Covid: Shops in England can open 24 hours a day over Christmas
30/11/2020 | news | business | 1,419
Local authorities in England will be allowed to temporarily waive rules restricting retail opening hours.
1
30/11/2020 10:11:52 14 27
bbc
Tories have shares in retail, so open the shops. Kerching!
8
30/11/2020 10:13:24 21 13
bbc
That’s a bit of a silly thing to post
25
37p
30/11/2020 10:23:21 3 2
bbc
So do members of all political parties!
30
30/11/2020 10:23:54 4 3
bbc
Anyone who has a pension plan almost certainly has shares in retail, through the big property companies.
But at best, opening for a few extra hours can only postpone the inevitable for a short time. We urgently need to start finding alternative uses for redundant retail and office space. The obvious one is for housing, which could rejuvenate town centres and bring new custom for local businesses.
49
30/11/2020 10:29:52 4 4
bbc
Pension schemes probably have more shares than any Tory. As a Tory supporter I have none so pleas e do not make generalisations you can not substantiate.
2
30/11/2020 10:12:04 167 43
bbc
So that's more time to buy tat and spread Coronavirus then.
199
30/11/2020 11:07:07 104 52
bbc
The high street as we knew it is on its last legs. Opening shops for longer will not make any difference.

Effort should go into finding new uses for empty shop units, not try to save the already just about dead.

And BTW - now is as good a time as any to stop buying plastic and polluting rubbish - cancel xmas, save lives!
217
30/11/2020 11:09:45 14 2
bbc
Chinese made tat at that.
358
30/11/2020 11:39:40 6 1
bbc
You don't have to shop its not an order. And as for spreading it with the rules being relaxed over the Christmas period that will almosr certainly spread it more than shopping ever will.
641
Si
30/11/2020 12:31:55 7 9
bbc
Can't spread what I don't have and the vast majority of the country don't have it.
3
30/11/2020 10:12:19 19 8
bbc
Don’t quite understand why, all to little too late as most now shop on line and have sorted Xmas items
29
30/11/2020 10:23:46 24 2
bbc
Have they? Guarantee we'll see crowds outside shops on Wednesday.
304
30/11/2020 11:27:29 0 1
bbc
"Too little, too late" - Ah, the brilliant originality of that phrase!
Did you think it up all by yourself?
4
30/11/2020 10:12:20 107 17
bbc
As usual it will be the big names and chains who reap the bulk of the benefits from this whilst the small, independent stores get whatever scraps remain.
11
30/11/2020 10:14:59 43 27
bbc
That’s life. Even the big names started small
41
30/11/2020 10:28:27 8 2
bbc
That’s apart from the big chains that have already closed down and the many small shops that have adapted to changing ways of shopping and the pandemic
282
30/11/2020 11:24:06 3 0
bbc
Do you mean big names like top shop .
553
30/11/2020 12:08:39 5 3
bbc
"As usual it will be the big names and chains who reap the bulk of the benefits from this whilst the small, independent stores get whatever scraps remain."

I doubt many of those reminiscing over small independent retailers actually use them.
929
30/11/2020 14:02:51 0 1
bbc
Many non essential small shops where i live are still open and the police don't do anything about it. At least the big names follow the law, paying low tax is another issue but is still legal, unlike some small shops.

If they cant differentiate from the big boys or offer me something extra via service for prices, then why waste my time and money going there when the big boys will do?
5
30/11/2020 10:11:59 5 16
bbc
WHY WOULD THEY DOTHIS AND PUT LIVES AT RISK?

PLEASE SHARE YOUR ANSWERS
16
30/11/2020 10:19:08 4 11
bbc
If we are in the middle of a major pandemic, why is the no excess mortality overall?
81
Rob
30/11/2020 10:42:30 3 1
bbc
I never heard Governments and others saying save lives when they invaded Iraq/.Libya
6
MVP
30/11/2020 10:12:58 13 14
bbc
I really do not think that this is a good idea.

Lives are more important than retailer profits.
7
30/11/2020 10:13:13 234 24
bbc
Just don't go for a pint afterwards else you may die.
24
30/11/2020 10:22:27 213 12
bbc
At least you get to die with a substantial meal.
35
30/11/2020 10:26:10 25 37
bbc
A pint would be fine but as so many find a pint is not enough and people forget all sense of responsibility after a few then this is the inevitable outcome.
74
30/11/2020 10:38:41 10 32
bbc
Track and trace has shown pubs and restaurants are easily the biggest spreaders of covid outside of people's actual homes...
260
Bob
30/11/2020 11:18:22 8 1
bbc
I am dying for a pint to be fair.
391
30/11/2020 11:38:37 0 1
bbc
go for a pint!!!!....good luck with that....
1
30/11/2020 10:11:52 14 27
bbc
Tories have shares in retail, so open the shops. Kerching!
8
30/11/2020 10:13:24 21 13
bbc
That’s a bit of a silly thing to post
226
30/11/2020 11:11:18 1 1
bbc
Why?
30/11/2020 15:57:51 1 0
bbc
Thank you XXXX
9
30/11/2020 10:14:10 6 4
bbc
Mwahahahaha!

This virus is so reasonable. Is it part of Sage?
10
30/11/2020 10:14:41 5 15
bbc
Good. I think shops are generally low risk and the situation was blatantly unfair.
4
30/11/2020 10:12:20 107 17
bbc
As usual it will be the big names and chains who reap the bulk of the benefits from this whilst the small, independent stores get whatever scraps remain.
11
30/11/2020 10:14:59 43 27
bbc
That’s life. Even the big names started small
455
30/11/2020 11:53:55 5 0
bbc
It these days yes Tesco etc started small but these big coffee and restaurant chains, started big and are mostly highly geared pillagers of our high st
12
30/11/2020 10:15:22 104 50
bbc
As we live in a modern society how about at least 8am til 11pm, Monday to Sunday.

Its not 1910 anymore with everyone tottering off to church on a Sunday and early closing on a weds! If you live by those “values” the high street will be done for even faster than the internet is demolishing it.
38
30/11/2020 10:26:57 34 43
bbc
Pity it isnt
54
37p
30/11/2020 10:32:36 3 6
bbc
Apart from Sunday, I thought most shops are open with these hours - sometimes longer. Certainly I see supermarkets already open 24 hours a day.
156
30/11/2020 11:00:02 3 2
bbc
Not sure about the hours but agree with the rest of it.
197
30/11/2020 11:06:59 11 12
bbc
By modern you imply better a seriously wrong assumption So working everyday 8am-11pm is good for people's wellbeing albeit for a short time? Sunday was a day that people were able to rest and recuperate Maybe our ancestors were ahead of today's generation in having a work like balance Remember you will not sell anymore opening up seven days a week than six it doesn't put money in customers pockets
210
30/11/2020 11:08:43 7 6
bbc
Don't tell that to the Brexiteers!!!!!!!!
234
30/11/2020 11:13:13 16 3
bbc
No it isn't 1910. In the last 110 years, however, we have been trying to get away from the 7 day a week servitude of that era. It saddens me that we seem hellbent on going backwards. All so that we can be misled into buying tat that none of us really wants or needs in order to feed the wealth machine.
262
30/11/2020 11:18:38 10 2
bbc
Not just the internet, idiot councils making parking all but impossible too.
369
30/11/2020 11:31:06 3 0
bbc
wealth has been created by better shopping and competition. the virus has not been planned. it has to be down to common sense. there will be a huge cost to follow. we were due for a major setback. jobs will be the major priority ahead. nothing comes from nothing. hope is eternal.
430
30/11/2020 11:50:15 4 0
bbc
I don't get the Sunday opening times either. I work 8am-12pm on Sundays mainly because where I work is closed so more covid safe (I do IT so easier when people aren't using the systems). Means working 6 days a week but why the special Sunday times in this day and age?
828
30/11/2020 13:28:55 2 1
bbc
But wouldn't it be nice to have at least one day of the week where you weren't subjected to racket?
968
30/11/2020 14:28:04 3 1
bbc
Reduced hours for Sundays is an outdated anachronism of the past which is based on an unproven theory. In this modern age, time to scrap the laws on Sunday trading and start living in the 21st. century.
13
30/11/2020 10:15:35 13 19
bbc
Cases were aready dropping before lockdown. The epidemic was in April/May and this resurgence is normal for repiritory diseases at this time of year. We have to learn to live with this, can we have some perspective and get back more normality whilst protecting the vunerable. If we do not this will go on forever.
27
30/11/2020 10:23:32 18 5
bbc
How many times has this been copy and pasted? Put up with this for a little longer then get a vaccine as soon as its available to you. I hate it too but would hate it even more if people died because I felt it more important to go to the pub etc.
398
30/11/2020 11:45:10 1 1
bbc
Another armchair doctor! Can you have a look at this lump for me please?
14
30/11/2020 10:15:59 140 40
bbc
No pubs or restaurants when you want them but you can go shopping 24hrs a day. I guess the Virus is frightened to go in a shop!
611
30/11/2020 12:22:03 123 3
bbc
No Arcadia shops of course as Sir Philip and Lady Green still refuse to pay back into the pension funds of their employees, the £350M that they stole.
It's been 4 years since they were asked to pay this back. Why the delay? Solution is very simple.
Pay the money in by the end of this week, or their assets will be frozen and then confiscated and Sir and Lady Green will be locked up for 30 years.
15
30/11/2020 10:18:04 123 30
bbc
Why not include Sundays?0 Surely spreading out the day for more than 6 hours means less density crowds in the stores
36
30/11/2020 10:26:31 190 110
bbc
Perhaps we should return to closing on Sunday like it was when I was young.
71
30/11/2020 10:37:38 22 3
bbc
Fully agree. In Scotland, where (in normal times) shops are allowed to open for as many hours as they want on Sundays, weekend shopping is a more relaxed, less crowded, generally more pleasant experience - not just on Sundays, but on Saturdays too.
137
30/11/2020 10:56:46 6 11
bbc
Because religion.
803
30/11/2020 13:22:02 3 0
bbc
Everyone needs a day of rest and time together with family. The world has lost the plot in greed and consumerism
983
30/11/2020 14:35:53 0 0
bbc
Not in the run up to Christmas. They will, in their extra thousands, get in their cars out in the distant 'burbs and hinterlands, drive into London to shop all night. Residents will get no sleep for a month, children's asthma will increase, their ability to concentrate will drop, everyone's health will be damaged. We will all be more vulnerable to Covid infection and more likely to be more ill.
5
30/11/2020 10:11:59 5 16
bbc
WHY WOULD THEY DOTHIS AND PUT LIVES AT RISK?

PLEASE SHARE YOUR ANSWERS
16
30/11/2020 10:19:08 4 11
bbc
If we are in the middle of a major pandemic, why is the no excess mortality overall?
17
30/11/2020 10:19:52 38 15
bbc
More evidence of economics and profits before common sense.
87
30/11/2020 10:43:53 18 6
bbc
No, people's jobs .
155
30/11/2020 10:59:59 2 1
bbc
Yes who needs jobs and an economy!

It’s not like all our taxes are needed to fund the NHS annual budget of £140 billion a year is it? ?????
231
OwO
30/11/2020 11:12:38 4 1
bbc
Apply a bit of thinking, and you'll see it's obviously the opposite. Longer hours means fewer people in the shops at any time, as you no longer have the same time constraints on when you can go. Fewer people means fewer potential instances of infection.

It's all very simple really, once you take the tinfoil hat off.
426
30/11/2020 11:49:17 2 2
bbc
How about jobs? I'm guessing you are comfortable in your middle class job or sitting on your fat triple locked pension.
18
30/11/2020 10:20:07 94 55
bbc
Odd really, since it's Government policy to destroy the High Street (especially small independents) and push everyone towards online shopping (thus helping the massive sellers like Amazon).

And once they have destroyed all the shops and pubs and restaurants, they will stand back and say "How did that happen?"
48
37p
30/11/2020 10:29:37 87 30
bbc
Where's the government policy to destroy the High Street? Can you share your source for this?
120
30/11/2020 10:53:23 24 2
bbc
Govt. policy to destroy the High Street!! It's been in decline for years because people shop differently no Govt goes out to destroy businsess's take your conspiracy hat off because this has happened over both Labour and Tory govts not just the latter What they can do is tax the online stores using warehouses as they have an enormous tax advantage and reinvest the money in the high street
124
Rob
30/11/2020 10:53:52 16 3
bbc
Why would the government want to replace the high street with Amazon, given their tax contribution is all but non-existent?
125
30/11/2020 10:54:11 11 4
bbc
Nope, not seen that as a policy of the Government. Have you been dreaming?
165
30/11/2020 11:02:40 10 4
bbc
Do you have one shred of evidence to support your opinion?
212
30/11/2020 11:09:02 14 2
bbc
It is not the government destroying the high street, it is the population choosing to buy cheap online. If you want 'cheap' there is a price to pay folks.
221
30/11/2020 11:10:33 4 1
bbc
Exactly which POLICY is that? Which of the many manifesto pledges etc, not that you can trust Tory ones, was the one that stated it? Where is the government bill that is being produced to enact this?
Somehow I think your "truth" is severely out of kilter and you may struggle to get it back.
254
30/11/2020 11:10:49 7 1
bbc
"Odd really, since it's Government policy to destroy the High Street"

No, it is consumer choice doing that.
279
30/11/2020 11:21:33 7 1
bbc
Government policy can be both set out in Law or implied. I think that we all have to accept that life has changed, the days of popping into the car, driving miles to watch your wife hop in and out of a pair of jeans have gone. Your wife can now have shed loads of jeans posted to try on and off to her hearts content at home, then send them back. Meanwhile I can watch the rugby.
457
30/11/2020 11:54:13 1 2
bbc
I think you'll find it's consumers who have created this problem
460
30/11/2020 11:54:23 1 1
bbc
Why would any government want to destroy the High Street with all the retail jobs that work there.
695
30/11/2020 12:47:15 0 1
bbc
Almost no one wants to save the high street. We are not using it and it was not due to corvid. No sane person travels out to some remote town centre to try & find goods any more. it is a useless horrible, expensive to get to on top, way to buy goods. Better methods are taking over thankfully. Fools that go out to eat & drink will still probably be as rich & stupid as ever & keep doing it, sadly.
698
30/11/2020 12:48:11 0 2
bbc
What rot. There’s no policy to destroy anything. Bonkers. Crikey. Man-behind-the-grassy-knoll fantasy.
19
30/11/2020 10:20:27 9 14
bbc
Why is this hapless so government determined to maximise risk before the vaccine is available? Just a few months more caution and patience and we can be out of this mess yet they continue to court 'popularity' (and profits) over lives.
28
30/11/2020 10:23:36 15 8
bbc
Just "3 weeks" we were told in April

That was 8 months ago.

Still, just another few weeks then, eh ?

And another few weeks, just a couple of more months, then a few more months.

"Just another...." is never ending.
20
30/11/2020 10:20:54 190 21
bbc
In the few times I have been out since the first lockdown, every pub and restaurant I have visited has felt FAR safer than the shops (full of non mask wearers, brushing past me. touching and putting stuff back on shelves etc.) I have been to.
Cos masks work, lol.
Case in point. Just there for your "reassurance". You said it yourself -"feel" safer

You weren't safer. They don't work.
Removed
610
30/11/2020 12:21:54 13 5
bbc
Indeed, it's a little jarring when you're walking down supermarket aisle carrying a basked, couldn't see what you wanted and turn around to go back the other way and bump into some idiot with a trolley who was following you so close they clearly weren't following distancing rules.
623
30/11/2020 12:23:45 18 2
bbc
Totally agree. Much safer in a pub/ restaurant than in the supermarket.
784
30/11/2020 13:10:03 0 1
bbc
Avoid then
974
30/11/2020 14:31:01 7 1
bbc
It's not the pub environment that's the problem as long as the rules are enforced. Consuming alcohol decreases inhibitions and causes a lack of mental clarity. Outside the pub people who are under the influence are more likely to ignore social distancing, mask wearing etc. This will cause problems.
jch
30/11/2020 14:50:24 1 0
bbc
Brushing past or touching does not constitute a danger of infection, the "official" view is spending more than 10 minutes within 2 metres of an infected person.
30/11/2020 15:13:54 0 2
bbc
Do you have a cat?
21
30/11/2020 10:21:04 533 60
bbc
Shut the shops, then create the conditions to pack them out over a three week window. Utter, utter, madness.
40
37p
30/11/2020 10:28:13 272 43
bbc
Seems to me that if the shops are going to be open then extending opening hours will reduce risks.
76
30/11/2020 10:39:17 11 17
bbc
But don't masks work?
232
Gaz
30/11/2020 11:12:49 13 2
bbc
the point is that shops wont be packed when they extend their hours and people buy on line, and the economy will look better too.
326
30/11/2020 11:31:26 21 9
bbc
Try thinking before typing.

Extending the opening hours means shops will be less packed because people won't all be crowding in at the same time of day.

And just to be clear, the Govt isn't telling shops to stay open 24/7 - they're simply empowering local authorities to make their own decision over extending permissible hours, where local conditions are suitable.

Utter, utter, common sense.
463
30/11/2020 11:54:55 13 0
bbc
No we’ve all be using Amazon to buy stuff got to keep the corporations in business first. They now do your Morrison’s shopping too and deliver it before morrisons. Amazons desire to be globally dominant..... wasn’t there a monopoly commission at one point?
514
30/11/2020 12:05:04 5 3
bbc
Every other logical person would see if shops open 24 hrs a week, then it disperses crowds into different hours of the day, like shopping for your grocery at 1 am with less customers than staff is a much better experience. As much as shopping everything else online, shop in person for grocery is a lot quicker.

But your twisted logic thinks its madness, because you don't think outside of the box?
531
30/11/2020 12:06:48 5 0
bbc
In my area the worst day for shopping is Sunday. Restricted hours mean that queues often form before 10 am. I don't see the problem with extending opening hours, except that staff may be asked to work for longer. This might be an opportunity though, to employ some additional temporary staff. There are plenty of unemployed people who might appreciate the chance to earn extra before Christmas.
583
30/11/2020 12:15:47 5 2
bbc
I loathe this business illiterate government of xenophobes, racists and public school weirdos but on this occasion for the first time they actually may be making a sensible decision. You cannot be wrong all of the time even when you are trying really hard.
763
30/11/2020 13:09:15 1 6
bbc
Open the pubs.
825
30/11/2020 13:28:23 3 1
bbc
Totally stupid idea lock down 3 on the way now, how are the small shops meant to compete with the big ones now probably more small businesses closing down now
848
30/11/2020 13:36:03 1 1
bbc
Surely extending the opening hours reduces how packed the shops will be?

Is that concept of space and time beyond your computing power?
919
30/11/2020 13:59:09 1 1
bbc
All totally mad,.. This goverment have lost touch with the real world, pure maddest,
30/11/2020 14:44:10 1 1
bbc
Yep can’t disagree
Removed
30/11/2020 19:24:40 1 0
bbc
Bit dramatic there. Simpleton.
22
30/11/2020 10:22:11 22 7
bbc
In lockdown, cases fall & businesses suffer. Out of lockdown cases rise & businesses suffer less.

Govt need to understand this, accept that they can't have both, make a decision and implement it. They can't have it both ways and they need to understand that desperately trying to make people happy for the sake of their own popularity is doing more harm than good.
50
30/11/2020 10:30:00 34 7
bbc
It wouldn’t matter who was in charge any government will be condemned for what it did or didn’t do equally.
23
30/11/2020 10:22:22 448 67
bbc
So let me get this straight, go out and buy rubbish from shops most folk don't need. Spread colds, flus and covid, then spend Christmas with your bubble households, where you'll likely share more than just presents with one another.

What could possibly go wrong in the new year?
121
30/11/2020 10:50:13 53 166
bbc
Keep taking your disco biscuits ??
140
30/11/2020 10:57:09 6 3
bbc
yes and you can now do it at 2.00a.m.
160
30/11/2020 11:01:33 20 23
bbc
So your your suggesting that the only option is to stay isolated away for life? What of this "hands, face, space" we've had shoved down our throats? You can literally stay in a shop all day and not catch a thing if social distancing is observed but nope people like you want us to live in isolated mud huts living off bread and water when the economy tanks.
297
30/11/2020 11:26:38 20 9
bbc
It beggars belief - HM Dad's Army Govt, lead by Captain Buffoon, strike again - remember go to work (but I did not mean the next day!), go to work then three weeks later work from home, help out to eat out and best of all "..we can beat this virus in three weeks" from the initial broadcast to the nation in March. Simply NOT fit to govern and we need to recognise this p**t is out of his depth.
371
30/11/2020 11:33:11 12 16
bbc
"So let me get this straight, go out and buy rubbish from shops most folk don't need"

If you base your life only on what you need it's going to be pretty miserable.
525
30/11/2020 12:06:00 3 2
bbc
I bet you waste your money on holidays that you don't need and that spread colds, flus and covid.
778
30/11/2020 13:14:43 2 0
bbc
This island is going to sink beneath the tidal wave of plastic rubbish that people can't live without, but who will be quite happy to risk passing the virus on to get.
957
30/11/2020 14:22:46 1 1
bbc
It isn't compulsory to visit shops. I suspect many won't.
30/11/2020 15:13:14 0 0
bbc
IF you all buy each other biohazard suits you'd be fine, and remember, in today's world, a biohazard suit isn't just for Christmas ;-)
30/11/2020 22:34:39 0 1
bbc
Its not like you have anything to do in the new year?! Pubs/clubs shut! Dry January.
Stop moaning!
7
30/11/2020 10:13:13 234 24
bbc
Just don't go for a pint afterwards else you may die.
24
30/11/2020 10:22:27 213 12
bbc
At least you get to die with a substantial meal.
26
30/11/2020 10:23:32 27 6
bbc
Imagine your last meal being ham, egg and chips in Spoons. What a way to go...
144
30/11/2020 10:58:34 2 8
bbc
Can't you cook?
188
30/11/2020 11:04:25 6 4
bbc
If we are forced to have a substantial meal with our pint, I think the government should pay for that part of it!
214
30/11/2020 11:09:24 2 2
bbc
Substantial meal...what the heck does that even mean? Who's deciding what a substantial meal is, if govt are just making this stuff up as they go then a substantial meal should just be a bag of peanuts.
1
30/11/2020 10:11:52 14 27
bbc
Tories have shares in retail, so open the shops. Kerching!
25
37p
30/11/2020 10:23:21 3 2
bbc
So do members of all political parties!
24
30/11/2020 10:22:27 213 12
bbc
At least you get to die with a substantial meal.
26
30/11/2020 10:23:32 27 6
bbc
Imagine your last meal being ham, egg and chips in Spoons. What a way to go...
191
30/11/2020 11:05:10 3 3
bbc
Sounds like a fairly decent way to go if you ask me. The simple pleasures are often the best!
481
30/11/2020 11:57:32 3 4
bbc
our local spoons has a first rate cook...
30/11/2020 14:43:13 0 2
bbc
"Imagine your last meal being ham, egg and chips in Spoons"

Most who eat in there have probably given up on life anyway.
13
30/11/2020 10:15:35 13 19
bbc
Cases were aready dropping before lockdown. The epidemic was in April/May and this resurgence is normal for repiritory diseases at this time of year. We have to learn to live with this, can we have some perspective and get back more normality whilst protecting the vunerable. If we do not this will go on forever.
27
30/11/2020 10:23:32 18 5
bbc
How many times has this been copy and pasted? Put up with this for a little longer then get a vaccine as soon as its available to you. I hate it too but would hate it even more if people died because I felt it more important to go to the pub etc.
19
30/11/2020 10:20:27 9 14
bbc
Why is this hapless so government determined to maximise risk before the vaccine is available? Just a few months more caution and patience and we can be out of this mess yet they continue to court 'popularity' (and profits) over lives.
28
30/11/2020 10:23:36 15 8
bbc
Just "3 weeks" we were told in April

That was 8 months ago.

Still, just another few weeks then, eh ?

And another few weeks, just a couple of more months, then a few more months.

"Just another...." is never ending.
45
30/11/2020 10:28:53 5 7
bbc
Thats our government for you, forever misleading.
83
30/11/2020 10:43:22 2 4
bbc
I don't remember anybody saying it would be 3 feedback n April. Boris said he would review restrictions the n but that was all. As usual many not listening to what is said
163
30/11/2020 11:02:04 5 1
bbc
Well, you can thank the idiots who ignore the rules for that.
3
30/11/2020 10:12:19 19 8
bbc
Don’t quite understand why, all to little too late as most now shop on line and have sorted Xmas items
29
30/11/2020 10:23:46 24 2
bbc
Have they? Guarantee we'll see crowds outside shops on Wednesday.
737
30/11/2020 13:00:13 1 0
bbc
And three weeks later crowds in intensive care
1
30/11/2020 10:11:52 14 27
bbc
Tories have shares in retail, so open the shops. Kerching!
30
30/11/2020 10:23:54 4 3
bbc
Anyone who has a pension plan almost certainly has shares in retail, through the big property companies.
But at best, opening for a few extra hours can only postpone the inevitable for a short time. We urgently need to start finding alternative uses for redundant retail and office space. The obvious one is for housing, which could rejuvenate town centres and bring new custom for local businesses.
30/11/2020 15:59:56 2 0
bbc
Yes indeed, I do too! Who cares any more? XXXX
31
30/11/2020 10:23:58 21 9
bbc
Shopping used to be a pleasant experience, although food shopping is now a tiresome experience. While 'er indoors was going up & down the aisles, I could sit in the cafe with a coffee, a cinnamon whirl and do a crossword. Lockdown restrictions have ended all that.
32
30/11/2020 10:24:53 82 19
bbc
I'm following the science, not the politicians. Just a few more months!
69
37p
30/11/2020 10:37:29 44 38
bbc
So which of the scientists do you follow?
202
OwO
30/11/2020 11:07:59 19 4
bbc
And when there is research of conflicting views, who do you ask then to do your thinking?

Whatever happened to people taking some responsibility for themselves....
831
30/11/2020 13:29:09 2 0
bbc
The scientists have only had one option since the beginning of the pandemic, regardless of the effect on people or the economy, lockdown until the vaccine is found.
30/11/2020 18:32:32 0 0
bbc
No such thing; what is called ‘Science’ is the pursuit of a particular kind of knowledge by people calling themselves Scientists. The questions they ask are determined by the assumptions they make: don’t mistake Science for neutral knowledge.
33
30/11/2020 10:25:29 8 16
bbc
Come on man! This lockdown is over, it never even began really (well apart from our small businesses) but as far as Asda, Tesco and Sainsburys are concerned they've never had it so good! We, the people demand you open the shops now.
131
30/11/2020 10:56:04 6 2
bbc
You speak on behalf of "the people" do you? Really?
34
30/11/2020 10:25:38 127 14
bbc
Better to waive the car parking charges.
300
30/11/2020 11:21:23 49 3
bbc
dream on.
549
Pip
30/11/2020 12:11:16 3 2
bbc
No matter what the 'Shopping Tax' will remain........?
988
30/11/2020 14:36:55 1 3
bbc
Thus forcing residents & their children to breathe health-damaging polluted air all night every night for a month.
990
30/11/2020 14:37:56 2 0
bbc
Cant see NCP doing that
jch
30/11/2020 14:52:06 0 2
bbc
Well, there won't buses, trams or trains at 2am will there?
30/11/2020 19:52:03 0 1
bbc
Tory owned businesses and greedy councils will never suspend car park charges and Japanese owned NCP would be outraged.
7
30/11/2020 10:13:13 234 24
bbc
Just don't go for a pint afterwards else you may die.
35
30/11/2020 10:26:10 25 37
bbc
A pint would be fine but as so many find a pint is not enough and people forget all sense of responsibility after a few then this is the inevitable outcome.
70
30/11/2020 10:37:32 16 37
bbc
The thumbs down to my post show me whats important in their lives. Probably the same people who at christmas think its ok to have a few then drive that short distance home.
15
30/11/2020 10:18:04 123 30
bbc
Why not include Sundays?0 Surely spreading out the day for more than 6 hours means less density crowds in the stores
36
30/11/2020 10:26:31 190 110
bbc
Perhaps we should return to closing on Sunday like it was when I was young.
51
30/11/2020 10:31:46 26 18
bbc
.Would love that. Just the newsagents open in the morning for fags and newspaper.Sunday seems to be busier than every other day where i live !!!!
192
30/11/2020 11:05:16 34 28
bbc
"Perhaps we should return to closing on Sunday like it was when I was young."

Good idea. We could also go back to living in caves, and really recreate the good old days.
424
30/11/2020 11:48:55 5 3
bbc
I'd love that. I hate how we are becoming a 24/7 society...
444
30/11/2020 11:52:35 8 4
bbc
Sundays were rather dreary back in the 70s when the shops were all shut. Only 3 channels on the TV and nothing to eat but coal..... okay, the last one I made up.
700
30/11/2020 12:48:47 3 9
bbc
No thanks, it was rubbish when no shops were open on Sunday.
727
30/11/2020 12:58:07 8 0
bbc
So do I. Why do people feel the need to shop 24/7.
The body and mind need rest, not constant go go go go go!
820
30/11/2020 13:27:07 3 1
bbc
sundays used to be quality family time. Deffo agree to have shops closed on a Sunday.
979
30/11/2020 14:33:23 1 1
bbc
Definitely. Let residents have one day per week of relative peace and cleaner air.
30/11/2020 15:17:22 0 0
bbc
but that would mean 7 day closing ;-)
30/11/2020 16:26:59 1 1
bbc
I agree, thought Sunday opening was a good idea at first but soon realised it was a failure and I recall staff were being forced to work Sunday before their contracts were changed. Minimum waged have little choice
37
30/11/2020 10:26:57 205 23
bbc
If shops are open longer then it will help stop overcrowding. Most businesses have been trying to do the right thing. It’s up to local authorities to close down premises not covid secure. They already have the right under public health rules.
216
30/11/2020 11:09:41 85 8
bbc
Sensible comment. Thank you.
357
30/11/2020 11:39:32 3 1
bbc
Most smaller shops will not be able to afford to open. The cost of heating, lighting and staff costs will make this prohibitive.
442
30/11/2020 11:52:29 8 2
bbc
Wow a sensible comment........ I just came to read all the hate directed towards people who don't want to lock themselves in their homes for the next 6 months but at the same time moan that businesses are closing down and people are losing their jobs.
474
30/11/2020 11:52:27 4 0
bbc
I agree but why have they not allowed supermarkets to remain open 24hours like normal all year long?
It would have prevented mqssive overcrowding!
519
30/11/2020 12:05:19 2 1
bbc
so you don't think people might be more inclined to go shopping during daylight hours then.
589
30/11/2020 12:17:07 4 3
bbc
But what about the shop workers, some of whom will end up working more hours than is sensible for their own health because they fear they'll be fired for not following orders.
673
30/11/2020 12:43:21 0 1
bbc
Overcrowding will still be a possibility, after all how many people are going to go to Primark at 2am?
807
30/11/2020 13:19:45 1 2
bbc
And what about the people who work in those shops. They are now going to be presureised by their hungry bossess to work all the hours they can with no thought that they might want to spend some xmas time with their families.
835
30/11/2020 13:30:40 0 0
bbc
Assuming customers turn up in an orderly fashion. You have been allocated the 3am to 4 am slot. Ok.
864
30/11/2020 13:38:29 1 0
bbc
The shops/stores are doing the best they can, howver the people who enter these premises seem to think they are covid free once inside, majority of them have no concept of social distancing, just walk around with not a care in the world
971
30/11/2020 14:29:16 0 0
bbc
If they took any notice of public health they would not have been allowing al fresco dining on public pavements without social distancing to protect diners, staff and any hapless passers-by (which latter have to run the gauntlet a few inches from possibly infected diners each side of them as they walk past). It won't stop overcrowding - more people will arrive to shop, exciting new fun idea.
jch
30/11/2020 14:48:02 1 0
bbc
Only if public transport also runs all night to cater for the shoppers?
30/11/2020 14:52:51 0 1
bbc
So open pubs, bars and restaurants 24 hours a day too then instead of having a curfew or forcing them all to close for good. More insanity.
30/11/2020 15:10:20 0 1
bbc
No it won't because people won't shop at 3 o'clock in the morning! Shop staff deserve a break!
30/11/2020 15:25:23 0 1
bbc
I take it you dont work in retail?
30/11/2020 15:31:53 1 0
bbc
An excellent comment! Lets hope Wales, N. Irland and Scotland all follow!
12
30/11/2020 10:15:22 104 50
bbc
As we live in a modern society how about at least 8am til 11pm, Monday to Sunday.

Its not 1910 anymore with everyone tottering off to church on a Sunday and early closing on a weds! If you live by those “values” the high street will be done for even faster than the internet is demolishing it.
38
30/11/2020 10:26:57 34 43
bbc
Pity it isnt
116
30/11/2020 10:52:00 25 6
bbc
Only in your opinion. I remember endless, boring Sundays of my childhood with seemingly the entire world closed for no possible reason. Liston to Hancock's brilliant "Sunday Afternoon at Home" - hilarious, but not least because it was true. You are not forced to go shopping on Sunday if you don't want to. You are not empowered to force your views onto everyone else.
207
30/11/2020 11:08:36 12 4
bbc
I agree. But the Church only has itself to blame. Meddling in politics, being stupid about women priests. Welby should have his people on the ground caring for their flock, not playing woke.
422
30/11/2020 11:48:48 2 2
bbc
You called our society modern dream on
39
30/11/2020 10:26:57 6 3
bbc
A bit late to save billionaire Sleazy Green though - and his staff's jobs!
315
30/11/2020 11:29:20 3 0
bbc
I doubt his bank account is empty. Probably got a few million offshore too.
21
30/11/2020 10:21:04 533 60
bbc
Shut the shops, then create the conditions to pack them out over a three week window. Utter, utter, madness.
40
37p
30/11/2020 10:28:13 272 43
bbc
Seems to me that if the shops are going to be open then extending opening hours will reduce risks.
136
30/11/2020 10:56:43 15 8
bbc
only if you can shop at 2am!
157
30/11/2020 11:00:21 4 10
bbc
How do you calculate that?
927
30/11/2020 14:01:26 2 0
bbc
Have you ever been in a supermarket when the drunks come out of the pub at midnight. Reducing risks! You must be kidding.
4
30/11/2020 10:12:20 107 17
bbc
As usual it will be the big names and chains who reap the bulk of the benefits from this whilst the small, independent stores get whatever scraps remain.
41
30/11/2020 10:28:27 8 2
bbc
That’s apart from the big chains that have already closed down and the many small shops that have adapted to changing ways of shopping and the pandemic
451
30/11/2020 11:53:34 4 2
bbc
Amazon, Ocado, Deliveroo, Next and many more all seem to be doing rather well out of this whole mess.
42
30/11/2020 10:28:31 4 9
bbc
Two things - It's not fair to force people to work round the clock. Rome wasn't built in a day, and it certainly wasn't built at night. Second, huge numbers of people absolutely hate shopping in their local town centres because of antisocial behaviour. Add darkness of night into the equation and plenty of others won't be going. Stupid. Jenrick the honest Tory at full tilt.
43
30/11/2020 10:28:37 22 8
bbc
I wasn't aware there were restrictions on shop opening hours outside of lockdown.

Would be useful if the article said what restrictions are actually being waived.
190
30/11/2020 11:06:02 15 15
bbc
Are you incapable of finding information on your own? If you are you have failed the education system, it hasn't failed you.
903
JR
30/11/2020 13:50:14 0 0
bbc
Lots of shops already open 24 hours, so yes, it would be interesting.
44
30/11/2020 10:28:46 7 5
bbc
Does Jeff Bezos care - nah! He's open 24/7 and avoiding tax 24/7.
28
30/11/2020 10:23:36 15 8
bbc
Just "3 weeks" we were told in April

That was 8 months ago.

Still, just another few weeks then, eh ?

And another few weeks, just a couple of more months, then a few more months.

"Just another...." is never ending.
45
30/11/2020 10:28:53 5 7
bbc
Thats our government for you, forever misleading.
46
30/11/2020 10:29:15 19 1
bbc
I'm shopping for pretty much of all it online this year, as I have for most years recently. I'm making sure I prioritise what people want too. Independents can still be supported online too. Etsy for example is good for unique bits.

Covid or no Covid, I won't be out and about in the Christmas shopping crowds anyway. Shopping is a chore to me so for those who see it as a hobby, fill your boots!
47
30/11/2020 10:29:25 18 11
bbc
Stopping the spread means spot checks, for instance at the Asian barber shop near me which is jammed with non-mask-wearing clients all day long.
53
30/11/2020 10:32:06 13 16
bbc
Why was it necessary for you to include race in this post?
57
30/11/2020 10:33:49 11 1
bbc
They shouldn't be at the moment as Barbers Shops are one of the places which should be closed under the terms of this second lockdown
59
30/11/2020 10:34:20 13 3
bbc
The council could close it under public health regulations. But I’m in the world we live in now no doubt someone in authority would be too frightened in case someone complained about racial discrimination.
64
30/11/2020 10:36:44 7 1
bbc
Same in Blackpool open during lockdown. Not closed down despite complaints to the local embarrassingly useless plod.
18
30/11/2020 10:20:07 94 55
bbc
Odd really, since it's Government policy to destroy the High Street (especially small independents) and push everyone towards online shopping (thus helping the massive sellers like Amazon).

And once they have destroyed all the shops and pubs and restaurants, they will stand back and say "How did that happen?"
48
37p
30/11/2020 10:29:37 87 30
bbc
Where's the government policy to destroy the High Street? Can you share your source for this?
55
30/11/2020 10:33:39 13 20
bbc
Take a walk down any High Street with your eyes open.
573
30/11/2020 12:13:55 4 1
bbc
covid tiers 2 and 3 for 99% of the country seems a pretty good place to start !
858
30/11/2020 13:36:46 2 0
bbc
It's a consequence of the government policy. Restrict sales by independents. By high business retail rates,not applying import duty rules , not policing drop shipments reward those responsible for the endemic.
30/11/2020 17:57:19 0 0
bbc
Not really helped them. Online giants reap the rewards but allowed to get away with paying little tax
1
30/11/2020 10:11:52 14 27
bbc
Tories have shares in retail, so open the shops. Kerching!
49
30/11/2020 10:29:52 4 4
bbc
Pension schemes probably have more shares than any Tory. As a Tory supporter I have none so pleas e do not make generalisations you can not substantiate.
30/11/2020 15:59:02 1 1
bbc
I didn’t say all Tories, but I am glad you seem offended. XXXX!
22
30/11/2020 10:22:11 22 7
bbc
In lockdown, cases fall & businesses suffer. Out of lockdown cases rise & businesses suffer less.

Govt need to understand this, accept that they can't have both, make a decision and implement it. They can't have it both ways and they need to understand that desperately trying to make people happy for the sake of their own popularity is doing more harm than good.
50
30/11/2020 10:30:00 34 7
bbc
It wouldn’t matter who was in charge any government will be condemned for what it did or didn’t do equally.
79
30/11/2020 10:41:15 3 3
bbc
How right you are!
147
30/11/2020 10:59:14 5 3
bbc
Absolutely correct. I'm sick and tired of pond life on here who are merely using Covid as a stick to beat politicians with. They're likely the same people who ignore lockdown, ignore social distancing and don't wear masks.
201
30/11/2020 11:07:49 2 0
bbc
No it wouldn't.
Money/Profit/Greed 1st is NOT a good recipe to help people.
355
30/11/2020 11:39:20 2 1
bbc
If Corbyn was in charge and did exactly the same I'm sure the press and many including you would be screaming for his head on a spike.
943
30/11/2020 14:09:35 1 0
bbc
Yeh, but you just know no one could possibly manage it worse than the current incumbent incompetents.
30/11/2020 16:55:38 0 0
bbc
maybe, but it's a good idea to figure out what works and what doesn't and lock-down doesn't, Sweden's approach did, they may have loads of infections but they are not having loads of deaths, mind you most places aren't. As for infections, 'seek and ye shall find', I've not heard of any Uni having lost hundreds of their students so far, at least not to covid.
30/11/2020 18:00:03 0 0
bbc
At least another Govt might tell the truth.
36
30/11/2020 10:26:31 190 110
bbc
Perhaps we should return to closing on Sunday like it was when I was young.
51
30/11/2020 10:31:46 26 18
bbc
.Would love that. Just the newsagents open in the morning for fags and newspaper.Sunday seems to be busier than every other day where i live !!!!
52
30/11/2020 10:31:58 8 10
bbc
Do the number of shoppers projected to need "stuff" at 3am really cover the staffing costs, electric, etc, to make it worthwhile stores opening? Plus do staff themselves really fancy working night shifts with all the transport, childcare, contractual issues? Smells like another ill-thought-out turd rolled in xmas glitter!
56
37p
30/11/2020 10:33:48 9 1
bbc
I don't think this is mandatory.
73
30/11/2020 10:38:36 2 1
bbc
They aren't forced to open
47
30/11/2020 10:29:25 18 11
bbc
Stopping the spread means spot checks, for instance at the Asian barber shop near me which is jammed with non-mask-wearing clients all day long.
53
30/11/2020 10:32:06 13 16
bbc
Why was it necessary for you to include race in this post?
123
30/11/2020 10:53:47 3 3
bbc
Because race is important to identify people.
126
30/11/2020 10:54:18 7 0
bbc
If it is an "Asian barber shop" then why shouldn't it be reported as an "Asian barber shop"? Why should it be necessary to leave out the word "Asian"?
263
30/11/2020 11:18:52 2 0
bbc
??????????
12
30/11/2020 10:15:22 104 50
bbc
As we live in a modern society how about at least 8am til 11pm, Monday to Sunday.

Its not 1910 anymore with everyone tottering off to church on a Sunday and early closing on a weds! If you live by those “values” the high street will be done for even faster than the internet is demolishing it.
54
37p
30/11/2020 10:32:36 3 6
bbc
Apart from Sunday, I thought most shops are open with these hours - sometimes longer. Certainly I see supermarkets already open 24 hours a day.
48
37p
30/11/2020 10:29:37 87 30
bbc
Where's the government policy to destroy the High Street? Can you share your source for this?
55
30/11/2020 10:33:39 13 20
bbc
Take a walk down any High Street with your eyes open.
75
30/11/2020 10:38:44 19 8
bbc
That does not make it government policy. Shops are shutting, yes because of external forces not because of government policy. What right minded government wants to put people out of work lose the tax income and pay benefits...
173
30/11/2020 11:03:53 7 2
bbc
That's not evidence of policy.
522
30/11/2020 12:04:24 0 1
bbc
"Take a walk down any High Street with your eyes open."

That does not make it Govt policy.
736
30/11/2020 13:00:01 0 1
bbc
Not the governments doing. They get more money from the high street , so why kill it off, Amazon doesn't pay Business Rates!
52
30/11/2020 10:31:58 8 10
bbc
Do the number of shoppers projected to need "stuff" at 3am really cover the staffing costs, electric, etc, to make it worthwhile stores opening? Plus do staff themselves really fancy working night shifts with all the transport, childcare, contractual issues? Smells like another ill-thought-out turd rolled in xmas glitter!
56
37p
30/11/2020 10:33:48 9 1
bbc
I don't think this is mandatory.
47
30/11/2020 10:29:25 18 11
bbc
Stopping the spread means spot checks, for instance at the Asian barber shop near me which is jammed with non-mask-wearing clients all day long.
57
30/11/2020 10:33:49 11 1
bbc
They shouldn't be at the moment as Barbers Shops are one of the places which should be closed under the terms of this second lockdown
58
30/11/2020 10:34:14 2 10
bbc
No dont go out to shop, stay at home like all these Old Far...Mature Citizens on this HYS, and gripe at others.

We're all in it together surely. Not that 90% of the deaths are the over 65s, no dont mention that figure.
141
30/11/2020 10:57:57 0 2
bbc
Yes and then watch them go berserk over increases in council tax and the loss of the triple lock state pension that was needed to pay to keep them alive
47
30/11/2020 10:29:25 18 11
bbc
Stopping the spread means spot checks, for instance at the Asian barber shop near me which is jammed with non-mask-wearing clients all day long.
59
30/11/2020 10:34:20 13 3
bbc
The council could close it under public health regulations. But I’m in the world we live in now no doubt someone in authority would be too frightened in case someone complained about racial discrimination.
66
30/11/2020 10:36:55 15 3
bbc
Exactly. They ARE open and have been throughout this lockdown. I specified the race, whatsthepoint, as I think the council are frightened of appearing racist by prosecuting them. Also all the other barber shops are abiding by the rules here - it is just the ones owned by Asian proprietors which are defying the rules in my town. That's not racist - it's an observation of fact.
60
30/11/2020 10:34:24 136 11
bbc
"Shops in England can open for longer in run-up to Christmas"

Phew, I thought we'd miss the spirit of the Christmas shopping /commercial binge and it would risk reverting back to those traditional times of seasonal celebration and goodwill to all.

(Please forgive the sarcasm). ??
501
30/11/2020 12:02:38 25 4
bbc
You dead right
30/11/2020 15:16:48 0 1
bbc
Beware, even cats can be infected with Corona-virus.
30/11/2020 18:29:54 0 1
bbc
If you need to point out sarcasm, you’ve rather missed the point.
61
30/11/2020 10:35:03 6 9
bbc
Thats it, go on, open longer to squash more people in, cram them together, turn back the recent successes. A big lockdown in Fe/Mar is hesding our way again, all in the name of panic buying tons of unwanted, plastic Chinese cr@p.
101
30/11/2020 10:48:12 3 0
bbc
Literally opening longer to spread people out, not squash them in. Opening FEWER hours would squash them in.
103
Rob
30/11/2020 10:48:40 0 0
bbc
Surely it is better to spread out the opening times so there is less of a squash?
62
30/11/2020 10:35:36 6 9
bbc
Always two things all Govs try to control Shopping on Sunday ooh cannot upset the Church ... and alcohol consumption time and limits - guess what Amazon sells everything and we can drink at home and lastly Luvvie BBC - Netflix / Prime now never watch BBC ... licence gone next year
86
30/11/2020 10:38:22 8 4
bbc
Make sure you don’t use the BBC website after you’ve stopped paying your licence fee please.
63
30/11/2020 10:35:52 8 3
bbc
Shops are much lower risk than pubs or restaurants. It was very unfair that some shops were able to claim that they were essential retail at the expense of others. Also hopefully it means the supermarkets will be less crammed.
102
30/11/2020 10:48:26 7 1
bbc
Yes supermarkets are crammed,pubs and resteraurants are closed so who's spreading it ?
47
30/11/2020 10:29:25 18 11
bbc
Stopping the spread means spot checks, for instance at the Asian barber shop near me which is jammed with non-mask-wearing clients all day long.
64
30/11/2020 10:36:44 7 1
bbc
Same in Blackpool open during lockdown. Not closed down despite complaints to the local embarrassingly useless plod.
65
30/11/2020 10:36:45 8 17
bbc
Shops can open 24hrs a day for all I care
Not been in one since July and won't again until the ridiculous spectacle of mask wearing comes to an end

They haven't worked, they can't work, and the sooner govt supports business by ending this mask "reassurance without benefits" show the better
80
30/11/2020 10:42:19 14 4
bbc
You're a CovDenier who probably sits at home in a tinfoil hat, in case the Govt or aliens are listening in. Masks help to prevent coughs and sneezes landing germs and virus everywhere. Common sense fact. Dont like it? Stay indoors. Keep away from the rest of us who follow the rules.
114
30/11/2020 10:51:14 2 0
bbc
The "ridiculous spectacle" is actually your post.
59
30/11/2020 10:34:20 13 3
bbc
The council could close it under public health regulations. But I’m in the world we live in now no doubt someone in authority would be too frightened in case someone complained about racial discrimination.
66
30/11/2020 10:36:55 15 3
bbc
Exactly. They ARE open and have been throughout this lockdown. I specified the race, whatsthepoint, as I think the council are frightened of appearing racist by prosecuting them. Also all the other barber shops are abiding by the rules here - it is just the ones owned by Asian proprietors which are defying the rules in my town. That's not racist - it's an observation of fact.
88
30/11/2020 10:44:17 1 9
bbc
Ah but would you have used the race of the perdon had it or any other business breaking the rules been run by a white person? I dont think so.
67
30/11/2020 10:37:16 8 10
bbc
So shops can open longer to squash people in like sardines, but pubs are the evil spreaders so they stay shut. MADNESS!
94
Rob
30/11/2020 10:46:14 4 1
bbc
Surely it would be better to have spread out opening hours, so avoiding as many people being "squashed in like sardines"?
68
30/11/2020 10:37:25 69 29
bbc
It seems stupid not to relax the Sunday trading laws too. At a time where we want to avoid people being too crowded together allowing longer opening hours on Sundays in the run-up to Christmas would make sense.
227
30/11/2020 11:11:39 116 21
bbc
Don’t agree with longer Sunday opening hours. Shop staff deserve some time with their families and to some of us Sunday still remains an important family day. Surprisingly life does not actually exist solely for shopping.
554
30/11/2020 12:09:54 7 5
bbc
"It seems stupid not to relax the Sunday trading laws too"

Exactly. Let them open all day and close churches to contain the risk. Who knows what goes on in those seedy places.
30/11/2020 18:34:36 3 0
bbc
Unlimited numbers allowed in Primark, but not churches, or even huge cathedrals with much higher ceilings.
32
30/11/2020 10:24:53 82 19
bbc
I'm following the science, not the politicians. Just a few more months!
69
37p
30/11/2020 10:37:29 44 38
bbc
So which of the scientists do you follow?
133
30/11/2020 10:56:26 5 6
bbc
Stephen Hawking
145
30/11/2020 10:59:07 4 7
bbc
Could be scientology , space and time man!
195
30/11/2020 11:06:52 8 2
bbc
Any with more knowledge than you obviously
211
30/11/2020 11:08:59 14 1
bbc
Ones that have a a peer review system not a group of doctors who don't but make all sorts of claims
329
30/11/2020 11:32:19 5 7
bbc
I ignore the ones where the BBC put the term "former" before their title.
30/11/2020 15:26:04 1 0
bbc
The one with a married mistress to die for by the sound of it.
35
30/11/2020 10:26:10 25 37
bbc
A pint would be fine but as so many find a pint is not enough and people forget all sense of responsibility after a few then this is the inevitable outcome.
70
30/11/2020 10:37:32 16 37
bbc
The thumbs down to my post show me whats important in their lives. Probably the same people who at christmas think its ok to have a few then drive that short distance home.
184
30/11/2020 11:00:15 25 2
bbc
Just because some people who like to visit pubs does not mean they drink and drive. You should restrain your baseless judgment.
198
30/11/2020 11:07:03 8 2
bbc
I think it's more of the patronising tone you take!
205
30/11/2020 11:06:25 16 1
bbc
The pubs I frequent are civilised, nobody gets drunk and starts lurching abut or shouting. Perhaps you need to visit a different hostelry if people behave badly in yours.
296
30/11/2020 11:26:26 10 2
bbc
I think it is a fair leap from feeling ok to have a few pints and drinking & driving. If the only way you can make a point is to add an entirely fictional danger scenario, maybe you don't have a point?
343
30/11/2020 11:35:55 1 5
bbc
Spot on sir
496
30/11/2020 12:01:39 3 1
bbc
More probably the same people who can go and have more than one pint, and remain sensible.
15
30/11/2020 10:18:04 123 30
bbc
Why not include Sundays?0 Surely spreading out the day for more than 6 hours means less density crowds in the stores
71
30/11/2020 10:37:38 22 3
bbc
Fully agree. In Scotland, where (in normal times) shops are allowed to open for as many hours as they want on Sundays, weekend shopping is a more relaxed, less crowded, generally more pleasant experience - not just on Sundays, but on Saturdays too.
72
30/11/2020 10:38:33 115 8
bbc
Who is going to staff the shops? Are staff to work 24/7 or are shop owners going to manage to employ extra staff at the drop of a hat?

If the idea is to spread the shoppers out there will be no extra takings to cover extra wages/lighting/heating.

Large chains will probably manage by making their staff be ‘flexible’ and impose antisocial rotas.

Small independents will be the losers as usual.
112
30/11/2020 10:50:43 48 7
bbc
There are plenty of unemployed shop workers. No problem finding staff now.
242
OwO
30/11/2020 11:14:08 8 5
bbc
Oh no, new jobs!

The govt. could discover veins of gold under Westminster, pay off the debt and give the rest to the people, and you'd still find a way to be outraged at them.
867
JR
30/11/2020 13:38:54 2 1
bbc
Some shops are already open 24 hours.
52
30/11/2020 10:31:58 8 10
bbc
Do the number of shoppers projected to need "stuff" at 3am really cover the staffing costs, electric, etc, to make it worthwhile stores opening? Plus do staff themselves really fancy working night shifts with all the transport, childcare, contractual issues? Smells like another ill-thought-out turd rolled in xmas glitter!
73
30/11/2020 10:38:36 2 1
bbc
They aren't forced to open
637
30/11/2020 12:31:26 1 0
bbc
No sure, but the workers will be forced to work shifts IF they are!!!
7
30/11/2020 10:13:13 234 24
bbc
Just don't go for a pint afterwards else you may die.
74
30/11/2020 10:38:41 10 32
bbc
Track and trace has shown pubs and restaurants are easily the biggest spreaders of covid outside of people's actual homes...
97
30/11/2020 10:47:03 26 1
bbc
@whatsthepoint - I think you may be straying away from my original point. Also, giving your comment a thumbs down doesn't automatically mean you like to have loads of beers and then drive home.
107
30/11/2020 10:49:31 33 1
bbc
@Neil Smith - I'm not denying there are cases from pubs/restaurants, but is that because they ask you to sign in to Track & Trace when you enter? I haven't had to do that in any shop I've been in since March...
122
30/11/2020 10:53:42 40 1
bbc
Track and trace has shown pubs and restaurants are easily the biggest spreaders of covid outside of people's actual homes...

-------------

44.17% education settings, 25.26% care homes, 16.06% workplace, 5.18% hospitality

PHE statistics
150
30/11/2020 10:59:29 21 0
bbc
That's just not true. It might be what you want to believe but it isn't factual.
186
30/11/2020 11:01:23 14 2
bbc
"Track and trace has shown pubs and restaurants are easily the biggest spreaders of covid outside of people's actual homes"

It hasn't shown anything of the sort, you made that up.
200
30/11/2020 11:07:27 8 0
bbc
Absolute nonsense! Transmission in hospitality less than 3%. Schools & universtities, care homes, hospitals, work places and private homes make up the top 5!
206
30/11/2020 11:07:19 6 0
bbc
No. Schools and universities are the main infection hubs. Kids don;t show symptoms, but take the infection home to their parents, who take it to work etc.
504
30/11/2020 12:03:11 5 0
bbc
It's actually shown that Super/Hypermarkets are easily the biggest spreaders of covid outside of people's actual homes...
565
30/11/2020 12:13:22 5 0
bbc
Made up nonsense look at the stats
633
30/11/2020 12:29:08 3 0
bbc
Where did you pull that stat from Neil?
55
30/11/2020 10:33:39 13 20
bbc
Take a walk down any High Street with your eyes open.
75
30/11/2020 10:38:44 19 8
bbc
That does not make it government policy. Shops are shutting, yes because of external forces not because of government policy. What right minded government wants to put people out of work lose the tax income and pay benefits...
91
30/11/2020 10:44:54 11 16
bbc
Lockdown and mandatory face masks in shops are Government policy.
21
30/11/2020 10:21:04 533 60
bbc
Shut the shops, then create the conditions to pack them out over a three week window. Utter, utter, madness.
76
30/11/2020 10:39:17 11 17
bbc
But don't masks work?
146
30/11/2020 10:59:10 42 3
bbc
Yes they do, but only up to a point. People are over assured when they wear them and take risks because they think they are then protected; people touch their faces when wearing and/or adjusting them; people don't wear them correctly; people reuse disposable ones; people dispose of them inappropriately;
In essence, people are the problem.
948
30/11/2020 14:14:17 2 0
bbc
Along with distancing, not instead of it.
20
30/11/2020 10:20:54 190 21
bbc
In the few times I have been out since the first lockdown, every pub and restaurant I have visited has felt FAR safer than the shops (full of non mask wearers, brushing past me. touching and putting stuff back on shelves etc.) I have been to.
Cos masks work, lol.
Case in point. Just there for your "reassurance". You said it yourself -"feel" safer

You weren't safer. They don't work.
Removed
158
30/11/2020 11:00:58 37 12
bbc
Nonsense. If everyone used a mask properly then cases would you reduce. No they don't protect the wearer but they do help prevent the wearer passing the virus on. Yes masks do work.
183
30/11/2020 11:05:33 26 7
bbc
Stop spreading disinformation. People like you are dangerous.
408
30/11/2020 11:46:59 21 6
bbc
Your mask does not protect you, it protects others. Masks work by slowing the jet of droplets coming from your mouth and nose. It's basic fluid mechanics. If everyone wears one, everyone else is better protected. Not 100% protected but the risk of transmission is reduced.
649
30/11/2020 12:35:18 12 5
bbc
Wear a mask snow-flake and stop hyperventilating.
78
30/11/2020 10:41:11 6 5
bbc
Personally I haven't been inside a shop since March and Christmas will be no different.
85
30/11/2020 10:43:39 10 2
bbc
Personally I have and will.

Each to their own.
99
30/11/2020 10:47:26 3 0
bbc
On a more important note, why are we putting the word 'personally' before 'I'?
115
30/11/2020 10:51:56 1 2
bbc
You don't know what you've been missing.
857
Bob
30/11/2020 13:36:38 0 0
bbc
It's ok come out from under the bed.
50
30/11/2020 10:30:00 34 7
bbc
It wouldn’t matter who was in charge any government will be condemned for what it did or didn’t do equally.
79
30/11/2020 10:41:15 3 3
bbc
How right you are!
65
30/11/2020 10:36:45 8 17
bbc
Shops can open 24hrs a day for all I care
Not been in one since July and won't again until the ridiculous spectacle of mask wearing comes to an end

They haven't worked, they can't work, and the sooner govt supports business by ending this mask "reassurance without benefits" show the better
80
30/11/2020 10:42:19 14 4
bbc
You're a CovDenier who probably sits at home in a tinfoil hat, in case the Govt or aliens are listening in. Masks help to prevent coughs and sneezes landing germs and virus everywhere. Common sense fact. Dont like it? Stay indoors. Keep away from the rest of us who follow the rules.
5
30/11/2020 10:11:59 5 16
bbc
WHY WOULD THEY DOTHIS AND PUT LIVES AT RISK?

PLEASE SHARE YOUR ANSWERS
81
Rob
30/11/2020 10:42:30 3 1
bbc
I never heard Governments and others saying save lives when they invaded Iraq/.Libya
98
30/11/2020 10:45:28 2 0
bbc
Blair is a war criminal
82
30/11/2020 10:42:52 3 8
bbc
Ministers haven’t a clue. They need to live in the real world, experience shops, pubs, cafes etc. and realise what people really need and want. Most don’t want to shop all hours.
28
30/11/2020 10:23:36 15 8
bbc
Just "3 weeks" we were told in April

That was 8 months ago.

Still, just another few weeks then, eh ?

And another few weeks, just a couple of more months, then a few more months.

"Just another...." is never ending.
83
30/11/2020 10:43:22 2 4
bbc
I don't remember anybody saying it would be 3 feedback n April. Boris said he would review restrictions the n but that was all. As usual many not listening to what is said
84
30/11/2020 10:43:33 16 5
bbc
Yes spend all your money now on stuff you don't need whilst spreading Covid at the same time. Lockdown 3 here we come, whats so hard about not interacting with other people !
106
30/11/2020 10:49:24 3 22
bbc
“What’s so hard about not interacting with other people!”

I reckon the hard bit is 1m extra unemployed, a destroyed economy and all to keep 85 years olds alive a few more months so they can die of cancer or strokes instead of dying from the same things whilst having covid
495
30/11/2020 12:01:28 1 0
bbc
Lockdown 3 is already planned. I work for a public transport company and we have been advised by TFL that a national lockdown is being imposed in January.
30/11/2020 17:09:02 0 0
bbc
How do you know a) anyone spends all their money b) the stuff is not needed c) they have covid to spread around? A Covid Cultist, with beliefs like that, do your celebrate lock down day?
30/11/2020 18:03:50 1 0
bbc
I agree with part one of your comment but there is a lot written and peer reviewed that the vast majority of humans need close, personal interaction and I am one of them. If this is ok for you I am chuffed but for me (and I presume many others) this is an unjustifiable nightmare.
78
30/11/2020 10:41:11 6 5
bbc
Personally I haven't been inside a shop since March and Christmas will be no different.
85
30/11/2020 10:43:39 10 2
bbc
Personally I have and will.

Each to their own.
62
30/11/2020 10:35:36 6 9
bbc
Always two things all Govs try to control Shopping on Sunday ooh cannot upset the Church ... and alcohol consumption time and limits - guess what Amazon sells everything and we can drink at home and lastly Luvvie BBC - Netflix / Prime now never watch BBC ... licence gone next year
86
30/11/2020 10:38:22 8 4
bbc
Make sure you don’t use the BBC website after you’ve stopped paying your licence fee please.
118
30/11/2020 10:52:50 0 0
bbc
If the BBC want to run a web site open to everyone - then everyone should be free to use it. Much as I like this site, I am not sure that licence fee payers should be funding it anyway. Yes I do have a licence. For now at least.
181
30/11/2020 11:04:52 1 2
bbc
You shuld use the other NATIONAL BROADCASTERS HYS to post you ignorance . Ooohhh wait....
See where your argument fall flat on it's face?
No thought not.
17
30/11/2020 10:19:52 38 15
bbc
More evidence of economics and profits before common sense.
87
30/11/2020 10:43:53 18 6
bbc
No, people's jobs .
66
30/11/2020 10:36:55 15 3
bbc
Exactly. They ARE open and have been throughout this lockdown. I specified the race, whatsthepoint, as I think the council are frightened of appearing racist by prosecuting them. Also all the other barber shops are abiding by the rules here - it is just the ones owned by Asian proprietors which are defying the rules in my town. That's not racist - it's an observation of fact.
88
30/11/2020 10:44:17 1 9
bbc
Ah but would you have used the race of the perdon had it or any other business breaking the rules been run by a white person? I dont think so.
117
30/11/2020 10:52:35 7 1
bbc
In this HYS, no; however if I was commenting on a news story in a country with a majority non-white population, and if a member of the white population was breaking the rules, then yes, I would.
134
30/11/2020 10:56:37 10 0
bbc
Racial minorities need to be called out if they are breaking the rules, just as any white person would be. No special privileges for BAMES.
89
30/11/2020 10:44:28 928 45
bbc
I despair at the total disregard for shop workers on here. They should get so much recognition, the food retail staff have worked throughout this with pretty basic PPE, nasty arrogant customers & blamed for empty shelves when that's the fault of the greedy!

Why tip toe around the teachers & the need to protect them!! Are retailers just cannon fodder.

They deserve our total respect & thanks.
100
30/11/2020 10:47:30 472 58
bbc
You are spot on. Supermarket workers have dealt with covidiots since March, and yet teachers and (worst of all) GPs have been hand-wringing about their own health. We are all worried, but if you choose a pubic-facing job you have to get on with it.
104
30/11/2020 10:48:48 58 1
bbc
Very well put.
127
30/11/2020 10:54:28 39 131
bbc
It's a ridiculous comparison. With a shop you are pretty much in and out. Teachers spend hours in small classrooms with 30+ kids, and with younger children, in close contact. And are shopkeepers dealing with the level of mess that 100s of children leave behind?
152
30/11/2020 10:59:38 75 21
bbc
Both shop-workers and teachers have been forced to be front-line troops, largely unprotected with PPE, unlike those who work in hospitals. Teachers have been more vocal. Shop-workers' unions need to get their act together and protest more.
174
30/11/2020 11:04:09 21 106
bbc
Education is much more valuable than buying tat...being a teacher is harder than being a retail worker, there is your answer
218
30/11/2020 11:09:47 42 6
bbc
Correct! They do deserve respect - I've done my time in a shop many years ago, it's poor pay, poor hours and has little to nothing to recommend it unless you have the opportunity to work up the management chain. However they should also be thankful they have a job, many have lost theirs and it seems like Arcadia is going to make 13,000 jobless possibly today.
228
Dee
30/11/2020 11:11:41 57 19
bbc
My friend manages a supermarket and you're pretty much spot on. Now we're asking the workers in that sector to work night shifts to boot, as well as facing higher taxes for Tory corruption, while everyone else was furloughed on a beach in summer.
258
30/11/2020 11:13:37 29 28
bbc
I'm a teacher, I couldn't care less about Covid, neither could anyone else I know. The only reason you hear complaints about it is because we have a Conservative government, the teaching unions will do anything to throw a spanner in the works and disagree with anything the Tories say.
311
30/11/2020 11:28:33 20 4
bbc
Any worker who is dealing with the public deserves recognition and support where needed. Basically I agree that shop workers are doing a difficult job in the pandemic but so are teachers and other key workers who deal directly with the public . So basically your comment and that of @specificnotpacific are both a bit ridiculous. We should all be supporting each other not pointing fingers.
338
30/11/2020 11:34:48 22 2
bbc
Spot on

And the security guards on the door face the biggest risk.

Poor PPE long hours and no sick pay no wonder it's one group of workers with a higher covid mortality rate

Yet people on furlough or working from home feel more stressed by a trip to a shop
365
30/11/2020 11:40:42 14 0
bbc
My thoughts precisely! These people have been treated abominably from the start of the pandemic, and now they are expected to simply knuckly under for December & January. They already work incredible hours in the run-up to Christmas. I do hope that this will give people a proper understanding of which jobs are REALLY important, and deserve far better in terms of pay and conditions.
368
30/11/2020 11:41:09 3 0
bbc
Fully agree. I feel sad when you look at big chains like top shop about to go under due the the lockdowns. Many will get a P45 as their Christmas gift.
380
30/11/2020 11:42:56 10 0
bbc
Agree completely. I worked a normal retail Christmas once and it was tough. This must be very hard on staff. Respect them.
384
30/11/2020 11:43:38 1 7
bbc
My experience of shop workers has ranged from normal to bad during Covid. As any essential worker, seemed to act like they were the only ones working and the only ones stressed out by it. Little consideration for those who had just pulled a 14hr shift and have little concentration for whatever escheresque systems to which they are working. People are just people and work is just work.
392
30/11/2020 11:38:53 11 4
bbc
"I despair at the total disregard for shop workers on here"

Many didn't wear masks until it became mandatory for them do so so. And even now not all of them do.
412
30/11/2020 11:47:23 3 5
bbc
Are you serious? The shops I go into, it is clear the workers are oblivious. They seem to think, as they are in the shop, they don't have to maintain distance, can do what they please and ignore COVID rules. I've been in so many shops where, despite having no health issues, workers pop their masks on and off as they please. You earn respect, you aren't just given it.
419
30/11/2020 11:48:21 5 0
bbc
Just because someone has it worse than you, doesn't mean you can't complain about a bad situation.
498
30/11/2020 12:01:45 1 0
bbc
well said
535
30/11/2020 12:07:46 11 1
bbc
Well said totally agree ,the rules are relaxed over xmas for 3 days only to find my wife could be asked to work 2 of them ,supermarkets should be looking at closing on boxing day & xmas eve & rewarding staff not expecting them to work additional hours for little reward ....
593
30/11/2020 12:18:22 0 0
bbc
Sadly, yes, they are
660
30/11/2020 12:38:06 8 0
bbc
When I was a teacher I had to deal with some nasty arrogant 'customers". Some of the parents were even worse.
90
30/11/2020 10:44:46 9 16
bbc
Yet another example of the stupidity of Johnson. First he boasts about a track and trace system - that still does not exist - now he says that shops can open for longer - when shops don't have the staff to do so!

He is an American agent of British destruction - HE MUST GO NOW! Kick out Johnson before he kills even more of the British people. Deaths come from Johnson - NOT COVID!
95
30/11/2020 10:46:35 13 4
bbc
Have you finished spouting your total garbage?
96
30/11/2020 10:46:38 3 0
bbc
It means they can open longer if they want to...
30/11/2020 23:59:22 0 0
bbc
You are right. He is an American.
75
30/11/2020 10:38:44 19 8
bbc
That does not make it government policy. Shops are shutting, yes because of external forces not because of government policy. What right minded government wants to put people out of work lose the tax income and pay benefits...
91
30/11/2020 10:44:54 11 16
bbc
Lockdown and mandatory face masks in shops are Government policy.
139
30/11/2020 10:56:59 13 4
bbc
That's for the public's safety, nowt to do with any Govt policy to "destroy" the High St. Just silly language.
92
30/11/2020 10:45:09 5 16
bbc
I love shopping and usually get a couple of tops every Saturday afternoon. Buying clothes online isn't the same and end up sending loads back cos it dont fit and having to wear last season and stuff. So shops getting opened again is really great, particularly if open longer over crimbo!
393
30/11/2020 11:39:04 2 0
bbc
thats right my lovely.consume,consume,ignore the dissenters,consume,consume.you are right,they are wrong,consume,consume.
93
30/11/2020 10:45:40 13 8
bbc
It really makes no difference having longer hours for a few days to Christmas. Shops should have never closed during the 2nd lockdown.
67
30/11/2020 10:37:16 8 10
bbc
So shops can open longer to squash people in like sardines, but pubs are the evil spreaders so they stay shut. MADNESS!
94
Rob
30/11/2020 10:46:14 4 1
bbc
Surely it would be better to have spread out opening hours, so avoiding as many people being "squashed in like sardines"?
90
30/11/2020 10:44:46 9 16
bbc
Yet another example of the stupidity of Johnson. First he boasts about a track and trace system - that still does not exist - now he says that shops can open for longer - when shops don't have the staff to do so!

He is an American agent of British destruction - HE MUST GO NOW! Kick out Johnson before he kills even more of the British people. Deaths come from Johnson - NOT COVID!
95
30/11/2020 10:46:35 13 4
bbc
Have you finished spouting your total garbage?
113
30/11/2020 10:50:49 2 8
bbc
Unnecessarily offensive to someone speaking the truth.
90
30/11/2020 10:44:46 9 16
bbc
Yet another example of the stupidity of Johnson. First he boasts about a track and trace system - that still does not exist - now he says that shops can open for longer - when shops don't have the staff to do so!

He is an American agent of British destruction - HE MUST GO NOW! Kick out Johnson before he kills even more of the British people. Deaths come from Johnson - NOT COVID!
96
30/11/2020 10:46:38 3 0
bbc
It means they can open longer if they want to...
74
30/11/2020 10:38:41 10 32
bbc
Track and trace has shown pubs and restaurants are easily the biggest spreaders of covid outside of people's actual homes...
97
30/11/2020 10:47:03 26 1
bbc
@whatsthepoint - I think you may be straying away from my original point. Also, giving your comment a thumbs down doesn't automatically mean you like to have loads of beers and then drive home.
81
Rob
30/11/2020 10:42:30 3 1
bbc
I never heard Governments and others saying save lives when they invaded Iraq/.Libya
98
30/11/2020 10:45:28 2 0
bbc
Blair is a war criminal
78
30/11/2020 10:41:11 6 5
bbc
Personally I haven't been inside a shop since March and Christmas will be no different.
99
30/11/2020 10:47:26 3 0
bbc
On a more important note, why are we putting the word 'personally' before 'I'?
89
30/11/2020 10:44:28 928 45
bbc
I despair at the total disregard for shop workers on here. They should get so much recognition, the food retail staff have worked throughout this with pretty basic PPE, nasty arrogant customers & blamed for empty shelves when that's the fault of the greedy!

Why tip toe around the teachers & the need to protect them!! Are retailers just cannon fodder.

They deserve our total respect & thanks.
100
30/11/2020 10:47:30 472 58
bbc
You are spot on. Supermarket workers have dealt with covidiots since March, and yet teachers and (worst of all) GPs have been hand-wringing about their own health. We are all worried, but if you choose a pubic-facing job you have to get on with it.
320
30/11/2020 11:30:04 35 2
bbc
I agree, especially GP's, what's more the BMA are demanding GP's are paid extra for administering the vaccine. I wouldn't be surprised if most GP's cant remember how to give an injection, it's normally the practice nurse.
350
30/11/2020 11:37:25 6 15
bbc
Working in a GP practice and working in retail is a bit different as un well people will be coming in. GP have been doing phone and video consultations and inviting patients in face-to-face.it's been absolutely crucial to protect staff from the infection. If surgery staff are un well or isolating there could potentially be no staff to run the practice and it would affect things like prescriptions
356
30/11/2020 11:39:31 25 5
bbc
I must take issue with the comment re teachers. I work in a large secondary school, our Head and SLT were in every day from 23/3 including half term and Easter for KeyWorker children. From September everyone has been in school every day in a building with over 1,000 people in it. We haven't closed or sent bubbles home due to stringent H+S measures. Please don't generalise.
405
30/11/2020 11:46:23 7 1
bbc
Have had no choice. Too many people oin low paying jobs have to keep working if they feel 'iffy'. This "you chose a public facing job" - i dont think i recognise your world mate
502
30/11/2020 12:03:02 8 7
bbc
shockingly our GPs have been hiding under the bed since March. About what I would have expected from teachers, anything for some paid leave.
511
30/11/2020 12:04:15 2 1
bbc
Ooops a bit of a spelling mistake there........just where are the customers supposed to be looking???
539
30/11/2020 12:09:27 8 1
bbc
How very true! I feel really sorry for our local GPs (do I hell) all they are interested in is poncing around with all their staff including non-medical staff wearing scrubs and saying how stressed, hard working and wonderful they are!! Shouting COVID COVID instead of looking after patients with other serious conditions! It's called 'DOING THEIR JOB AND EARNING THEIR CORN' They are well paid!!
572
30/11/2020 12:13:10 3 1
bbc
Tell me more about these pubic-facing jobs!
602
Ben
30/11/2020 12:20:07 3 4
bbc
GPs have to be careful because they have the potential to be super spreaders to the people who are most vulnerable to covid. Their requests for PPE were about protecting patients more than themselves.
607
Gaz
30/11/2020 12:21:38 4 0
bbc
Dont fancy the thought of a pubic facing job!
654
30/11/2020 12:36:04 2 1
bbc
Teaching is a public-facing job.