Covid vaccine: Moderna seeks approval in US and Europe
30/11/2020 | news | health | 751
Regulators will decide if it is safe and effective enough to recommend for widespread use.
1
30/11/2020 13:26:40 21 22
bbc
Are they safe, what are the side effects these are the questions?
6
30/11/2020 13:29:15 28 6
bbc
There are always risks. But getting Covid is also risky.
11
30/11/2020 13:33:01 16 3
bbc
Safety will be assessed and monitored by the regulator. The assessors and regulator are completely independent from government in this country and indeed, the U.K. really is highly respected in this field.
356
30/11/2020 16:13:35 3 1
bbc
Those questions are exactly what the mhra and FDA authorities ask and scrutinise.
2
30/11/2020 13:27:25 98 43
bbc
Cannot believe all these stupid students in Nottingham raving together. Considering they are supposed to be intelligent they really haven’t got a brain cell between them. Rave now, get a positive test and force them to stay at uni for Xmas. Then watch them squeal like stuck pigs. Deserve everything they get.
53
30/11/2020 13:53:09 64 14
bbc
I suggest expulsion or some similar punishment.
No tolerance for those involved.
55
30/11/2020 13:53:36 9 11
bbc
Chill Winston..... they have probably worked out that their chance of dying from COVID is less than dying from the normal flu for their age group. Many people didn't get the annual flu shot before COVID came along.
79
30/11/2020 13:59:32 9 4
bbc
Probably all majoring political studies. That's a field where we need more people!
248
30/11/2020 15:12:56 7 8
bbc
It is called freedom of choice. Their risk appetite is different from yours. I would suggest that you should take whatever steps you feel appropriate,,,and lead others to lead their lives as they wish.
329
30/11/2020 16:05:25 7 5
bbc
Supposed to be intelligent? This is Nottingham University we’re talking about! ??
372
30/11/2020 16:15:31 4 11
bbc
lol a student from notts here just to let u know we were all sick and depressed from staying inside with most of us having no human contact for weeks. THAT WAS THE BEST time I've had since the lockdown began. keep this energy please to people who are actually protesting against face masks and a lockdown. shake my head
516
30/11/2020 17:14:19 1 4
bbc
They are intelligent enough not to believe the government's scaremongering. Like most bright people, they know that their chance of even suffering a little because of this virus is miniscule, so they are getting on with trying to enjoy their lives.

Those who spend their lives in fear never really live at all!
535
30/11/2020 17:24:23 1 1
bbc
Even better idea - tell their parents they were one of the ones involved. Watch their faces as their own mother tells them to come back incase they infect their grandparent
541
30/11/2020 17:27:45 1 1
bbc
Because their woke scum does that clarify your question
3
30/11/2020 13:27:45 21 11
bbc
We need to get this Vaccine out as soon as possible, but we also need to ensure that the risks of the Vaccine aren't greater than the risk of Covid. The obvious priority should be the vulnerable who already have high Covid risk.
27
30/11/2020 13:44:26 52 11
bbc
“We need to ensure the risks of the vaccine aren’t greater than risk of covid”. Good job you mentioned that, I bet none of the researchers, health professionals and regulators gave it a thought.
4
30/11/2020 13:28:00 198 26
bbc
Happily be at the front of the queue once these are given approval.....
16
30/11/2020 13:37:50 83 12
bbc
Snap
69
30/11/2020 13:57:46 20 3
bbc
Me too
182
30/11/2020 14:48:46 15 5
bbc
Yup yup - then i'm off to an anti-vax get-together with a heavy, spluttering cough...well, if it doesn't exist [they are the same guys right?] they shouldn't mind, eh.....
184
30/11/2020 14:49:10 8 26
bbc
Put me at the back then. I am not anti vax per se just not convinced the jabs have been tested enough
I'm happy for there to be legislation whereby once you've had the vaccination, you're free to enjoy society as normal.
Meanwhile the tinfoil hat brigade can stay in lockdown. Pubs and social spaces will be awesome without having to listen to them drivelling on.
411
30/11/2020 16:26:47 0 6
bbc
Well there’s always one......
461
30/11/2020 16:48:05 4 7
bbc
Really pleased for you.

My family and I will definitely not be at the front of the queue so enjoy.

I respect your decision and I am sure you will respect mine.

If you have the vaccine why would you be scared to be near non vaccinated people - surely you will be safe from this terrible disease??
507
30/11/2020 17:05:36 4 8
bbc
You can have my place, and that of almost everyone I know.

Hell, knock yourself out. Have all three vaccines.
601
30/11/2020 18:15:00 0 5
bbc
I hope you enjoy developing autism.
5
30/11/2020 13:29:13 37 11
bbc
Can we please have some peer-reviewed feedback rather than press releases to help assuage any potential concerns.
33
30/11/2020 13:47:15 41 8
bbc
Without the press releases we would still be in the dark, when actually there is real hope that vaccines will one day be successful and that day might soon be here. I much prefer that than political and press speculation. It’s good news, the best this year by far, why not share it!
145
30/11/2020 14:22:39 10 4
bbc
Peer reviewed research would be excellent, however few would understand it. The regulators will have their own experts to do the reviewing.
190
30/11/2020 14:51:16 1 3
bbc
Go and take out a subscription to the peer review papers
213
30/11/2020 15:02:13 5 1
bbc
I'd rather the regulators review the evidence then decide. At that point, they'll be sufficient evidence to assuage reasonable concerns, but some concerns will never be assuaged as they are not rational.
279
30/11/2020 15:37:32 1 0
bbc
You could watch this webinar to assuage your fears?
https://covid.joinzoe.com/post/covid-vaccines-expert-questions
332
30/11/2020 16:06:24 2 0
bbc
A quick Google leads to the published papers relevant to the various news & media articles.
Takes less time to find than making a post on HYS...
397
30/11/2020 16:24:06 1 0
bbc
Your looking in the wrong place here
1
30/11/2020 13:26:40 21 22
bbc
Are they safe, what are the side effects these are the questions?
6
30/11/2020 13:29:15 28 6
bbc
There are always risks. But getting Covid is also risky.
156
30/11/2020 14:27:17 2 7
bbc
That's the question isn't it. Can they prove the vaccines are less dangerous than the disease to the least at risk groups in society?

People may ask, if I have an infinitesimal chance of Covid complications should I catch it (U45s) . Why should I take a vaccine, that's been rushed through and bypassed the normal hoops and liability? Especially when those at risk can protect themselves
7
30/11/2020 13:30:01 261 19
bbc
I trust the regulator/s to get this right rather than HYS /social media 'experts'
.
44
30/11/2020 13:50:39 29 62
bbc
As long as they don't get pressured by all the governments who wants this out there and Covid defeated asap.
180
30/11/2020 14:47:06 4 35
bbc
hmm.
185
30/11/2020 14:49:12 4 36
bbc
did you hear the one, about the woman who spent 2 years writing a review of a food additive for the FDA. after she wrote the review, her management changed her job. her new job title was required to approve the review she had just written

it got approved.
I'm happy for there to be legislation whereby once you've had the vaccination, you're free to enjoy society as normal.
Meanwhile the tinfoil hat brigade can stay in lockdown. Pubs and social spaces will be awesome without having to listen to them drivelling on.
307
30/11/2020 15:55:04 15 1
bbc
Thankfully the up vote / down vote ratio on your post suggests that while HYS audience may disagree on many things - the vast majority do agree and support our NHS.

Given any vaccine requires a high up take rate to protect those with weakened immune systems - ie the 5% who may not gain protection from it - I am happy to see such there is such a low level of antivax idiots here. Good for us UK.
410
30/11/2020 16:26:31 2 5
bbc
Well more fool you!
499
30/11/2020 17:04:31 1 0
bbc
I would probably seek some input from other quarters who are medical experts you trust to also help interpret and put it in to context. There will be a lot of words that will cause "concerns" and some "trusted" people will be useful to make it more easy to understand. If you read an Aspirin, Paracetamol data sheet/PIL you probably would never take one.
693
30/11/2020 23:02:23 0 1
bbc
I don't trust "experts", because I have seen many being tied in complete knots in the witness stand by Counsel cross examination over forensic results!
8
30/11/2020 13:30:02 20 12
bbc
Let’s face it... the viral vector types are going to be much more important due to them only needing refrigeration. However all the time the others are “for profit” I would hazard a guess that we will see those rolled out much quicker. Wonder why?
9
30/11/2020 13:32:12 12 7
bbc
There’s too much reliance on the vaccine. The first lot will be nurses, docs, care homes, the vulnerable. Others like police, ambulance, fire and prison, lorry drivers etc. The normal person won’t get a vaccine until April/May and beyond.
75
30/11/2020 13:58:41 3 4
bbc
I get your intention, but " normal"
is not the correct word.
Yes, Spring/Summer will be around the time we all
get to receive the vaccine. Making enough doses is
also an issue
174
30/11/2020 14:43:53 3 1
bbc
The first objective is to reduce deaths and hospitalizations. Hence vaccinate those most likely to die or have serious disease (statistically). Then to reduce the spread (vaccinate more and more people). As long as the first objective is achieved then the virus becomes more a nuisance than a major disruptor.
403
30/11/2020 16:26:36 0 0
bbc
I think you'll be surprised.
My GP has their contingency plan ready for vaccination beginning any time after the second week in December.
10
30/11/2020 13:32:16 10 3
bbc
Why haven’t we bought any Sputnik v vaccine.............lol
123
30/11/2020 14:13:50 15 2
bbc
Just in case it's Novichock!
214
30/11/2020 15:02:42 3 1
bbc
Because it hasn't been reviewed and the data not published
1
30/11/2020 13:26:40 21 22
bbc
Are they safe, what are the side effects these are the questions?
11
30/11/2020 13:33:01 16 3
bbc
Safety will be assessed and monitored by the regulator. The assessors and regulator are completely independent from government in this country and indeed, the U.K. really is highly respected in this field.
32
30/11/2020 13:47:07 6 8
bbc
True, but governments do have a habit of meddling and pushing their own agenda and views on 'independent bodies' these days.
12
30/11/2020 13:34:00 120 29
bbc
Great news , idiots who keep pushing lies should be prosecuted
29
30/11/2020 13:45:03 26 124
bbc
Do grow up.
38
kh
30/11/2020 13:38:27 9 25
bbc
When are you playing to hand yourself in?
I'm happy for there to be legislation whereby once you've had the vaccination, you're free to enjoy society as normal.
Meanwhile the tinfoil hat brigade can stay in lockdown. Pubs and social spaces will be awesome without having to listen to them drivelling on.
395
PH
30/11/2020 16:23:38 3 5
bbc
Let’s hope Trump doesn’t set foot in Britain again then. The loser who the Americans have told ‘You’re Fired’ has blood in his hands for his incompetence. Sadly our own brain dead Covid Ito PM is second in line to the throne
737
01/12/2020 10:10:44 0 2
bbc
The BBC are going to be short-staffed if that's the case.
13
30/11/2020 13:35:09 19 7
bbc
From the comparison table, the Russian vac seems the "best" in terms of effectiveness and storage facilities. Big business for Pfizer and Moderna - but why full protection? For me the risk to get COVID without serious complications would be fine enough, then create maybe own antibodies for the future.
15
30/11/2020 13:37:28 25 5
bbc
Not sure if the Russian vaccine followed all the steps though.
19
30/11/2020 13:39:16 10 4
bbc
Can you really trust anything coming out of Russia without independent proof?
37
kh
30/11/2020 13:38:10 9 3
bbc
And you wouldn't be suspicious of Russia's claims?
135
30/11/2020 14:19:25 5 5
bbc
Confused by your comment. If you become infected by contact with the virus your natural body defences that have evolved over millions of years react to fight of the infection. If you receive a vaccine exactly the same defence mechanism kicks in and you produce exactly the same defences, there is NO difference except you avoid the chance of a possible severe illness.
14
30/11/2020 13:31:27 13 45
bbc
Why is the gov ordering enough to vaccinate the entire country? People under 60 really have no need for this and are probably already immune. Total waste of money.
18
30/11/2020 13:38:48 29 7
bbc
Because everyone can be a spreader......
80
30/11/2020 13:59:55 1 2
bbc
Do keep up with the news
13
30/11/2020 13:35:09 19 7
bbc
From the comparison table, the Russian vac seems the "best" in terms of effectiveness and storage facilities. Big business for Pfizer and Moderna - but why full protection? For me the risk to get COVID without serious complications would be fine enough, then create maybe own antibodies for the future.
15
30/11/2020 13:37:28 25 5
bbc
Not sure if the Russian vaccine followed all the steps though.
4
30/11/2020 13:28:00 198 26
bbc
Happily be at the front of the queue once these are given approval.....
16
30/11/2020 13:37:50 83 12
bbc
Snap
412
30/11/2020 16:26:58 0 4
bbc
Two
17
30/11/2020 13:38:29 56 7
bbc
Great news all around if they work safely and are long lasting.
40
kh
30/11/2020 13:40:54 20 72
bbc
How would you know if they didn't. Would you trust the media to report honestly?
154
30/11/2020 14:25:11 0 7
bbc
Whoever plays no beats Man U that's important now what was the other thing?
417
30/11/2020 16:27:46 0 0
bbc
They wont
14
30/11/2020 13:31:27 13 45
bbc
Why is the gov ordering enough to vaccinate the entire country? People under 60 really have no need for this and are probably already immune. Total waste of money.
18
30/11/2020 13:38:48 29 7
bbc
Because everyone can be a spreader......
24
30/11/2020 13:42:59 0 10
bbc
Not sure that these vaccines stop the spread. They will reduce the symptoms in individuals.
13
30/11/2020 13:35:09 19 7
bbc
From the comparison table, the Russian vac seems the "best" in terms of effectiveness and storage facilities. Big business for Pfizer and Moderna - but why full protection? For me the risk to get COVID without serious complications would be fine enough, then create maybe own antibodies for the future.
19
30/11/2020 13:39:16 10 4
bbc
Can you really trust anything coming out of Russia without independent proof?
392
30/11/2020 16:23:04 2 0
bbc
Indeed.
Their novichok certainly didn't live up to the claims made about it...;-)
20
30/11/2020 13:40:02 11 13
bbc
This is excellent news. It will be interesting to see how the EU which bans genetically modified beef deals with a genetically modified vaccine. Personally I’m happy with both.
171
30/11/2020 14:41:46 1 5
bbc
Why would you eat genetically modified beef if you didn't have to? And, FYI, the EU has not banned GMOs you just need to get approval first. But hey, the UK can fill it's farming boots with 4 breast chickens after 1 January. Then we can export them to the world and rebuild the Empire.
21
30/11/2020 13:41:28 3 4
bbc
Great achievements as they are I am Getting a tad fed up with vaccine promises etc every day. The next Proper news will be when they are finished testing and approved for use.
23
30/11/2020 13:42:48 7 5
bbc
Stop watching it then?
22
30/11/2020 13:42:00 10 16
bbc
1. How did vaccines get 5% more efficient in 15 days?

2. Nobady is talking about Dido,s comments that vaccine and her app could be used as "health passport" to allow travel. In other words every holiday maker will have to fork extra for vaccine an use TRACING app or will be banned from traveling. That is a freedom of movement being canceled in our democratic society.
31
30/11/2020 13:45:40 16 3
bbc
With freedoms come responsibilities, go figure.
35
30/11/2020 13:47:24 4 3
bbc
I think you’ll find that a democracy seeks to protect its most vulnerable citizens. With freedom goes responsibility. Think of the old and the weak and vulnerable instead of yourself maybe?
21
30/11/2020 13:41:28 3 4
bbc
Great achievements as they are I am Getting a tad fed up with vaccine promises etc every day. The next Proper news will be when they are finished testing and approved for use.
23
30/11/2020 13:42:48 7 5
bbc
Stop watching it then?
18
30/11/2020 13:38:48 29 7
bbc
Because everyone can be a spreader......
24
30/11/2020 13:42:59 0 10
bbc
Not sure that these vaccines stop the spread. They will reduce the symptoms in individuals.
46
30/11/2020 13:51:19 9 3
bbc
They stop you catching it, therefore you cant spread it.
50
30/11/2020 13:52:58 1 4
bbc
As you say that with such certainty, you must be very expert among a field of experts, but I am prepared to bet that you are not.
25
30/11/2020 13:43:48 2 30
bbc
There is no way I will want the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Now we can start to worry what the government will want to foist upon us. The cheap but much riskier Oxford version or the better American one? I have a bad feeling about it.
34
30/11/2020 13:47:17 14 2
bbc
How do you know the US one is better? Because they will probably charge 10+ the amount and bankrupt any country who wants to use it? The Oxford one shows better efficacy, easier to store and cheaper.
36
30/11/2020 13:47:46 6 2
bbc
The Oxford one is a more traditional vaccine the other two use a method that has never been tried before.
54
30/11/2020 13:53:34 8 1
bbc
What evidence /peer-reviewed scientific information is that based on?

How does that compare to the efficacy /choice of other inoculations received in your life to date?
26
30/11/2020 13:43:59 3 9
bbc
It also needs to be tested if the different vaccines be mixed? That is have one dosage of one type and the second dosage of another?
64
30/11/2020 13:55:50 6 2
bbc
Why? Pick one. To mix them makes no sense
3
30/11/2020 13:27:45 21 11
bbc
We need to get this Vaccine out as soon as possible, but we also need to ensure that the risks of the Vaccine aren't greater than the risk of Covid. The obvious priority should be the vulnerable who already have high Covid risk.
27
30/11/2020 13:44:26 52 11
bbc
“We need to ensure the risks of the vaccine aren’t greater than risk of covid”. Good job you mentioned that, I bet none of the researchers, health professionals and regulators gave it a thought.
338
30/11/2020 16:08:28 0 2
bbc
Shows just have little you know about the regulatory process.
350
30/11/2020 16:12:02 1 1
bbc
I rather think that it would have been uppermost in their minds.
28
30/11/2020 13:44:49 6 6
bbc
Get them rolled out quickly and then we can get out of this mess and start living our lives again
12
30/11/2020 13:34:00 120 29
bbc
Great news , idiots who keep pushing lies should be prosecuted
29
30/11/2020 13:45:03 26 124
bbc
Do grow up.
539
30/11/2020 17:25:53 2 5
bbc
Were you looking in the mirror when you typed that
30
30/11/2020 13:45:36 11 21
bbc
Well lets enjoy one of the last benefits of EU access, getting drugs at the same time as the EU, once we are alone, we will be much further down the queue for stuff like this. Leaving the EU was such a good idea...not!
astra zeneca is british- idiot Removed
58
30/11/2020 13:54:39 2 5
bbc
Remoaner
59
30/11/2020 13:54:41 5 2
bbc
And what exactly are you basing that assertion on?
22
30/11/2020 13:42:00 10 16
bbc
1. How did vaccines get 5% more efficient in 15 days?

2. Nobady is talking about Dido,s comments that vaccine and her app could be used as "health passport" to allow travel. In other words every holiday maker will have to fork extra for vaccine an use TRACING app or will be banned from traveling. That is a freedom of movement being canceled in our democratic society.
31
30/11/2020 13:45:40 16 3
bbc
With freedoms come responsibilities, go figure.
11
30/11/2020 13:33:01 16 3
bbc
Safety will be assessed and monitored by the regulator. The assessors and regulator are completely independent from government in this country and indeed, the U.K. really is highly respected in this field.
32
30/11/2020 13:47:07 6 8
bbc
True, but governments do have a habit of meddling and pushing their own agenda and views on 'independent bodies' these days.
5
30/11/2020 13:29:13 37 11
bbc
Can we please have some peer-reviewed feedback rather than press releases to help assuage any potential concerns.
33
30/11/2020 13:47:15 41 8
bbc
Without the press releases we would still be in the dark, when actually there is real hope that vaccines will one day be successful and that day might soon be here. I much prefer that than political and press speculation. It’s good news, the best this year by far, why not share it!
25
30/11/2020 13:43:48 2 30
bbc
There is no way I will want the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Now we can start to worry what the government will want to foist upon us. The cheap but much riskier Oxford version or the better American one? I have a bad feeling about it.
34
30/11/2020 13:47:17 14 2
bbc
How do you know the US one is better? Because they will probably charge 10+ the amount and bankrupt any country who wants to use it? The Oxford one shows better efficacy, easier to store and cheaper.
57
30/11/2020 13:54:23 2 2
bbc
The US vacines are better, more expensive yes, but the efficacy of the Oxford one is much lower...
92
30/11/2020 14:04:00 0 1
bbc
Muddled thinking. The Astra Zeneca vaccine has much lower efficacy than Moderna's of Pfizer's.
22
30/11/2020 13:42:00 10 16
bbc
1. How did vaccines get 5% more efficient in 15 days?

2. Nobady is talking about Dido,s comments that vaccine and her app could be used as "health passport" to allow travel. In other words every holiday maker will have to fork extra for vaccine an use TRACING app or will be banned from traveling. That is a freedom of movement being canceled in our democratic society.
35
30/11/2020 13:47:24 4 3
bbc
I think you’ll find that a democracy seeks to protect its most vulnerable citizens. With freedom goes responsibility. Think of the old and the weak and vulnerable instead of yourself maybe?
333
30/11/2020 16:07:50 1 0
bbc
Well said.
25
30/11/2020 13:43:48 2 30
bbc
There is no way I will want the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Now we can start to worry what the government will want to foist upon us. The cheap but much riskier Oxford version or the better American one? I have a bad feeling about it.
36
30/11/2020 13:47:46 6 2
bbc
The Oxford one is a more traditional vaccine the other two use a method that has never been tried before.
13
30/11/2020 13:35:09 19 7
bbc
From the comparison table, the Russian vac seems the "best" in terms of effectiveness and storage facilities. Big business for Pfizer and Moderna - but why full protection? For me the risk to get COVID without serious complications would be fine enough, then create maybe own antibodies for the future.
37
kh
30/11/2020 13:38:10 9 3
bbc
And you wouldn't be suspicious of Russia's claims?
121
dan
30/11/2020 14:13:28 2 6
bbc
Of course he wouldn't, based off the broken English I'd hazard a guess he's based in Russia...
12
30/11/2020 13:34:00 120 29
bbc
Great news , idiots who keep pushing lies should be prosecuted
38
kh
30/11/2020 13:38:27 9 25
bbc
When are you playing to hand yourself in?
39
kh
30/11/2020 13:39:53 3 14
bbc
What would happen if UK approves it but Europe and America don't approve it. And then Hancock makes it compulsory? Would be an interesting story for the BBC to cover, impartially of course.
wow you are some kind of moron Removed
your a idiot regardless how many times the BBc remove the comment Removed
107
30/11/2020 14:09:25 3 2
bbc
Hancock wont make it compulsory. Boris Johnson himself said last week on TV that it wont be compulsory. I very much doubt that anyone under the age of 50 with no underlying health conditions will even be offered it!
17
30/11/2020 13:38:29 56 7
bbc
Great news all around if they work safely and are long lasting.
40
kh
30/11/2020 13:40:54 20 72
bbc
How would you know if they didn't. Would you trust the media to report honestly?
49
30/11/2020 13:52:51 7 12
bbc
Would you trust the government to report honestly?
112
dan
30/11/2020 14:10:52 9 3
bbc
Yes
137
30/11/2020 14:21:17 12 3
bbc
Maybe not the Mail or Express, but most of the others yes
249
30/11/2020 15:22:13 9 3
bbc
Iwould trust the media before I would trust you!
355
30/11/2020 16:13:34 0 2
bbc
yes.. reason not to
474
30/11/2020 16:51:41 0 0
bbc
Yes
571
30/11/2020 17:47:25 0 0
bbc
On the whole, yes. It would be hard fior them to fabricate the results of public trials.
The wonder of the internet is such that the results of the testing can be verified directly with the appropriate authorities online, despite the best efforts of internet trolls to pollute the water with outright lies.
628
30/11/2020 18:48:16 0 0
bbc
I will trust someone who puts their name and reputation to something, before I will trust someone anonymous on the BBC comments section.

Question to you is whether you will only trust a report that agrees with what you already believe. Saying "I don't trust the media" is not a superior position than knowing when to trust them and when not to.
729
01/12/2020 08:37:29 0 0
bbc
Depends on the particular media. Specific medical and science journals, yes, including possible issues; ordinary news/current affairs publications, not so much; Online sites not associated with the first, not at all.
41
30/11/2020 13:49:52 2 8
bbc
Only a idiot would trust the Russian one, though no that jeen on the Oxford one either, though bet thats the one most of get
115
30/11/2020 14:11:34 2 2
bbc
It doesn't work like that. All candidate vaccines have to go through a rigid, formal approval process. The quality of Russia's scientists should not be underestimated.
270
30/11/2020 15:34:33 0 0
bbc
Any chance of that in English?
39
kh
30/11/2020 13:39:53 3 14
bbc
What would happen if UK approves it but Europe and America don't approve it. And then Hancock makes it compulsory? Would be an interesting story for the BBC to cover, impartially of course.
wow you are some kind of moron Removed
43
30/11/2020 13:50:32 72 14
bbc
It's a bit sad that more people seem to be interested in eating in a Scotch egg in a pub than a vaccine...
172
30/11/2020 14:42:23 45 9
bbc
I've never tried eating a vaccine in a pub. ;)
7
30/11/2020 13:30:01 261 19
bbc
I trust the regulator/s to get this right rather than HYS /social media 'experts'
.
44
30/11/2020 13:50:39 29 62
bbc
As long as they don't get pressured by all the governments who wants this out there and Covid defeated asap.
109
30/11/2020 14:02:42 36 3
bbc
I am pretty sure everyone wants it beaten asap? I feel confident in the UK's approach to safety. No vaccines have ever been under as much scrutiny and as long as the data is peer reviewed and independently assessed. That's why we need to leave it to experts - because very few people have the ability or knowledge to make this type of decision.
150
30/11/2020 14:23:42 17 4
bbc
Considering the large number of people who work on developing a vaccine, and the attention this is receiving, if the vaccine was at all being rushed, someone would speak out that this was the case. There are only 21 members of the PMs cabinet and it's hard enough to keep a secret on that.
229
30/11/2020 15:11:50 20 1
bbc
Usually people think it is the drug company who will be pressurising the regulatory authorities, not the govs. The regulators will be scrutinising this very carefully and capable of asking any question of the trial. Trust them.
482
30/11/2020 16:55:20 1 1
bbc
Everything is politics - especially "science"
45
30/11/2020 13:51:01 149 16
bbc
Just waiting for the next conspiracy theorist idiot to say "Don't take the Vaccine, its designed to kill us all!". Just a pinch of the brain washed rubbish I've heard this year!.
166
30/11/2020 14:35:55 154 14
bbc
I'm advising anyone that seriously thinks a vaccine will alter thier DNA to take the Jab.

It can only be an improvement.
I'm happy for there to be legislation whereby once you've had the vaccination, you're free to enjoy society as normal.
Meanwhile the tinfoil hat brigade can stay in lockdown. Pubs and social spaces will be awesome without having to listen to them drivelling on.
288
30/11/2020 15:47:32 13 3
bbc
Everyone knows it will turns us all slowly into one of the Lizard people - they proved it on the global elite of George Soros, Bill Gates and poor Joe Biden first. Trump has been fighting an unseen war against the Lizard people for 4 years but now it seems they have won and we are all destined to end up being one of them - dont say David Icke didnt warn you ;)
486
30/11/2020 16:56:21 5 1
bbc
There are lots of them out there, one guy l speak to told me Covid is not real it’s a conspiracy so we all stop using cash, so the government knows how much money you have. FFS.
511
30/11/2020 17:09:27 1 7
bbc
Well, I've had a shed load of voluntary vaccines: typhoid, yellow fever and rabies to name but a few. Several more than once, and I'll happily pay to get them again.

But there's no way I'm getting one of these covid-19 vaccines: funny, that.
585
ant
30/11/2020 17:56:11 3 2
bbc
Brain washed ? Yes you are.. turn off the tv and look around you... Thats reality..
24
30/11/2020 13:42:59 0 10
bbc
Not sure that these vaccines stop the spread. They will reduce the symptoms in individuals.
46
30/11/2020 13:51:19 9 3
bbc
They stop you catching it, therefore you cant spread it.
73
30/11/2020 13:58:32 1 2
bbc
Not true. And I’m not anti vax. You need to understand what the effective figures mean. Example: a 90% efficacy (ie 10% RR) means that the proportion of infection in the vaccinated group is about one-tenth of the proportion of infection in the placebo group
47
30/11/2020 13:48:43 5 19
bbc
Until the gov is honest about this virus, i won't be taking one. Unless they say its a chinese bioweapon, people will be bribing the nurses to squirt their dose into the sink.
Another special kind of idiot, you will not be forced to take it, but hopefully prevented from traveling out the country till you do, in fact they should exclude idiots like you from all major public areas Removed
48
30/11/2020 13:52:33 4 11
bbc
Obviously, you cannot read. Try again and look at the percentages, not how much it costs. I'd rather pay for the Moderna from my own pocket than have it "free" from this wonderful NHS. I am not clapping in the street, and "Protect the NHS", "save the NHS" and all that ... it is not the NHS that I want to save.
40
kh
30/11/2020 13:40:54 20 72
bbc
How would you know if they didn't. Would you trust the media to report honestly?
49
30/11/2020 13:52:51 7 12
bbc
Would you trust the government to report honestly?
24
30/11/2020 13:42:59 0 10
bbc
Not sure that these vaccines stop the spread. They will reduce the symptoms in individuals.
50
30/11/2020 13:52:58 1 4
bbc
As you say that with such certainty, you must be very expert among a field of experts, but I am prepared to bet that you are not.
158
30/11/2020 14:30:29 1 2
bbc
Clearly I’m a bit more informed than you. I’ve answered the your point and an other persons below.
30
30/11/2020 13:45:36 11 21
bbc
Well lets enjoy one of the last benefits of EU access, getting drugs at the same time as the EU, once we are alone, we will be much further down the queue for stuff like this. Leaving the EU was such a good idea...not!
51
bbc
astra zeneca is british- idiot Removed
61
30/11/2020 13:55:47 1 2
bbc
this article is about the Moderna vacine!????
52
30/11/2020 13:53:06 2 5
bbc
Remoaner. Get your facts right the oxford vaccine is being produced in the UK
are you stupid much, this article is about Moderna not the oxford one, why are all leaves so thick Removed
2
30/11/2020 13:27:25 98 43
bbc
Cannot believe all these stupid students in Nottingham raving together. Considering they are supposed to be intelligent they really haven’t got a brain cell between them. Rave now, get a positive test and force them to stay at uni for Xmas. Then watch them squeal like stuck pigs. Deserve everything they get.
53
30/11/2020 13:53:09 64 14
bbc
I suggest expulsion or some similar punishment.
No tolerance for those involved.
473
30/11/2020 16:51:29 2 0
bbc
why did I scroll this far down the page. why?
25
30/11/2020 13:43:48 2 30
bbc
There is no way I will want the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Now we can start to worry what the government will want to foist upon us. The cheap but much riskier Oxford version or the better American one? I have a bad feeling about it.
54
30/11/2020 13:53:34 8 1
bbc
What evidence /peer-reviewed scientific information is that based on?

How does that compare to the efficacy /choice of other inoculations received in your life to date?
2
30/11/2020 13:27:25 98 43
bbc
Cannot believe all these stupid students in Nottingham raving together. Considering they are supposed to be intelligent they really haven’t got a brain cell between them. Rave now, get a positive test and force them to stay at uni for Xmas. Then watch them squeal like stuck pigs. Deserve everything they get.
55
30/11/2020 13:53:36 9 11
bbc
Chill Winston..... they have probably worked out that their chance of dying from COVID is less than dying from the normal flu for their age group. Many people didn't get the annual flu shot before COVID came along.
324
30/11/2020 16:03:39 5 4
bbc
I don't like the idea of 'blaming students' for being young but I do worry they are not being properly informed of the risks of long-Covid. Forget all the nonsense about yuppie flu - lives can be ruined by post viral fatigues. Long-Covid is an extreme and debilitating illness estimated to affect 1 in 20 infected individuals (even for people in their 20-30s >1 in 100 are thought to suffer this).
370
30/11/2020 16:17:25 12 2
bbc
I care not one iota about whether they die from their own stupidity.
Unfortunately, that stupidity puts other people's lives at risk & will in fact have already caused a not insignificant number of deaths & serious illnesses.
56
30/11/2020 13:53:48 31 7
bbc
It is down to the Regulatory approval now ,we just hope the vaccine will get approval ,so they can started Vaccination and get we out of his horrible mess the World is in at the moment.
747
Stu
01/12/2020 12:35:40 0 0
bbc
Then all we will need is a brexit vaccine !
34
30/11/2020 13:47:17 14 2
bbc
How do you know the US one is better? Because they will probably charge 10+ the amount and bankrupt any country who wants to use it? The Oxford one shows better efficacy, easier to store and cheaper.
57
30/11/2020 13:54:23 2 2
bbc
The US vacines are better, more expensive yes, but the efficacy of the Oxford one is much lower...
100
30/11/2020 14:06:40 3 1
bbc
You did read that the efficacy was anywhere between 70 and 90% dependent on the doses right, I mean you are such an expert I guess you will also know that efficacy like that is higher than the average flu vaccine, and that an efficacy of 95% was good enough to wipe out smallpox. Get the doses right and the Oxford vaccine will do the same.
30
30/11/2020 13:45:36 11 21
bbc
Well lets enjoy one of the last benefits of EU access, getting drugs at the same time as the EU, once we are alone, we will be much further down the queue for stuff like this. Leaving the EU was such a good idea...not!
58
30/11/2020 13:54:39 2 5
bbc
Remoaner
76
30/11/2020 13:59:03 2 3
bbc
Get it right, im a Rejoiner ;)
30
30/11/2020 13:45:36 11 21
bbc
Well lets enjoy one of the last benefits of EU access, getting drugs at the same time as the EU, once we are alone, we will be much further down the queue for stuff like this. Leaving the EU was such a good idea...not!
59
30/11/2020 13:54:41 5 2
bbc
And what exactly are you basing that assertion on?
71
30/11/2020 13:58:28 2 5
bbc
I work in the industry, and know that drug companies will try for approval in the biggest markets first, China/India, US, EU.... we will be far from first!
60
30/11/2020 13:55:11 1 3
bbc
Ip dip dip
My blue ship
Which vaccine is it? ??????
astra zeneca is british- idiot Removed
61
30/11/2020 13:55:47 1 2
bbc
this article is about the Moderna vacine!????
62
30/11/2020 13:55:48 27 11
bbc
Perhaps they need to offer a free tin foil hat with every vaccine?
??
I'm happy for there to be legislation whereby once you've had the vaccination, you're free to enjoy society as normal.
Meanwhile the tinfoil hat brigade can stay in lockdown. Pubs and social spaces will be awesome without having to listen to them drivelling on.
423
30/11/2020 16:29:56 2 0
bbc
I remember fools like you coming out with crap like that when government spying on us was mentioned.

Snowden soon wiped that smirk of the likes of you!
47
30/11/2020 13:48:43 5 19
bbc
Until the gov is honest about this virus, i won't be taking one. Unless they say its a chinese bioweapon, people will be bribing the nurses to squirt their dose into the sink.
Another special kind of idiot, you will not be forced to take it, but hopefully prevented from traveling out the country till you do, in fact they should exclude idiots like you from all major public areas Removed
26
30/11/2020 13:43:59 3 9
bbc
It also needs to be tested if the different vaccines be mixed? That is have one dosage of one type and the second dosage of another?
64
30/11/2020 13:55:50 6 2
bbc
Why? Pick one. To mix them makes no sense
65
30/11/2020 13:56:24 85 12
bbc
Anyone else just here for the armchair immunologist expert and antivaxxer comments?
131
30/11/2020 14:18:14 38 14
bbc
Me......highly amusing how deluded some people are in thinking that they are experts or have some superior knowledge.
I'm happy for there to be legislation whereby once you've had the vaccination, you're free to enjoy society as normal.
Meanwhile the tinfoil hat brigade can stay in lockdown. Pubs and social spaces will be awesome without having to listen to them drivelling on.
238
30/11/2020 15:10:46 4 12
bbc
I will not be swayed by those who clearly have a conflict of interest. The title of Dr or Professor has no sway over me.
358
30/11/2020 16:14:41 7 1
bbc
I was at that stage 6 months ago. I find reading the BBC website as little as possible, quite beneficial.
66
30/11/2020 13:56:45 15 13
bbc
Based on stats in the article, the Russian vaccine looks the best all-round. But of course, politics trump lives and health, so it's is a no for the US and her lackeys (like us).

Not a huge fan of Russia (politically, that is: it's a beautiful country with fascinating history and culture), but I don't trust the US one iota either. Form for profiteering from war and human misery don't build trust.
78
30/11/2020 13:59:15 16 5
bbc
Yeah and you pretty stupid if you beleive anything come out of PutinVille
196
30/11/2020 14:55:14 4 3
bbc
One is a liberal democracy with relatively open government and a free media and genuinely tries to combat corruption. The other is a totalitarian regime, has an appalling human rights record, has next to no concern for the health of it's citizens. with insane levels of corruption and has habitually lied for decades about the achievements whilst force feeding the athletes with toxic level of drugs.
67
30/11/2020 13:57:02 2 18
bbc
The results of the british vaccine is embarrassing compared to the US ones ??
82
30/11/2020 14:00:58 12 3
bbc
It is likely to be 90% effective with a bit of tweaking and can be easily transported across the globe... not so embarrassing.
83
30/11/2020 14:01:09 3 1
bbc
Oh you mean the one that can be kept in a normal fridge and does not require storage and transport at -70 degrees? Right.
89
30/11/2020 14:02:38 2 1
bbc
Embarrassing or honest..?

It seems that the level of detail released by Oxford is much greater than that released by other makers; they openly admitted that the half dose-full dose strategy (which appears to make it comparable in efficacy with the others) was an accidental discovery.

I'll wait for peer and regulatory reviews before I make any judgement. Not that my judgment matters, mind.
39
kh
30/11/2020 13:39:53 3 14
bbc
What would happen if UK approves it but Europe and America don't approve it. And then Hancock makes it compulsory? Would be an interesting story for the BBC to cover, impartially of course.
your a idiot regardless how many times the BBc remove the comment Removed
4
30/11/2020 13:28:00 198 26
bbc
Happily be at the front of the queue once these are given approval.....
69
30/11/2020 13:57:46 20 3
bbc
Me too
70
30/11/2020 13:57:59 4 22
bbc
99.8% recovery rate for Sars-Cov 2.99.9 % for Influenza without vaccines.Plus the Pfizer vaccine is only a symptom reducer not a cure.Only those at most risk should take a vaccine,ideally the Sputnik 5.Do not bother to reply 77 and 13 cointel.
81
30/11/2020 14:00:58 12 2
bbc
What's the recovery rate from stupidity?
86
30/11/2020 14:02:15 3 3
bbc
This is not correct, the Pfizer vacine stopped people contracting the virus...
119
30/11/2020 14:12:15 1 2
bbc
you should audition for a new muppet character called knuckle dragger
122
30/11/2020 14:10:22 1 2
bbc
Greetings Comrade. Let me welcome you to the West. We have democracy and independent research here that disproves your statement. Although I am no expert, I am listening to those that are.
153
30/11/2020 14:24:50 1 2
bbc
Sources please (although I doubt there will be any for these numbers).
59
30/11/2020 13:54:41 5 2
bbc
And what exactly are you basing that assertion on?
71
30/11/2020 13:58:28 2 5
bbc
I work in the industry, and know that drug companies will try for approval in the biggest markets first, China/India, US, EU.... we will be far from first!
52
30/11/2020 13:53:06 2 5
bbc
Remoaner. Get your facts right the oxford vaccine is being produced in the UK
are you stupid much, this article is about Moderna not the oxford one, why are all leaves so thick Removed
46
30/11/2020 13:51:19 9 3
bbc
They stop you catching it, therefore you cant spread it.
73
30/11/2020 13:58:32 1 2
bbc
Not true. And I’m not anti vax. You need to understand what the effective figures mean. Example: a 90% efficacy (ie 10% RR) means that the proportion of infection in the vaccinated group is about one-tenth of the proportion of infection in the placebo group
74
TY
30/11/2020 13:58:38 1 9
bbc
Fun fact.. all vaccines contain microchips designed by Bill gates and Elon Musk.. source: internet memes
Fun fact: even if you trying to be funny, you still come across as a idiot!! I see you take after your folks, dumb n dumber Removed
9
30/11/2020 13:32:12 12 7
bbc
There’s too much reliance on the vaccine. The first lot will be nurses, docs, care homes, the vulnerable. Others like police, ambulance, fire and prison, lorry drivers etc. The normal person won’t get a vaccine until April/May and beyond.
75
30/11/2020 13:58:41 3 4
bbc
I get your intention, but " normal"
is not the correct word.
Yes, Spring/Summer will be around the time we all
get to receive the vaccine. Making enough doses is
also an issue
126
30/11/2020 14:14:47 0 4
bbc
You do realise that people under the age of 50 who are not obese and have no underlying health conditions aren't even likely to be offered it don't you? That's info from the vaccine taskforce! So if you are under 50 either eat yourself to obesity or diabetes and you can have one.
58
30/11/2020 13:54:39 2 5
bbc
Remoaner
76
30/11/2020 13:59:03 2 3
bbc
Get it right, im a Rejoiner ;)
77
30/11/2020 13:59:03 3 3
bbc
Naturally everyone is excited by the prospect of the vaccines being approved for use and vaccination programmes being rolled out very soon. The open question remains, for how long will the protection afforded by the vaccines last? This will be a real time experiment the outcome of which will not be known for months or years. Presumably there is a plan to secure next year's supply of jabs as well?
66
30/11/2020 13:56:45 15 13
bbc
Based on stats in the article, the Russian vaccine looks the best all-round. But of course, politics trump lives and health, so it's is a no for the US and her lackeys (like us).

Not a huge fan of Russia (politically, that is: it's a beautiful country with fascinating history and culture), but I don't trust the US one iota either. Form for profiteering from war and human misery don't build trust.
78
30/11/2020 13:59:15 16 5
bbc
Yeah and you pretty stupid if you beleive anything come out of PutinVille
111
30/11/2020 14:10:50 6 6
bbc
Like I said, politically, Russia and the US are no better than each other. For entirely different reasons, though. If it came down to having to 'take their word for it' on any given subject, especially when it's something where there's a huge amount of money at stake, I'd probably trust Russia's word marginally more than the US'. Not much in it, but my trust in US and it's corps is less than zero.
296
30/11/2020 15:51:33 0 3
bbc
The American electorate and the Brexit voters were quite happy to go along with Putin, Britain should stand up to these despots instead of kissing their backsides.
2
30/11/2020 13:27:25 98 43
bbc
Cannot believe all these stupid students in Nottingham raving together. Considering they are supposed to be intelligent they really haven’t got a brain cell between them. Rave now, get a positive test and force them to stay at uni for Xmas. Then watch them squeal like stuck pigs. Deserve everything they get.
79
30/11/2020 13:59:32 9 4
bbc
Probably all majoring political studies. That's a field where we need more people!
99
30/11/2020 14:06:32 9 4
bbc
Don't forget "Fashion Journalism".
14
30/11/2020 13:31:27 13 45
bbc
Why is the gov ordering enough to vaccinate the entire country? People under 60 really have no need for this and are probably already immune. Total waste of money.
80
30/11/2020 13:59:55 1 2
bbc
Do keep up with the news
70
30/11/2020 13:57:59 4 22
bbc
99.8% recovery rate for Sars-Cov 2.99.9 % for Influenza without vaccines.Plus the Pfizer vaccine is only a symptom reducer not a cure.Only those at most risk should take a vaccine,ideally the Sputnik 5.Do not bother to reply 77 and 13 cointel.
81
30/11/2020 14:00:58 12 2
bbc
What's the recovery rate from stupidity?
96
30/11/2020 14:05:39 0 4
bbc
Ask the sheeple who voted leave.
67
30/11/2020 13:57:02 2 18
bbc
The results of the british vaccine is embarrassing compared to the US ones ??
82
30/11/2020 14:00:58 12 3
bbc
It is likely to be 90% effective with a bit of tweaking and can be easily transported across the globe... not so embarrassing.
102
30/11/2020 14:07:25 0 1
bbc
Sounds over optimistic to me. Needs more than "a bit of tweaking" if rumours of methodology errors are confirmed.
67
30/11/2020 13:57:02 2 18
bbc
The results of the british vaccine is embarrassing compared to the US ones ??
83
30/11/2020 14:01:09 3 1
bbc
Oh you mean the one that can be kept in a normal fridge and does not require storage and transport at -70 degrees? Right.
84
30/11/2020 14:01:09 2 5
bbc
Only a idiot would trust the Russian one, though not that keen on the Oxford one either.
Though bet that's the one most of us get, I would happily pay 25 and get the Moderna one

One thing in our favour is all the idiots who don't want to take the vaccine, means we can gets ours quicker!!
97
30/11/2020 14:05:55 2 2
bbc
Can I ask why a preference for one over the others?
104
30/11/2020 14:07:51 0 2
bbc
You need to widen your Brow.None of the vaccines are being marketed as cures.There was a dedicated team trying to find a cure for Corona virus Common Cold for 31 years.Millions spent it was ended without a cure found.Sorry to pop your bubble.
85
RM
30/11/2020 14:01:10 3 6
bbc
Oxford AstraZeneca
62-90% effective
What does that mean?
Isolated from monkey poo
94
30/11/2020 14:05:11 1 2
bbc
It means that it stops between 62 - 90 % of people from catching the virus, they need more time/analysis to confirm...
105
30/11/2020 14:08:10 1 1
bbc
Your chance to go ape----!
110
30/11/2020 14:04:44 0 3
bbc
Not sure what point you are making? It's pretty obvious what the effectiveness measures and your question can be answered by a simple search. It seems you are more interested in mocking intelligent people whom are trying to resolve the issue than actually making effort to understand.
138
30/11/2020 14:21:49 3 2
bbc
Two crucial pieces of the puzzle still outstanding:

1) Are these sterilising vaccines? Or will you still develop the disease, albeit it with milder symptoms?

2) Is a vaccinated person still able to carry and transmit the virus?

These are important questions and I don't believe we have the answers yet.
70
30/11/2020 13:57:59 4 22
bbc
99.8% recovery rate for Sars-Cov 2.99.9 % for Influenza without vaccines.Plus the Pfizer vaccine is only a symptom reducer not a cure.Only those at most risk should take a vaccine,ideally the Sputnik 5.Do not bother to reply 77 and 13 cointel.
86
30/11/2020 14:02:15 3 3
bbc
This is not correct, the Pfizer vacine stopped people contracting the virus...
114
30/11/2020 14:11:20 3 3
bbc
You are just plain wrong
87
30/11/2020 14:02:21 3 4
bbc
Juice me up I want to go to the football and a couple of pints after.
74
TY
30/11/2020 13:58:38 1 9
bbc
Fun fact.. all vaccines contain microchips designed by Bill gates and Elon Musk.. source: internet memes
Fun fact: even if you trying to be funny, you still come across as a idiot!! I see you take after your folks, dumb n dumber Removed
67
30/11/2020 13:57:02 2 18
bbc
The results of the british vaccine is embarrassing compared to the US ones ??
89
30/11/2020 14:02:38 2 1
bbc
Embarrassing or honest..?

It seems that the level of detail released by Oxford is much greater than that released by other makers; they openly admitted that the half dose-full dose strategy (which appears to make it comparable in efficacy with the others) was an accidental discovery.

I'll wait for peer and regulatory reviews before I make any judgement. Not that my judgment matters, mind.
90
30/11/2020 13:58:37 2 3
bbc
I bought shares in Moderna back in May.

Thanks
103
30/11/2020 14:07:31 1 2
bbc
Walter Mitty.....
385
30/11/2020 16:21:26 0 0
bbc
Post your receipt
91
30/11/2020 13:59:35 2 5
bbc
Brilliant, let get this approved and distributed to people. Then we can end this Covid political mess that has brought great disruption to lives.
34
30/11/2020 13:47:17 14 2
bbc
How do you know the US one is better? Because they will probably charge 10+ the amount and bankrupt any country who wants to use it? The Oxford one shows better efficacy, easier to store and cheaper.
92
30/11/2020 14:04:00 0 1
bbc
Muddled thinking. The Astra Zeneca vaccine has much lower efficacy than Moderna's of Pfizer's.
93
30/11/2020 14:04:04 5 7
bbc
So who will we accept as decision maker on whether the drug is safe? We do not have an agency to do so anymore.

So much for ‘taking back control’!
108
30/11/2020 14:09:50 2 1
bbc
hey - we can trust boris and his ERG cronies and yes-men and women to make all the right decisions!
133
30/11/2020 14:18:59 0 1
bbc
Apart from MHRA you mean?
Stage 1 trials have already demonstrated that it is safe. Stage 2 trial demonstrated that they build anti bodies, Stage 3 trails demonstrate efficacy.
222
30/11/2020 15:06:00 1 0
bbc
"So who will we accept as decision maker on whether the drug is safe? "

Brian Harvey from East 17.
85
RM
30/11/2020 14:01:10 3 6
bbc
Oxford AstraZeneca
62-90% effective
What does that mean?
Isolated from monkey poo
94
30/11/2020 14:05:11 1 2
bbc
It means that it stops between 62 - 90 % of people from catching the virus, they need more time/analysis to confirm...
146
30/11/2020 14:22:51 1 2
bbc
You are the Oracle of misinformation.
95
30/11/2020 14:05:32 3 16
bbc
I ask that the BBC Moderators read the Book of Truth as dictated by Our Blessed Lord Jesus Christ to the Last Prophet Maria Divine Mercy.

Please do not have the vaccine.
113
30/11/2020 14:11:00 4 4
bbc
????????????????

??
120
30/11/2020 14:12:54 1 1
bbc
If I wasn't sure before I read that, I am now... Where do I sign up for a vaccine?!
220
30/11/2020 15:05:22 0 0
bbc
I thought the "Don't have the vaccine" book was dictated to St. David of Icke?
81
30/11/2020 14:00:58 12 2
bbc
What's the recovery rate from stupidity?
96
30/11/2020 14:05:39 0 4
bbc
Ask the sheeple who voted leave.
84
30/11/2020 14:01:09 2 5
bbc
Only a idiot would trust the Russian one, though not that keen on the Oxford one either.
Though bet that's the one most of us get, I would happily pay 25 and get the Moderna one

One thing in our favour is all the idiots who don't want to take the vaccine, means we can gets ours quicker!!
97
30/11/2020 14:05:55 2 2
bbc
Can I ask why a preference for one over the others?
98
Ben
30/11/2020 14:06:20 3 8
bbc
I don't understand why the approval process take so long. We can at least offer it to elderly people who are the group most vulnerable to the virus and side effect from the lockdown due treatment delay. At worst scenario, what do they have to loss. The benefit outweighs the risk by far.
151
30/11/2020 14:24:30 6 1
bbc
You don’t understand why it takes so long? A vaccine usually takes 10 years to produce and approve.
164
30/11/2020 14:34:26 0 1
bbc
It has to be safe, normally this process takes 10-15 years, this is why they are taking the time,
79
30/11/2020 13:59:32 9 4
bbc
Probably all majoring political studies. That's a field where we need more people!
99
30/11/2020 14:06:32 9 4
bbc
Don't forget "Fashion Journalism".
116
30/11/2020 14:11:44 9 6
bbc
Or media studies, some will be following this thread assiduously. Makes it all worthwhile and rather proud to be part of someone's PhD
378
30/11/2020 16:19:29 0 1
bbc
And "Dance movement psychotherapy" (look it up, it really exists...)
57
30/11/2020 13:54:23 2 2
bbc
The US vacines are better, more expensive yes, but the efficacy of the Oxford one is much lower...
100
30/11/2020 14:06:40 3 1
bbc
You did read that the efficacy was anywhere between 70 and 90% dependent on the doses right, I mean you are such an expert I guess you will also know that efficacy like that is higher than the average flu vaccine, and that an efficacy of 95% was good enough to wipe out smallpox. Get the doses right and the Oxford vaccine will do the same.