 December anyway... self isolate for two weeks before Christmas so they can see granny....
53
Bob
01/12/2020 14:59:17 2 7
bbc
Lowerd in her new artisan pine box. There finished it for you
40
01/12/2020 14:45:36 24 7
bbc
How many children have died as a result of Covid 19?
How many teachers have died as a result of Covid 19?
The answer is incredibly small

The way we protect our vulnerable is to adopt social distancing measures around them
With 7million children at school, 10% of the population are still mixing, the virus will not go away, no matter how long we spend in Tier 3
75
01/12/2020 15:13:26 18 4
bbc
I’m diabetic and am in school with no social distancing as the children are 4. I have a mask and that’s it. I don’t go to the supermarket, or anywhere inside but school. I don’t feel safe but I have a mortgage to pay.
88
Ben
01/12/2020 15:23:39 11 4
bbc
We don't know about teachers because the Government have refused to release any data about teacher absences or illnesses or deaths since September. This is now subject to several Freedom of Information requests, ever since Chris Whitty misused/lied about transmission in schools a few weeks ago,
131
01/12/2020 15:44:49 11 0
bbc
21 children so far. No data on teachers as the government won't release the data. Just under 25% of all new infections are coming from schools.
169
01/12/2020 16:05:57 4 0
bbc
It's not about how many children or teachers have died (both small numbers fortunately). It's about how many elderly relatives and parents have had their contact with the virus minimized and have thus not succumbed that is important. Schools have adopted social distancing measures. Sorry, but I prefer that to your idea of just ignoring the virus and pretending we can all behave as normal.
390
01/12/2020 21:25:41 0 0
bbc
How many relatives of children and teachers have died?
How many teachers and children will suffer long term due to Long Covid?
The answers are not easy, but we need to think in a strategic way about how education can continue.
The Open University has been going for a long time, pre internet.
Something other than "In you all go, try not to spread the virus" is needed.
13
01/12/2020 14:25:03 17 1
bbc
....and the staff? We had a primary school teacher die in our county 2 weeks ago who had Covid. Staff with chronic health conditions are expected to be at work, with no funding allowing additional supply staff to protect them (ie, working in the classroom to allow them to remote teach). All schools want is a level playing field and that won't be possible with no change to exams at this rate.
41
01/12/2020 14:45:42 1 8
bbc
every school my kids went to seemed to have teachers using every excuse to not be there
186
01/12/2020 16:17:45 2 0
bbc
Yeah, yeah, you hate everyone and undersatnd no-one but your indignation. Bravo.

"Every excuse" being tabloid ballcocks for "we made this up". Did you make that up?

"Seemed?" Did the head tell you why they were off? No, you made that up, too.
273
01/12/2020 17:00:49 0 0
bbc
Well closest fri6has 2 teachers out of 3 children, oldest was told to stay home due to a long term medical issue and the other one kept going
42
01/12/2020 14:46:22 7 7
bbc
I do Home Tutoring for my granddaughter. She stays at home and I travel to tutor her.

I also Home Tutored her mother (my daughter) who now has a good job.

We are all teachers, although I was never trained as a teacher.

It is what parents and grand parents do.
43
01/12/2020 14:48:44 7 5
bbc
And still exams go ahead next summer in the current postcode lottery.
44
01/12/2020 14:48:35 88 7
bbc
I agree that keeping schools open is a national priority - but please could the adults who are doing so at least be classed as keyworkers when it comes to being offered the vaccine. School staff in all jobs, are at a higher risk than the general population who do not potentially 'mix' with the numbers that are in a school.
71
01/12/2020 15:10:21 16 18
bbc
"School staff in all jobs, are at a higher risk than the general population"

Meanwhile a study undertaken by the Swedish (schools kept open) and Finnish (schools closed) health services concluded that "A comparison of the incidence of COVID-19 in different professions suggested no increased risk for teachers."
72
01/12/2020 15:11:13 17 1
bbc
Agreed. This especially so since so many have worked all through this 'pandemic' - through holidays, half terms, summer holidays - all unpaid and unlauded.
45
01/12/2020 14:50:40 0 6
bbc
Test in the schools....Do them one at a time, and test the lot. Anyone not tested / not there / already isolating finishes there isolation at home, or someone pops round a nd does the test. Clear them all up, only way to do it, as the little darlings are bored, don't understand the rules, and don't care anyway as it doesn't hurt them when / if they catch it.
They pass covid to me and I guarantee you it will hurt them. Removed
82
01/12/2020 15:19:21 3 0
bbc
Good idea, but this only proves the person is clear when the test is taken, and even then the test is not 100% accurate. The student could go home and catch Covid the same evening. The only way to do this would be to test the whole school every week, as my wife has to be tested every week in her care home. This would be very expensive to do for schools and very disruptive.
8
01/12/2020 14:16:35 16 13
bbc
Wow. The BBC dust this story down once a week and spray a sheen of panic over it, ready to present once again as balanced reporting.
46
Jon
01/12/2020 14:51:14 3 1
bbc
To cite the article, the "latest official figures for overall attendance in England show". These figures weren't there to be reported in the past, that's how linear time works. Do you think everything needs to be reported once and never revisited even as new information comes to light?
Another tory liar,have you children at school? Bet no,just some oldfart agreeing to tory lies Removed
47
01/12/2020 14:51:21 3 4
bbc
This is a very nasty comment and should be removed
112
01/12/2020 15:38:49 2 1
bbc
Ad Hominem vitriol is all some people have sadly
2
01/12/2020 14:11:02 55 12
bbc
Kids don't learn as well at home, too many distractions and they don't view they're parents the same way as teachers - it's a tough time to be a kid.
48
01/12/2020 14:52:30 12 9
bbc
Wrong.

My children both caught up considerably under lockdown and returned to school well ahead of schedule.

They are 8 and 9 though so were keen to learn, not sure that would be the case in 5 years when other interests take over admittedly.
55
01/12/2020 15:00:21 15 3
bbc
That may be wrong for you and your experience, but let's not forget that not all families enjoy exactly the same set of circumstances that have allowed you to ensure everything was done satisfactorily.
153
01/12/2020 15:55:39 7 2
bbc
Wrong.

Your anectode - and congratulations for doing so well - does not reflect nor represent the millions of toher people that you have never met and never will. Perhaps the experts know something we don;t and we could consider listening to them?
306
01/12/2020 17:20:27 1 0
bbc
You start with a single word sentence of 'Wrong'.
You finish with a caveat.
Are you a politician?
49
01/12/2020 14:52:36 32 4
bbc
I’m in the SE of England and my daughters school had 6 new cases over the weekend - in addition to existing cases. Whole year groups have been sent home. She sat in a class of 2 waiting for others to join. It’s her GCSEs this year and she is so stressed out with the constant disruption and will they won’t they cancel the exams. As a parent I want my child to be educated but this is ridiculous ????
Maby your crotch toad is just thick Removed
349
01/12/2020 17:52:26 0 0
bbc
Rest assured, unless Gavin Williams does a complete U-turn, the GCSEs have always been planned to go ahead. Timetables are available on Exam Board websites - start June 7th, end July 2nd. Papers have already been written and now ready to print. So there should be no 'will they won't they cancel exams'.
429
02/12/2020 20:24:20 0 0
bbc
I teach GCSE and since start of this term more than 50% are isolating due to covid cases one after another. They are very stressed as they lost lots of months due to covid and even with the live lessons, they don’t feel they are making as much progress as they would have without Covid. They are worried about exams and find it hard to learn from home.
50
01/12/2020 14:53:14 23 11
bbc
Without a functioning test & trace system

lockdowns & school closures are all we have

The £bns Johnson & co have thrown at their chums and they have failed utterly to deliver is a scandal
117
01/12/2020 15:41:12 3 13
bbc
We have an excellent T&T , possibly the best in Europe.
312
01/12/2020 17:26:41 0 0
bbc
Why do you say we have not got a functioning test and trace system? We are conducting more tests than any other country in Europe and if you bother to read the news you will see that virtually every other country is having the same problems we are. We are no worse off than anywhere else.
49
01/12/2020 14:52:36 32 4
bbc
I’m in the SE of England and my daughters school had 6 new cases over the weekend - in addition to existing cases. Whole year groups have been sent home. She sat in a class of 2 waiting for others to join. It’s her GCSEs this year and she is so stressed out with the constant disruption and will they won’t they cancel the exams. As a parent I want my child to be educated but this is ridiculous ????
51
Bob
bbc
Maby your crotch toad is just thick Removed
Removed
Removed
45
01/12/2020 14:50:40 0 6
bbc
Test in the schools....Do them one at a time, and test the lot. Anyone not tested / not there / already isolating finishes there isolation at home, or someone pops round a nd does the test. Clear them all up, only way to do it, as the little darlings are bored, don't understand the rules, and don't care anyway as it doesn't hurt them when / if they catch it.
52
Bob
bbc
They pass covid to me and I guarantee you it will hurt them. Removed
56
01/12/2020 15:00:57 0 0
bbc
Bob. You tell that to my friends husband. They died from Covid
39
01/12/2020 14:45:07 7 4
bbc
I wonder how many parents will take their kids out of schools from 11 December anyway... self isolate for two weeks before Christmas so they can see granny....
53
Bob
01/12/2020 14:59:17 2 7
bbc
Lowerd in her new artisan pine box. There finished it for you
95
01/12/2020 15:27:49 2 0
bbc
Granny has been child care for the children all their lives as mum workers with children in care,
Granny still looking after children through C-19, as they need continuity and I am not in any pine box.
Try thinking before acting, you will just upset MY MOTHER.
13
01/12/2020 14:25:03 17 1
bbc
....and the staff? We had a primary school teacher die in our county 2 weeks ago who had Covid. Staff with chronic health conditions are expected to be at work, with no funding allowing additional supply staff to protect them (ie, working in the classroom to allow them to remote teach). All schools want is a level playing field and that won't be possible with no change to exams at this rate.
54
01/12/2020 15:00:12 0 0
bbc
There have been changes to exams - in my subject (English) we have been able to drop the study of one text in the Literature exam. Also, the time allowed is longer - both papers used to allocate 45 minutes per essay; now, each essay is given 50, with the unseen poetry section being given 55. Also, the exams start three weeks later, giving 5 weeks study after the Easter break instead of 2.
126
01/12/2020 15:43:56 1 0
bbc
So it's not really a GCSE (or A-level) is it? It's just part of it re-named to make it look like the real thing. A prime example of devaluing qualifications.

Coming next, a driving test where you only need to be able to drive in one gear.
48
01/12/2020 14:52:30 12 9
bbc
Wrong.

My children both caught up considerably under lockdown and returned to school well ahead of schedule.

They are 8 and 9 though so were keen to learn, not sure that would be the case in 5 years when other interests take over admittedly.
55
01/12/2020 15:00:21 15 3
bbc
That may be wrong for you and your experience, but let's not forget that not all families enjoy exactly the same set of circumstances that have allowed you to ensure everything was done satisfactorily.
198
01/12/2020 16:24:34 0 0
bbc
Like what exactly
They pass covid to me and I guarantee you it will hurt them. Removed
56
01/12/2020 15:00:57 0 0
bbc
Bob. You tell that to my friends husband. They died from Covid
66
01/12/2020 15:09:07 0 0
bbc
Ah, sorry Bob, I read your comment wrong.
33
01/12/2020 14:42:12 1 18
bbc
So some people appear to value education on this

Can they tell me one piece of knowledge they remember learning at school except the skills (so not really knowledge strictly) of reading, writing (so communicating with the written word inc via computer) and basic maths that they've used in adult life?

And you aren't working in education of course.

Education is not designed to be useful
57
NMT
01/12/2020 15:01:12 18 0
bbc
How to type. How to grow a plant. How my blood travels round my body. How to identify animals. How my brain works. How to socially interact with my peers in the workplace and in a social situation. It gave me the discipline to get on with a task, to structure a project and keep to a timetable. I could go on....
29
01/12/2020 14:41:15 14 0
bbc
but those 20% of schools are educating hundreds of thousands of children. THey can't just be written off. And that's just one week: more schools than that have sent children home at least once, in some areas multiple times.
58
01/12/2020 15:01:51 16 10
bbc
Spot on Terry, the BBC have become obsessed with emotion and drama rather than objective, pragmatic news reporting
119
01/12/2020 15:38:14 5 2
bbc
All media outlets suffer from this its a desease that's slowley destroying our society.
30
01/12/2020 14:41:41 26 1
bbc
They have become an extinct breed
59
NMT
01/12/2020 15:02:11 0 0
bbc
What Doctors? Or do you mean Candlestick makers? I'd agree with that....:-)
Send them to school, according to most other media outlets this is a fake virus anyway and lockdowns make no difference. Apparently it is all about the NWO and control over peoples rights. Shocking really that the majority of MSM are following this path and the BBC is regarded as bias fake news by so many now. Removed
This virus is not fake.
My friends husband died of the virus.
People like you pushing your fake-news conspiracies are technically murdering people.
Removed
69
01/12/2020 15:08:14 1 1
bbc
The problem arises because the BBC has been caught giving a biased account many, many times in recent years. This has been to the point of even being caught fabricating 'evidence' on Panorama. It really is a shame.
26
01/12/2020 14:35:32 37 4
bbc
Compared to doctors schools are doing very well, at least children get to see a teacher at work, a child won't see a doctor at work!
61
01/12/2020 15:03:37 3 4
bbc
No, you can still se a Doctor, they just aren't seeing the usual hypochondriac and time wasters.
62
01/12/2020 15:01:51 5 14
bbc
Lazy parents and lazy kids who don’t want to go out in the cold.
65
01/12/2020 15:06:43 1 6
bbc
Bet your on the DSS.
Removed
108
01/12/2020 15:33:55 1 0
bbc
Thats just rediculous, I worry for the state of humanity sometimes
195
01/12/2020 16:24:00 0 0
bbc
You forgot lazy grandparents, lazily lazing around in the ICU, and lazy remarks made by the ignorant that are incapable and unwilling to comment on the reality. Or even read the article. Do you imagine that 20% of the nation;s children are miraculously so lazy this year, unlike every other year ever?

Lazy lazy lazy racist comment. Yeah, I'm too lazy to look up the word for whoever you hate.
10
01/12/2020 14:20:15 90 39
bbc
BBC instruction to all journalists:

- go find a problem
- identify the most negative statistics possible
- ignore solutions and the positive
- write a piece - the message is that "we are all doomed"

BBC - almost 1 in 5 secondary schools sending pupils home.

Reality - 80% of schools are operating fairly normally
63
01/12/2020 15:04:34 4 9
bbc
Terry, do you work at ITV son?
Send them to school, according to most other media outlets this is a fake virus anyway and lockdowns make no difference. Apparently it is all about the NWO and control over peoples rights. Shocking really that the majority of MSM are following this path and the BBC is regarded as bias fake news by so many now. Removed
This virus is not fake.
My friends husband died of the virus.
People like you pushing your fake-news conspiracies are technically murdering people.
Removed
62
01/12/2020 15:01:51 5 14
bbc
Lazy parents and lazy kids who don’t want to go out in the cold.
65
01/12/2020 15:06:43 1 6
bbc
Bet your on the DSS.
74
01/12/2020 15:13:08 5 0
bbc
At least he can write English.

you're - abbreviation of you are.
your - belonging to you

Perhaps you ought to spend more time in the library 90.
105
NMT
01/12/2020 15:34:46 2 0
bbc
It's not been the DSS for a long long time.
56
01/12/2020 15:00:57 0 0
bbc
Bob. You tell that to my friends husband. They died from Covid
66
01/12/2020 15:09:07 0 0
bbc
Ah, sorry Bob, I read your comment wrong.
22
01/12/2020 14:30:50 80 9
bbc
The media will whinge whatever.

Schools open and the media will whinge about 1 in 5 kids being off, ignoring that 4 in 5 kids are in school fine.

Close the schools and the media will complain about kids missing out on their education.

What's it to be? Why so negative. No wonder people are losing faith in the mainstream media
67
01/12/2020 15:09:18 17 7
bbc
Is 20% out not bad?
410
02/12/2020 12:44:28 0 0
bbc
Awful should be no more than 5%
Maby your crotch toad is just thick Removed
Removed
Send them to school, according to most other media outlets this is a fake virus anyway and lockdowns make no difference. Apparently it is all about the NWO and control over peoples rights. Shocking really that the majority of MSM are following this path and the BBC is regarded as bias fake news by so many now. Removed
69
01/12/2020 15:08:14 1 1
bbc
The problem arises because the BBC has been caught giving a biased account many, many times in recent years. This has been to the point of even being caught fabricating 'evidence' on Panorama. It really is a shame.
70
01/12/2020 15:10:19 10 5
bbc
Children in primary school do nothing but watch dvds in the last week before Xmas. I don’t think they’ll be missing much if schools closed early!
78
01/12/2020 15:17:06 20 3
bbc
You might want to consider changing your children's primary school
118
01/12/2020 15:41:59 0 1
bbc
Don't believe it.
181
01/12/2020 16:13:51 0 0
bbc
All of them?

Academically speaking, you mioght be right but even watcving a DVD with your peers can be beneficial socially, adding to the "school is a normal place to normally be", and chillax with the teacher. All of which can support education in and of itself.
408
02/12/2020 12:20:45 0 0
bbc
I'd complain if I were you. I have never done this, or taught in a school which did this, in my 20 years of teaching!
44
01/12/2020 14:48:35 88 7
bbc
I agree that keeping schools open is a national priority - but please could the adults who are doing so at least be classed as keyworkers when it comes to being offered the vaccine. School staff in all jobs, are at a higher risk than the general population who do not potentially 'mix' with the numbers that are in a school.
71
01/12/2020 15:10:21 16 18
bbc
"School staff in all jobs, are at a higher risk than the general population"

Meanwhile a study undertaken by the Swedish (schools kept open) and Finnish (schools closed) health services concluded that "A comparison of the incidence of COVID-19 in different professions suggested no increased risk for teachers."
93
mcg
01/12/2020 15:26:42 7 0
bbc
They still have to isolate if they have e contact with pupils who are positive..
193
01/12/2020 16:22:15 26 0
bbc
What was the average class size in the Swedish and Finnish studies? What was the age/ventilation regime of the schools. What was the length/frequency of exposure. What was the age profile of the staff? How do these metrics compare to those in UK schools - taking it further comparing to each devolved area?
227
01/12/2020 16:39:44 15 1
bbc
Seen the class sizes and behaviour of Swedish and Finnish kids? Most UK schools qualify as human zoos with inadequate space by comparison.
272
01/12/2020 17:00:36 4 13
bbc
My missus is a teacher - and I agree with you.. everyone wants us to give out Victoria Crosses for doing a job. We use words like 'frontline' and 'battle/war'... reality is that the vast majority who get it are fine after a bit of illness.
I'm sorry but I think the whole response is overblown - to the tune of £400bn and two generations' prospects ruined.
283
01/12/2020 17:05:12 6 0
bbc
If that’s the case why are so many staff off with it!
351
01/12/2020 17:53:08 5 0
bbc
Could you shed some light on the source of this research? It could be very poor or even worthless. Just because it was published doesn't mean it is reliable.
359
01/12/2020 17:58:52 3 0
bbc
Hi Andy,

Any use of Sweeden in comparison to the UK approach is flawed due to the socially cooperative way in which the Sweedish population upheld basic restrictions.

In short people in England wouldn't do what they were asked to do by being "exempt" from masks and generally being selfish; the prevailing attitude is that "there's no such thing as society" (Thatcher, M. 1987)
412
02/12/2020 13:56:43 2 0
bbc
Indeed a Swedish school is exceptionally well resourced with lessons taught outside for all year groups and much larger classrooms and less pupils per teacher. Perhaps include that context before you mislead the thousands who read this nonsense.
44
01/12/2020 14:48:35 88 7
bbc
I agree that keeping schools open is a national priority - but please could the adults who are doing so at least be classed as keyworkers when it comes to being offered the vaccine. School staff in all jobs, are at a higher risk than the general population who do not potentially 'mix' with the numbers that are in a school.
72
01/12/2020 15:11:13 17 1
bbc
Agreed. This especially so since so many have worked all through this 'pandemic' - through holidays, half terms, summer holidays - all unpaid and unlauded.
158
Liz
01/12/2020 15:55:30 25 0
bbc
Yes - your comment is much appreciated. I hate the teachers are lazy and sitting at home doing nothing line trotted out by some newspapers who i'm sure reflect some people's opinions... some teachers may have been slow to adapt to online teaching or anxious about delivering online but the vast majority have been working their socks off to try and keep learning moving forwards....
162
01/12/2020 15:59:16 10 1
bbc
You forgot the HYS mantra: all public sector workers were both furloughed on full pay -AND- were dossing about at work -AND- loony lefty liberal elite - AND- would have been worse under Neil Kinnock -AND- gold plated pension fat cats never had it so good hanging's too good for them - etc. ad nauseam.

The facts you mention are mere inconveniences to the torybots.
209
01/12/2020 16:30:27 2 2
bbc
You really expect people to take that in, my experience through a club that is overrun with children and has many teachers as members would laugh at your post as fantasy
62
01/12/2020 15:01:51 5 14
bbc
Lazy parents and lazy kids who don’t want to go out in the cold.
Removed
65
01/12/2020 15:06:43 1 6
bbc
Bet your on the DSS.
74
01/12/2020 15:13:08 5 0
bbc
At least he can write English.

you're - abbreviation of you are.
your - belonging to you

Perhaps you ought to spend more time in the library 90.
40
01/12/2020 14:45:36 24 7
bbc
How many children have died as a result of Covid 19?
How many teachers have died as a result of Covid 19?
The answer is incredibly small

The way we protect our vulnerable is to adopt social distancing measures around them
With 7million children at school, 10% of the population are still mixing, the virus will not go away, no matter how long we spend in Tier 3
75
01/12/2020 15:13:26 18 4
bbc
I’m diabetic and am in school with no social distancing as the children are 4. I have a mask and that’s it. I don’t go to the supermarket, or anywhere inside but school. I don’t feel safe but I have a mortgage to pay.
76
01/12/2020 15:16:40 4 2
bbc
Schools have been the source of a high proportion of the outbreaks, so this is, to some extent, inevitable. As more are sent home, over time, case rates will fall.
86
01/12/2020 15:22:35 8 1
bbc
Can only speak for the school I work at.

The kids confirmed all caught it out of school and non of the self isolating kids they had contact with have had a positive test.
91
mcg
01/12/2020 15:24:42 3 0
bbc
And in my area kids sent home to isolate do not stay at home, often see them in supermarkets. It is extremely difficult to keep teenager in the house. Maybe schools should be prioritised for the fast test which might reduce the amount of time children need to be away from school.
33
01/12/2020 14:42:12 1 18
bbc
So some people appear to value education on this

Can they tell me one piece of knowledge they remember learning at school except the skills (so not really knowledge strictly) of reading, writing (so communicating with the written word inc via computer) and basic maths that they've used in adult life?

And you aren't working in education of course.

Education is not designed to be useful
77
01/12/2020 15:14:32 4 0
bbc
eh! How is a skill not formed from prior knoweledge James?
70
01/12/2020 15:10:19 10 5
bbc
Children in primary school do nothing but watch dvds in the last week before Xmas. I don’t think they’ll be missing much if schools closed early!
78
01/12/2020 15:17:06 20 3
bbc
You might want to consider changing your children's primary school
79
01/12/2020 15:17:56 10 3
bbc
I'm amazed how many people have a pop at kids like they're responsible for Covid.

It's adults who who chose/vote for govts to control borders, quarantine, track & trace, testing, transport infrastructure, commercial centralisation, industrial concentration etc

Yet some people seem content to blame a group of people who don't even have the right to vote for all our woes?! Pathetic.
179
01/12/2020 16:13:02 4 0
bbc
Hilariously, you'll find the same angry beetroots complaining that kids today are dangerous rule-breakers spreading the virus... while also simultaneously telling you that kids can't catch Covid-19 so should go to school as normal. Whatever sates their irrational rage at any given moment!
241
01/12/2020 16:48:00 0 1
bbc
I haven't noticed anyone having a pop at kids.
1
01/12/2020 14:10:18 36 11
bbc
So what? If the alternative is to close schools until this is over then there is no alternative. They need to stay open, be as safe as possible, and continue to educate.
80
01/12/2020 15:18:26 4 0
bbc
That is all well and good - and I agree with you. But we need to accept that exams at the end of year 11 are not going to be straightforward this year. Best to prepare for a robust teacher assessment now.
81
01/12/2020 15:18:48 6 2
bbc
The important thing here is what is best for the pupils. Teachers don't want to be in the position of defence lawyers and judges, but this year only teachers know to what extent each pupil has been disadvantaged throughout the year by being sent home, perhaps multiple times, and what support they get then. It's not ideal, but external assessment won't work this year.
104
01/12/2020 15:34:29 0 1
bbc
The exam tests what you know. Either you know enough of it to get a given grade, or you don't. The circumstances that have caused your lack of knowledge are irrelevant. Apply the same logic to the driving test and you'll see what I mean.

"Hi, Mr Smith, all you can do is switch the engine on and open the window, but as you only had one lesson that's fine, have a driving licence and cause a crash."
45
01/12/2020 14:50:40 0 6
bbc
Test in the schools....Do them one at a time, and test the lot. Anyone not tested / not there / already isolating finishes there isolation at home, or someone pops round a nd does the test. Clear them all up, only way to do it, as the little darlings are bored, don't understand the rules, and don't care anyway as it doesn't hurt them when / if they catch it.
82
01/12/2020 15:19:21 3 0
bbc
Good idea, but this only proves the person is clear when the test is taken, and even then the test is not 100% accurate. The student could go home and catch Covid the same evening. The only way to do this would be to test the whole school every week, as my wife has to be tested every week in her care home. This would be very expensive to do for schools and very disruptive.
Maby your crotch toad is just thick Removed
Removed
84
01/12/2020 15:19:42 4 3
bbc
Good to see the plan for keeping schools open is working so well.

Unfortunately, from tomorrow the hospitality sector is still going to be closed or partly closed in most of the country as part of the plan to keep schools open. I could never see the logic of this and the current situation shows that there was no logic ad the decision to close hospitality was just plain wrong.
85
01/12/2020 15:21:59 19 2
bbc
No exam system can be fair to all students whose learning has been disrupted to a greater or lesser extent. The only fair way is to utilise moderated teacher assessment.
211
01/12/2020 16:32:39 9 1
bbc
In 2020 exams were cancelled, after the students had completed their tuition and were just in the revision stage. In 2021 they are planning on holding the exams despite the students missing a large part (in the case of A levels a very large part) of tuition this year. Doesn't make sense to me.
76
01/12/2020 15:16:40 4 2
bbc
Schools have been the source of a high proportion of the outbreaks, so this is, to some extent, inevitable. As more are sent home, over time, case rates will fall.
86
01/12/2020 15:22:35 8 1
bbc
Can only speak for the school I work at.

The kids confirmed all caught it out of school and non of the self isolating kids they had contact with have had a positive test.
145
Liz
01/12/2020 15:51:05 2 0
bbc
In my school had several cases in the staff very recently who have not been anywhere so have probably caught it at school - all in the same teams or sharing office space, this prompted partial closure. But I have seen in my local area many teens not abiding by the rules of this latest lockdown - it's difficult to pinpoint where they caught it but safe to say schools can't operate easily
265
01/12/2020 16:58:06 0 0
bbc
How do you know that statement to be true
87
01/12/2020 15:22:44 5 16
bbc
Schools should be closed.
129
01/12/2020 15:44:21 5 1
bbc
And all the parents of school-age children should stay home too? The country would face economic collapse, and those children without access to a computer would be disadvantaged further in their education and social development than they already have.
40
01/12/2020 14:45:36 24 7
bbc
How many children have died as a result of Covid 19?
How many teachers have died as a result of Covid 19?
The answer is incredibly small

The way we protect our vulnerable is to adopt social distancing measures around them
With 7million children at school, 10% of the population are still mixing, the virus will not go away, no matter how long we spend in Tier 3
88
Ben
01/12/2020 15:23:39 11 4
bbc
We don't know about teachers because the Government have refused to release any data about teacher absences or illnesses or deaths since September. This is now subject to several Freedom of Information requests, ever since Chris Whitty misused/lied about transmission in schools a few weeks ago,
107
dan
01/12/2020 15:36:36 8 1
bbc
Exactly, do you remember how they pushed the kids don't transmit the virus as much message?
89
Ben
01/12/2020 15:23:53 3 1
bbc
In a school that's been badly affected by this and experience every day the negative effects of the Tories forbidding the use of their own rota/tier system, can I just say I see a human cost. It is the unnecessary mental turmoil that those facing public exams are battling with, knowing how unlevel the playing field is and how unjust the system is.
If London were in the North, there'd be no GCSEs
97
01/12/2020 15:31:37 1 1
bbc
"If London were in the North"

Always good to meet a fellow fan of the accurate subjunctive.
99
01/12/2020 15:32:20 0 3
bbc
Oh....my heart bleeds.....mental turmoil?....The only mental turmoil they suffer is likely to be the result of losing their blessed iphones.
101
Liz
01/12/2020 15:32:17 1 0
bbc
totally agree - I teach in the south east and we have only less cases in my school than in many others but we have had 2 weeks of partial closure due to positive cases among the staff and I am now isolating due to this. It's impossible to keep learning going like this and there is so much pressure on the students so many highly stressed students unable to come in or poor & challenging behaviour
90
01/12/2020 15:24:41 6 3
bbc
Isn't this the same story the bbc has run for the last two weeks, and the figures haven't changed much.
122
Jon
01/12/2020 15:42:50 4 0
bbc
They have. The percentages are stable but that means the affected number of students is rising. 100,000 students out of school in one week and 100,000 the next is a cumulative 200,000.
76
01/12/2020 15:16:40 4 2
bbc
Schools have been the source of a high proportion of the outbreaks, so this is, to some extent, inevitable. As more are sent home, over time, case rates will fall.
91
mcg
01/12/2020 15:24:42 3 0
bbc
And in my area kids sent home to isolate do not stay at home, often see them in supermarkets. It is extremely difficult to keep teenager in the house. Maybe schools should be prioritised for the fast test which might reduce the amount of time children need to be away from school.
13
01/12/2020 14:25:03 17 1
bbc
....and the staff? We had a primary school teacher die in our county 2 weeks ago who had Covid. Staff with chronic health conditions are expected to be at work, with no funding allowing additional supply staff to protect them (ie, working in the classroom to allow them to remote teach). All schools want is a level playing field and that won't be possible with no change to exams at this rate.
92
01/12/2020 15:24:56 0 0
bbc
Teachers are not the only key workers who have health problems expected to carry on
71
01/12/2020 15:10:21 16 18
bbc
"School staff in all jobs, are at a higher risk than the general population"

Meanwhile a study undertaken by the Swedish (schools kept open) and Finnish (schools closed) health services concluded that "A comparison of the incidence of COVID-19 in different professions suggested no increased risk for teachers."
93
mcg
01/12/2020 15:26:42 7 0
bbc
They still have to isolate if they have e contact with pupils who are positive..
94
01/12/2020 15:26:47 15 4
bbc
80% attendence isn't that bad all things considered. There's a lot worse going on with people's jobs and livelihoods at the moment.
168
01/12/2020 16:04:21 1 2
bbc
Could be worse; could be 50, 230, 20, 5, 0 percent. And there's starving children in Africa.

Does that mean we should celebrate 80%, ignore it, suppress the fact?
176
01/12/2020 16:11:09 2 0
bbc
80% attendance in any other year would see a school in the local headlines, shut down by Ofsted summary inspection and handed over to a private academy chain. It's a serious matter. What you mean is that other people who like to write angry letters about such matter to the Daily Mail have better things to worry about in their own lives for a change!
356
01/12/2020 17:56:57 0 0
bbc
But it’s only 80% with the dodge that those awaiting test results don’t count as absent, but aea. That’s at least a few more % points.
53
Bob
01/12/2020 14:59:17 2 7
bbc
Lowerd in her new artisan pine box. There finished it for you
95
01/12/2020 15:27:49 2 0
bbc
Granny has been child care for the children all their lives as mum workers with children in care,
Granny still looking after children through C-19, as they need continuity and I am not in any pine box.
Try thinking before acting, you will just upset MY MOTHER.
96
01/12/2020 15:30:29 4 4
bbc
"Completely disrupted".

What does that actually mean? Either it was disrupted or it wasn't. The disruption may have been severe. If it were complete (and yes, that is how you say it), that would mean no-one was attending school.

Worryingly, this statement comes from the people in charge of educational standards in this country.
175
01/12/2020 16:10:58 0 0
bbc
"Significantly disrupted and in an somewhat arbitrary way"

Worryingly, we all know what the author means and pedandtry does not help. Even if you then use that as a peg to hang your anti-acedemic rhetoric on.
89
Ben
01/12/2020 15:23:53 3 1
bbc
In a school that's been badly affected by this and experience every day the negative effects of the Tories forbidding the use of their own rota/tier system, can I just say I see a human cost. It is the unnecessary mental turmoil that those facing public exams are battling with, knowing how unlevel the playing field is and how unjust the system is.
If London were in the North, there'd be no GCSEs
97
01/12/2020 15:31:37 1 1
bbc
"If London were in the North"

Always good to meet a fellow fan of the accurate subjunctive.
125
Ben
01/12/2020 15:43:48 1 0
bbc
I'm just in that kind of mood today.
24
01/12/2020 14:33:43 20 11
bbc
To all the tory people,this news has been reported on ITV,Sky and local radio
Just because it doesn't agree with your world doesn't mean it's incorrect,when will you accept that sometimes your leader is wrong
98
01/12/2020 15:29:51 1 0
bbc
Polarisation is the problem here not tories. Not everything in human society fits into to distinct boxes!
89
Ben
01/12/2020 15:23:53 3 1
bbc
In a school that's been badly affected by this and experience every day the negative effects of the Tories forbidding the use of their own rota/tier system, can I just say I see a human cost. It is the unnecessary mental turmoil that those facing public exams are battling with, knowing how unlevel the playing field is and how unjust the system is.
If London were in the North, there'd be no GCSEs
99
01/12/2020 15:32:20 0 3
bbc
Oh....my heart bleeds.....mental turmoil?....The only mental turmoil they suffer is likely to be the result of losing their blessed iphones.
313
Ben
01/12/2020 17:26:43 1 0
bbc
Having attended the funerals of several young people in my 30 years of teaching. Young people who have committed suicide for a range of reasons including what the education system does to them, call me a softy but I was actually bothered... just a bit, mind.
12
01/12/2020 14:25:01 3 10
bbc
keep the schools open
Ridiculous to send entire schools home due to one infection
Like to know which areas have shut schools.
Home schooling and on line fails children
100
01/12/2020 15:31:37 2 0
bbc
Factually incorrect Donald