Covid fears prompt 38% rise in parents home educating
24/11/2020 | news | education | 159
A huge rise in home education is revealed amid parents' fears of Covid-19 in England's schools.
1
23/11/2020 11:24:24 10 3
bbc
Typically BBC headline designed to distort reality.

Yes the number of home educated kids is up by 38%.

76,000 out 8,900,000 (8.9m) schoolchildren represents less than 1 in a 1000. Big deal!
73
23/11/2020 18:11:27 5 2
bbc
Yes exactly, just scaremongering to get more people on board the anti home ed train
2
23/11/2020 11:28:28 8 5
bbc
75,668 children being home schooled out of a total of 8,890,357 is a statistical insignificance.
9
23/11/2020 12:12:35 6 3
bbc
By that measure so are Covid deaths.
16
23/11/2020 12:30:55 6 2
bbc
That's 75,668 too many. Schools are not just about learning, it's all the social interactions and peer relationship building that children need as they grow up too
40
23/11/2020 14:29:03 2 0
bbc
No it isn't. 75,000 individuals being groomed in extremist values (of any persuasion), is a frightening number of potential lone wolf attackers.And all below the radar.

State schools teach far more than maths and English, they teach tolerance and broader culture.
3
23/11/2020 11:31:53 2 14
bbc
Good. It needs to be the start of education's 'high street' moment.

We do not need that old fashioned schooling by herds, spreading diseases and nits, worse way of education in this modern age.
Time our taxes helped parents educate not fund gulags of schooling child care, pampering armies of state employees vested interests.

Get planning to close all schools, do it better than high streets.
6
23/11/2020 11:45:46 8 2
bbc
so, every other country in the developed world has got it wrong? you need to touch base with reality - and soon
12
23/11/2020 12:27:12 4 2
bbc
Wow. And it's people like you that exemplify why this county is in the absolute mess it is in at the moment.
31
23/11/2020 14:00:23 2 2
bbc
.... and encourage a further deepening of isolation, and potentially exacerbating the hideous bullying on social platforms. The children need schools to make their friendship groups. Living online is hermetic suicide for the entire population of the world. Where's the life experience of living purely by "modern technologies". A balance is needed, and schools offer the kids social connection.
4
23/11/2020 11:34:35 20 13
bbc
The incredible stupidity of some parents truly beggars belief. This virus represents a negligible risk to children, yet we have parents who are panicking about it and destroying their education.

If these parent are prone, in general, to massive over anxiety then one must be really concerned for the mental health of any cotton-wooled children they might have.
5
23/11/2020 11:43:45 7 4
bbc
I may not agree with you on many points, but you final sentence is 100% bang on.
19
23/11/2020 12:37:32 2 4
bbc
Your one size fits all approach is ill-informed. Parents are right to be concerned that some Asthmatic youngsters (about 10% of pupils) who are already susceptible to their immune system over reacting to just a cold, could fare badly if they were to get China Virus esp. while GP's claim not to have medication if it starts going bad. A cause of CV going bad is the immune system over-reacting.
33
23/11/2020 14:05:16 3 1
bbc
Statistically, you are right that the risk to children is low, although we use the argument that the measles' vaccination is a necessity despite only 1% being statistically at risk.

But the thing you & others conveniently forget is that children can and do spread CV19. Going to school and mixing with others is statistically going to increase the risk of CV19 being spread into the wider community.
115
24/11/2020 02:29:37 1 2
bbc
Protecting a child which is not in any way to be confused with a "cotton-wooled" approach is the first duty of any responsible parent and is not "panicking". Parents are not "destroying" their child's education either. The "mental health" argument is massively overstated, children adapt very well to home schooling which, will not last forever and will do no harm in the comparatively short term.
157
24/11/2020 20:44:09 0 0
bbc
Wow... my CLINICALLY EXTREMELY VULNERABLE child is enjoying home ed right now and this will continue until Spring. If she needed shielding from March to August and then required to learn from home during the second ‘lockdown’ then she shouldn’t be in a room with 30 others all day. As a qualified mental health nurse I feel able to manage it, keeping her wellbeing and respiratory health priority.
4
23/11/2020 11:34:35 20 13
bbc
The incredible stupidity of some parents truly beggars belief. This virus represents a negligible risk to children, yet we have parents who are panicking about it and destroying their education.

If these parent are prone, in general, to massive over anxiety then one must be really concerned for the mental health of any cotton-wooled children they might have.
5
23/11/2020 11:43:45 7 4
bbc
I may not agree with you on many points, but you final sentence is 100% bang on.
11
23/11/2020 12:25:06 8 2
bbc
As a former Headteacher I wish to share that I admitted a child once who had been 'home schooled' for over a year. The arrogant parents thought that their child was 'way ahead' of the rest of their year group when they looked around the school. The reality was that it took the poor child almost all of the following year to catch up...
3
23/11/2020 11:31:53 2 14
bbc
Good. It needs to be the start of education's 'high street' moment.

We do not need that old fashioned schooling by herds, spreading diseases and nits, worse way of education in this modern age.
Time our taxes helped parents educate not fund gulags of schooling child care, pampering armies of state employees vested interests.

Get planning to close all schools, do it better than high streets.
6
23/11/2020 11:45:46 8 2
bbc
so, every other country in the developed world has got it wrong? you need to touch base with reality - and soon
7
23/11/2020 11:52:37 1 8
bbc
Every other country has high streets, technological change means lives change. We are rapidly moving to residual high street shops as goods are better acquired by on line routes. UK is apparently faster adapting to that than others.

If you live by looking and aping only what others do you will be last every time. Be creative, make the world not follow it.
Schools for the most unfortunate only.
13
23/11/2020 12:27:34 0 4
bbc
Well said Minnie!
6
23/11/2020 11:45:46 8 2
bbc
so, every other country in the developed world has got it wrong? you need to touch base with reality - and soon
7
23/11/2020 11:52:37 1 8
bbc
Every other country has high streets, technological change means lives change. We are rapidly moving to residual high street shops as goods are better acquired by on line routes. UK is apparently faster adapting to that than others.

If you live by looking and aping only what others do you will be last every time. Be creative, make the world not follow it.
Schools for the most unfortunate only.
14
23/11/2020 12:29:02 2 2
bbc
I'm sorry, but you really are one on your own. Watch your negative 'thumbs down' reactions over the next few hours
35
23/11/2020 14:08:30 2 1
bbc
Equating retail with education highlights the paucity of your intellegence - but hey ho demonstrate to us you are right and start a political party whose main aim is to abolish state education, and tell us how you get on!
8
23/11/2020 12:11:41 9 2
bbc
Well, this sounds like a good thing. Much better than one or two vulnerable parents thinking that the whole school system should collapse because of them. At least a few have realised that the world does not revolve around them.
2
23/11/2020 11:28:28 8 5
bbc
75,668 children being home schooled out of a total of 8,890,357 is a statistical insignificance.
9
23/11/2020 12:12:35 6 3
bbc
By that measure so are Covid deaths.
10
23/11/2020 12:23:58 11 3
bbc
JamesStGeorge - still banging on about closing schools and doing it all remotely? So how’s the online learning business going? Who are the 'unfortunates' you mention in an earlier post? Is it the ones that can't afford decent equipment at home? Rather than being creative and forward thinking you seem to want entrench and hide away the problems of education in the private sphere of the home!
18
23/11/2020 12:32:14 5 2
bbc
Couldn't agree more Crone
81
23/11/2020 18:32:35 0 2
bbc
Actually remotely is the only current option, my view of a proper education would be far wider and open than that alone. But no schools, forced herds of incompetant live performance. Keep on hoping schooling like what was the only ever possible in the past if it is in your interests. The future would appear not to be. Given you think it about 'business'. Back to the music hall no tv for you!
123
24/11/2020 12:03:07 1 1
bbc
The majority can afford a simple tablet & those who cant could be supplied by the education system, be cheaper that heating a school for a day.

You look at problems & want to keep to the status quo. JamesStGeorge & others look at how to improve the system. Or do you really think that the UK education system is beyond any form of improvement?
5
23/11/2020 11:43:45 7 4
bbc
I may not agree with you on many points, but you final sentence is 100% bang on.
11
23/11/2020 12:25:06 8 2
bbc
As a former Headteacher I wish to share that I admitted a child once who had been 'home schooled' for over a year. The arrogant parents thought that their child was 'way ahead' of the rest of their year group when they looked around the school. The reality was that it took the poor child almost all of the following year to catch up...
3
23/11/2020 11:31:53 2 14
bbc
Good. It needs to be the start of education's 'high street' moment.

We do not need that old fashioned schooling by herds, spreading diseases and nits, worse way of education in this modern age.
Time our taxes helped parents educate not fund gulags of schooling child care, pampering armies of state employees vested interests.

Get planning to close all schools, do it better than high streets.
12
23/11/2020 12:27:12 4 2
bbc
Wow. And it's people like you that exemplify why this county is in the absolute mess it is in at the moment.
78
23/11/2020 18:27:07 1 1
bbc
Rather thecopposite, dead heads keeping on doing the same old thing in the same old way scared of change. Vested interests in industry 'wages and restrictive practices' That has more to do with problems we have had and continue to hold us down. Like old print unions, absolutle hated tech that replaced then hand setting type. Create, innovate, or fizzle out. Education is ripe for it.
6
23/11/2020 11:45:46 8 2
bbc
so, every other country in the developed world has got it wrong? you need to touch base with reality - and soon
13
23/11/2020 12:27:34 0 4
bbc
Well said Minnie!
7
23/11/2020 11:52:37 1 8
bbc
Every other country has high streets, technological change means lives change. We are rapidly moving to residual high street shops as goods are better acquired by on line routes. UK is apparently faster adapting to that than others.

If you live by looking and aping only what others do you will be last every time. Be creative, make the world not follow it.
Schools for the most unfortunate only.
14
23/11/2020 12:29:02 2 2
bbc
I'm sorry, but you really are one on your own. Watch your negative 'thumbs down' reactions over the next few hours
77
23/11/2020 18:23:04 1 1
bbc
Lol fear of change and the future in action, makes no difference to me. I neither gain not lose, but the future destination is inevitable. Hence I do not need to be 'liked' by strangers. Vested interests run scared of change. Lazy parents to money leaching employees from the status quo.
15
23/11/2020 12:29:49 5 5
bbc
OH DEAR on line schooling failed last time
Even pupils said they only had minimal contact, one long holiday
17
23/11/2020 12:31:38 1 3
bbc
Exactly
23
23/11/2020 13:35:38 3 0
bbc
The infrastructure for online learning isn't in place.

Lots of pupils have no access to the internet or have to share devices within the family.

Teachers IT skills is sadly lacking especially in the primary sector.

And then some pupils don't engage with learning at school. Do you expect them to miraculously change.

Hardly surprising it failed.
70
23/11/2020 17:53:42 0 0
bbc
I worked through the first lockdown, my time was spent encouraging pupils to engage with online teaching. Staff delivered laptops to pupils who had no tech, we had staff talking parents through how to access online teaching over the phone, by email and face time /teams. I was the only person on my street without a tan and with an untidy garden during lockdown one, and I'm just support staff.
2
23/11/2020 11:28:28 8 5
bbc
75,668 children being home schooled out of a total of 8,890,357 is a statistical insignificance.
16
23/11/2020 12:30:55 6 2
bbc
That's 75,668 too many. Schools are not just about learning, it's all the social interactions and peer relationship building that children need as they grow up too
22
23/11/2020 13:15:19 0 4
bbc
I think it is the social interaction in state schools that many parents worry about. The private system has a much more beneficial effect on the general development of a child.
15
23/11/2020 12:29:49 5 5
bbc
OH DEAR on line schooling failed last time
Even pupils said they only had minimal contact, one long holiday
17
23/11/2020 12:31:38 1 3
bbc
Exactly
10
23/11/2020 12:23:58 11 3
bbc
JamesStGeorge - still banging on about closing schools and doing it all remotely? So how’s the online learning business going? Who are the 'unfortunates' you mention in an earlier post? Is it the ones that can't afford decent equipment at home? Rather than being creative and forward thinking you seem to want entrench and hide away the problems of education in the private sphere of the home!
18
23/11/2020 12:32:14 5 2
bbc
Couldn't agree more Crone
4
23/11/2020 11:34:35 20 13
bbc
The incredible stupidity of some parents truly beggars belief. This virus represents a negligible risk to children, yet we have parents who are panicking about it and destroying their education.

If these parent are prone, in general, to massive over anxiety then one must be really concerned for the mental health of any cotton-wooled children they might have.
19
23/11/2020 12:37:32 2 4
bbc
Your one size fits all approach is ill-informed. Parents are right to be concerned that some Asthmatic youngsters (about 10% of pupils) who are already susceptible to their immune system over reacting to just a cold, could fare badly if they were to get China Virus esp. while GP's claim not to have medication if it starts going bad. A cause of CV going bad is the immune system over-reacting.
36
23/11/2020 14:08:55 2 1
bbc
Why did you have to spoil the comment with the ridiculous labelling of CV19 as the "China Virus"? Viruses do not have nationalities, or recognise borders.

Presumably you do know that viruses have in the past arisen in the USA?
20
23/11/2020 13:12:28 3 9
bbc
Children need to be in school. Parents do not have the qualifications, knowledge and professionalism needed to teach GCSE and upwards content, no matter what their arrogance tells them. Home-schooling damages children's education and development. Children need the key development that school provides. There should be STRICT CONSTRAINTS on what children can learn at home to protect them.
28
23/11/2020 13:51:23 6 4
bbc
What an utter load of nonsense, the tools are readily available to home school and it is not about a curriculum, a well motivated child can easily achieve or exceed the results an in school child can, plus there learning can be enriched with extra activities that a school cannot give, daughter home schooled 8 gcse at 7 and above and three a levels, now at uni studying medicine.
60
23/11/2020 17:10:29 2 0
bbc
'Parents do not have the qualifications, knowledge and professionalism needed to teach GCSE and upwards content, no matter what their arrogance tells them' - HA why do you think private tutoring is so popular? Because schools can't seem to get students to a high level either!
110
23/11/2020 23:59:57 0 0
bbc
I’m going to copy my reply from above for you.

I have 9 GCSE’s at C grades (apart from one B) , no A-levels and no degree (as yet).

I have been home educating (home schooling is when a child who is still registered at a school is too ill to attend school, so the LA supply tutors) for 6 years.

My eldest just got accepted to his first choice uni, and his younger sibling has his sights on oxford
111
24/11/2020 00:00:20 0 0
bbc
My children’s results are as follows

English language (7/A)
English literature (5/C+)
Art (6/B+)
Religious studies (A/7)
Psychology (5/ C+)
Biology (8/A*)
Chemistry (9/A**)
Physics (9 / A**)
Classical civilisation (B+/6)
Classical civilisation (B+/6)
Maths (A*/8)

They are also getting music grades, and qualifications in Japanese.

I’m sure we can all agree that this meets the term ‘varied’
112
24/11/2020 00:02:16 1 0
bbc
So as you can see quite plainly, it IS possible to home educate your child(ren) successfully (we can debate what success means separately if you wish), without a high level of education on the part of the parent. Those children, can do well, can succeed, can go on to higher education if they wish, and most certainly are not damaged in any development way.
21
23/11/2020 13:21:50 3 1
bbc
Home schooling needs an adult at home with the child. In homes that need both parents to work with no other adult to call on, this would mean further increase in educational discrimination. Schools are an economical way to educate though I think keeping children in the company of other children instead of an all age environment is disadvantageous for society. I have no alternative to offer.
16
23/11/2020 12:30:55 6 2
bbc
That's 75,668 too many. Schools are not just about learning, it's all the social interactions and peer relationship building that children need as they grow up too
22
23/11/2020 13:15:19 0 4
bbc
I think it is the social interaction in state schools that many parents worry about. The private system has a much more beneficial effect on the general development of a child.
15
23/11/2020 12:29:49 5 5
bbc
OH DEAR on line schooling failed last time
Even pupils said they only had minimal contact, one long holiday
23
23/11/2020 13:35:38 3 0
bbc
The infrastructure for online learning isn't in place.

Lots of pupils have no access to the internet or have to share devices within the family.

Teachers IT skills is sadly lacking especially in the primary sector.

And then some pupils don't engage with learning at school. Do you expect them to miraculously change.

Hardly surprising it failed.
98
23/11/2020 21:53:29 0 0
bbc
it will never work kids need to be in school for many reasons
Home all day with mum and dad is not good .
24
23/11/2020 13:43:20 10 6
bbc
The vast majority of home schooled children were removed by their parents because the schools did not meet the requirements for their kids and they could not afford private.

This could be health issues, bullying or enforcing teaching contrary to the parents culture or ethics.

When a parent decides to home school the question should be are the schools failing to meet the childs needs.
26
23/11/2020 13:50:30 7 2
bbc
'enforcing teaching contrary to the parents culture or ethics'

You mean teaching them about global warming! There is a national curriculum that schools have to follow - if parents don't like it, then they have the right unfortunately (unlike in Germany) to home school their children.
113
24/11/2020 01:23:55 1 3
bbc
If they have neither the wisdom or the curtesy to engage with the school it's not a good start; so the question should be, are they even competent parents, let alone educators.
25
23/11/2020 13:48:17 8 6
bbc
School is not just about the academics. It is about children learning to play, work, socialise, etc with their peers and also elders (in the form of teachers who are in a position of authority).
Teaching at home denies the most of these things, and many parents would be unable to carry out the role properly. Let's face it, some parents can't tie their own shoelaces let alone teach a child.
29
23/11/2020 13:55:03 2 8
bbc
Absolutely nailed it, it's about life skills and far more than passing an exam in a classroom, the home schooled brigade will turn into anti-social hermits just like their parents have been the past 8 months.
84
23/11/2020 18:42:41 2 1
bbc
No. The 'socialisation, play' line is the last acr of desparate defence of schooling gulags. Remarkably children manage to play and socialise by themselves, always have done. The playing outside, on the streets even, before cars were such a menace. Going round to friends. Chosen friend not the school bully you can't avoid in school jail. Socialising in schools is appalling, age delineated, worst.
24
23/11/2020 13:43:20 10 6
bbc
The vast majority of home schooled children were removed by their parents because the schools did not meet the requirements for their kids and they could not afford private.

This could be health issues, bullying or enforcing teaching contrary to the parents culture or ethics.

When a parent decides to home school the question should be are the schools failing to meet the childs needs.
26
23/11/2020 13:50:30 7 2
bbc
'enforcing teaching contrary to the parents culture or ethics'

You mean teaching them about global warming! There is a national curriculum that schools have to follow - if parents don't like it, then they have the right unfortunately (unlike in Germany) to home school their children.
47
23/11/2020 15:13:13 2 3
bbc
You mean sit them in a classroom and teach them to nod.
83
23/11/2020 18:38:07 3 2
bbc
Actually global warming as an issue has vastly more learnt and appreciated about it down to David Attenbough in one 'on line' TV nature series. Precious little via catch up schooling. Most of the adult population has learnt of it without entering any school. Inadequate, useless schooling. The education came via tv. In homes. Oh home education. Lol.
27
23/11/2020 13:50:51 6 5
bbc
Travel and outdoor education will always be far superior than being sat in a classroom learning bout a lot of stuff, quite frankly which is useless.
37
23/11/2020 14:13:00 4 4
bbc
Sorry - it won't be, and just because education fell on stony ground for you, doesn't mean it will for the vast majority of others.
20
23/11/2020 13:12:28 3 9
bbc
Children need to be in school. Parents do not have the qualifications, knowledge and professionalism needed to teach GCSE and upwards content, no matter what their arrogance tells them. Home-schooling damages children's education and development. Children need the key development that school provides. There should be STRICT CONSTRAINTS on what children can learn at home to protect them.
28
23/11/2020 13:51:23 6 4
bbc
What an utter load of nonsense, the tools are readily available to home school and it is not about a curriculum, a well motivated child can easily achieve or exceed the results an in school child can, plus there learning can be enriched with extra activities that a school cannot give, daughter home schooled 8 gcse at 7 and above and three a levels, now at uni studying medicine.
25
23/11/2020 13:48:17 8 6
bbc
School is not just about the academics. It is about children learning to play, work, socialise, etc with their peers and also elders (in the form of teachers who are in a position of authority).
Teaching at home denies the most of these things, and many parents would be unable to carry out the role properly. Let's face it, some parents can't tie their own shoelaces let alone teach a child.
29
23/11/2020 13:55:03 2 8
bbc
Absolutely nailed it, it's about life skills and far more than passing an exam in a classroom, the home schooled brigade will turn into anti-social hermits just like their parents have been the past 8 months.
32
23/11/2020 14:03:45 4 1
bbc
If you have experience of home schooling then fine, if not, do not make sweeping generalizations that have no bearing on fact. Home school children have access to peer groups and activities they do not need 30 plus in a classroom to get social skills. our children privately educated up to yr 7 then home schooled they met friends and have plenty of social contact, daughter at Uni studying medicine
30
23/11/2020 13:59:25 2 1
bbc
We chose to send our daughter to school primarily for social reasons. It took several years to regain the good manners she had before she started school... but overall she learned to cope with all manner of people, which has stood her in good stead in several public-facing jobs and in dealing with customers (however difficult) . Home projects helped her retain the joy of learning despite school.
3
23/11/2020 11:31:53 2 14
bbc
Good. It needs to be the start of education's 'high street' moment.

We do not need that old fashioned schooling by herds, spreading diseases and nits, worse way of education in this modern age.
Time our taxes helped parents educate not fund gulags of schooling child care, pampering armies of state employees vested interests.

Get planning to close all schools, do it better than high streets.
31
23/11/2020 14:00:23 2 2
bbc
.... and encourage a further deepening of isolation, and potentially exacerbating the hideous bullying on social platforms. The children need schools to make their friendship groups. Living online is hermetic suicide for the entire population of the world. Where's the life experience of living purely by "modern technologies". A balance is needed, and schools offer the kids social connection.
76
23/11/2020 18:18:53 0 0
bbc
Schools are the very definition of real bullying. Even another specific article related on this page. No one is bullied on line. It is not possible. Like almost all of life outside State gulag child jails, schools, you can walk away. Bullying requires forced attendance and no get out.
29
23/11/2020 13:55:03 2 8
bbc
Absolutely nailed it, it's about life skills and far more than passing an exam in a classroom, the home schooled brigade will turn into anti-social hermits just like their parents have been the past 8 months.
32
23/11/2020 14:03:45 4 1
bbc
If you have experience of home schooling then fine, if not, do not make sweeping generalizations that have no bearing on fact. Home school children have access to peer groups and activities they do not need 30 plus in a classroom to get social skills. our children privately educated up to yr 7 then home schooled they met friends and have plenty of social contact, daughter at Uni studying medicine
4
23/11/2020 11:34:35 20 13
bbc
The incredible stupidity of some parents truly beggars belief. This virus represents a negligible risk to children, yet we have parents who are panicking about it and destroying their education.

If these parent are prone, in general, to massive over anxiety then one must be really concerned for the mental health of any cotton-wooled children they might have.
33
23/11/2020 14:05:16 3 1
bbc
Statistically, you are right that the risk to children is low, although we use the argument that the measles' vaccination is a necessity despite only 1% being statistically at risk.

But the thing you & others conveniently forget is that children can and do spread CV19. Going to school and mixing with others is statistically going to increase the risk of CV19 being spread into the wider community.
34
23/11/2020 14:08:25 7 4
bbc
Removing children from an environment where the virus is fastest spreading makes complete sense.
7
23/11/2020 11:52:37 1 8
bbc
Every other country has high streets, technological change means lives change. We are rapidly moving to residual high street shops as goods are better acquired by on line routes. UK is apparently faster adapting to that than others.

If you live by looking and aping only what others do you will be last every time. Be creative, make the world not follow it.
Schools for the most unfortunate only.
35
23/11/2020 14:08:30 2 1
bbc
Equating retail with education highlights the paucity of your intellegence - but hey ho demonstrate to us you are right and start a political party whose main aim is to abolish state education, and tell us how you get on!
75
23/11/2020 18:15:55 1 0
bbc
Dont need to. Like no one started a party to adopt home shopping. Home based education is already happening. No one goes to night 'schools' any more. Remote means long taken over outside the State sinecures sector. Keep raging against the inevitable, progress. It may well last out interests out still.
19
23/11/2020 12:37:32 2 4
bbc
Your one size fits all approach is ill-informed. Parents are right to be concerned that some Asthmatic youngsters (about 10% of pupils) who are already susceptible to their immune system over reacting to just a cold, could fare badly if they were to get China Virus esp. while GP's claim not to have medication if it starts going bad. A cause of CV going bad is the immune system over-reacting.
36
23/11/2020 14:08:55 2 1
bbc
Why did you have to spoil the comment with the ridiculous labelling of CV19 as the "China Virus"? Viruses do not have nationalities, or recognise borders.

Presumably you do know that viruses have in the past arisen in the USA?
27
23/11/2020 13:50:51 6 5
bbc
Travel and outdoor education will always be far superior than being sat in a classroom learning bout a lot of stuff, quite frankly which is useless.
37
23/11/2020 14:13:00 4 4
bbc
Sorry - it won't be, and just because education fell on stony ground for you, doesn't mean it will for the vast majority of others.
38
23/11/2020 14:17:23 4 2
bbc
In the midlands the largest number of cases are in schools and colleges mixture of kids and staff. I don't know of one school that has not been affected. Boris said it was safe, if I could I would keep kids off and teach them at home either via the school or home schooling. Not a cat in hells chance of the figures staying low with everything opening and schools still in has for Christmas forget it
39
bbc
Removed
2
23/11/2020 11:28:28 8 5
bbc
75,668 children being home schooled out of a total of 8,890,357 is a statistical insignificance.
40
23/11/2020 14:29:03 2 0
bbc
No it isn't. 75,000 individuals being groomed in extremist values (of any persuasion), is a frightening number of potential lone wolf attackers.And all below the radar.

State schools teach far more than maths and English, they teach tolerance and broader culture.
41
23/11/2020 14:29:55 8 0
bbc
I don't find this article very clear - is the "covid fear" a fear for the child's safety or something broader? Such as children with much older parents and/or living with grandparents?

If it's the former, then calling the parents stupid isn't going to help - schools need to work with them to get the kids back into school. If it's the latter then hopefully it's short term until vaccine is ready
42
23/11/2020 14:39:44 9 2
bbc
Schools are hotbeds of transmission for Covid-19. Loads of them are closed or partially closed in my area due to children and staff testing positive. I pity the poor teachers who are having to risk their lives and those of their families due to the government's insistence that it is 'safe' for children to be in school.
43
WCW
23/11/2020 14:42:13 3 0
bbc
This data is incorrect. The ADCS extrapolate from incomplete data. My data covers 151 local authorities and is from freedom of information requests to all 151 Local Authorities. No local authority has had an increase of 200% and in fact the two LAs claimed to have had 150% and 200% increases, had 38% and 44.82% increases since 2019 (55501). The overall increase is 25.94% to 1st October 2020.
44
WCW
23/11/2020 14:43:30 2 0
bbc
The claimed figure of increases from1st September 2020 of 25% is wrong. On 1st July 2020 there were 61534 HE children in 151 LAs (not including year 11 children who were no longer of compulsory school age). On 1st October that figure was 69917, an overall increase of 8383, or 13.62% since July. In practice, the increase is considerably less, as the July figure is excludes year 11 pupils).
45
WCW
23/11/2020 14:43:43 1 0
bbc
It is common practice for the ADCS to publish extrapolated and inaccurate data in order to further their campaign to introduce intrusive and unwarranted monitoring of home educated children. This data requires correction.
46
WCW
23/11/2020 14:46:10 8 5
bbc
There is absolutely no evidence to suggest that home education is used by abusive parents to remove children from sight.
51
23/11/2020 15:46:06 5 3
bbc
A lack of evidence isn't evidence in itself, especially after such a brief period of time. Let's just wait until the dust settles and see the flood of cases...

Here's a couple statements we'll be hearing a LOT in years to come.

"In hindsight"
"We should have looked at this"
"Lessons will be learnt"
26
23/11/2020 13:50:30 7 2
bbc
'enforcing teaching contrary to the parents culture or ethics'

You mean teaching them about global warming! There is a national curriculum that schools have to follow - if parents don't like it, then they have the right unfortunately (unlike in Germany) to home school their children.
47
23/11/2020 15:13:13 2 3
bbc
You mean sit them in a classroom and teach them to nod.
49
23/11/2020 15:24:05 2 1
bbc
No provide them with proper evidence and not rubbish from dodgy websites to fit their parents' predjudices!
48
23/11/2020 15:18:15 7 6
bbc
Home educating my youngest and it is working out brilliantly.
50
23/11/2020 15:25:15 5 4
bbc
You would say that wouldn't you!
47
23/11/2020 15:13:13 2 3
bbc
You mean sit them in a classroom and teach them to nod.
49
23/11/2020 15:24:05 2 1
bbc
No provide them with proper evidence and not rubbish from dodgy websites to fit their parents' predjudices!
48
23/11/2020 15:18:15 7 6
bbc
Home educating my youngest and it is working out brilliantly.
50
23/11/2020 15:25:15 5 4
bbc
You would say that wouldn't you!
46
WCW
23/11/2020 14:46:10 8 5
bbc
There is absolutely no evidence to suggest that home education is used by abusive parents to remove children from sight.
51
23/11/2020 15:46:06 5 3
bbc
A lack of evidence isn't evidence in itself, especially after such a brief period of time. Let's just wait until the dust settles and see the flood of cases...

Here's a couple statements we'll be hearing a LOT in years to come.

"In hindsight"
"We should have looked at this"
"Lessons will be learnt"
52
23/11/2020 15:52:44 9 0
bbc
How about the lack of support for SEN, children with anxiety, autism and additional needs that are not being supported in schools?
Actual reasons people are choosing it.

I took my son out on September after 2 days, when promises of additional support were not being kept by staff.

In March I thought I'd fail homeschooling, but he has thrived since and continues to do so with homeeducation.
86
23/11/2020 18:48:59 3 3
bbc
It is fairly common to home educate sen, forcing them into schooling is not a good thing, and schools really can't fit any individuals. No choices. Hence the 'extra' help etc. You were not getting. The system of schooling fails every individual, it is a mass herd based machine. Made and works creating Victorian factory, office fodder clones.
53
23/11/2020 16:48:04 11 8
bbc
Such scaremongering. How about we stop saying how incompetent parents are and start looking at how terrible the state schools are. Primary school teachers are not specialists at all yet we don't seem to criticize them. Parents don't take home educating lightly, it's a huge step but they do it because they love their children and want to do what is best by them as they know them the best.
59
23/11/2020 17:02:06 5 3
bbc
Talking of scaremongering your evidence for suggesting state schools are terrible is what exactly? Also are you suggesting that the vast majority of parents who are happy to send their children to school don't love them?
85
23/11/2020 18:48:48 3 1
bbc
I would love to find a primary school teacher who has never been criticised! Don't get me wrong, I'm NOT perfect and most of the criticism I take as constructive criticism as do my colleagues. But I do wonder why you think teachers aren't being criticised? Parents, Ofsted, Senior Leadership, students and colleagues are just some of the many groups who criticise teachers daily.
54
JL
23/11/2020 16:49:46 6 3
bbc
Interesting that a fear of COVID infections is cited as a major reason-I can only speak from experience but I de-registered my son as a result of the side effects of COVID on the school system-an over the top risk averse environment not good for child development (particularly the youngest) sitting in rows, not allowed to move, no practical science and limited social time and PE..ran out of space.
55
JL
23/11/2020 16:50:52 3 2
bbc
Following on from my last post....we have been able to side step all of them by home educating and he is now living his best life academicslly, developmentally and socially. I have not yet met a single person who has deresigered for fear of the virus. I have also. It met anyone who I would worry about from a safeguarding point of view-many have done it for all the right reasons ....
56
23/11/2020 16:52:27 13 3
bbc
Also remember that most children who are abused go to school and it goes unnoticed!!
57
JL
23/11/2020 16:51:40 7 0
bbc
Last bit I promise....many have done it for all the right reasons because it is not an easy option! Much easier to just send your children to school. I have, however, come across many children within the school system who have suffeeed abuse and it been undetected.....I think the mirror of analysis needs to look inward here....!
58
23/11/2020 16:58:13 2 0
bbc
'good and broad education to their child/ren'- most schools have cut back on music, languages, the arts, extra curricular
61
23/11/2020 17:13:22 2 3
bbc
More unevidenced twaddle
69
JL
23/11/2020 17:49:03 3 0
bbc
As a teacher I can vouch for what you are saying as being true in many cases and across the country-I have colleagues across the country from 20 years teaching and all would support what you are saying about cutbacks to music, art, extra curricular...so not “Unevidenced twaddle..”
53
23/11/2020 16:48:04 11 8
bbc
Such scaremongering. How about we stop saying how incompetent parents are and start looking at how terrible the state schools are. Primary school teachers are not specialists at all yet we don't seem to criticize them. Parents don't take home educating lightly, it's a huge step but they do it because they love their children and want to do what is best by them as they know them the best.
59
23/11/2020 17:02:06 5 3
bbc
Talking of scaremongering your evidence for suggesting state schools are terrible is what exactly? Also are you suggesting that the vast majority of parents who are happy to send their children to school don't love them?
20
23/11/2020 13:12:28 3 9
bbc
Children need to be in school. Parents do not have the qualifications, knowledge and professionalism needed to teach GCSE and upwards content, no matter what their arrogance tells them. Home-schooling damages children's education and development. Children need the key development that school provides. There should be STRICT CONSTRAINTS on what children can learn at home to protect them.
60
23/11/2020 17:10:29 2 0
bbc
'Parents do not have the qualifications, knowledge and professionalism needed to teach GCSE and upwards content, no matter what their arrogance tells them' - HA why do you think private tutoring is so popular? Because schools can't seem to get students to a high level either!
58
23/11/2020 16:58:13 2 0
bbc
'good and broad education to their child/ren'- most schools have cut back on music, languages, the arts, extra curricular
61
23/11/2020 17:13:22 2 3
bbc
More unevidenced twaddle
59
23/11/2020 17:02:06 5 3
bbc
Talking of scaremongering your evidence for suggesting state schools are terrible is what exactly? Also are you suggesting that the vast majority of parents who are happy to send their children to school don't love them?
65
23/11/2020 17:20:08 3 2
bbc
Oh nonsense from a right-wing think tank - I think we all know where you are coming from!
61
23/11/2020 17:13:22 2 3
bbc
More unevidenced twaddle
61
23/11/2020 17:13:22 2 3
bbc
More unevidenced twaddle
66
23/11/2020 17:28:43 2 2
bbc
But many state schools still provide music and other creative opportunities for their pupils but as the articles say, it is pressure from the current right-wing government that is forcing schools to concentrate on what they see as the core academic subjects.
65
23/11/2020 17:20:08 3 2
bbc
Oh nonsense from a right-wing think tank - I think we all know where you are coming from!
119
24/11/2020 10:40:04 1 0
bbc
Agreed. Political bias, of the right or left should have no influence in a classroom. As with religion, politics should only be covered only as a topic for study. There may have been a case for starting the day with prayers when the vast majority were observant followers of a religion, that is plainly no longer the case, no such case exists for political leanings nor should there be in the future.
66
23/11/2020 17:28:43 2 2
bbc
But many state schools still provide music and other creative opportunities for their pupils but as the articles say, it is pressure from the current right-wing government that is forcing schools to concentrate on what they see as the core academic subjects.
67
23/11/2020 17:35:03 2 1
bbc
So then people home educate!
66
23/11/2020 17:28:43 2 2
bbc
But many state schools still provide music and other creative opportunities for their pupils but as the articles say, it is pressure from the current right-wing government that is forcing schools to concentrate on what they see as the core academic subjects.
67
23/11/2020 17:35:03 2 1
bbc
So then people home educate!
68
23/11/2020 17:42:34 2 2
bbc
A very small proportion of people home educate and I'm sure in the vast majority of cases it has nothing to do with music teaching! I'm suspect that there are more rabid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool than those concerned with the arts. It is interesting that in Germany home schooling is illegal except for a grand total of 400 pupils with very exceptional circumstances.
67
23/11/2020 17:35:03 2 1
bbc
So then people home educate!
68
23/11/2020 17:42:34 2 2
bbc
A very small proportion of people home educate and I'm sure in the vast majority of cases it has nothing to do with music teaching! I'm suspect that there are more rabid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool than those concerned with the arts. It is interesting that in Germany home schooling is illegal except for a grand total of 400 pupils with very exceptional circumstances.
71
23/11/2020 18:06:06 1 1
bbc
'abid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool' evidence please! And we are not 1984, people are entitled to disagree with whatever the state says under freedom of speech!
72
23/11/2020 18:07:51 1 2
bbc
Just shows how evil the German attitude is. Nasty State controling. Unacceptable to free peoples.
58
23/11/2020 16:58:13 2 0
bbc
'good and broad education to their child/ren'- most schools have cut back on music, languages, the arts, extra curricular
69
JL
23/11/2020 17:49:03 3 0
bbc
As a teacher I can vouch for what you are saying as being true in many cases and across the country-I have colleagues across the country from 20 years teaching and all would support what you are saying about cutbacks to music, art, extra curricular...so not “Unevidenced twaddle..”
15
23/11/2020 12:29:49 5 5
bbc
OH DEAR on line schooling failed last time
Even pupils said they only had minimal contact, one long holiday
70
23/11/2020 17:53:42 0 0
bbc
I worked through the first lockdown, my time was spent encouraging pupils to engage with online teaching. Staff delivered laptops to pupils who had no tech, we had staff talking parents through how to access online teaching over the phone, by email and face time /teams. I was the only person on my street without a tan and with an untidy garden during lockdown one, and I'm just support staff.
97
23/11/2020 21:52:20 0 0
bbc
well done to one of the few sadly
68
23/11/2020 17:42:34 2 2
bbc
A very small proportion of people home educate and I'm sure in the vast majority of cases it has nothing to do with music teaching! I'm suspect that there are more rabid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool than those concerned with the arts. It is interesting that in Germany home schooling is illegal except for a grand total of 400 pupils with very exceptional circumstances.
71
23/11/2020 18:06:06 1 1
bbc
'abid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool' evidence please! And we are not 1984, people are entitled to disagree with whatever the state says under freedom of speech!
79
23/11/2020 18:30:11 0 1
bbc
i.e. those who like to cite iea as evidence!
68
23/11/2020 17:42:34 2 2
bbc
A very small proportion of people home educate and I'm sure in the vast majority of cases it has nothing to do with music teaching! I'm suspect that there are more rabid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool than those concerned with the arts. It is interesting that in Germany home schooling is illegal except for a grand total of 400 pupils with very exceptional circumstances.
72
23/11/2020 18:07:51 1 2
bbc
Just shows how evil the German attitude is. Nasty State controling. Unacceptable to free peoples.
80
23/11/2020 18:32:31 2 1
bbc
Germany - a much more modern, forward-thinking, compassionate and successful country than the UK and one infinitely better led.
1
23/11/2020 11:24:24 10 3
bbc
Typically BBC headline designed to distort reality.

Yes the number of home educated kids is up by 38%.

76,000 out 8,900,000 (8.9m) schoolchildren represents less than 1 in a 1000. Big deal!
73
23/11/2020 18:11:27 5 2
bbc
Yes exactly, just scaremongering to get more people on board the anti home ed train
74
23/11/2020 18:14:39 1 1
bbc
Good for them, meanwhile if the parents are considering their safety too, then they should take not of the MRHA request for:

II.1.4 Short description
The MHRA urgently seeks an Artificial Intelligence (AI) software tool to process the expected high volume of Covid-19 vaccine Adverse Drug Reaction (ADRs) and ensure that no details from the ADRs’ reaction text are missed

I do appreciate the tender
35
23/11/2020 14:08:30 2 1
bbc
Equating retail with education highlights the paucity of your intellegence - but hey ho demonstrate to us you are right and start a political party whose main aim is to abolish state education, and tell us how you get on!
75
23/11/2020 18:15:55 1 0
bbc
Dont need to. Like no one started a party to adopt home shopping. Home based education is already happening. No one goes to night 'schools' any more. Remote means long taken over outside the State sinecures sector. Keep raging against the inevitable, progress. It may well last out interests out still.
31
23/11/2020 14:00:23 2 2
bbc
.... and encourage a further deepening of isolation, and potentially exacerbating the hideous bullying on social platforms. The children need schools to make their friendship groups. Living online is hermetic suicide for the entire population of the world. Where's the life experience of living purely by "modern technologies". A balance is needed, and schools offer the kids social connection.
76
23/11/2020 18:18:53 0 0
bbc
Schools are the very definition of real bullying. Even another specific article related on this page. No one is bullied on line. It is not possible. Like almost all of life outside State gulag child jails, schools, you can walk away. Bullying requires forced attendance and no get out.
122
24/11/2020 11:48:55 1 0
bbc
Extraordinary thought process you have. No such thing as online bullying??
From your stance on this subject I can only assume you had a miserable time when you were at school. I do hope for your sake this is not the case.
Comparing schools to gulags or jails is beyond belief.
14
23/11/2020 12:29:02 2 2
bbc
I'm sorry, but you really are one on your own. Watch your negative 'thumbs down' reactions over the next few hours
77
23/11/2020 18:23:04 1 1
bbc
Lol fear of change and the future in action, makes no difference to me. I neither gain not lose, but the future destination is inevitable. Hence I do not need to be 'liked' by strangers. Vested interests run scared of change. Lazy parents to money leaching employees from the status quo.
12
23/11/2020 12:27:12 4 2
bbc
Wow. And it's people like you that exemplify why this county is in the absolute mess it is in at the moment.
78
23/11/2020 18:27:07 1 1
bbc
Rather thecopposite, dead heads keeping on doing the same old thing in the same old way scared of change. Vested interests in industry 'wages and restrictive practices' That has more to do with problems we have had and continue to hold us down. Like old print unions, absolutle hated tech that replaced then hand setting type. Create, innovate, or fizzle out. Education is ripe for it.
71
23/11/2020 18:06:06 1 1
bbc
'abid anti-state idealogues who wish to homeschool' evidence please! And we are not 1984, people are entitled to disagree with whatever the state says under freedom of speech!
79
23/11/2020 18:30:11 0 1
bbc
i.e. those who like to cite iea as evidence!
72
23/11/2020 18:07:51 1 2
bbc
Just shows how evil the German attitude is. Nasty State controling. Unacceptable to free peoples.
80
23/11/2020 18:32:31 2 1
bbc
Germany - a much more modern, forward-thinking, compassionate and successful country than the UK and one infinitely better led.
87
23/11/2020 18:54:06 1 1
bbc
Good for following orders then. Not free people. Why they are the eu. Bullying from the top. The old continental/island people divide probably. Yoi can keep your success and funny compassion.
10
23/11/2020 12:23:58 11 3
bbc
JamesStGeorge - still banging on about closing schools and doing it all remotely? So how’s the online learning business going? Who are the 'unfortunates' you mention in an earlier post? Is it the ones that can't afford decent equipment at home? Rather than being creative and forward thinking you seem to want entrench and hide away the problems of education in the private sphere of the home!
81
23/11/2020 18:32:35 0 2
bbc
Actually remotely is the only current option, my view of a proper education would be far wider and open than that alone. But no schools, forced herds of incompetant live performance. Keep on hoping schooling like what was the only ever possible in the past if it is in your interests. The future would appear not to be. Given you think it about 'business'. Back to the music hall no tv for you!
145
24/11/2020 17:50:10 1 1
bbc
What? Just to clarify a few points in your almost cultish ramblings: -
1) Well remote learning is not the only current option is it – that is why schools are open!
2) The teachers that my children have do not give incompetent performances (if you think that all teachers do then you need to get out more).
3) No I am suggesting that you think of education as a business.
82
23/11/2020 18:34:51 4 6
bbc
As a teacher I don't understand why people think they can educate a child without professional training. It is almost impossible to teach subjects you're not confident with yourself to any depth. That's why teaching is a profession not a hobby.
88
23/11/2020 18:58:55 1 3
bbc
??

Coulouring in a particular challenge to the non professional presumably.
91
23/11/2020 19:04:25 5 3
bbc
Can you teach astro navigation to a child? I can, so you might want to reserve your judgement, while i teach a child how to play a musical instrument, be a proof reader, or a gardener, or an arborist, or teach history, or geography, or spherical trigonometry, IT and how not to be fooled by other people, especially if you are a clown in politics, or more specifically, the Village idiot in charge
92
23/11/2020 19:05:34 1 1
bbc
I know primary school teachers who struggle with Y6 curriculum!
100
23/11/2020 22:18:16 2 1
bbc
We chose home-ed for our children.
Although completing an MA, I only have GCSE’s at C, no A-levels, & no degree.
However, I have one son who got accepted to his first choice university without A-levels the university were so impressed with him in his interview, & between him and his brother they have 6 A*/8/9’s GCSE’s , 2 B’s and 2 C’s at the moment , with one looking to Oxford.
101
23/11/2020 22:19:46 1 0
bbc
Teaching is not only about qualifications, it is about passion, enthusiasm, and a love of learning as much as any qualification.

One without the other is pointless.
26
23/11/2020 13:50:30 7 2
bbc
'enforcing teaching contrary to the parents culture or ethics'

You mean teaching them about global warming! There is a national curriculum that schools have to follow - if parents don't like it, then they have the right unfortunately (unlike in Germany) to home school their children.
83
23/11/2020 18:38:07 3 2
bbc
Actually global warming as an issue has vastly more learnt and appreciated about it down to David Attenbough in one 'on line' TV nature series. Precious little via catch up schooling. Most of the adult population has learnt of it without entering any school. Inadequate, useless schooling. The education came via tv. In homes. Oh home education. Lol.
25
23/11/2020 13:48:17 8 6
bbc
School is not just about the academics. It is about children learning to play, work, socialise, etc with their peers and also elders (in the form of teachers who are in a position of authority).
Teaching at home denies the most of these things, and many parents would be unable to carry out the role properly. Let's face it, some parents can't tie their own shoelaces let alone teach a child.
84
23/11/2020 18:42:41 2 1
bbc
No. The 'socialisation, play' line is the last acr of desparate defence of schooling gulags. Remarkably children manage to play and socialise by themselves, always have done. The playing outside, on the streets even, before cars were such a menace. Going round to friends. Chosen friend not the school bully you can't avoid in school jail. Socialising in schools is appalling, age delineated, worst.
53
23/11/2020 16:48:04 11 8
bbc
Such scaremongering. How about we stop saying how incompetent parents are and start looking at how terrible the state schools are. Primary school teachers are not specialists at all yet we don't seem to criticize them. Parents don't take home educating lightly, it's a huge step but they do it because they love their children and want to do what is best by them as they know them the best.
85
23/11/2020 18:48:48 3 1
bbc
I would love to find a primary school teacher who has never been criticised! Don't get me wrong, I'm NOT perfect and most of the criticism I take as constructive criticism as do my colleagues. But I do wonder why you think teachers aren't being criticised? Parents, Ofsted, Senior Leadership, students and colleagues are just some of the many groups who criticise teachers daily.
120
24/11/2020 10:44:45 0 1
bbc
Well said. Worth adding that teachers have to prove a level competence before being allowed to teach, such a pity the same does not apply to parenting; it's clearly necessary in some cases and would avoid a lot of harm & heartache.
52
23/11/2020 15:52:44 9 0
bbc
How about the lack of support for SEN, children with anxiety, autism and additional needs that are not being supported in schools?
Actual reasons people are choosing it.

I took my son out on September after 2 days, when promises of additional support were not being kept by staff.

In March I thought I'd fail homeschooling, but he has thrived since and continues to do so with homeeducation.
86
23/11/2020 18:48:59 3 3
bbc
It is fairly common to home educate sen, forcing them into schooling is not a good thing, and schools really can't fit any individuals. No choices. Hence the 'extra' help etc. You were not getting. The system of schooling fails every individual, it is a mass herd based machine. Made and works creating Victorian factory, office fodder clones.
80
23/11/2020 18:32:31 2 1
bbc
Germany - a much more modern, forward-thinking, compassionate and successful country than the UK and one infinitely better led.
87
23/11/2020 18:54:06 1 1
bbc
Good for following orders then. Not free people. Why they are the eu. Bullying from the top. The old continental/island people divide probably. Yoi can keep your success and funny compassion.
90
23/11/2020 19:04:20 1 1
bbc
Probably rather freer than us!
82
23/11/2020 18:34:51 4 6
bbc
As a teacher I don't understand why people think they can educate a child without professional training. It is almost impossible to teach subjects you're not confident with yourself to any depth. That's why teaching is a profession not a hobby.
88
23/11/2020 18:58:55 1 3
bbc
??

Coulouring in a particular challenge to the non professional presumably.
89
23/11/2020 19:02:16 6 2
bbc
'Couloring' - says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it!
88
23/11/2020 18:58:55 1 3
bbc
??

Coulouring in a particular challenge to the non professional presumably.
89
23/11/2020 19:02:16 6 2
bbc
'Couloring' - says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it!
93
23/11/2020 19:18:30 2 2
bbc
Ah the fossil speaks! Children love colouring, it teaches them boundaries. Clearly your intentions are merely provocative. Says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it?
96
23/11/2020 21:45:05 2 2
bbc
Poor old desparate Serp. Yes I typed a word and failed to check it's spelling, failed proof reading, etc. On social media. I feel so terribly well put down by your superiority. How very schoolmarm of you. Can't expect more I guess.
87
23/11/2020 18:54:06 1 1
bbc
Good for following orders then. Not free people. Why they are the eu. Bullying from the top. The old continental/island people divide probably. Yoi can keep your success and funny compassion.
90
23/11/2020 19:04:20 1 1
bbc
Probably rather freer than us!
82
23/11/2020 18:34:51 4 6
bbc
As a teacher I don't understand why people think they can educate a child without professional training. It is almost impossible to teach subjects you're not confident with yourself to any depth. That's why teaching is a profession not a hobby.
91
23/11/2020 19:04:25 5 3
bbc
Can you teach astro navigation to a child? I can, so you might want to reserve your judgement, while i teach a child how to play a musical instrument, be a proof reader, or a gardener, or an arborist, or teach history, or geography, or spherical trigonometry, IT and how not to be fooled by other people, especially if you are a clown in politics, or more specifically, the Village idiot in charge
82
23/11/2020 18:34:51 4 6
bbc
As a teacher I don't understand why people think they can educate a child without professional training. It is almost impossible to teach subjects you're not confident with yourself to any depth. That's why teaching is a profession not a hobby.
92
23/11/2020 19:05:34 1 1
bbc
I know primary school teachers who struggle with Y6 curriculum!
89
23/11/2020 19:02:16 6 2
bbc
'Couloring' - says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it!
93
23/11/2020 19:18:30 2 2
bbc
Ah the fossil speaks! Children love colouring, it teaches them boundaries. Clearly your intentions are merely provocative. Says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it?
95
23/11/2020 21:44:27 2 2
bbc
I'll hazard a guess that your lack of education is greater than mine - also it wasn't 'colouring in' that i was objectinng to but our 'sainted' friend's reference to 'couloring in' - I guess for all the things you claim to be able to teach, spelling isn't one of them!
94
23/11/2020 19:59:59 5 2
bbc
A few weird comments on here about 'children not catching C-19 badly, if at all' (Wow!)
What planet these geniuses are from, is a mystery
Viruses don't care about the age of the 'host', or how badly they suffer. It's the contact infected children have with the rest of society that's the worry. Particularly when living with, or being collected by, grandparents which is not unusual and a real risk
93
23/11/2020 19:18:30 2 2
bbc
Ah the fossil speaks! Children love colouring, it teaches them boundaries. Clearly your intentions are merely provocative. Says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it?
95
23/11/2020 21:44:27 2 2
bbc
I'll hazard a guess that your lack of education is greater than mine - also it wasn't 'colouring in' that i was objectinng to but our 'sainted' friend's reference to 'couloring in' - I guess for all the things you claim to be able to teach, spelling isn't one of them!
89
23/11/2020 19:02:16 6 2
bbc
'Couloring' - says everything about your education, or should one say lack of it!
96
23/11/2020 21:45:05 2 2
bbc
Poor old desparate Serp. Yes I typed a word and failed to check it's spelling, failed proof reading, etc. On social media. I feel so terribly well put down by your superiority. How very schoolmarm of you. Can't expect more I guess.
99
23/11/2020 22:15:12 4 2
bbc
I'm not sure what is more laughable: your failure, evident in many of your posts, to grasp the proper use of the English language or your pathetic dislike of people in the teaching profession.
70
23/11/2020 17:53:42 0 0
bbc
I worked through the first lockdown, my time was spent encouraging pupils to engage with online teaching. Staff delivered laptops to pupils who had no tech, we had staff talking parents through how to access online teaching over the phone, by email and face time /teams. I was the only person on my street without a tan and with an untidy garden during lockdown one, and I'm just support staff.
97
23/11/2020 21:52:20 0 0
bbc
well done to one of the few sadly
23
23/11/2020 13:35:38 3 0
bbc
The infrastructure for online learning isn't in place.

Lots of pupils have no access to the internet or have to share devices within the family.

Teachers IT skills is sadly lacking especially in the primary sector.

And then some pupils don't engage with learning at school. Do you expect them to miraculously change.

Hardly surprising it failed.
98
23/11/2020 21:53:29 0 0
bbc
it will never work kids need to be in school for many reasons
Home all day with mum and dad is not good .
96
23/11/2020 21:45:05 2 2
bbc
Poor old desparate Serp. Yes I typed a word and failed to check it's spelling, failed proof reading, etc. On social media. I feel so terribly well put down by your superiority. How very schoolmarm of you. Can't expect more I guess.
99
23/11/2020 22:15:12 4 2
bbc
I'm not sure what is more laughable: your failure, evident in many of your posts, to grasp the proper use of the English language or your pathetic dislike of people in the teaching profession.
82
23/11/2020 18:34:51 4 6
bbc
As a teacher I don't understand why people think they can educate a child without professional training. It is almost impossible to teach subjects you're not confident with yourself to any depth. That's why teaching is a profession not a hobby.
100
23/11/2020 22:18:16 2 1
bbc
We chose home-ed for our children.
Although completing an MA, I only have GCSE’s at C, no A-levels, & no degree.
However, I have one son who got accepted to his first choice university without A-levels the university were so impressed with him in his interview, & between him and his brother they have 6 A*/8/9’s GCSE’s , 2 B’s and 2 C’s at the moment , with one looking to Oxford.