Bid to create Scotland's 'largest upland woods'
10/12/2019 | news | uk | 73
A Moray-based charity plans to plant a 100,000-tree woodland in hills near Loch Ness to create new habitats.
1
11/12/2019 10:49:42 34 1
bbc
Amazing news. We need more of this.
2
11/12/2019 10:52:44 28 7
bbc
I'm all for this, so long as fencing is removed once trees big enough to fend for themselves. There's plenty of grouse moors that should be planted over as well.
12
11/12/2019 11:19:39 17 4
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2. AlbaAl >There's plenty of grouse moors that should be planted over as well. Not a fan of grouse then? Grouse won't survive if the moorland is planted over. Grouse need managed heather moorland to survive. Woodlands will benefit other species however, but to protect the woodlands deer will need to be managed better than what they are at the moment. A mixed use will suit everyone.
3
11/12/2019 10:53:24 17 0
bbc
Well done and all the best ..
4
11/12/2019 10:53:25 21 0
bbc
This will be amazing when it's matured, what a fantastic project.
5
11/12/2019 10:57:27 19 4
bbc
At present tax breaks are given for this sort of work, but tax breaks and tax disregard still given for too many land management issues which destroy the landscape. The Scottish Government must be made to see that planning controls must be adequately enforced. Scotland's Upland and "wild" areas should never be 'out of sight, out of mind playgrounds' for the very rich, who happen to afford them.
6
11/12/2019 11:01:09 34 0
bbc
Inspirational project. It's important to remember in other parts of the UK that it's not just the absolute number of trees planted that should be measured but that native forests a created. Plantations of densely grown sitka are essentially dead monoculture, dark and largely absent of wildlife denuding the lanscape of nutrients before harvesting. The country can't just be one giant farm.
7
11/12/2019 11:09:33 9 30
bbc
Great project But doesn't an Indy Scotland need oil and gas revenue to hold up the economy.... Carbon neutral by 2030..... Don't think so.
8
11/12/2019 11:13:05 23 0
bbc
The natural reforesting of Scotland is well underway. Pictures of the postwar landscape taken in the 1950's & 60's compared with new taken at same places confirm this. Since sheep were taken off the hills in many glens native birch rowan and alder are returning.But satellites confirm willful damage to fragile areas by unregulated ATV's. Never out of sight now. Regulators know what they must do?
9
11/12/2019 11:16:37 22 3
bbc
-- Great news. We really are lucky to live on such a diverse and beautiful island. We should protect it as much as possible and work together to improve it. --
10
11/12/2019 11:17:18 13 4
bbc
Mon the trees !!
11
11/12/2019 11:17:18 10 16
bbc
Great , hope it will be also recreational , with cycle routes design for all abilities ...
2
11/12/2019 10:52:44 28 7
bbc
I'm all for this, so long as fencing is removed once trees big enough to fend for themselves. There's plenty of grouse moors that should be planted over as well.
12
11/12/2019 11:19:39 17 4
bbc
2. AlbaAl >There's plenty of grouse moors that should be planted over as well. Not a fan of grouse then? Grouse won't survive if the moorland is planted over. Grouse need managed heather moorland to survive. Woodlands will benefit other species however, but to protect the woodlands deer will need to be managed better than what they are at the moment. A mixed use will suit everyone.
13
11/12/2019 11:23:33 3 23
bbc
As previously mentioned, this whole tax evasion thing has never went away. Why would one need a forest in an area that never had one for centuries ? I’m not buying it.
14
11/12/2019 11:27:15 29 9
bbc
My landscape in Scotland has suffered with the grouse moors and sheep grazing (and release of millions of battery pheasants and persecution of predators of these birds). Native trees need to be replanted so hopefully this is a start. Fed up with Scotland being a rich playground. Bring back nature. Do something about it Sturgeon.
15
11/12/2019 11:52:20 8 15
bbc
14. SnowDog >My landscape in Scotland has suffered with the grouse moors and sheep grazing Yet the economy has benefitted. No? >Native trees need to be replanted so hopefully this is a start. Blanket afforestation of Sitka Spruce didn't help wildlife in the past >Fed up with Scotland being a rich playground. Shooting and fishing benefit Scotland's economy. Do your homework.
14
11/12/2019 11:27:15 29 9
bbc
My landscape in Scotland has suffered with the grouse moors and sheep grazing (and release of millions of battery pheasants and persecution of predators of these birds). Native trees need to be replanted so hopefully this is a start. Fed up with Scotland being a rich playground. Bring back nature. Do something about it Sturgeon.
15
11/12/2019 11:52:20 8 15
bbc
14. SnowDog >My landscape in Scotland has suffered with the grouse moors and sheep grazing Yet the economy has benefitted. No? >Native trees need to be replanted so hopefully this is a start. Blanket afforestation of Sitka Spruce didn't help wildlife in the past >Fed up with Scotland being a rich playground. Shooting and fishing benefit Scotland's economy. Do your homework.
18
11/12/2019 12:14:36 10 3
bbc
#15 No one denies creation of Grouse to shoot has importance, nor that far too many deer are not culled well enough to allow natural upland regeneration. But what is also occurring (as any flight across Upland regions will confirm) is vast areas are being systematically denuded by patchwork burning and unwise ATV tracks. ATV's -not ponies -reduce rural jobs, ruts & tracks cause erosion and floods.
16
11/12/2019 11:53:00 5 27
bbc
Oh,hear come the leftie townies with their 'Ban the grouse' nonsense and their politics of grievance
17
11/12/2019 11:58:54 13 3
bbc
Is Scotland doing this deliberately to make England look bad?
15
11/12/2019 11:52:20 8 15
bbc
14. SnowDog >My landscape in Scotland has suffered with the grouse moors and sheep grazing Yet the economy has benefitted. No? >Native trees need to be replanted so hopefully this is a start. Blanket afforestation of Sitka Spruce didn't help wildlife in the past >Fed up with Scotland being a rich playground. Shooting and fishing benefit Scotland's economy. Do your homework.
18
11/12/2019 12:14:36 10 3
bbc
#15 No one denies creation of Grouse to shoot has importance, nor that far too many deer are not culled well enough to allow natural upland regeneration. But what is also occurring (as any flight across Upland regions will confirm) is vast areas are being systematically denuded by patchwork burning and unwise ATV tracks. ATV's -not ponies -reduce rural jobs, ruts & tracks cause erosion and floods.
19
11/12/2019 12:24:12 12 2
bbc
700 acres sounds a lot until you realise it's; 1 square mile 1,700 x 1,700 METRES. A good start but needs factored up by about 100.
28
11/12/2019 12:42:12 0 6
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@19 Andrew: Yes its gesture politics. As you point out it just over a square mile. 100,00 trees sounds a lot so good PR 700 acres sounds a lot so good PR approx. 1 square mile sounds very little, bad PR. Its also play the NIMBY card, "its ok were doing something green miles away from you so you dont need to check us and you can carry on as normal"
20
11/12/2019 12:25:33 7 6
bbc
As a frequent flyer to the Northern Isles, I can also confirm that there is barely an inch of ground that could be considered natural. Even the lochs have been artificially created for hydro power, the forests are almost exclusively for harvest, sheep and deer have replaced natural forest. Much, much more need to be done to re-wild our landscape.
Yes yes yes. You're talking absolute nonsense. Keep out of Scotland. You're not welcome. Removed
24
11/12/2019 12:36:39 4 3
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21 McTavish LOL. clown.
22
11/12/2019 12:34:28 13 1
bbc
A forest does not to be densely planted. It can be open with widely spaced trees and shrubs to encourage a diverse range of species.
23
ljs
11/12/2019 12:00:39 6 2
bbc
Well, it is a start. NEVER liked sheep anyway.
Yes yes yes. You're talking absolute nonsense. Keep out of Scotland. You're not welcome. Removed
24
11/12/2019 12:36:39 4 3
bbc
21 McTavish LOL. clown.
25
11/12/2019 12:37:30 8 18
bbc
Anti grouse moor comments from the urban cagoul wearers. I'm always disappointed by how many English accents there are from "conservationist types" who tell Scottish people what to do. Sort out your own country. Packham, Tingay etc.
26
11/12/2019 12:38:40 14 1
bbc
Good stuff. Given how much land is for livestock- I'd like to see those fields be lined with trees/bushes, connecting up the various woodlands of the country. Not only is it a 'bridge' for mammalian wildlife, but great for foraging insects. Besides, the land isn't really used due to it typically being close to dykes. Can be funded by the subsidy that farmers will need post-EU.
27
11/12/2019 12:41:22 2 3
bbc
Yes yes yes. Which northern isles do you fly to? Carbon foot print sounds awfie.
19
11/12/2019 12:24:12 12 2
bbc
700 acres sounds a lot until you realise it's; 1 square mile 1,700 x 1,700 METRES. A good start but needs factored up by about 100.
28
11/12/2019 12:42:12 0 6
bbc
@19 Andrew: Yes its gesture politics. As you point out it just over a square mile. 100,00 trees sounds a lot so good PR 700 acres sounds a lot so good PR approx. 1 square mile sounds very little, bad PR. Its also play the NIMBY card, "its ok were doing something green miles away from you so you dont need to check us and you can carry on as normal"
29
11/12/2019 12:45:24 0 6
bbc
Yes yes yes. Typical townie. And frequent flyer. Sort out your own country. Lol.
30
11/12/2019 12:48:16 15 1
bbc
It would be nice to see a greater part of Scotland recovered in native forest which apart from anything else would cut the habitat available to midges
31
ss
11/12/2019 12:55:10 23 4
bbc
The 'land managers' here blaming anti-grouse moor rhetoric on townies,I'm a Scottish country lass right through,I'd see the back of the grouse moors today if I could.A blight on the landscape,devastating to biodiversity&the 'management's' effects on our raptors& carnivores, they disappear too often on those estates;trap-setting,rifle-wielding,sleekit (profanities),Pack up your argos and sod off
35
11/12/2019 13:55:25 1 7
bbc
31. Posted bysson 57 minutes ago The 'land managers' here blaming anti-grouse moor rhetoric on townies,I'm a Scottish country lass right through,I'd see the back of the grouse moors today if I could. etc Yes, sure you are. Guaranteed incomer to wherever you claim to be from
32
11/12/2019 12:57:22 7 19
bbc
What's wrong with Grouse moors? Heather is native and is pretty much the only thing that will grow on a Grouse moor. It is managed so that it doesn't get so thick that animals and other plants are suffocated out. Ah yes of course, its a class thing isn't it, justifiable questions about sustainability just being politicized and used by the ignorant as an excuse to hate the rich.
65
11/12/2019 17:18:21 1 0
bbc
32. Posted by dazza Ah yes of course, its a class thing isn't it, justifiable questions about sustainability just being politicized and used by the ignorant as an excuse to hate the rich. --------- Yet followed by posts arguing for greater deer stalking to keep the deer numbers down so the trees can grow. Win-win if some folk lose the chips on their shoulders
33
11/12/2019 13:00:44 2 17
bbc
Well there is little else to do with most of Scotland. Its an ideal candidate for reforesting. Fortunately no one wants to live there creating any housing demand, or it would be developed over in concrete in a flash. 100k trees trivial. 11k planted near me recently, 30 acres ish. Its tiny.
34
11/12/2019 13:30:00 8 1
bbc
....some comments make me embarrassed to be scottish - lets not be so small minded and more positive about positive developments. Proud nation and all that ....born and breed
38
11/12/2019 13:55:08 1 7
bbc
34 - You know, maybe you shouldn't hedge your sense of self worth on what other people who happen to exist in the same region of land as you say and do... You might be a lot happier for it.
31
ss
11/12/2019 12:55:10 23 4
bbc
The 'land managers' here blaming anti-grouse moor rhetoric on townies,I'm a Scottish country lass right through,I'd see the back of the grouse moors today if I could.A blight on the landscape,devastating to biodiversity&the 'management's' effects on our raptors& carnivores, they disappear too often on those estates;trap-setting,rifle-wielding,sleekit (profanities),Pack up your argos and sod off
35
11/12/2019 13:55:25 1 7
bbc
31. Posted bysson 57 minutes ago The 'land managers' here blaming anti-grouse moor rhetoric on townies,I'm a Scottish country lass right through,I'd see the back of the grouse moors today if I could. etc Yes, sure you are. Guaranteed incomer to wherever you claim to be from
36
11/12/2019 13:50:36 4 6
bbc
Great, I'm all for it. Did you know in Scotland agriculture takes up 79% of the land while accounting for a mere 1% of our GDP? Things seriously have to change here, we should be looking at largescale rewilding campaigns (boar, wolves, lynx, elk etc.) and wildlife tourism to go with it. I'm sick of hearing the whining and protestations from the obsolete agriculture sector in Scotland.
37
11/12/2019 14:00:58 1 0
bbc
283ha? That's a drop in the ocean compared to the NTS Glen Rosa project.!
34
11/12/2019 13:30:00 8 1
bbc
....some comments make me embarrassed to be scottish - lets not be so small minded and more positive about positive developments. Proud nation and all that ....born and breed
38
11/12/2019 13:55:08 1 7
bbc
34 - You know, maybe you shouldn't hedge your sense of self worth on what other people who happen to exist in the same region of land as you say and do... You might be a lot happier for it.
39
11/12/2019 14:06:51 6 4
bbc
"What's wrong with Grouse moors? Heather is native and is pretty much the only thing that will grow on a Grouse moor." Heather is the only thing that grows back after the ground is sterilized by fire every five years. A biodiversity impoverished monoculture.
40
11/12/2019 14:02:42 3 21
bbc
"Carn na Caorach" Anyone think it's weird that over half the placenames in a region of land are unpronounceable/readable by over 95% of the population? Just me? It means 'Sheep's Cairn', btw. Maybe we should have alternate English translations for all these nice placenames in Scotland. Like the Cairngorms 'the Red Hills', considering the language they're in is spoken by 1% of the population.
41
11/12/2019 14:27:07 6 1
bbc
Think reforestation is a great thing for Scotland, hope it is properly managed.
42
11/12/2019 14:41:21 4 8
bbc
I am sure there is a greater range of flora and fauna on a grouse moor compared to a dense birch woodland where not much grows underneath. The demonised grouse moors maybe principally for grouse but they are the best places to see our ever dwindling population of ground nesting birds such as curlews, plovers and lapwings to name but a few.
44
11/12/2019 14:47:34 2 1
bbc
42 hmacd - I'm sure you're wrong!
43
11/12/2019 14:46:24 11 1
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There are three times the number of red deer today as 'when I was a lad' and as Cameron McNeish tweeted recently all we have to do is cull a large number of them and let nature take its course. If you want to see how quickly this works visit Creag Meagaidh or Glen Feshie where the natural Caledonian Forest is half way to total recovery in less than a decade.
42
11/12/2019 14:41:21 4 8
bbc
I am sure there is a greater range of flora and fauna on a grouse moor compared to a dense birch woodland where not much grows underneath. The demonised grouse moors maybe principally for grouse but they are the best places to see our ever dwindling population of ground nesting birds such as curlews, plovers and lapwings to name but a few.
44
11/12/2019 14:47:34 2 1
bbc
42 hmacd - I'm sure you're wrong!
47
11/12/2019 14:59:52 0 7
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Re 44 Lack of flowers and thick undergrowth of birch saplings and long heather are not suitable for most ground nesting birds which are in terrible decline nationally. They prosper on grouse moors because they have less predators and they can see predators coming - really quite simple. The flowers and diverse range of plants means more insects for feeding the young.
45
11/12/2019 14:52:17 1 7
bbc
Re the burning of heath it creates perfect conditions for a wide range of native plants many of which would not grow in dense forest especially flowers. Take a proper look and you will see bod asphodel, several types of orchid, eye brights, sun dews, hare bell, berries, several heathers, many lichens. mosses, sedge, and grass species. All these support a wide range of insects and birds too.
46
11/12/2019 14:44:59 3 11
bbc
No, ridiculous then to want English placenames in Scotland? Why would that be, you think Gaelic is traditional and indigenous or something? Gaelic has been spoken in Scotland roughly the same length of time English has, and Gaelic itself displaced Pictish as well as their own placenames for things over the centuries. Learn your history, makes no sense having names in a language nobody speaks.
52
11/12/2019 15:36:02 7 2
bbc
#46 @sthompson / @ #48 Aits Knee Grow How very sad that you think of highland Scotland as an area requiring English place names. Do you think it's a English county ? Do you refer to 'North Britain' as well? Does this to apply to Welsh mountains too ... or how about Helvellyn or Pen-Y-Ghent, are they to be renamed 'in the English' ? ...or does this only apply to Scottish mountains ?
44
11/12/2019 14:47:34 2 1
bbc
42 hmacd - I'm sure you're wrong!
47
11/12/2019 14:59:52 0 7
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Re 44 Lack of flowers and thick undergrowth of birch saplings and long heather are not suitable for most ground nesting birds which are in terrible decline nationally. They prosper on grouse moors because they have less predators and they can see predators coming - really quite simple. The flowers and diverse range of plants means more insects for feeding the young.
@ sthomson22 I agree with this fellow gentleman. They should have an English name. Carn na Caorach just sounds like an ejaculating cockroach. Removed
49
11/12/2019 15:21:34 9 2
bbc
@ 48 "They should have an English name" Tough! Locals were predominantly Gaelic speakers when such places as Carn na Caorach were named, in the same way that some place names in Scotland have either Norse or Pictish roots. Just learn to pronounce them and stop trying to make political capital out of things like this.
@ sthomson22 I agree with this fellow gentleman. They should have an English name. Carn na Caorach just sounds like an ejaculating cockroach. Removed
49
11/12/2019 15:21:34 9 2
bbc
@ 48 "They should have an English name" Tough! Locals were predominantly Gaelic speakers when such places as Carn na Caorach were named, in the same way that some place names in Scotland have either Norse or Pictish roots. Just learn to pronounce them and stop trying to make political capital out of things like this.
54
11/12/2019 15:46:45 2 9
bbc
49 - I never will learn to pronounce them and will continue to refer to them by their English translations and encourage others to do the same :) 51 - Yeah do you understand people in France still actually speak French though? Nobody speaks Gaelic (more correctly called Irish) in Scotland anymore. Things change, languages die. Gaelic replaced Pictish and was itself replaced by English. Move on.
50
11/12/2019 15:22:55 6 0
bbc
Time to branch out. Turn over a new leaf. I am rooting for every barking sap involved in this initiative. Stick at it fellas.
51
11/12/2019 15:24:05 5 1
bbc
Very good news. More of this please. Do those of you know how stupid are about the names? Would you go to France and complain that none of the signs are in English? Scots and Gaelic are distinct native languages. If you had the first clue about why there are so few trees in Scotland historically speaking, you would realise how ignorant you are about eradicating the native language.
46
11/12/2019 14:44:59 3 11
bbc
No, ridiculous then to want English placenames in Scotland? Why would that be, you think Gaelic is traditional and indigenous or something? Gaelic has been spoken in Scotland roughly the same length of time English has, and Gaelic itself displaced Pictish as well as their own placenames for things over the centuries. Learn your history, makes no sense having names in a language nobody speaks.
52
11/12/2019 15:36:02 7 2
bbc
#46 @sthompson / @ #48 Aits Knee Grow How very sad that you think of highland Scotland as an area requiring English place names. Do you think it's a English county ? Do you refer to 'North Britain' as well? Does this to apply to Welsh mountains too ... or how about Helvellyn or Pen-Y-Ghent, are they to be renamed 'in the English' ? ...or does this only apply to Scottish mountains ?
53
11/12/2019 15:48:19 4 3
bbc
Good ! here's hoping that this happens and that we regain some of the lost "wilderness" of Scotland. Kids stopped going walking with us as every "Forrest Walk" we tried ended up a logging wasteland with only the stumps left in the ground ! Leave them "wild" - NO Forrestry Release Red Squirrels and Wild Cats into them Jail anyone interfering with them Forget Gibberish names etc
49
11/12/2019 15:21:34 9 2
bbc
@ 48 "They should have an English name" Tough! Locals were predominantly Gaelic speakers when such places as Carn na Caorach were named, in the same way that some place names in Scotland have either Norse or Pictish roots. Just learn to pronounce them and stop trying to make political capital out of things like this.
54
11/12/2019 15:46:45 2 9
bbc
49 - I never will learn to pronounce them and will continue to refer to them by their English translations and encourage others to do the same :) 51 - Yeah do you understand people in France still actually speak French though? Nobody speaks Gaelic (more correctly called Irish) in Scotland anymore. Things change, languages die. Gaelic replaced Pictish and was itself replaced by English. Move on.
63
11/12/2019 16:38:18 5 2
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@54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? Even if so few Scots speak Gaelic today, it was a great part of its history. Why would you want to deny it? There will be a reason why the hill was named Carn na Caorach - all part of Scots heritage.
67
11/12/2019 17:20:02 6 1
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@54. Posted by sthomson22 Think it's safe to say you can only speak/read/comprehend one language. Hope you don't "encourage others to do the same" for that. Gaelic is fine. If people are too lazy to take the time to understand the general pronunciations of it, it's a sign of how intellectually and culturally lazy they are.
55
11/12/2019 16:09:34 6 2
bbc
‘Managed’ Grouse moors have no place in Scotland. They exist to profit from the killing of grouse while at the same time attempting (often illegally) to eradicate iconic species such as hen Harriers, mountain hares and golden eagles. Burning the heather is not exactly environmentally friendly either - especially setting fire to neighbouring land and relying on the fire brigade to extinguish it.
56
11/12/2019 16:14:04 4 1
bbc
Gaelic is a very word descriptive language Some words actually making a most apt visual image of what it refers to
57
11/12/2019 16:14:55 1 3
bbc
When Nicola Sturgeon goes on about how great Scotland is at planting trees shes including horrible dense lifeless forestry plantations. They look nice enough from the road but are lifeless and dark, nothing like a proper natural Caledonian forest. That's what should be getting planted, not a profit based plantation.
58
11/12/2019 16:17:16 3 1
bbc
#57 - read the article - this won't be conifer plantations. How you can blame wee Nicky for the conifers planted 25 years ago (or more) is worrying?
57
11/12/2019 16:14:55 1 3
bbc
When Nicola Sturgeon goes on about how great Scotland is at planting trees shes including horrible dense lifeless forestry plantations. They look nice enough from the road but are lifeless and dark, nothing like a proper natural Caledonian forest. That's what should be getting planted, not a profit based plantation.
58
11/12/2019 16:17:16 3 1
bbc
#57 - read the article - this won't be conifer plantations. How you can blame wee Nicky for the conifers planted 25 years ago (or more) is worrying?
61
11/12/2019 16:32:15 1 5
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#58, ah the NS defence force. Of course I read it, NS is taking credit for the tree planting now which is mainly Forestry for business. Keep trying tho, as someone that has voted SNP many times I am not blinded to their massive shortcomings. Unfortunately they have turned into the horrible old Scots Labour, people defending them and voting for them no matter what, so they are not held to account.
59
11/12/2019 16:24:00 3 8
bbc
Scotland will continue to be lost in the woods until the SNP is kicked out of office.
60
11/12/2019 16:28:53 1 2
bbc
Burning heather is very good for diversity of species. Rather more relevant today is that when done properly it reduces the risk of out of control fires. Hill and forest fires are much easier to put out when they reach a well managed grouse moor with shorter heather. Mountain hares do not flourish in forest - they do well on grouse moors as it is perfect habitat for them.
58
11/12/2019 16:17:16 3 1
bbc
#57 - read the article - this won't be conifer plantations. How you can blame wee Nicky for the conifers planted 25 years ago (or more) is worrying?
61
11/12/2019 16:32:15 1 5
bbc
#58, ah the NS defence force. Of course I read it, NS is taking credit for the tree planting now which is mainly Forestry for business. Keep trying tho, as someone that has voted SNP many times I am not blinded to their massive shortcomings. Unfortunately they have turned into the horrible old Scots Labour, people defending them and voting for them no matter what, so they are not held to account.
71
11/12/2019 17:47:07 1 3
bbc
@61 Foresthills Isn’t the business side of forestry regulated by the forestry commission? Isn’t the forestry commission an area that isn’t devolved to the Scottish government? For someone who has allegedly voted SNP so many times you seem rather fickle!
62
11/12/2019 16:33:46 0 3
bbc
Sitka spruce while not nearly as nice to look at as old Caledonian forest does provide employment while native woodland would have limited employment opportunities away from the tourist hot spots. Too much recreation scares away many of our native species - not much wildlife on the shores of Loch Muick. Sitka does provide a good home for many smaller birds - ideally you want a mix.
54
11/12/2019 15:46:45 2 9
bbc
49 - I never will learn to pronounce them and will continue to refer to them by their English translations and encourage others to do the same :) 51 - Yeah do you understand people in France still actually speak French though? Nobody speaks Gaelic (more correctly called Irish) in Scotland anymore. Things change, languages die. Gaelic replaced Pictish and was itself replaced by English. Move on.
63
11/12/2019 16:38:18 5 2
bbc
@54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? Even if so few Scots speak Gaelic today, it was a great part of its history. Why would you want to deny it? There will be a reason why the hill was named Carn na Caorach - all part of Scots heritage.
@63 Ignore. He is likely a nationalist troll intentionally trying to stoke tension within our UK family. This HYS is about trees and woodland. Stick to the subject. And get rid of your 'indygran' username whilst you're at it. It is sad. -- Removed
68
11/12/2019 17:24:04 1 5
bbc
63. Posted by indygran @54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? ------------- Gaelic is not Scotland or the UK's history, it was only really present on the western seaboard and islands, as proven by the preponderance of hill and place names. Norse, Pict, Scots and Briton dominate elsewhere.
64
11/12/2019 16:38:59 1 1
bbc
Creating new native forests is good and many have been created already - the key thing is to have a balanced mix of different land uses. We should have employment in these rural areas which are often remote. The worst hill is one that is overgrazed by sheep and or deer. Post Brexit I suspect there will be many less sheep farms so much more upland landscape will change.
32
11/12/2019 12:57:22 7 19
bbc
What's wrong with Grouse moors? Heather is native and is pretty much the only thing that will grow on a Grouse moor. It is managed so that it doesn't get so thick that animals and other plants are suffocated out. Ah yes of course, its a class thing isn't it, justifiable questions about sustainability just being politicized and used by the ignorant as an excuse to hate the rich.
65
11/12/2019 17:18:21 1 0
bbc
32. Posted by dazza Ah yes of course, its a class thing isn't it, justifiable questions about sustainability just being politicized and used by the ignorant as an excuse to hate the rich. --------- Yet followed by posts arguing for greater deer stalking to keep the deer numbers down so the trees can grow. Win-win if some folk lose the chips on their shoulders
63
11/12/2019 16:38:18 5 2
bbc
@54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? Even if so few Scots speak Gaelic today, it was a great part of its history. Why would you want to deny it? There will be a reason why the hill was named Carn na Caorach - all part of Scots heritage.
@63 Ignore. He is likely a nationalist troll intentionally trying to stoke tension within our UK family. This HYS is about trees and woodland. Stick to the subject. And get rid of your 'indygran' username whilst you're at it. It is sad. -- Removed
54
11/12/2019 15:46:45 2 9
bbc
49 - I never will learn to pronounce them and will continue to refer to them by their English translations and encourage others to do the same :) 51 - Yeah do you understand people in France still actually speak French though? Nobody speaks Gaelic (more correctly called Irish) in Scotland anymore. Things change, languages die. Gaelic replaced Pictish and was itself replaced by English. Move on.
67
11/12/2019 17:20:02 6 1
bbc
@54. Posted by sthomson22 Think it's safe to say you can only speak/read/comprehend one language. Hope you don't "encourage others to do the same" for that. Gaelic is fine. If people are too lazy to take the time to understand the general pronunciations of it, it's a sign of how intellectually and culturally lazy they are.
63
11/12/2019 16:38:18 5 2
bbc
@54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? Even if so few Scots speak Gaelic today, it was a great part of its history. Why would you want to deny it? There will be a reason why the hill was named Carn na Caorach - all part of Scots heritage.
68
11/12/2019 17:24:04 1 5
bbc
63. Posted by indygran @54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? ------------- Gaelic is not Scotland or the UK's history, it was only really present on the western seaboard and islands, as proven by the preponderance of hill and place names. Norse, Pict, Scots and Briton dominate elsewhere.
72
11/12/2019 17:53:21 5 0
bbc
@68 "it was only really present on the western seaboard and islands" I'm afraid you are wrong there. Can you tell me where on the Western seaboard GlenMoriston is?
73
11/12/2019 21:16:59 3 0
bbc
@68 Having researched more than my fair share of family trees I can say with some confidence that Gaelic was commonly spoken well into Moray, Angus and Perthshire in previous centuries. I suspect your view has more to do with generating a reaction than a serious comment. I agree that 1 square mile of planting is not a lot but surely it is better than not planting it at all?
69
11/12/2019 17:31:08 0 0
bbc
What a wonderful idea and as soon as I have some spare cash I'll get you to plant some for me!!
70
11/12/2019 17:37:32 5 0
bbc
Excellent idea, most of Britain used to be Forest. They provide oxygen and are very calming places to visit.
61
11/12/2019 16:32:15 1 5
bbc
#58, ah the NS defence force. Of course I read it, NS is taking credit for the tree planting now which is mainly Forestry for business. Keep trying tho, as someone that has voted SNP many times I am not blinded to their massive shortcomings. Unfortunately they have turned into the horrible old Scots Labour, people defending them and voting for them no matter what, so they are not held to account.
71
11/12/2019 17:47:07 1 3
bbc
@61 Foresthills Isn’t the business side of forestry regulated by the forestry commission? Isn’t the forestry commission an area that isn’t devolved to the Scottish government? For someone who has allegedly voted SNP so many times you seem rather fickle!
68
11/12/2019 17:24:04 1 5
bbc
63. Posted by indygran @54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? ------------- Gaelic is not Scotland or the UK's history, it was only really present on the western seaboard and islands, as proven by the preponderance of hill and place names. Norse, Pict, Scots and Briton dominate elsewhere.
72
11/12/2019 17:53:21 5 0
bbc
@68 "it was only really present on the western seaboard and islands" I'm afraid you are wrong there. Can you tell me where on the Western seaboard GlenMoriston is?
68
11/12/2019 17:24:04 1 5
bbc
63. Posted by indygran @54 So you are not interested in passing on and preserving your country's history? ------------- Gaelic is not Scotland or the UK's history, it was only really present on the western seaboard and islands, as proven by the preponderance of hill and place names. Norse, Pict, Scots and Briton dominate elsewhere.
73
11/12/2019 21:16:59 3 0
bbc
@68 Having researched more than my fair share of family trees I can say with some confidence that Gaelic was commonly spoken well into Moray, Angus and Perthshire in previous centuries. I suspect your view has more to do with generating a reaction than a serious comment. I agree that 1 square mile of planting is not a lot but surely it is better than not planting it at all?